Women and Girls to the Front
This article was originally published in Forbes Africa.   Follow @IPSNewsUNBureau !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+'://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js';fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document, 'script', 'twitter-wjs');   The post Women and Girls to the Front appeared first on Inter Press Service. Excerpt: Gender Equality in STEM for a better tomorrow The post Women and Girls to the Front appeared first on Inter Press Service. (Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health)
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 6, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Siddharth Chatterjee and Ali Obaid Al Dhaheri Tags: Asia-Pacific Development & Aid Economy & Trade Education Gender Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies Inequity Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Women & Economy Source Type: news

'Mop up' malaria vaccine advances to trials in people
(University of Florida) University of Florida researcher Rhoel Dinglasan, Ph.D., was awarded $6 million today by the Global Health Innovative Technology Fund to test a new malaria vaccine in people. The process leading to a phase 1 clinical trial begins this April. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 30, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

WRAIR, Duke scientists find evidence of monoclonal antibodies activity against malaria
(Walter Reed Army Institute of Research) Scientists at Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, in a collaboration the Duke University, have confirmed that monoclonal antibodies can be an effective tool in the global fight against malaria, identifying two potential mAbs for further development. Decades of malaria vaccine research have shown low efficacy in field trials conducted in several countries in Africa. Many researchers around the world have now focused their attention on using mAbs against the circumsporozoite protein of the parasite. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 5, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

First vaccine to fully immunize against malaria builds on pandemic-driven RNA tech
(Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 27, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Open data on malaria genomes will help combat drug resistance
(Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) Genome variation data on more than 7,000 malaria parasites from 28 endemic countries is released today. It has been produced by MalariaGEN, a data-sharing network of groups around the world who are working together to build high-quality data resources for malaria research and disease control. This open data release provides benchmark data on parasite genome variation that is needed in the search for new drugs and vaccines, and in the development of surveillance tools for malaria control and elimination. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 24, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

It ’s Not Clear That We Actually Need Human Challenge Trials for COVID-19, But the U.K. Is Moving Ahead With Them Anyway
On Feb. 17, health officials in the UK announced that they are ready to start exposing healthy volunteers to the COVID-19 virus in a carefully controlled study. The so-called human challenge trial is the first of its kind for COVID-19 and will help scientists learn how much virus is needed to cause infection, among other important questions. The practice of intentionally exposing healthy people to a disease-causing (and potentially deadly) pathogen isn’t new in science, but it remains controversial. Scientists must balance the benefits of exposing people—which mostly fall in the realm of new knowledge about the...
Source: TIME: Health - February 18, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Job vacancies with Cochrane Infectious Diseases - Liverpool, UK
The   Centre for Evidence Synthesis in Global Health has led developments in systematic reviews in tropical medicine and international health. In the 1990s, staff contributed to setting up Cochrane, and established theCochrane Infectious Diseases Group (CIDG). This is now recognised as one of Cochrane ’s premier groups, with over 150 Cochrane reviews and 600 authors, and is well-linked with the World Health Organization. Two job positions are currently being advertised with the Centre.Take a look at  www.evidence4health.org/  and  https://cidg.cochrane.org/ where you will find annua...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - February 10, 2021 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Could a vaccine get rid of malaria for good?
Seventeen-year-old Victoline explores progress to tackle the disease in her home country, Kenya. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - January 31, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

GSK transfers malaria vaccine production to India's Bharat Biotech
The agreement includes transfer of manufacturing of the protein part of the vaccine, RTS,S/AS01, while GSK will continue to supply Bharat Biotech with the adjuvant or vaccine booster for the shot, the London-listed company said. (Source: The Economic Times)
Source: The Economic Times - January 27, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Top Global Health Moments of 2020
By The Editorial Team, IntraHealth International Community Health Nurse Olivia Yeboah thoroughly washes her hands at the Akropong Clinic in Ghana. Photo by Emmanuel Attramah, PMI Impact Malaria/US President's Malaria Initiative.December 17, 2020If we wanted to, we could list a COVID-19 moment for every month of 2020.  We all know that the onset of the coronavirus pandemic—first in China and then worldwide—overwhelmed news coverage this year. And with good reason. It’s the first large-scale global pandemic in 100 years. At the time this article was publ...
Source: IntraHealth International - December 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: kseaton Tags: HIV & AIDS COVID-19 Nutrition Policy Advocacy Health Workforce Systems Nursing Midwifery 2020 Health Workers Source Type: news

