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HIV Vaccine Boost Induces Significant Antibody Response HIV Vaccine Boost Induces Significant Antibody Response
An additional dose of HIV vaccine MVA-B four years after the last immunization induces significant immune responses in healthy volunteers, researchers from Spain report.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines - November 12, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: HIV/AIDS News Source Type: news

HIV Guidelines Make Special HPV Recommendations for Gay Men HIV Guidelines Make Special HPV Recommendations for Gay Men
New European guidelines differ from American guidelines in that they recommend that gay and bisexual men get vaccinated for human papillomavirus until age 40.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - October 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: HIV/AIDS News Source Type: news

Innovation for Climate-Smart Agriculture Key to Ending Hunger in Kenya
Vaccination of live stock in Samburu County, Kenya. Credit: @FAO/LUIS TATOBy Siddharth ChatterjeeNAIROBI, Kenya , Oct 23 2017 (IPS)Some parts of Kenya are reeling from the effects of probably the worst drought in the last 20 years. With nearly 3.4 million people food insecure, Kenya’s food security prognosis looks gloomy, with climate change and natural resource depletion set to pose even greater risks in the long term. Rising temperatures and unpredicatble rainy seasons could destroy crop yield gains made in the recent past, and the threats of extreme weather such as flooding, drought and pests becoming more real. T...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - October 23, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Siddharth Chatterjee Tags: Africa Aid Climate Change Combating Desertification and Drought Development & Aid Economy & Trade Environment Featured Food & Agriculture Gender Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies Labour Natural Resources Poverty & SDG Source Type: news

Study: West ’s device aids in dose-sparing administration of polio vaccine
West Pharmaceutical Services (NYSE:WST) touted results today from a study showing that its ID Adapter can improve the intradermal administration of polio vaccines. The study, published in the journal Vaccine, evaluated the feasibility of using a fractional inactivated polio virus vaccine in remote locations where polio outbreaks continue to be of serious concern to public health officials. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The post Study: West’s device aids in dose-sparing administration of polio vaccine appeared first on MassDevice. (Source: Mass Device)
Source: Mass Device - October 10, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Drug-Device Combinations Pharmaceuticals Research & Development Wall Street Beat West Pharmaceutical Services Inc. Source Type: news

Durable end to the HIV/AIDS pandemic likely will require an HIV vaccine
From a practical standpoint, ending the HIV/AIDS pandemic without a vaccine is unlikely. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - October 10, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Durable end to the HIV/AIDS pandemic likely will require an HIV vaccine
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Despite remarkable gains in the treatment and prevention of HIV infection, development of an effective HIV vaccine likely will be necessary to achieve a durable end to the HIV/AIDS pandemic, according to a new commentary from Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 9, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Trispecific broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies mediate potent SHIV protection in macaques
The development of an effective AIDS vaccine has been challenging because of viral genetic diversity and the difficulty of generating broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs). We engineered trispecific antibodies (Abs) that allow a single molecule to interact with three independent HIV-1 envelope determinants: the CD4 binding site, the membrane-proximal external region (MPER), and the V1V2 glycan site. Trispecific Abs exhibited higher potency and breadth than any previously described single bnAb, showed pharmacokinetics similar to those of human bnAbs, and conferred complete immunity against a mixture of simian-human immuno...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 5, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Xu, L., Pegu, A., Rao, E., Doria-Rose, N., Beninga, J., McKee, K., Lord, D. M., Wei, R. R., Deng, G., Louder, M., Schmidt, S. D., Mankoff, Z., Wu, L., Asokan, M., Beil, C., Lange, C., Leuschner, W. D., Kruip, J., Sendak, R., Do Kwon, Y., Zhou, T., Chen, X Tags: Immunology, Medicine, Diseases, Virology r-articles Source Type: news

The World Health Organization Just Picked Its New Leaders. Most of Them Are Women
The World Health Organization announced its new senior leadership team Tuesday, and more than 60% of the appointees are women. “The team represents 14 countries, including all WHO regions, and is more than 60% women, reflecting my deep-held belief that we need top talent, gender equity and a geographically diverse set of perspectives to fulfill our mission to keep the world safe,” WHO Director-General Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said in a statement. The five men selected to lead the agency are Dr. Peter Salama, Dr. Bernhard Schwartländer, Dr. Ranieri Guerra, Dr. Ren Minghui, and Stewart Simonson. WHO ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Casey Quackenbush Tags: Uncategorized onetime United Nations women's empowerment Source Type: news

