Nigeria:National Assembly Budget Cuts to Stifle Vaccines, HIV Drugs
[Daily Trust] A total of N7.45 billion has been cut from funds allocated for strategic interventions in health care, after lawmakers adjusted portions of the 2018 Budget signed into law on Wednesday. (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - June 21, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Development of vaccines from AIDS to Zika, using a novel 'plug and play' viral platform
(American Society for Microbiology) Researchers from GeoVax have developed a flexible 'Plug and Play' technology platform that delivers single-dose vaccines that fully protect against emerging infectious diseases such as Zika, Lassa fever, and Ebola. The research will be presented at ASM Microbe, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, held from June 7-11 in Atlanta, Ga. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 10, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Human Trials Set for Experimental HIV Vaccine
The vaccine targets a vulnerable site on HIV -- the virus that causes AIDS -- and triggered antibody production in mice, guinea pigs and monkeys, according to researchers with the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - June 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Uganda:New Hope for HIV Vaccine Invention
[Observer] Medical researchers are looking at ongoing trials on a number of potential vaccines in the hope that by 2021 an inoculation against the virus may be within sight. (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - May 30, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Analysis links US government global health R & D funding to jobs, economic benefits across states
The Trump Administration's proposal to slash funding to fight global health threats like malaria, Ebola, and HIV/AIDS could cost states thousands of jobs and millions of dollars in economic investment and put the health of residents at risk, according to a new state-by-state analysis released today on Capitol Hill by the Global Health Technologies Coalition (GHTC). This first-of-its-kind analysis quantifies how federal funding to create vaccines and treatments to combat deadly global diseases also benefits American states. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - May 1, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Development Research and Development Source Type: news

Analysis links US government global health R & D funding to jobs, economic benefits across states
(Global Health Technologies Coalition) The Trump Administration's proposal to slash funding to fight global health threats like malaria, Ebola, and HIV/AIDS could cost states thousands of jobs and millions of dollars in economic investment and put the health of residents at risk, according to a new state-by-state analysis released today by the Global Health Technologies Coalition. This first-of-its-kind analysis quantifies how federal funding to create vaccines and treatments to combat deadly global diseases also benefits American states. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 1, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

UTSA researchers explore little-known, deadly fungal infections
(University of Texas at San Antonio) A new study by Althea Campuzano, Ph.D., a student at the University of Texas at San Antonio, and Floyd Wormley, Jr., Professor of Biology and Senior Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies, sheds light on little-known fungal infections caused by the fungus Cryptococcus. There are currently no vaccines available for any fungal infection, which can be extremely deadly to patients under treatment for diseases like HIV, AIDS and cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 10, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Uganda:Anger Over Fake Hepatitis B Vaccine
[Independent (Kampala)] Kampala -More Ugandans are infected with Hepatitis B than HIV, the virus which causes the dreaded AIDS. And both infections are spread the same way - through blood and other body fluids. Unlike HIV which destroys the immune system and opens up the sufferer to myriad infections, Hepatitis destroys the liver. And it generally kills faster than AIDS. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - March 26, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

AIDS Researcher Robert Redfield Is the New CDC Director. Here ’s Why the Pick Is Controversial
The Trump administration has tapped HIV researcher Dr. Robert Redfield to be the new leader of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Redfield will be replacing Dr. Brenda Fitzgerald, who stepped down from CDC director after Politico reported that she had bought shares in a tobacco company after accepting the position. Redfield will not require Senate confirmation. However, reactions to his selection have been mixed. Before joining the CDC, Redfield was a professor at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the co-founder of the university’s Institute of Human Virology. Over his career, ...
Source: TIME: Health - March 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized CDC CDC Director Dr. Robert Redfield healthytime public health Scientific misconduct Source Type: news

Failing Forward: Innovative Approaches to Improve Reproductive Health in Senegal
March 14, 2018We found what works for real people. But that's  not where we started.In any given field, the top 10% of performers  produce more than 50% of the big breakthroughs. What is the key to these superstars’ success?Fortunately for most of us, the answer is not raw talent or even expertise. The truth is, these top performers produce as many bad ideas as everyone else —but, crucially, they learn from their failures and continue to innovate. Iteration has been shown to improve performance across a range of fields.You ’ll hear this right from the source, too—Jeff Bezos,...
Source: IntraHealth International - March 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Source Type: news

