AACR: HPV Vax Low for Adults at High Risk for HIV Infection
Age, sex, sexual orientation differences in HPV vaccination rates were statistically significant (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - April 3, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Family Medicine, Gynecology, Infections, AIDS, Internal Medicine, Nursing, Oncology, Pharmacy, Conference News, Source Type: news

How HIV Might Influence HPV Vaccination Rates
TUESDAY, April 2, 2019 -- Does being at high risk for HIV mean you're less likely to get the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine? New research suggests that's so. HIV is the virus that causes AIDS, while HPV can cause cervical, anal and other... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - April 2, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Adults at high risk for HIV infection have low rates of vaccination against HPV
(American Association for Cancer Research) Adults who are at high risk of becoming infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which causes AIDS, were less likely than the general population to be vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV), which can cause anal and cervical cancer, according to results presented at the AACR Annual Meeting 2019, held in Atlanta March 29-April 3. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 2, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Senegal ’s New eLearning Platform Helps Prevent Service Disruptions as Health Workers Train
By Moussa Dia, Technical advisor for health systems performance, IntraHealth InternationalMarch 21, 2019Unlike other online platforms, it covers several areas of care and is useful for all types of health workers.en fran çaisMaty* is the only nurse in her remote village in Senegal. When she travels to the health district for training —which she must do frequently—it means there are no qualified medical personnel in her village to care for pregnant women, deliver babies, treat sicknesses, or respond to medical emergencies.If she ’s gone and her clients need help, they must either wait or go to ano...
Source: IntraHealth International - March 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Tags: Neema Digital Health Mobile Technology Education & Performance eLearning Management and Performance Nurses Senegal Source Type: news

Computer-designed vaccine elicits potent antibodies against RSV
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) A first-of-its-kind nanoparticle vaccine candidate for respiratory syncytial virus, a major cause of infant mortality worldwide, has been developed through computer design. Animal tests suggest the vaccine could provide potent, durable protection against RSV. The vaccine is being further developed for possible clinical trials. The nanoparticle platform will also be used to design potential vaccines for AIDS, hepatitis C and cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 7, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Sexually transmitted infections are on the rise. Here ’s what you need to know to protect yourself
UCLA Health Rates of sexually transmitted diseases have risen for the past four years to record highs in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ’slatest analysis. In California, the state health departmentfound that the number of people diagnosed with syphilis, gonorrhea or chlamydia in 2017 was 45 percent higher than five years prior.These sorts of statistics may spark a fear that there ’s little we can do to protect ourselves — but that’s not the full story.Dr. Leena Nathan, an obstetrician/gynecologist at UCLA Health-Westlake Village, consults with peo...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 14, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Chinese Blood Plasma Feared Contaminated With HIV Tests Negative, Investigators Say
(BEIJING) — Chinese investigators said Thursday tests on a batch of a plasma product feared to have been contaminated with HIV have turned up negative for the virus that causes AIDS. The result appears to have headed off the possibility of yet another scandal involving medical products in the country. Incidents include the falsifying of production records for rabies vaccines that prompted a nationwide crackdown on the industry and the injecting of other faulty vaccines. Public outrage over such scandals has alarmed the leadership of the ruling Communist Party, moving it to respond more quickly and firmly than in the ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized China onetime Source Type: news

Trump Wants to End HIV Within 10 Years. Here ’s What That Would Take, According to Experts
About 1.1 million Americans currently live with HIV, and approximately 40,000 are infected each year, according to federal data. But in his State of the Union address, President Donald Trump promised to “eliminate the HIV epidemic in the United States within 10 years” — a plan that hinges on a multi-agency push for better diagnosis, treatment and prevention in at-risk communities, health officials said Wednesday. Trump introduced the plan during his annual address on Tuesday but offered few details. Health officials fleshed out the plan during a call with reporters on Wednesday. The initiative will be ove...
Source: TIME: Health - February 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime HIV/AIDS onetime Source Type: news

Diversity in the CD4 receptor protects chimpanzees from infection by AIDS-like viruses
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Hahn's lab and an international team of collaborators, found that the CD4 surface protein, which is used by HIV and SIV as the receptor to enter immune cells, is highly variable among wild chimpanzees. Understanding how these viruses are transmitted within and between species may reveal clues for novel vaccine strategies in humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 4, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Superbugs, Anti-Vaxxers Make WHO ’ s List Of 10 Global Health Threats
(CNN) — From climate change to superbugs, the World Health Organization has laid out 10 big threats to our global health in 2019. And unless these threats get addressed, millions of lives will be in jeopardy. Here’s a snapshot of 10 urgent health issues, according to the United Nations’ public health agency: Not vaccinating when you can One of the most controversial recent health topics in the US is now an international concern. “Vaccine hesitancy — the reluctance or refusal to vaccinate despite the availability of vaccines — threatens to reverse progress made in tackling vaccine-prevent...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Local TV Source Type: news