Philanthropists Join Forces to Fund Africa ’s Cash-Strapped Health Sector
Tristate Heart and Vascular Centre in Nigeria. Credit: Tristate Heart and Vascular CentreBy Pavithra Rao, Africa Renewal*NEW YORK, Sep 28 2017 (IPS)In the 2017 World Happiness Report by Gallup, African countries score poorly. Of the 150 countries on the list, the Central African Republic, Tanzania and Burundi rank as the unhappiest countries in the world. Some of the factors driving unhappiness are the poor state of the continent’s health care systems, the persistence of HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis, and the growth of lifestyle diseases such as hypertension, heart disease and diabetes.Few African countries make...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - September 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Pavithra Rao Tags: Development & Aid Featured Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Predictors for and Coverage of Flu Vaccine in HIV Patients Predictors for and Coverage of Flu Vaccine in HIV Patients
How likely are HIV-infected individuals to be vaccinated against influenza, and what are the reasons for not doing so? A survey of HIV-positive patients provides insight.HIV Medicine (Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines - September 25, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: HIV/AIDS Journal Article Source Type: news

Fighting HIV on Multiple Fronts Might Lead to Vaccine
Combination strategy fully protects lab monkeys, studies find (Source: Fertility News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Fertility News - Doctors Lounge - September 20, 2017 Category: Reproduction Medicine Tags: Infections, AIDS, Reproductive Medicine, Research, News, Source Type: news

Fighting HIV on Multiple Fronts Might Lead to Vaccine
Combination strategy fully protects lab monkeys, studies find Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: HIV/AIDS, Immunization (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - September 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Selena Gomez ’ s kidney transplant: Young, minority women disproportionately affected by lupus
In the world of celebrities, there are diseases such as HIV/AIDS and breast cancer that are very “popular” and well understood, thanks to years of fundraising and awareness campaigns by stars. And there are those diseases that are less so. Lupus, an autoimmune disorder that can damage organs, is in the second category. When Selena Gomez shocked her 126 […]Related:To fight deadly hepatitis outbreak, San Diego begins power-washing streets with bleachWhat to know about a study of flu vaccine and miscarriageMelinda Gates decries ‘loss of U.S. leadership’ in global aid (Source:...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - September 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Promoting evidence-based health care in Africa
Charles Shey Wiysonge, Director ofCochane  South Africa, gave an interview to the World Health Organization Bulletin. Here is a re-post , with premission, from their  recent publication.Charles Shey Wiysonge is devoted to encouraging better use of scientific evidence for health policies and programmes in African countries. He is the director of the South African Cochrane Centre, a unit of the South African Medical Research Council, and a professor of epidemiology and biostatistics at the department of Global Health in the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences at Stellenbosch University in South Africa. He was C...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - August 17, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

HIV Fight Advances With New Drug Cocktails, Fresh Vaccine Hopes HIV Fight Advances With New Drug Cocktails, Fresh Vaccine Hopes
Three decades after approval of the first-ever AIDS treatment, HIV medicine is seeing a new wave of innovation with scientists reporting positive data on Monday for improved drug cocktails and a novel experimental vaccine.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines - August 4, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: HIV/AIDS News Source Type: news

HIV fight advances with new drug cocktails, fresh vaccine hopes
LONDON (Reuters) - Three decades after approval of the first-ever AIDS treatment, HIV medicine is seeing a new wave of innovation with scientists reporting positive data on Monday for improved drug cocktails and a novel experimental vaccine. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - July 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Cows May Offer Clues to an AIDS Vaccine
Title: Cows May Offer Clues to an AIDS VaccineCategory: Health NewsCreated: 7/21/2017 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 7/24/2017 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet HIV General)
Source: MedicineNet HIV General - July 24, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Cows May Offer Clues to an AIDS Vaccine
Their rapid reaction to immunization makes them potential guinea pigs, study suggests Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: HIV/AIDS (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - July 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Could cows be the clue that leads to an HIV vaccine?
Conclusion This early stage research on cows indicates that they had a broad and quick immune response to HIV infection when given a specific vaccine. Because the immune proteins produced in cows are able to neutralise many different strains of HIV virus, the authors suggest this potentially gives them an edge over the human proteins that have been looked at so far. As always with animal studies it is important to remember that what works in cows might not work in the same way in humans. Many drug studies that appear promising at first, fall at the first hurdle once humans are involved. The study was also carried out on ju...
Source: NHS News Feed - July 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medication Source Type: news