Africa Should Be at the Forefront of a Global Response to COVID-19
Women in Nigeria collect food vouchers as part of a programme to support families struggling under the COVID-19 lockdown. Credit: WFP/Damilola OnafuwaBy Aeneas Chapinga ChumaJOHANNESBURG, Nov 27 2020 (IPS) As COVID-19 swept across the globe, one thing became clear: a well-functioning, well-resourced, agile and resilient health system can mean the difference between life and death. For Africa, the economic costs of the health pandemic were high. The prescription was often worse than the illness as Africa’s poor found themselves without work, food and even access to health care as economies were locked down across the ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - November 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Aeneas Chapinga Chuma Tags: Africa Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs Source Type: news

The volunteers lining up for Covid-19 challenge trials
Non-profit organisation 1Day Sooner has attracted over 38,500 willing participantsCovid: firm secures £10m to infect young volunteers to hasten vaccineHuman challenge trials – in which young, healthy volunteers are intentionally infected with a virus to allow vaccines and treatments to be tested quickly – have been used in the fight against diseases ranging from typhoid and cholera to malaria.Withthe announcement on Tuesday of such trials to help develop a vaccine against Covid-19 there is a key difference – there are as yet very few proven therapies for the virus and we know little about its long-t...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 20, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Natalie Grover Science correspondent Tags: Coronavirus UK news Infectious diseases Science Medical research Source Type: news

COVID-19: Examining Theories for Africa ’ s Low Death Rates
This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. The post COVID-19: Examining Theories for Africa’s Low Death Rates appeared first on Inter Press Service. (Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health)
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - October 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: External Source Tags: Africa Headlines Health Source Type: news

Injectable hydrogel could someday lead to more effective vaccines
(American Chemical Society) Vaccines have curtailed the spread of several infectious diseases, such as smallpox, polio and measles. However, vaccines against some diseases, including HIV-1, influenza and malaria, don't work very well, and one reason could be the timing of antigen and adjuvant presentation to the immune system. Now, researchers reporting inACS Central Science developed an injectable hydrogel that allows sustained release of vaccine components, increasing the potency, quality and duration of immune responses in mice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 16, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

The Great Vaccine Race: Inside the Unprecedented Scramble to Immunize the World Against COVID-19
The cleverest of enemies thrive on surprise attacks. Viruses—and coronaviruses in particular—know this well. Remaining hidden in animal hosts for decades, they mutate steadily, sometimes serendipitously morphing into more effective and efficient infectious agents. When a strain with just the right combination of genetic codes that spell trouble for people makes the leap from animal to human, the ambush begins. Such was the case with SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus behind COVID-19, and the attack was mostly silent and insidious at first. Many people infected with SARS-CoV-2 remained oblivious as they served as the v...
Source: TIME: Health - September 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Magazine Source Type: news

Transforming the Global Economy or Parachuting Cats into Borneo?
Credit: United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNDRR)By Lawrence SurendraBANGKOK, Thailand, Aug 24 2020 (IPS) The COVID 19 Pandemic continues relentlessly. Deaths approaching a million globally, 22 million infected and growing. Brazil, India, the US and Russia accounting for almost 50% of the total cases in the world. Medically the promise of a vaccine is given as signs of hope; what surprises awaits us when such a vaccine is available, would be another story. Economically, to address the uncertainty and the grim future ahead, the UN, some governments and even Joe Biden the US Presidential hopeful, are waving ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - August 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Lawrence Surendra Tags: Development & Aid Featured Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Population Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

FDA Authorizes Use of Plasma From Recovered Patients to Treat COVID-19
(WASHINGTON) — President Donald Trump on Sunday announced emergency authorization to treat COVID-19 patients with convalescent plasma — a move he called “a breakthrough,” one of his top health officials called “promising” and other health experts said needs more study before it’s celebrated. The announcement came after White House officials complained there were politically motivated delays by the Food and Drug Administration in approving a vaccine and therapeutics for the disease that has upended Trump’s reelection chances. On the eve of the Republican National Convention, T...
Source: TIME: Health - August 24, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jonathan Lemire an Mike Stobbe / AP Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 overnight wire Source Type: news

