Impaired liver function during pregnancy may increase risk of childhood obesity

(Society for Endocrinology) Impaired liver function during pregnancy may alter gut bacteria composition and increase the risk of obesity in children, according to results presented at The Society for Endocrinology Annual Conference. In a rodent of model of the most common liver disease in pregnancy, the composition of gut bacteria in offspring was altered and liver function impaired, particularly when they were fed a Western-style, high-fat diet.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

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Excess dietary fructose is a major public health concern (1–4). Evidence shows increased fructose intake can cause insulin resistance, hepatic de novo lipogenesis, hypertriglyceridemia, obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) (5–9). However, little is known about the effects of fructose during pregnancy and its influence on offspring development and predisposition to later-life disease. To determine whether moderately increased maternal fructose intake could have health consequences on offspring, we have investigated the effects of 10% w/v fructose water intake during preconception and pregnancy. ...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
One of the worst symptoms of any plague is uncertainty—who it will strike, when it will end, why it began. Merely understanding a pandemic does not stop it, but an informed public can help curb its impact and slow its spread. It can also provide a certain ease of mind in a decidedly uneasy time. Here are some of the most frequently asked questions about the COVID-19 pandemic from TIME’s readers, along with the best and most current answers science can provide. A note about our sourcing: While there are many, many studies underway investigating COVID-19 and SARS-CoV-19, the novel coronavirus that causes the illn...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Explainer Source Type: news
CONCLUSION: We found that maternal OWOB status is related to fatty liver content in the offspring as young adults, even after taking into account OWOB status and lifestyle factors in the offspring. PMID: 32145139 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: BJOG : An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: BJOG Source Type: research
In conclusion, all above mechanisms appear to intervene synergistically and may act as modifiable risk factors for infant and mother NAFLD. PMID: 31969089 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Current Pharmaceutical Design - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Curr Pharm Des Source Type: research
ConclusionResults of this study support that the TyG index may be a useful indicator to detect MONW phenotype and associated cardiovascular risk factors.
Source: Journal of Endocrinological Investigation - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Authors: Azzaroli F, Mazzella G, Marchesini G, Brodosi L, Petroni ML Abstract INTRODUCTION: Fatty liver is rather common in pregnancy, occurring in two totally different conditions, i.e, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in pregnancy and acute fatty liver of pregnancy (AFLP). The former is a common condition, resulting by chance association because of the epidemics of obesity and the older age of many pregnant women in Western countries; the latter is a rare disease whose pathophysiology is still incompletely understood.Areas covered:We reviewed the evidence-based knowledge on fatty liver in/of pregnancy. Fo...
Source: Expert Review of Gastroenterology and Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Expert Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol Source Type: research
Right now, one in 12 children and adolescents in the US are severely obese. If that isn’t startling enough, consider this: among 12-to-15-year-olds, that number jumps to one in 10 — and among 16-to-19-year-olds, it is one in seven. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), the best hope for many of these youths may be bariatric surgery. Bariatric surgery is surgery that helps with weight loss by making the stomach smaller and making other changes in the digestive system. It’s jarring to think about doing irreversible surgery on an adolescent — or a child, as the AAP discourages age limi...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Adolescent health Children's Health Diabetes Diet and Weight Loss Parenting Source Type: blogs
AbstractPurpose of ReviewThis review will focus on the long-term outcomes in offspring exposed to in utero hyperglycemia and gestational diabetes (GDM), including obesity, adiposity, glucose metabolism, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and puberty.Recent FindingsThere is evidence, mostly from observational studies, that offspring of GDM mothers have increased risk of obesity, increased adiposity, disorders of glucose metabolism (insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes), and hypertension. In contrast, evidence from the two intervention studies of treatment of mild GDM and childhood measures of ...
Source: Current Diabetes Reports - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
According to a study presented at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Brighton, liver disease during pregnancy may alter gut bacteria composition and increase risk of childhood obesity.Scienmag
Source: Society for Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news
Kids love sweets. Of course, so do many adults. But even those grown-ups with a serious sweet tooth would likely struggle to polish off a big bag of candy, while the average kid would relish that chore. “Even during infancy, newborns have an innate preference for breast milk because of its sweetness,” says Juliana Cohen, an assistant professor of nutrition at Merrimack College in Northern Massachusetts and the Harvard School of Public Health. Cohen says the prevailing theory is that a taste for sugary foods offered early humans an evolutionary advantage: In nature, sweet foods—stuff like fruits or honey&m...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
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