Is Alzheimer disease a failure of mobilizing immune defense? Lessons from cognitively fit oldest-old.

Is Alzheimer disease a failure of mobilizing immune defense? Lessons from cognitively fit oldest-old. Dialogues Clin Neurosci. 2019 Mar;21(1):7-19 Authors: Katsel P, Haroutunian V Abstract Multifaceted evidence supports the hypothesis that inflammatory-immune mechanisms contribute to Alzheimer disease (AD) neuropathology and genetic association of several immune specific genes (TREM2, CR1, and CD33) suggests that maladaptive immune responses may be pivotal drivers of AD pathogenesis. We reviewed microglia-related data from postmortem AD studies and examined supporting evidence from AD animal models to answer the following questions: i) What is the temporal sequence of immune activation in AD progression and what is its impact on cognition? ii) Are there discordant, "primed", microglia responses in AD vs successful cognitive aging? iii) Does central nervous system (CNS) repair in aging depend on recruitment of the elements of cellular adaptive immune response such as effector T cells, and can the recruitment of systemic immune cells ameliorate AD neuropathology? iv) How effective are the immune-system-based therapeutic approaches currently employed for the treatment of AD? PMID: 31607776 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Dialogues in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Tags: Dialogues Clin Neurosci Source Type: research

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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Journal of Proteomics - Category: Biochemistry Authors: Tags: J Proteomics Source Type: research
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Of Interest Source Type: blogs
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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