Religion & the Pandemic: A Call Beyond the Here & Now
Religions for Peace Interreligious Council of Albania distributing Covid relief supplies from the Multi-religious Humanitarian Fund. Credit: Erzen CarjaBy Prof. Azza KaramNEW YORK, Aug 4 2020 (IPS) — I have never been interested in religion or spirituality before, but I found myself tuning in to all sorts of on-line religion and spirituality related forums “in search of something.” These are the words of a 30-something single young, middle class man (born into a Protestant-Catholic family background) in a European country. The latter is known more for turning several churches into museums or shopping ce...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - August 4, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Azza Karam Tags: Civil Society Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Inequity Religion TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

UCalgary researchers unlock new insights that could help with vaccine development
(University of Calgary) Researchers at the University of Calgary have unlocked new insights that may help with vaccine development for infectious diseases such as COVID-19, malaria, and tuberculosis. The findings show that rather than enhancing protection, a highly polarized cell-mediated response that was believed to be protective was, in fact, detrimental. These observations into the regulation of immunity against infectious diseases could provide a more holistic framework to design vaccines against those infections that don't have one. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 27, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Should We Experimentally Infect People With Covid-19 To Speed Up Vaccine Development?
Dr. Stephen Thomas, Chief of Infectious Diseases at SUNY Upstate Medical University, discusses his experience volunteering for a malaria vaccine trial in 2001 and how to evaluate the risks of human challenge experiments in search of a coronavirus vaccine. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - July 8, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Stephen Thomas, Contributor Tags: Healthcare /healthcare Innovation /innovation Science /science Editors' Pick editors-pick Decision Maker decision-maker Coronavirus Source Type: news

This Scientist Is Searching For A Vaccine To World ’s Second-Most Devastating Parasite
Amanda Elyssa Ruiz, a PhD student at Brown University, is looking for potential vaccines to protect against schistosomiasis, a disease that impacts over 250 million people every year, making it the second most socio-economically devastating parasitic disease after malaria. #globalsouthscience (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - July 2, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Andrew Wight, Contributor Tags: Science /science Innovation /innovation Healthcare /healthcare Leadership /leadership ForbesWomen /forbeswomen Editors' Pick editors-pick Decision Maker decision-maker Source Type: news

How Deforestation Helps Deadly Viruses Jump from Animals to Humans
This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. The post How Deforestation Helps Deadly Viruses Jump from Animals to Humans appeared first on Inter Press Service. (Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health)
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 26, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: External Source Tags: Environment Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

New discovery paves way for next generation malaria vaccine
(Seattle Children's) New findings pave the way for a novel, next generation genetically attenuated parasite (GAP) vaccine against the deadliest form of malaria in humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How a vaccine made of mosquito spit could help stop the next epidemic
Five years ago, in an office complex with a giant sculpture of a mosquito just northwest of Phnom Penh, Jessica Manning struck on a novel idea. Rather than spend more years in what felt like a futile search for a malaria vaccine, she would take on all mosquito-borne pathogens at once. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - June 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

NBC News trashes hydroxychloroquine to protect lucrative vaccine profits while Americans needlessly suffer and die
(Natural News) One of the most vocal media opponents to hydroxychloroquine, the generic anti-malaria drug that President Trump touted as having benefits, is NBC News. For the past several weeks at least, NBC News has been churning out story after story claiming that hydroxychloroquine does not help prevent or treat the Wuhan coronavirus (COVID-19). In... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 5, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Curious Case of Covid-19 in Africa
Eunice G. Kamwendo is an Economist and Strategic Advisor with UNDP Africa in New York. Chaltu Daniel Kalbessa is a UNDP Fellow and Strategic Analyst with UNDP Africa in New York.By Eunice G. Kamwendo and Chaltu Daniel KalbessaNEW YORK, Jun 3 2020 (IPS) With very weak health systems and overall capacity constraints to effectively respond to the deadly coronavirus disease, Africa’s fate against the invisible enemy, was going to be nothing short of catastrophic according to early predictions. Although Africa is yet to reach its peak, many countries are not seeing the exponential growth in case numbers, or in mortality r...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 3, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Eunice G. Kamwendo and Chaltu Daniel Kalbessa Tags: Africa Aid Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

