UN Welcomes ‘Most Comprehensive Agreement Ever’ on Global Health

In conclusion, he pointed to the “profound” challenges we face, saying: “I am confident that if we continue and strengthen international co-operation and seize the opportunities already available, while creating even more opportunities, we can overcome them – together”.   ‘A political choice’ Universal health coverage means all people regardless of their ability to pay, having access to the health care they need, when and where they need it, without facing financial hardship. Congratulating world leaders, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General at the World Health Organization (WHO) told the historic meeting that UHC was “a political choice: today world leaders have signaled their readiness to make that choice.” The declaration comes the day after WHO and partners flagged the need to double health coverage between now and 2030, or leave up to five billion people unable to access sufficient services. In adopting the declaration, Member States have committed to investing in policies which would prevent financial hardship from out-of-pocket healthcare payments. It also aims to implement high-impact health interventions to combat diseases and protect women’s and children’s health.   General Assembly Seventy-fourth session High-level meeting on universal health coverage. Credit: UN Photo/Kim Haughton   Human development outcome At the same time, David R. Malpass, President of the World Bank ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Development & Aid Global Headlines Health Human Rights Source Type: news

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(CNN) — From climate change to superbugs, the World Health Organization has laid out 10 big threats to our global health in 2019. And unless these threats get addressed, millions of lives will be in jeopardy. Here’s a snapshot of 10 urgent health issues, according to the United Nations’ public health agency: Not vaccinating when you can One of the most controversial recent health topics in the US is now an international concern. “Vaccine hesitancy — the reluctance or refusal to vaccinate despite the availability of vaccines — threatens to reverse progress made in tackling vaccine-prevent...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN Local TV Source Type: news
We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 11/30 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Vanessa Carter (@_FaceSA) on the topic of “The Global Impact of Health IT”. Global health pandemics like antibiotic and antimicrobial resistance are among the most critical issues to tackle and in future will require robust, harmonious data surveillance systems along with mass co-operation between the animal, human and environmental health sectors across every country [1]. This is known as One Health [2]. WHO initiatives like GLAS...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: #HITsm Healthcare Healthcare AI HealthCare IT #HITsm Topics Antibiotic Resistance GLASS Global Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System Global Health One Health Vanessa Carter Source Type: blogs
Nigeria Centre for Disease Control. 11/2017 This 158-page situation analysis report is based on the current situation for antimicrobial use and resistance in Nigeria, and provides recommendations for immediate and long-term goals. It discusses how much of the disease burden in Nigeria comes from AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria. The country also suffers considerable burden from systemic infections, including HIV, bacteremia, and meningitis. There are, as yet, no available studies outlining the full burden of antimicrobial resistance and its health and economic impact on Nigerians. (PDF)
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By Grace VirtueTAORMINA, Italy, May 25 2017 (IPS)The G7 Summit, held annually among the leaders of the world’s most powerful economies (Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, the United States, and the EU), plays an important role in shaping responses to global challenges—theoretically at least. The format of the Summit continues to be modeled off the first one, held in 1975 when French President Valéry Giscard d’Estaing invited his counterparts to an informal meeting in Rambouillet to discuss the economic crisis triggered by the oil shock of 1973–1974. Leaders adopt a rel...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Aid Armed Conflicts Civil Society Crime & Justice Development & Aid Economy & Trade Featured Financial Crisis Global Global Governance Headlines Health Human Rights Migration & Refugees Poverty & SDGs Trade & Investment Source Type: news
Each year, World Tuberculosis Day brings another reminder that an airborne scourge is the top infectious killer worldwide despite being preventable and curable. An estimated 1.8 million people died in 2015 of the disease, which has a 90 percent cure rate if treated. The growth of drug-resistant strains has experts worried that decades of progress in the fight could be erased. And the World Health Organization estimates there is a $2 billion investment gap in the efforts of low- and middle-income countries to fight tuberculosis each year, as well as a $1.3 billion shortfall in research and development. But despite tho...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
In the current issue of Health Affairs, we explore a pivotal moment of opportunity and peril in global health, while identifying the leadership challenges of “the global health trio” — the World Health Organization, the United Nations, and the World Bank. Each of the challenges we pose share a common thread: poor and other marginalized populations are most vulnerable to current and emerging health risks. Maternal and child mortality, infectious diseases, non-communicable diseases, health harms from climate change, and mass migration — all disproportionately affect those who are poor and less educate...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Featured Global Health Policy Public Health antimicrobial resistance Ebola Source Type: blogs
Antibiotics revolutionized medicine. Professor Alexander Fleming's accidental discovery of Penicillin granted him a Nobel Prize and unleashed the era of antibiotics. Penicillin became a miracle drug and for the first time there was an effective way to treat many of the common infections that were killing millions of people. Most of us have taken antibiotics at one point or another in our lives and it's almost impossible to imagine a world without them. From 1950 to 1970, the ongoing discovery of new antimicrobials led to the swift development of many new drugs. It was the golden era of antibiotics and they were seen as a ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Aaron Motsoaledi is tired of delivering the same spiel over and over again. No matter how many times the charismatic health minister of South Africa speaks out, people don’t seem to grasp the threat presented by tuberculosis, now the No. 1 infectious killer in the world. “People think it’s a curable disease that’s been there for ages, so what’s new? I think that’s the mentality,” Dr. Motsoaledi told The Huffington Post. As chair of the Stop TB Partnership, a group of public and private leaders hosted through the United Nations Office for Project Service, he has seen the eyes o...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
A collection of journal articles published this week points to poor quality medicine as a "real and present" threat to the fight against ongoing health crises around the globe. The articles, including 17 published in "The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene," calls the proliferation of fake drugs a global pandemic responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths and a troubling increase in antimicrobial resistance. Scientists found up to 41 percent of medications used to treat HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis weren't up to international standards, part of an estimated $75 billion annual...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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