Top 10 Threats to Global Health Include Flu, Pollution Top 10 Threats to Global Health Include Flu, Pollution
Other threats on WHO's radar include Ebola and other high-threat pathogens, antimicrobial resistance, vaccine'hesitancy,'weak primary healthcare, and noncommunicable diseases.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines - January 17, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

FT Health: Key moment for the NHS
Mark Feinberg on Aids vaccines, Coke’s role in China, palm oil perils (Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare)
Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare - January 11, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Demystifying Medicine 2019
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH). Published: 1/8/2019. This one-hour, 48-minute presentation discusses the history of pandemics, their challenges, and the next influenza pandemic. Topics include the role of viral, host, and secondary bacterial factors in influenza pathogenesis; contemporary Avian influenza, and why an HIV vaccine Is essential for ending the HIV/AIDS pandemic. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - January 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Demystifying Medicine 2019: The Next Influenza Pandemic and Ending the HIV/AIDS Pandemic: Follow the Science
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH). Published: 1/8/2019. This one-hour, 48-minute presentation discusses the history of pandemics, their challenges, and the next influenza pandemic. Topics include the role of viral, host, and secondary bacterial factors in influenza pathogenesis; contemporary Avian influenza, and why an HIV vaccine Is essential for ending the HIV/AIDS pandemic. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - January 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

10 New Year ’s Resolutions Doctors Actually Want You to Make
Each year, Americans’ most popular New Year’s resolutions are more or less the same: get healthy, get organized, save money. But doctors at the American Medical Association (AMA) have some more specific thoughts in mind for 2019. The AMA this week released a list of 10 wellness-focused resolutions that could “help Americans make the most impactful, long-lasting improvements to their health in 2019.” Here’s what they are — and how to make them happen. Learn your risk for type 2 diabetes Diabetes is one of the most common chronic health conditions in the U.S., affecting an estimated 30 mil...
Source: TIME: Health - December 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Holidays 2018 public health Source Type: news

10 New Year's Resolutions Doctors Actually Want You to Make
Each year, Americans’ most popular New Year’s resolutions are more or less the same: get healthy, get organized, save money. But doctors at the American Medical Association (AMA) have some more specific thoughts in mind for 2019. The AMA this week released a list of 10 wellness-focused resolutions that could “help Americans make the most impactful, long-lasting improvements to their health in 2019.” Here’s what they are — and how to make them happen. Learn your risk for type 2 diabetes Diabetes is one of the most common chronic health conditions in the U.S., affecting an estimated 30 mil...
Source: TIME: Health - December 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Holidays 2018 public health Source Type: news

Batavia Biosciences Partners with IAVI to Advance Development of...
Batavia Biosciences announces today that the...(PRWeb December 11, 2018)Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/batavia_biosciences_partners_with_iavi_to_advance_development_of_vaccine_against_lassa_fever/prweb15980690.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - December 11, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

The Future of HIV Treatment Might Not Involve Pills
HIV treatments have come a long way in the more than 30 years since the virus was first identified. Powerful antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) can now keep the virus controlled at levels that current tests cannot detect in the blood. Perhaps just as important, people who take these drugs diligently soon after they’re infected are unlikely to pass the virus to others. But the treatment isn’t perfect. Those with HIV need to take a pill every day for the rest of their lives, and even if they do, the virus can easily morph to become resistant to the drugs. That’s why patients on ARV treatment should faithfully moni...
Source: TIME: Health - December 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized healthytime HIV/AIDS onetime Source Type: news

Chinese Researcher Claiming Controversial Gene-Edited Babies Reports Second Pregnancy May Be Underway
(HONG KONG) — A Chinese researcher who claims to have helped make the world’s first genetically edited babies says a second pregnancy may be underway. The researcher, He Jiankui of Shenzhen, revealed the possible pregnancy Wednesday while making his first public comments about his controversial work at an international conference in Hong Kong. He claims to have altered the DNA of twin girls born earlier this month to try to make them resistant to infection with the AIDS virus. Mainstream scientists have condemned the experiment, and universities and government groups are investigating. The second potential preg...
Source: TIME: Health - November 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Marilynn Marchione / AP Tags: Uncategorized crispr onetime Source Type: news