U.S. FDA Approves New Pediatric Formulation of SIRTURO ® (bedaquiline) as Part of Combination Therapy to Treat Children with Pulmonary Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis
NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ, May 27, 2020 — The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted approval for a new pediatric formulation of SIRTURO® (bedaquiline). SIRTURO® is now indicated for use as part of combination therapy in the treatment of adult and pediatric patients (5 years and older and weighing at least 15 kg) with pulmonary multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR‑TB). In the U.S., the medicine should be reserved for use when an effective treatment regimen cannot otherwise be provided. This indication received acceler...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - May 27, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news

Humans Inoculated with Genetically Modified Malaria Parasites
Engineered Plasmodium parasites form the basis of two experimental malaria vaccines that showed safety and encouraging immune responses in clinical trials. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - May 20, 2020 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

First clinical trial with genetically modified malaria vaccine completed
(Radboud University Medical Center) In an innovative study, Radboudumc and LUMC jointly tested a candidate vaccine based on a genetically weakened malaria parasite. The results of this clinical trial, published in Science Translational Medicine, show that the vaccine is safe and elicits a defense response against a malaria infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 20, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Malaria vaccines based on engineered parasites show safety, signs of efficacy
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) Two vaccines for malaria based on genetically engineered malaria parasites have been found to be safe in humans and show preliminary signs of protection, according to a pair of new phase 1/2a clinical trials. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 20, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Promising virus vaccine results reported as Trump takes anti-malaria drug
The phased reopening of U.S. business and social life gained traction on Monday with more Americans emerging from coronavirus lockdowns and financial markets boosted by promising early results from the first U.S. vaccine trial in humans. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - May 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Molecular signatures can predict the efficacy of malaria vaccines
(Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal)) Molecular signatures before and after immunization can predict vaccine-induced protection, according to a study by ISGlobal, an institution supported by 'la Caixa.' The study analysed the gene expression in peripheral blood cells from individuals immunized with the first malaria vaccine (Mosquirix or RTS,S) and another experimental malaria vaccine. The results, published in Science Translational Medicine suggest that boosting the immune system before vaccination could potentially improve vaccine efficacy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 13, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

WHO conditionally backs Covid-19 vaccine trials that infect people
‘Challenge’ studies would deliberately give coronavirus to healthy volunteersCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageControversial trials in which volunteers are intentionally infected with Covid-19 could accelerate vaccine development, according to the World Health Organization, which has releasednew guidance on how the approach could be ethically justified despite the potential dangers for participants.So-called challenge trials are a mainstream approach in vaccine development and have been used in malaria, typhoid and flu, but there are treatments available for these diseases if a v...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 8, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin, Science Correspondent Tags: Medical research Coronavirus outbreak World Health Organization Infectious diseases Science World news Vaccines and immunisation Source Type: news

A Top Government Scientist Claims He Was Ousted for Raising Concerns About Malaria Drug Touted by Trump
(WASHINGTON) — The Trump administration failed to prepare for the onslaught of the coronavirus, then sought a quick fix by trying to rush an unproven drug to patients, a senior government scientist alleged in a whistleblower complaint Tuesday. Dr. Rick Bright, former director of the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority, alleges he was reassigned to a lesser role because he resisted political pressure to allow widespread use of hydroxychloroquine, a malaria drug pushed by President Donald Trump. He said the Trump administration wanted to “flood” hot spots in New York and New Jersey with t...
Source: TIME: Health - May 5, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR, MICHAEL BALSAMO and COLLEEN LONG / AP Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 News Desk wire Source Type: news