Cows May Offer Clues to an AIDS Vaccine
FRIDAY, July 21, 2017 -- Cows already give us milk, meat and leather. Now, researchers say they may also hold the key to an AIDS vaccine. Scientists found it took cows just a few weeks to develop powerful antibodies against HIV, the virus that... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - July 21, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Cow antibodies may be key to effective AIDS vaccine
Researchers have found a way to elicit powerful, HIV-blocking antibodies in cows in weeks instead of years, which may lead to an effective AIDS vaccine. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - July 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Africa: Trump's Proposed Health Research Cuts Putting Millions at Risk
[Global Health Techonologies Coalition] In just eight years, $14 billion in public spending returned $33 billion to US economy, delivering malaria and meningitis breakthroughs, and advancing AIDS vaccine research (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - July 20, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Cow antibodies yield important clues for developing a broadly effective AIDS vaccine
(International AIDS Vaccine Initiative) As outlined in a study published today in Nature, lead author Devin Sok, Director, Antibody Discovery and Development at the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI), reports the elicitation of powerful, HIV-blocking antibodies in cows in a matter of weeks - a process that usually takes years in humans. The unexpected animal model is providing clues for important questions at a moment when new energy has infused HIV vaccine research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nigeria: HIV Vaccine Moves One Step Closer to Reality
[Vanguard] SCIENTISTS from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) and the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology (LJI) may have found the best delivery mode for a vaccine against HIV. (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - July 6, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

WHO: Medtech could accelerate universal healthcare in Africa
(Thomson Reuters Foundation) – Integrating technology into Africa’s healthcare systems is key to opening them up faster to the poorest and most vulnerable people, the World Health Organization’s Africa director said. Using more technology presents a “big opportunity” for rolling out universal health coverage in the region, Dr. Matshidiso Rebecca Moeti told the Thomson Reuters Foundation ahead of the first WHO Africa Health Forum this week in Rwanda. Technology can pave the way to improvements in data management, training for health workers and making referrals, among other areas, she added. Th...
Source: Mass Device - June 27, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MassDevice Tags: Health Information Technology Healthcare Reform Hospital Care Source Type: news

More than 50 medicines and vaccines in development for HIV infection, Treatment and Prevention
From the introduction of anti-retroviral therapy (ART) in the mid-1990 ’s, to the discovery of medicines that prevent the transmission of HIV, America’s biopharmaceutical companies are leading the fight against HIV/AIDS. In recent years, combination therapies have further transformed the lives of patients with HIV/AIDS so that today they can take a single pill containing multiple medicines. This once-a-day model increases adherence and is a sea change from the old model of multiple medicines taken multiple times in a day. (Source: The Catalyst)
Source: The Catalyst - June 27, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Medicines in Development HIV/AIDS Source Type: news

Pharma Leads the Charge on NCDs
A disaster in slow motion; that is how Dr Githinji Gitahi, CEO of African health NGO AMREF, describes the threat of non-communicable diseases (NCDs).Long thought of as diseases of the richer countries, the threat of NCDs – including cancer, diabetes and hypertension – is growing in low-to-middle-income countries, which now account for three-quarters of the annual death toll of more than 40 million.A toxic mix of modernization, urbanization and lifestyle changes has seen this growth in NCDs in developing countries, a scenario that has already played out in developed countries, where smoking, alcohol, processed f...
Source: EyeForPharma - June 21, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Anonymous Source Type: news

Insane Texas Bill That Attacks Abortion From All Sides Just Became Law
On Tuesday, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott signed into law a far-reaching anti-abortion bill that critics have slammed as “cruel” and “unconstitutional.” After a landmark Supreme Court ruling that struck down two Texas abortion restrictions last June, legislators in that state came back with a vengeance, considering some 50 anti-choice measures over the last several months. (Rewire called it an “anti-choice blitz.”) But the newly passed Senate Bill 8 stands out from the rest for the startling breadth with which it attacks abortion rights.  The Center for Reproductive Rights has already pled...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Zimbabwe: HIV Vaccine Research Gathers Momentum
[New Zimbabwe] Zimbabwe has, since December last year, recruited over 168 women out of the required 330 for HIV vaccine research trials as the battle to end the epidemic continues. (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - June 7, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