NIDA's 2018 Avant-Garde awards highlight immune response and killer cells
(NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse) With diverse proposals focused on everything from natural killer cells to therapeutic vaccines to treat HIV, three recipients have been selected for the 2018 Avant-Garde Award for HIV/AIDS Research from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, part of the National Institutes of Health. The awards will each provide $500,000 per year for up to five years (subject to the availability of funds) to support the research of three scientists, Drs. Catherine Blish, Nathaniel Landau, and Sara Sawyer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NIDA & #039;s 2018 Avant-Garde awards highlight immune response and killer cells
With diverse proposals focused on everything from natural killer cells to therapeutic vaccines to treat HIV, three recipients have been selected for the 2018 Avant-Garde Award for HIV/AIDS Research from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), part of the National Institutes of Health. The... (Source: NIDA News)
Source: NIDA News - March 13, 2018 Category: Addiction Tags: HIV or AIDS, Researchers Source Type: news

Why Flu Outbreaks Have Been the Worst in Nearly a Decade
The only thing worse than getting the flu is catching it after you’ve gotten a flu shot. It’s been a terrible year for outbreaks — the worst in almost a decade. Contributing to that is the high failure rate of this year’s vaccine. The current shot is just 25 percent effective against the H3N2 virus, this season’s most-often-identified strain by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The experts say, with enough time and money, they can do a lot better. “There has to be a wholesale change to how we make the flu vaccine,” said Amesh Adalja, senior scholar at Johns Hopkins Ce...
Source: TIME: Science - February 28, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Bloomberg Tags: Uncategorized Bloomberg flu healthytime onetime Source Type: news

UCLA scientists receive $7.7 million grant to study HIV recurrence
The virus that causes AIDS is known to hide in certain rare cells. When people with HIV stop taking their medications, the virus can re-emerge and multiply, or “rebound,” from those hiding places. To better combat HIV, scientists have been working to understand how and why the virus re-emerges.“It’s the resurrection of virus that you couldn’t see in the body before,” said Jerome Zack, professor of medicine and chair of the UCLA department of microbiology, immunology and molecular genetics at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. Zack, who is director of the  UCLA Center ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 16, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Bill and Melinda Gates: Trump ’s Proposed Cuts to Foreign Aid Will Lead to More Deaths
Bill and Melinda Gates used their 10th annual letter to answer tough questions about their work at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation — and to defend funding for health work and international aid, just a day after President Donald Trump’s budget proposed slashing resources to these areas. The Gates Foundation donates billions of dollars to health and humanitarian causes including vaccine delivery, child and maternal health as well as infectious disease prevention. “These efforts save lives,” Bill Gates wrote in the letter, which was published Tuesday. “They also create U.S. jobs. And they m...
Source: TIME: Health - February 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime philanthropy Source Type: news

Scientists report big improvements in HIV vaccine production
(University of California - Santa Cruz) Research on HIV has led to many promising ideas for vaccines to prevent infection by the AIDS virus, but very few candidate vaccines have been tested in clinical trials. One reason is the technical difficulty of manufacturing vaccines based on the envelope proteins of the virus, according to vaccine expert Phil Berman, who has now developed new methods for the production of HIV vaccines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 5, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

UCLA study describes structure of tumor herpes virus associated with Kaposi ’s sarcoma
UCLA researchers have provided the first description of the structure of the herpes virus associated with Kaposi ’s sarcoma, a type of cancer.The discovery answers important questions about how the virus spreads and provides a potential roadmap for the development of antiviral drugs to combat both that virus and the more common Epstein-Barr virus, which is present in more than 90 percent of the adult population and is believed to have a nearly identical structure.In the study, published in the journal  Nature, the UCLA team showed in the laboratory that an inhibitor could be developed to break down the herpes vi...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 20, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

10 Global Health Issues to Watch in 2018
January 19, 2018It ’s notallbad news.When we set out to compile our annual list of global health issues to watch this year, it seemed like all bad news. And true, that ’s often what we deal with in global health—the problems that need tackling, the suffering we can help alleviate.But then stories and columns likethis one cheer us up. They remind us that no matter how complicated and frustrating our work may get, fighting back against poverty and inequality works.There are and always will be global health challenges to face. But there ’s boundless hope, too. And a field full of determined health work...
Source: IntraHealth International - January 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Source Type: news

PPPs Likely to Undermine Public Health Commitments
Capacity-building support for developing countries to safeguard the public interest in terms of public health and especially, to ensure that no one is left behind, is essential. Credit: IPSBy Anis Chowdhury and Jomo Kwame SundaramSYDNEY and KUALA LUMPUR , Jan 17 2018 (IPS)The United Nations Agenda 2030 for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) is being touted in financial circles as offering huge investment opportunities requiring trillions of dollars. In 67 low- and middle-income countries, achieving SDG 3 — healthy lives and well-being for all, at all ages — is estimated to require new investments increasi...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - January 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Anis Chowdhury and Jomo Kwame Sundaram Tags: Development & Aid Economy & Trade Featured Global Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Trade & Investment Water & Sanitation Source Type: news