What the History of Polio Can Teach Us About COVID-19
Think all this stuff about injecting disinfectant or introducing ultraviolet light into the body to battle coronavirus is a lot of crazy talk? What about preventing the disease by hanging mothballs around your neck? How about blaming it on flies or bed bugs or street dust or even cornflakes? Think hyping a malaria drug like hydroxychloroquine to battle a disease it was not meant to battle seems ill-thought-through? What about promoting a paste made of wintergreen, Russian thyme, and the oils of rosemary, cajeput and wood, which you rub on your skin? And you think sheltering in place in your climate-controlled, wifi-streami...
Source: TIME: Health - May 5, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Demand for coronavirus tests raises concerns over HIV and malaria
Some firms shifting production away from malaria, HIV and TB, which kill millionsCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageGovernments were caught out when Covid-19 hit, having overlooked the need to be able to test for new diseases because they were focused on drugs and vaccines for those they already knew about.Now there are fears that the rush to supply wealthier countries pressing for more tests may destabilise the fight against HIV, malaria and tuberculosis, illnesses that kill millions, mostly in low- and middle-income countries.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 1, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Medical research Aids and HIV Malaria Tuberculosis Health Science World news Source Type: news

Africa: Malaria Consortium Calls for Sustained Investment in Malaria Vaccine Development
[Malaria Consortium] This World Immunisation Week, Malaria Consortium is delighted to announce the publication of a timely opinion paper on a key global health priority - vaccination. (Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria)
Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria - April 29, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Kenya: Malaria Vaccine Pilot One Year On - New Vaccine Could Boost Kenya's Malaria Fight
[WHO] Nairobi -Oblivious to the auspicious occasion, a bundle of children winced and gasped as they received their vaccinations. But in that moment, as they clung even tighter to their mothers, they became Kenya's first children to receive the malaria vaccine through a historic pilot introduction programme initiated in Africa one year ago. Today, on this World Malaria Day, about 82 000[1] Kenyan children in pilot areas have received their first dose of the vaccine and are benefiting from the added protection against mala (Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria)
Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria - April 28, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Collaboration Can Help Eradicate COVID-19
This article 0riginally appeared in UM News”. The link follows: https://www.umnews.org/en/news/collaboration-can-help-eradicate-covid-19   Follow @IPSNewsUNBureau !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+'://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js';fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document, 'script', 'twitter-wjs'); The post Collaboration Can Help Eradicate COVID-19 appeared first on Inter Press Service. Excerpt: Rev Liberato C. Bautista is assistant general secretary for United Nations a...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The Rev. Liberato C. Bautista Tags: Civil Society Development & Aid Education Featured Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations OPINION/NGO Source Type: news

Research reveals a new malaria vaccine candidate
(Brown University) In a study that could lead to a new vaccine against malaria, researchers have found antibodies that trigger a 'kill switch' in malarial cells, causing them to self-destruct. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 22, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

BCG Vaccine Fighting Coronavirus in South Asia
The map from the medical journal Plos Medicine displays BCG vaccination policy by country. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine is a vaccine primarily used against tuberculosis. Yellow: The country now has a universal BCG vaccination program. Blue: The country used to recommend BCG vaccination for everyone, but now does not. Red: The country never had a universal vaccination program.By Darini Rajasingham-SenanayakeCOLOMBO, Sri Lanka, Apr 20 2020 (IPS) Numerous studies in many parts of the world have linked the BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guerin) vaccination, widely used in the developing world with fewer Coronavirus cases. T...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Darini Rajasingham-Senanayake Tags: Development & Aid Economy & Trade Featured Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Vaccines, Antibodies and Drug Libraries. The Possible COVID-19 Treatments Researchers Are Excited About
In early April, about four months after a new, highly infectious coronavirus was first identified in China, an international group of scientists reported encouraging results from a study of an experimental drug for treating the viral disease known as COVID-19. It was a small study, reported in the New England Journal of Medicine, but showed that remdesivir, an unapproved drug that was originally developed to fight Ebola, helped 68% of patients with severe breathing problems due to COVID-19 to improve; 60% of those who relied on a ventilator to breathe and took the drug were able to wean themselves off the machines after 18...
Source: TIME: Health - April 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

