Fibrin biopolymer as scaffold candidate to treat bone defects in rats

Conclusions: FBP proved to be an excellent scaffold candidate for bone repair therapies due to application ease and biocompatibility with synthetic calcium-based materials. The satisfactory results obtained by the association of FBP with MSCs may provide a more effective and less costly new approach for bone tissue engineering.
Source: Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins including Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Source Type: research

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CONCLUSIONS The 3D culture of ADSCs with 3DTi scaffolds enhanced osteogenic differentiation and new bone formation through the IGF-1R/AKT/mTORC1 pathway. This improved method of osteointegration may have clinical application in the preparation of bone grafts before implantation for improved repair of mandibular bone defects. PMID: 31655847 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Medical Science Monitor - Category: Research Tags: Med Sci Monit Source Type: research
Pocket-size ultrasound devices that cost 50 times less than the machines in hospitals (and connect to your phone). Virtual reality that speeds healing in rehab. Artificial intelligence that’s better than medical experts at spotting lung tumors. These are just some of the innovations now transforming medicine at a remarkable pace. No one can predict the future, but it can at least be glimpsed in the dozen inventions and concepts below. Like the people behind them, they stand at the vanguard of health care. Neither exhaustive nor exclusive, the list is, rather, representative of the recasting of public health and medic...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized HealthSummit19 technology Source Type: news
In this study, researchers studied 438,952 participants in the UK Biobank, who had a total of 24,980 major coronary events - defined as the first occurrence of non-fatal heart attack, ischaemic stroke, or death due to coronary heart disease. They used an approach called Mendelian randomisation, which uses naturally occurring genetic differences to randomly divide the participants into groups, mimicking the effects of running a clinical trial. People with genes associated with lower blood pressure, lower LDL cholesterol, and a combination of both were put into different groups, and compared against those without thes...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In this study, we identify a link between members of the genus Veillonella and exercise performance. We observed an increase in Veillonella relative abundance in marathon runners postmarathon and isolated a strain of Veillonella atypica from stool samples. Inoculation of this strain into mice significantly increased exhaustive treadmill run time. Veillonella utilize lactate as their sole carbon source, which prompted us to perform a shotgun metagenomic analysis in a cohort of elite athletes, finding that every gene in a major pathway metabolizing lactate to propionate is at higher relative abundance postexercise. Us...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Authors: Zhou J, Liu HX, Li SH, Gong YS, Zhou MW, Zhang JH, Zhu GY Abstract OBJECTIVE: To investigate the role of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell (hucMSC)-derived exosomes in the Wnt signaling pathway and their effects on fracture healing in rats. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 24 healthy male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into 3 groups, of which the experimental groups were injected with Phosphate-Buffered Saline (PBS) and hUCMSC-derived exosomes, respectively, at the fracture site, and a blank control group was set. At 2 and 3 w after treatment, respectively, the healing conditi...
Source: European Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci Source Type: research
Jacopo Pizzicannella1†, Agnese Gugliandolo2†, Tiziana Orsini3, Antonella Fontana4, Alessia Ventrella4, Emanuela Mazzon2*, Placido Bramanti2, Francesca Diomede1‡ and Oriana Trubiani1‡ 1Department of Medical, Oral and Biotechnological Sciences, “G. d’Annunzio” University of Chieti–Pescara, Chieti, Italy 2IRCCS Centro Neurolesi “Bonino Pulejo,” Messina, Italy 3Institute of Cell Biology and Neurobiology, National Research Council, Rome, Italy 4Department of Pharmacy, “G. d’Annunzio” University of Chieti–Pescara, Chieti, Italy B...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Mark E. Gray1,2*, James Meehan2,3, Paul Sullivan4, Jamie R. K. Marland4, Stephen N. Greenhalgh1, Rachael Gregson1, Richard Eddie Clutton1, Carol Ward2, Chris Cousens5, David J. Griffiths5, Alan Murray4 and David Argyle1 1The Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies and Roslin Institute, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom 2Cancer Research UK Edinburgh Centre and Division of Pathology Laboratories, Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom 3School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Institute of Sensors, Signals and Systems, Heriot-Watt Univer...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
In this study, scaffold-free tissue constructs engineered using periodontal ligament cells (PDLCs), which contain a population of adult stem/progenitor cells, self-assembled into an organized multi-tissue structure comprising a mineralized cementum-like core enclosed within a periodontal ligament (PDL)-like tissue. Scaffold-free engineered constructs were formed by culturing human PDLCs to form a cell sheet on six-well dishes containing two minutien pins placed 7 mm apart. The cell sheet was contracted by the cells to roll into the pins forming a cylindrical construct anchored on either end by the pins. These tissues ...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Ryan R. Kelly1,2†, Lindsay T. McDonald1,2†, Nathaniel R. Jensen1,2, Sara J. Sidles1,2 and Amanda C. LaRue1,2* 1Research Services, Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC, United States 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, United States The significant biochemical and physiological effects of psychological stress are beginning to be recognized as exacerbating common diseases, including osteoporosis. This review discusses the current evidence for psychological stress-associated mental health disorders as risk factors for os...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
In this study, we employed zirconium-89 (89Zr)-oxine-labeled BM cells imaged with positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) to visualize and quantitate BM cell trafficking following acute bone injury and to investigate the effect of plerixafor on BM cell homing. Unilateral 1-mm incisions were created in the distal tibia of mice either on the same day (d0) or 24  h (d1) after89Zr-oxine-labeled BM cell transfer (n = 4–6, 2–2.3 × 107 cells at 9.65 –15.7 kBq/106 cells). Serial microPET/CT imaging was performed and migration of89Zr-labeled cells to ...
Source: EJNMMI Research - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
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