36 Years Later: The Opportunity To End AIDS As We Know It
Thirty-six years ago today, if someone had told me that we would be on threshold of controlling the HIV/AIDS pandemic without a vaccine or a cure, I would not have believed it. But today we can realize that potential. And with the critical and essential progress we have made on HIV cure research and vaccine development, we are closer to eliminating HIV than ever before – binding communities, scientists, and political leaders together to envision a different future. On June 5, 1981, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported the first cases of what would later become known as AIDS. Particularly for t...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Through Bullets and Bombs to Reach Health Care
June 02, 2017In conflict areas around the world, health workers like Patrick in South Sudan continue to risk their lives to do their jobs.  “There were guns, bullets, and bombs everywhere,” says Patrick Hakim, a clinical officer inSouth Sudan.That was the scene around Juba last July after fighting broke out at the presidential compound between the Sudan People ’s Liberation Army (SPLA) and the SPLA in Opposition (SPLA-IO) forces.Amidst the country ’s already horrific and brutal conflict, Patrick says those two weeks were characterized by widespread terror. Many borders, roads, and markets were ...
Source: IntraHealth International - June 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: cbales Source Type: news

Sorting out HIV
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory) Researchers at EMBL, ESPCI Paris, and the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative have developed a new technique for rapidly sorting HIV viruses, which could lead to more rapid development of a vaccine for HIV, as they report in Cell Chemical Biology.The technique will enable scientists to identify specific features in the proteins on the virus's surface which are recognized by the immune system and elicit a response similar to that seen in elite controllers -- patients that are able to survive without antiviral treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nigeria: HIV Vaccine Realisable - NACA
[Premium Times] Recent developments have indicated that the global efforts to develop an effective HIV/AIDS vaccine is realisable. (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - May 19, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

NIH statement on HIV Vaccine Awareness Day - 2017
Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., Director, NIAID and Carl W. Dieffenbach, Ph.D., Director, Division of AIDS, NIAID. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - May 18, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Zimbabwe: Towards an HIV Vaccine
[The Herald] Today (May 18) is HIV Vaccine Awareness Day and developing a vaccine that can prevent HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, must remain a top priority for global human health. (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - May 18, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Canadian researcher wins grant to explore promising HIV vaccine candidate
(International AIDS Vaccine Initiative) The Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) has awarded a new CA$3.99 million grant to Dr. Gary Kobinger of Universit é Laval for work on a vaccine to prevent HIV infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 18, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Important step taken toward an HIV vaccine
Researchers have developed a strategy that can revolutionize vaccine design. The new strategy is used to develop vaccines that can prevent HIV infection and the development of AIDS. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 17, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Researchers take an important step toward an HIV vaccine
(University of Copenhagen The Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences) Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have developed a strategy that can revolutionize vaccine design. The new strategy is used to develop vaccines that can prevent HIV infection and the development of AIDS. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The World Is Not Ready for the Next Pandemic
Across China, the virus that could spark the next pandemic is already circulating. It’s a bird flu called H7N9, and true to its name, it mostly infects poultry. Lately, however, it’s started jumping from chickens to humans more readily–bad news, because the virus is a killer. During a recent spike, 88% of people infected got pneumonia, three-quarters ended up in intensive care with severe respiratory problems, and 41% died. What H7N9 can’t do–yet–is spread easily from person to person, but experts know that could change. The longer the virus spends in humans, the better the chance that i...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - May 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Bryan Walsh Tags: Uncategorized CDC Disease ebola Gates Foundation MERS outbreak pandemic Zika Source Type: news

Ghana, Kenya and Malawi to Pilot GSK Malaria Vaccine From 2018 Ghana, Kenya and Malawi to Pilot GSK Malaria Vaccine From 2018
Ghana, Kenya and Malawi will pilot the world's first malaria vaccine from 2018, offering it for babies and children in high-risk areas as part of real-life trials, the World Health Organization said on Monday.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines - April 25, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