This Is the Best Way to Prevent HIV, Expert Group Says
While there is no vaccine yet to protect against HIV, doctors have an effective drug to prevent HIV infection. After impressive studies overseas and in the U.S., the Food and Drug Administration approved Truvada, a combination of anti-HIV drugs, in 2012 as the first medication that can prevent healthy people from getting infected with HIV by up to 90%. Now, for the first time, a group of independent experts convened by the government, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), is recommending that people at high risk of acquiring HIV infection be prescribed the drug, also known as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Th...
Source: TIME: Health - November 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized hiv-aids Source Type: news

Zimbabwe:Cholera - WHO Warns Against Vaccination Complacency
[New Zimbabwe] Local authorities must continue to improve sanitation and the availability of clean water to prevent cholera as vaccination is not 100 percent effective, the World Health Organisation (WHO) has said. (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - November 4, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Zimbabwe: Cholera - WHO Warns Against Vaccination Complacency
[New Zimbabwe] Local authorities must continue to improve sanitation and the availability of clean water to prevent cholera as vaccination is not 100 percent effective, the World Health Organisation (WHO) has said. (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - November 4, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Bill Gates Talks to TIME About a Coming ‘Third Wave’ of Development in Africa
There’s a very big difference between simple and easy—especially when it comes to global health. It’s simple to eradicate polio—just get all children are vaccinated. It’s simple to reduce nighttime malaria infections—make sure everyone in malaria-endemic areas sleeps under a bed net. But none of that is easy. The tension between simple and easy is at play when it comes to eradicating poverty in the developing world too, as the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation makes clear in its second annual Goalkeepers Data Report. In a conversation with TIME, Bill Gates points to two recent waves of...
Source: TIME: Health - September 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized onetime public health Source Type: news

One Major Reason the AIDS Epidemic Isn ’t Going Away
It's a serious threat to progress in HIV treatment and prevention —and something we have the knowledge to stop, especially in health care settings.August 08, 2018It's a serious threat to public health and progress in HIV treatment and prevention —and something we have the knowledge to stop.A few years ago Dany Stolbunov, now 20, told his doctor in Ukraine that he wanted to go to medical school. He was sharing his ambitions with someone he admired and trusted, who he thought might believe in him, the person responsible for his care.“I told him I wanted to become a physician, too.”“You can&rsquo...
Source: IntraHealth International - August 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: lfreeze Source Type: news

Tanzania:Editorial - HIV Is Still a Major Threat - Lets Not Lower Our Guard
[Citizen] There has been talk in recent weeks of a potential breakthrough in the search for a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine 35 years after the virus was first identified. The pandemic has caused much misery globally, but especially in developing countries, including Tanzania. (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - July 24, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson to Present New Data for Investigational Preventive Vaccine and Single-Tablet Treatment Regimens for HIV-1 at AIDS 2018
(Source: Johnson and Johnson)
Source: Johnson and Johnson - July 20, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Experts warn approach to HIV/AIDS is complacent
Resurgence of the disease could emerge, say experts Related items fromOnMedica Uptake of PrEP coincides with less condom use JCVI recommends universal HPV vaccination New care standards for HIV aim to boost quality despite funding pressures HPV vaccination to be offered to men who have sex with men Smoking cuts life expectancy in HIV more than AIDS does (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - July 20, 2018 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Impact of Aging and HIV on Serologic Response to Flu Vaccine Impact of Aging and HIV on Serologic Response to Flu Vaccine
In what ways might patient age and HIV status impact seasonal influenza vaccine responses?AIDS (Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines - June 28, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: HIV/AIDS Journal Article Source Type: news

Nigeria:National Assembly Budget Cuts to Stifle Vaccines, HIV Drugs
[Daily Trust] A total of N7.45 billion has been cut from funds allocated for strategic interventions in health care, after lawmakers adjusted portions of the 2018 Budget signed into law on Wednesday. (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - June 21, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Development of vaccines from AIDS to Zika, using a novel 'plug and play' viral platform
(American Society for Microbiology) Researchers from GeoVax have developed a flexible 'Plug and Play' technology platform that delivers single-dose vaccines that fully protect against emerging infectious diseases such as Zika, Lassa fever, and Ebola. The research will be presented at ASM Microbe, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, held from June 7-11 in Atlanta, Ga. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 10, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Human Trials Set for Experimental HIV Vaccine
The vaccine targets a vulnerable site on HIV -- the virus that causes AIDS -- and triggered antibody production in mice, guinea pigs and monkeys, according to researchers with the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - June 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Uganda:New Hope for HIV Vaccine Invention
[Observer] Medical researchers are looking at ongoing trials on a number of potential vaccines in the hope that by 2021 an inoculation against the virus may be within sight. (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - May 30, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Analysis links US government global health R & D funding to jobs, economic benefits across states
The Trump Administration's proposal to slash funding to fight global health threats like malaria, Ebola, and HIV/AIDS could cost states thousands of jobs and millions of dollars in economic investment and put the health of residents at risk, according to a new state-by-state analysis released today on Capitol Hill by the Global Health Technologies Coalition (GHTC). This first-of-its-kind analysis quantifies how federal funding to create vaccines and treatments to combat deadly global diseases also benefits American states. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - May 1, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Development Research and Development Source Type: news