Hepatitis B Vaccination Rates Subpar in Patients With HIV Hepatitis B Vaccination Rates Subpar in Patients With HIV
More than a third of patients with HIV infection fail to get hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination, despite a longstanding recommendation, report researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - December 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: HIV/AIDS News Source Type: news

Malawi:Malawi to Conduct HIV Vaccine Trials 2018
[Malawi News Agency] Blantyre -Ministry of Health says the University of North-Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) will start conducting HIV vaccine trials in the country next year (2018). (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - December 22, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New Vaccine, Long-acting Drug Trials Buoy Hopes in HIV Fight New Vaccine, Long-acting Drug Trials Buoy Hopes in HIV Fight
Researchers announced the launch of two big studies in Africa on Thursday to test a new HIV vaccine and a long-acting injectable drug, fueling hopes for better ways to protect against the virus that causes AIDS.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines - December 1, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: HIV/AIDS News Source Type: news

Africa:New Trial for HIV Vaccine Regimen Begins
[Nation] A new experimental HIV vaccine regimen has been launched for the first human trials, bringing hope to patients as the world celebrates Aids Day. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - December 1, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

New Project Uses Data and Determination to Expand Key HIV Services in Eastern Uganda
A health worker at Jinja Regional Referral Hospital in Uganda takes a blood sample for an HIV test. Photo by Tommy Trenchard for IntraHealth International.November 30, 2017IntraHealth International ’s newest project in Uganda—the USAID Regional Health Integration to Enhance Services in Eastern Uganda Activity (or USAID RHITES-E)—developed a 60-day strategy to help the Eastern Uganda region achieve and surpass some of its annual HIV service goals.Some 1.4 million adults and children are living with HIV in Uganda. The adultprevalence rate is 6.4%, and 28,000 Ugandans died due to AIDS-related causes in 2016....
Source: IntraHealth International - November 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: intrahealth Source Type: news

New vaccine, long-acting drug trials buoy hopes in HIV fight
LONDON (Reuters) - Researchers announced the launch of two big studies in Africa on Thursday to test a new HIV vaccine and a long-acting injectable drug, fuelling hopes for better ways to protect against the virus that causes AIDS. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - November 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Los Alamos research fundamental to first efficacy study for mosaic HIV-1 preventive vaccine
(DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory) Just in time for World AIDS Day (Dec. 1) international partners are announcing the first efficacy study for an investigational HIV-1-preventive 'mosaic' vaccine. Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson& Johnson are joining forces with The Bill& Melinda Gates Foundation and National Institutes of Health on this study, and they have enlisted the aid of top researchers worldwide to conduct the trial. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

U.S. tobacco must issue “corrective statements” – When will the courts demand the same for vaccine makers' “Tobacco Science”?
(Natural News) According to a federal court order, Altria, R. J. Reynolds Tobacco, Lorillard and Philip Morris USA were ordered to pay for and run newspaper and media advertisements stating: “More people,” one ad says, “die every year from smoking than murder, AIDS, suicide, drugs, car crashes, and alcohol, combined.” Another reads: “Cigarette companies intentionally... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Africa:Four Big Insights Into HIV/Aids That Provide Hope of Finding a Vaccine
[The Conversation Africa] HIV remains one of the continent's most intractable health challenges. Tremendous progress is being made to understand the virus, the immune mechanisms that contribute to its control and for new antiretroviral drugs and vaccines to be developed to treat and prevent HIV. (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - November 24, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New findings to help HIV scientists establish 'template' for potent antibodies
(International AIDS Vaccine Initiative) New data published today in Immunity further illuminate how some human beings generate powerful, HIV-blocking antibodies. Led by scientists at the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI) and The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI), the results offer important insight into a potential AIDS vaccine design. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 21, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

HIV Vaccine Boost Induces Significant Antibody Response HIV Vaccine Boost Induces Significant Antibody Response
An additional dose of HIV vaccine MVA-B four years after the last immunization induces significant immune responses in healthy volunteers, researchers from Spain report.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines - November 12, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: HIV/AIDS News Source Type: news