World's First Malaria Vaccine Pilot Will Run In 2018
Ghana, Kenya and Malawi will pilot the world’s first malaria vaccine from 2018, offering it for babies and children in high-risk areas as part of real-life trials, the World Health Organization said on Monday. The injectable vaccine, called RTS,S or Mosquirix, was developed by British drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline to protect children from the most deadly form of malaria in Africa. In clinical trials it proved only partially effective, and it needs to be given in a four-dose schedule, but is the first regulator-approved vaccine against the mosquito-borne disease. The WHO, which is in the process of assessing whether to ad...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scripps Florida Scientist awarded $4.8 million to bring HIV vaccine closer to human trials
(Scripps Research Institute) Professor Michael Farzan, co-chair of the Department of Immunology and Microbiology on the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) has received $4.8 million in funding through a 2017 Avant-Garde Award for HIV/AIDS research from the National Institutes of Health's National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). The new funding will support a five-year project, led by Farzan, to bring a potential HIV vaccine closer to human clinical trials. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 11, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Variation in Occupational Influenza Vaccination Coverage
Wide variation by state in vaccination coverage among tier 1 and health care personnel groups (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - April 4, 2017 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Endocrinology, Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Gastroenterology, Gynecology, Infections, AIDS, Internal Medicine, Allergy, Critical Care, Emergency Medicine, Nursing, Oncology, ENT, Pathology, Pediatrics, Pharmacy, Pulmonology, Journal, Source Type: news

Despite ongoing meningitis outbreak, vaccinations low among gay men, study shows
Despite a yearlong outbreak of invasive meningococcal disease in Southern California primarily affecting gay and bisexual men, less than 27 percent of men who have sex with men in Los Angeles County have been vaccinated for meningitis.The findings released today by the California HIV/AIDS Policy Research Center in collaboration with the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs, the Los Angeles LGBT Center and AIDS Project Los Angeles Health call for more education about the disease and more places offering immunization throughout Southern California at venues where gay and bisexual men socialize.More than 500 men were intervie...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 30, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Medical News Today: HIV 'fingerprint' tool could greatly assist vaccine development
A method that quickly fingerprints the shield of sugar molecules that helps HIV evade immune system antibodies could be very useful to vaccine developers. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: HIV / AIDS Source Type: news

HPV Vaccination After Lesion Treatment Is Likely Cost - Effective
Adjuvant HPV vaccination could reduce anal cancer risk in HIV - infected men who have sex with men (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - March 28, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Family Medicine, Infections, AIDS, Internal Medicine, Nursing, Oncology, Pathology, Pharmacy, Urology, Journal, Source Type: news

NIAID Is Dedicated To Saving The Lives Of People With TB
Originally published on niaid.nih.gov Statement of Christine F. Sizemore, PhD., Richard Hafner, M.D., and Anthony S. Fauci, M.D. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious DiseasesNational Institutes of Health Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the world’s most devastating infectious diseases. March 24th marks the day in 1882 when German microbiologist Robert Koch announced he had discovered Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes this ancient scourge. Today, in recognition of World TB Day, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH)...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dozens of Scientific Journals Offered Her a Job. But She Didn ’t Exist
If you received a resumé and cover letter from an Anna O. Fraud, you might sense something fishy. If you got one from an Anna O. Szust, you’d probably be less concerned — even though oszust means “a fraud” in Polish. Either way, in a recent scientific sting operation reported in Nature, plenty of potential employers liked the fictitious Dr. Szust just fine — enough that 48 of them offered her a job. And that’s a big problem. The investigation was conducted by a team of researchers led by Piotr Sorokowski, of the University of Wroclaw in Poland, and described in Nature by co-resear...
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - March 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Academic Fraud journals onetime predatory publishers publishing Research Science Source Type: news

Women’s History Month: Defending A Woman’s Right To Live HIV/AIDS-Free In America
By Susan J. Blumenthal, M.D., M.P.A. This piece was adapted from an article first published on The Advocate for National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day on March 10, 2017. The landmark Women’s March in January brought millions of people in America and around the world together in support of women’s rights, equality, expanding access to healthcare, and protecting the environment. As I witnessed legions of women, men, and children take to the street to make an indelible mark during Women’s History Month, I was reminded of the remarkable progress we have made over the past two decades in advancing wom...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news