Analysis links US government global health R & D funding to jobs, economic benefits across states
(Global Health Technologies Coalition) The Trump Administration's proposal to slash funding to fight global health threats like malaria, Ebola, and HIV/AIDS could cost states thousands of jobs and millions of dollars in economic investment and put the health of residents at risk, according to a new state-by-state analysis released today by the Global Health Technologies Coalition. This first-of-its-kind analysis quantifies how federal funding to create vaccines and treatments to combat deadly global diseases also benefits American states. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 1, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

UTSA researchers explore little-known, deadly fungal infections
(University of Texas at San Antonio) A new study by Althea Campuzano, Ph.D., a student at the University of Texas at San Antonio, and Floyd Wormley, Jr., Professor of Biology and Senior Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies, sheds light on little-known fungal infections caused by the fungus Cryptococcus. There are currently no vaccines available for any fungal infection, which can be extremely deadly to patients under treatment for diseases like HIV, AIDS and cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 10, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Uganda:Anger Over Fake Hepatitis B Vaccine
[Independent (Kampala)] Kampala -More Ugandans are infected with Hepatitis B than HIV, the virus which causes the dreaded AIDS. And both infections are spread the same way - through blood and other body fluids. Unlike HIV which destroys the immune system and opens up the sufferer to myriad infections, Hepatitis destroys the liver. And it generally kills faster than AIDS. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - March 26, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

AIDS Researcher Robert Redfield Is the New CDC Director. Here ’s Why the Pick Is Controversial
The Trump administration has tapped HIV researcher Dr. Robert Redfield to be the new leader of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Redfield will be replacing Dr. Brenda Fitzgerald, who stepped down from CDC director after Politico reported that she had bought shares in a tobacco company after accepting the position. Redfield will not require Senate confirmation. However, reactions to his selection have been mixed. Before joining the CDC, Redfield was a professor at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the co-founder of the university’s Institute of Human Virology. Over his career, ...
Source: TIME: Health - March 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized CDC CDC Director Dr. Robert Redfield healthytime public health Scientific misconduct Source Type: news

Failing Forward: Innovative Approaches to Improve Reproductive Health in Senegal
March 14, 2018We found what works for real people. But that's  not where we started.In any given field, the top 10% of performers  produce more than 50% of the big breakthroughs. What is the key to these superstars’ success?Fortunately for most of us, the answer is not raw talent or even expertise. The truth is, these top performers produce as many bad ideas as everyone else —but, crucially, they learn from their failures and continue to innovate. Iteration has been shown to improve performance across a range of fields.You ’ll hear this right from the source, too—Jeff Bezos,...
Source: IntraHealth International - March 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Source Type: news

NIDA's 2018 Avant-Garde awards highlight immune response and killer cells
(NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse) With diverse proposals focused on everything from natural killer cells to therapeutic vaccines to treat HIV, three recipients have been selected for the 2018 Avant-Garde Award for HIV/AIDS Research from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, part of the National Institutes of Health. The awards will each provide $500,000 per year for up to five years (subject to the availability of funds) to support the research of three scientists, Drs. Catherine Blish, Nathaniel Landau, and Sara Sawyer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NIDA & #039;s 2018 Avant-Garde awards highlight immune response and killer cells
With diverse proposals focused on everything from natural killer cells to therapeutic vaccines to treat HIV, three recipients have been selected for the 2018 Avant-Garde Award for HIV/AIDS Research from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), part of the National Institutes of Health. The... (Source: NIDA News)
Source: NIDA News - March 13, 2018 Category: Addiction Tags: HIV or AIDS, Researchers Source Type: news

Why Flu Outbreaks Have Been the Worst in Nearly a Decade
The only thing worse than getting the flu is catching it after you’ve gotten a flu shot. It’s been a terrible year for outbreaks — the worst in almost a decade. Contributing to that is the high failure rate of this year’s vaccine. The current shot is just 25 percent effective against the H3N2 virus, this season’s most-often-identified strain by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The experts say, with enough time and money, they can do a lot better. “There has to be a wholesale change to how we make the flu vaccine,” said Amesh Adalja, senior scholar at Johns Hopkins Ce...
Source: TIME: Science - February 28, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Bloomberg Tags: Uncategorized Bloomberg flu healthytime onetime Source Type: news