HIV Guidelines Make Special HPV Recommendations for Gay Men HIV Guidelines Make Special HPV Recommendations for Gay Men
New European guidelines differ from American guidelines in that they recommend that gay and bisexual men get vaccinated for human papillomavirus until age 40.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - October 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: HIV/AIDS News Source Type: news

Innovation for Climate-Smart Agriculture Key to Ending Hunger in Kenya
Vaccination of live stock in Samburu County, Kenya. Credit: @FAO/LUIS TATOBy Siddharth ChatterjeeNAIROBI, Kenya , Oct 23 2017 (IPS)Some parts of Kenya are reeling from the effects of probably the worst drought in the last 20 years. With nearly 3.4 million people food insecure, Kenya’s food security prognosis looks gloomy, with climate change and natural resource depletion set to pose even greater risks in the long term. Rising temperatures and unpredicatble rainy seasons could destroy crop yield gains made in the recent past, and the threats of extreme weather such as flooding, drought and pests becoming more real. T...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - October 23, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Siddharth Chatterjee Tags: Africa Aid Climate Change Combating Desertification and Drought Development & Aid Economy & Trade Environment Featured Food & Agriculture Gender Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies Labour Natural Resources Poverty & SDG Source Type: news

Study: West ’s device aids in dose-sparing administration of polio vaccine
West Pharmaceutical Services (NYSE:WST) touted results today from a study showing that its ID Adapter can improve the intradermal administration of polio vaccines. The study, published in the journal Vaccine, evaluated the feasibility of using a fractional inactivated polio virus vaccine in remote locations where polio outbreaks continue to be of serious concern to public health officials. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The post Study: West’s device aids in dose-sparing administration of polio vaccine appeared first on MassDevice. (Source: Mass Device)
Source: Mass Device - October 10, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Drug-Device Combinations Pharmaceuticals Research & Development Wall Street Beat West Pharmaceutical Services Inc. Source Type: news

Durable end to the HIV/AIDS pandemic likely will require an HIV vaccine
From a practical standpoint, ending the HIV/AIDS pandemic without a vaccine is unlikely. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - October 10, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Durable end to the HIV/AIDS pandemic likely will require an HIV vaccine
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Despite remarkable gains in the treatment and prevention of HIV infection, development of an effective HIV vaccine likely will be necessary to achieve a durable end to the HIV/AIDS pandemic, according to a new commentary from Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 9, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Trispecific broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies mediate potent SHIV protection in macaques
The development of an effective AIDS vaccine has been challenging because of viral genetic diversity and the difficulty of generating broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs). We engineered trispecific antibodies (Abs) that allow a single molecule to interact with three independent HIV-1 envelope determinants: the CD4 binding site, the membrane-proximal external region (MPER), and the V1V2 glycan site. Trispecific Abs exhibited higher potency and breadth than any previously described single bnAb, showed pharmacokinetics similar to those of human bnAbs, and conferred complete immunity against a mixture of simian-human immuno...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 5, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Xu, L., Pegu, A., Rao, E., Doria-Rose, N., Beninga, J., McKee, K., Lord, D. M., Wei, R. R., Deng, G., Louder, M., Schmidt, S. D., Mankoff, Z., Wu, L., Asokan, M., Beil, C., Lange, C., Leuschner, W. D., Kruip, J., Sendak, R., Do Kwon, Y., Zhou, T., Chen, X Tags: Immunology, Medicine, Diseases, Virology r-articles Source Type: news

The World Health Organization Just Picked Its New Leaders. Most of Them Are Women
The World Health Organization announced its new senior leadership team Tuesday, and more than 60% of the appointees are women. “The team represents 14 countries, including all WHO regions, and is more than 60% women, reflecting my deep-held belief that we need top talent, gender equity and a geographically diverse set of perspectives to fulfill our mission to keep the world safe,” WHO Director-General Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said in a statement. The five men selected to lead the agency are Dr. Peter Salama, Dr. Bernhard Schwartländer, Dr. Ranieri Guerra, Dr. Ren Minghui, and Stewart Simonson. WHO ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Casey Quackenbush Tags: Uncategorized onetime United Nations women's empowerment Source Type: news