All Your Coronavirus Questions, Answered
One of the worst symptoms of any plague is uncertainty—who it will strike, when it will end, why it began. Merely understanding a pandemic does not stop it, but an informed public can help curb its impact and slow its spread. It can also provide a certain ease of mind in a decidedly uneasy time. Here are some of the most frequently asked questions about the COVID-19 pandemic from TIME’s readers, along with the best and most current answers science can provide. A note about our sourcing: While there are many, many studies underway investigating COVID-19 and SARS-CoV-19, the novel coronavirus that causes the illn...
Source: TIME: Health - April 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: TIME Staff Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Explainer Source Type: news

Debunking 9 Popular Myths Doing the Rounds in Africa About the Coronavirus
This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. The post Debunking 9 Popular Myths Doing the Rounds in Africa About the Coronavirus appeared first on Inter Press Service. (Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health)
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: External Source Tags: Africa Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Coronavirus Source Type: news

Latin America Has Weak Defences Against the Pandemic
This article includes reporting by Ivet González in Havana, Mario Osava in Rio de Janeiro, and Orlando Milesi in Santiago. The post Latin America Has Weak Defences Against the Pandemic appeared first on Inter Press Service. (Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health)
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 4, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Humberto Marquez Tags: Development & Aid Editors' Choice Featured Headlines Health Human Rights Latin America & the Caribbean Population Regional Categories Coronavirus COVID-19 ECLAC Pan-American Health Organization (PAHO) Poverty World Health Organ Source Type: news

West First Policies Expose Myths
By Anis Chowdhury and Jomo Kwame SundaramSYDNEY and KUALA LUMPUR, Mar 31 2020 (IPS) As the epicentre of the COVID-19 pandemic shifts from China to the developed West, all too many rich countries are acting selfishly, invoking the ‘national interest’, by banning exports of vital medical supplies. US President Donald Trump has reportedly gone further by seeking exclusive rights to a future coronavirus vaccine, although the report has been denied by a German drug company and some investors believed to be involved. Europe first Following France, Germany, the Czech Republic and Poland now also want to ban the expor...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - March 31, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Anis Chowdhury and Jomo Kwame Sundaram Tags: Development & Aid Economy & Trade Featured Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations Jomo Kwame Sundaram & Anis Chowdhury Source Type: news

President Trump Called Hydroxychloroquine a ‘Game Changer,’ But Experts Warn Against Self-Medicating With the Drug. Here’s What You Need to Know
After President Trump, late last week, expressed great confidence in the promise of a new COVID-19 therapy that combines two existing prescription medications, supplies of these two drugs rapidly began disappearing from pharmacy shelves. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration allowed an Indian company previously restricted from importing drug products into the US to now start manufacturing one of the drugs. And U.S. plants began gearing up to produce enough to meet the surge in demand. But in those few days, a few people who began self medicating with the drugs in an effort to prevent COVID-19 have died, and others have bee...
Source: TIME: Health - March 24, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Plagues and People – The Coronavirus in a Historical Perspective
By Jan LundiusSTOCKHOLM / ROME, Mar 19 2020 (IPS) The human factor is intimately involved in the origin, spread, and mitigation of the Coronavirus and we cannot afford to ignore that our future existence depends on compassion and cooperation. Response matters! Some quarantined Italians might recall Giovanni Boccaccio´s The Decameron from 1353 in which people escaping the plague are secluded in a villa where they tell stories to each other. Boccaccio introduced his collection of short stories with an eyewitness account of horrifying human suffering in Florence, which in 1348 was struck by a ”pestilence” t...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - March 19, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Jan Lundius Tags: Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations Women's Health Source Type: news

Bioethicists Criticize WHO ’s Malaria Vaccine Trial
The study, conducted in Malawi, Kenya, and Ghana, did not obtain informed consent from each parent whose child participated, but rather considered consent “implied” because of the particular... (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - February 28, 2020 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Geography, age and anemia shape childhood vaccine responses in Sub-Saharan Africa
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) Vaccine responses in the developing immune systems of children may depend on factors such as age, location and anemia status, according to a study comparing samples from 1,119 Dutch children to 171 children in sub-Saharan Africa who took part in a malaria vaccine trial. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news