UCLA scientists receive $7.7 million grant to study HIV recurrence
The virus that causes AIDS is known to hide in certain rare cells. When people with HIV stop taking their medications, the virus can re-emerge and multiply, or “rebound,” from those hiding places. To better combat HIV, scientists have been working to understand how and why the virus re-emerges.“It’s the resurrection of virus that you couldn’t see in the body before,” said Jerome Zack, professor of medicine and chair of the UCLA department of microbiology, immunology and molecular genetics at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. Zack, who is director of the  UCLA Center ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 16, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Bill and Melinda Gates: Trump ’s Proposed Cuts to Foreign Aid Will Lead to More Deaths
Bill and Melinda Gates used their 10th annual letter to answer tough questions about their work at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation — and to defend funding for health work and international aid, just a day after President Donald Trump’s budget proposed slashing resources to these areas. The Gates Foundation donates billions of dollars to health and humanitarian causes including vaccine delivery, child and maternal health as well as infectious disease prevention. “These efforts save lives,” Bill Gates wrote in the letter, which was published Tuesday. “They also create U.S. jobs. And they m...
Source: TIME: Health - February 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime philanthropy Source Type: news

Scientists report big improvements in HIV vaccine production
(University of California - Santa Cruz) Research on HIV has led to many promising ideas for vaccines to prevent infection by the AIDS virus, but very few candidate vaccines have been tested in clinical trials. One reason is the technical difficulty of manufacturing vaccines based on the envelope proteins of the virus, according to vaccine expert Phil Berman, who has now developed new methods for the production of HIV vaccines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 5, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

UCLA study describes structure of tumor herpes virus associated with Kaposi ’s sarcoma
UCLA researchers have provided the first description of the structure of the herpes virus associated with Kaposi ’s sarcoma, a type of cancer.The discovery answers important questions about how the virus spreads and provides a potential roadmap for the development of antiviral drugs to combat both that virus and the more common Epstein-Barr virus, which is present in more than 90 percent of the adult population and is believed to have a nearly identical structure.In the study, published in the journal  Nature, the UCLA team showed in the laboratory that an inhibitor could be developed to break down the herpes vi...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 20, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

10 Global Health Issues to Watch in 2018
January 19, 2018It ’s notallbad news.When we set out to compile our annual list of global health issues to watch this year, it seemed like all bad news. And true, that ’s often what we deal with in global health—the problems that need tackling, the suffering we can help alleviate.But then stories and columns likethis one cheer us up. They remind us that no matter how complicated and frustrating our work may get, fighting back against poverty and inequality works.There are and always will be global health challenges to face. But there ’s boundless hope, too. And a field full of determined health work...
Source: IntraHealth International - January 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Source Type: news

PPPs Likely to Undermine Public Health Commitments
Capacity-building support for developing countries to safeguard the public interest in terms of public health and especially, to ensure that no one is left behind, is essential. Credit: IPSBy Anis Chowdhury and Jomo Kwame SundaramSYDNEY and KUALA LUMPUR , Jan 17 2018 (IPS)The United Nations Agenda 2030 for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) is being touted in financial circles as offering huge investment opportunities requiring trillions of dollars. In 67 low- and middle-income countries, achieving SDG 3 — healthy lives and well-being for all, at all ages — is estimated to require new investments increasi...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - January 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Anis Chowdhury and Jomo Kwame Sundaram Tags: Development & Aid Economy & Trade Featured Global Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Trade & Investment Water & Sanitation Source Type: news

Hepatitis B Vaccination Rates Subpar in Patients With HIV Hepatitis B Vaccination Rates Subpar in Patients With HIV
More than a third of patients with HIV infection fail to get hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination, despite a longstanding recommendation, report researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - December 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: HIV/AIDS News Source Type: news

Malawi:Malawi to Conduct HIV Vaccine Trials 2018
[Malawi News Agency] Blantyre -Ministry of Health says the University of North-Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) will start conducting HIV vaccine trials in the country next year (2018). (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - December 22, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New Vaccine, Long-acting Drug Trials Buoy Hopes in HIV Fight New Vaccine, Long-acting Drug Trials Buoy Hopes in HIV Fight
Researchers announced the launch of two big studies in Africa on Thursday to test a new HIV vaccine and a long-acting injectable drug, fueling hopes for better ways to protect against the virus that causes AIDS.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines - December 1, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: HIV/AIDS News Source Type: news