Philanthropists Join Forces to Fund Africa ’s Cash-Strapped Health Sector
Tristate Heart and Vascular Centre in Nigeria. Credit: Tristate Heart and Vascular CentreBy Pavithra Rao, Africa Renewal*NEW YORK, Sep 28 2017 (IPS)In the 2017 World Happiness Report by Gallup, African countries score poorly. Of the 150 countries on the list, the Central African Republic, Tanzania and Burundi rank as the unhappiest countries in the world. Some of the factors driving unhappiness are the poor state of the continent’s health care systems, the persistence of HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis, and the growth of lifestyle diseases such as hypertension, heart disease and diabetes.Few African countries make...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - September 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Pavithra Rao Tags: Development & Aid Featured Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Predictors for and Coverage of Flu Vaccine in HIV Patients Predictors for and Coverage of Flu Vaccine in HIV Patients
How likely are HIV-infected individuals to be vaccinated against influenza, and what are the reasons for not doing so? A survey of HIV-positive patients provides insight.HIV Medicine (Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines - September 25, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: HIV/AIDS Journal Article Source Type: news

Fighting HIV on Multiple Fronts Might Lead to Vaccine
Combination strategy fully protects lab monkeys, studies find (Source: Fertility News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Fertility News - Doctors Lounge - September 20, 2017 Category: Reproduction Medicine Tags: Infections, AIDS, Reproductive Medicine, Research, News, Source Type: news

Fighting HIV on Multiple Fronts Might Lead to Vaccine
Combination strategy fully protects lab monkeys, studies find Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: HIV/AIDS, Immunization (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - September 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Selena Gomez ’ s kidney transplant: Young, minority women disproportionately affected by lupus
In the world of celebrities, there are diseases such as HIV/AIDS and breast cancer that are very “popular” and well understood, thanks to years of fundraising and awareness campaigns by stars. And there are those diseases that are less so. Lupus, an autoimmune disorder that can damage organs, is in the second category. When Selena Gomez shocked her 126 […]Related:To fight deadly hepatitis outbreak, San Diego begins power-washing streets with bleachWhat to know about a study of flu vaccine and miscarriageMelinda Gates decries ‘loss of U.S. leadership’ in global aid (Source:...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - September 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Promoting evidence-based health care in Africa
Charles Shey Wiysonge, Director ofCochane  South Africa, gave an interview to the World Health Organization Bulletin. Here is a re-post , with premission, from their  recent publication.Charles Shey Wiysonge is devoted to encouraging better use of scientific evidence for health policies and programmes in African countries. He is the director of the South African Cochrane Centre, a unit of the South African Medical Research Council, and a professor of epidemiology and biostatistics at the department of Global Health in the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences at Stellenbosch University in South Africa. He was C...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - August 17, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

HIV Fight Advances With New Drug Cocktails, Fresh Vaccine Hopes HIV Fight Advances With New Drug Cocktails, Fresh Vaccine Hopes
Three decades after approval of the first-ever AIDS treatment, HIV medicine is seeing a new wave of innovation with scientists reporting positive data on Monday for improved drug cocktails and a novel experimental vaccine.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines - August 4, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: HIV/AIDS News Source Type: news

HIV fight advances with new drug cocktails, fresh vaccine hopes
LONDON (Reuters) - Three decades after approval of the first-ever AIDS treatment, HIV medicine is seeing a new wave of innovation with scientists reporting positive data on Monday for improved drug cocktails and a novel experimental vaccine. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - July 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Cows May Offer Clues to an AIDS Vaccine
Title: Cows May Offer Clues to an AIDS VaccineCategory: Health NewsCreated: 7/21/2017 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 7/24/2017 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet HIV General)
Source: MedicineNet HIV General - July 24, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Cows May Offer Clues to an AIDS Vaccine
Their rapid reaction to immunization makes them potential guinea pigs, study suggests Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: HIV/AIDS (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - July 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Could cows be the clue that leads to an HIV vaccine?
Conclusion This early stage research on cows indicates that they had a broad and quick immune response to HIV infection when given a specific vaccine. Because the immune proteins produced in cows are able to neutralise many different strains of HIV virus, the authors suggest this potentially gives them an edge over the human proteins that have been looked at so far. As always with animal studies it is important to remember that what works in cows might not work in the same way in humans. Many drug studies that appear promising at first, fall at the first hurdle once humans are involved. The study was also carried out on ju...
Source: NHS News Feed - July 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medication Source Type: news

Cows May Offer Clues to an AIDS Vaccine
FRIDAY, July 21, 2017 -- Cows already give us milk, meat and leather. Now, researchers say they may also hold the key to an AIDS vaccine. Scientists found it took cows just a few weeks to develop powerful antibodies against HIV, the virus that... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - July 21, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Cow antibodies may be key to effective AIDS vaccine
Researchers have found a way to elicit powerful, HIV-blocking antibodies in cows in weeks instead of years, which may lead to an effective AIDS vaccine. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - July 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news