Argentum Targets Emerging Superbug with Antimicrobial Dressing

Argentum Medical’s antimicrobial dressings received an extra bit of validation after strong results from recent lab findings. The Geneva, IL-based company’s Silverlon antimicrobial dressing was found to effectively kill Candida Auris (C. Auris), the emerging “superbug” causing invasive, potentially fatal human infection in more than 30 countries, including the U.S. Argentum Medical commissioned Microbiological Consultants, an independent FDA-registered pharmaceutical testing laboratory, to establish if its metallic wound dressings can destroy C. Auris yeast. C. Auris is resistant to multiple antifungal drugs commonly used to treat Candida infections and is difficult and expensive to identify. In addition, it causes outbreaks in healthcare settings to an extent not seen with other Candida species. And even after industrial cleaning, hospital room surfaces can remain contaminated with this fungus well after a patient has been discharged. “What’s new about [Auris] is that in certain patient populations, especially those that have comorbidities and are elderly is this bug is now causing a lot of issues,” Raul Brizuela, president and CEO of Argentum Medical, told MD+DI. “It’s not something that was commonly found to cause problems in our patient population until recently. As each one of these threats materialize we want t...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Materials Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 13 October 2019Source: MycoscienceAuthor(s): Katesaraporn Nuankeaw, Boonyanoot Chaiyosang, Thanapat Suebrasri, Somdej Kanokmedhakul, Saisaamorn Lumyong, Sophon BoonlueAbstractBioactive compounds of endophytic fungus Trichoderma polyalthiae were extracted from culture broth media. The crude extracts showed strong antimicrobial activity against human pathogens. Biologically active compounds were isolated and purified by chromatographic methods. The structures of the pure compounds were elucidated by spectroscopic methods. They were identified as Violaceol I and Violaceol II. These compounds...
Source: Mycoscience - Category: Biology Source Type: research
[New Times] Rwanda is planning a big vaccination campaign against the Ebola Virus Disease (EBV) for adults, adolescents, and children aged two years living within the vicinity of a possible Ebola outbreak.
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - Category: African Health Source Type: news
In this study, thermal activation was opted for the modification of natural bentonite clay (BC) and utilized to investigate the adsorptive removal of tetracycline (TC) from aqueous solution. The physicochemical surface properties of the raw and modified bentonite samples were also investigated. The BET analysis revealed that the thermally activated bentonite (TB) has better properties than BC. The surface area of TB was found to be more than two-fold higher compared to that of BC. The FTIR spectra exhibited the existence of AlOH, SiO and SiOSi functional groups in the samples, confirming the presence of hydrated aluminosil...
Source: Journal of Hazardous Materials - Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 12 October 2019Source: Journal of Advanced ResearchAuthor(s): Yanguang Cong, Sijin Yang, Xiancai RaoAbstractThe infection caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a global threat to public health. Vancomycin remains one of the first-line drugs for the treatment of MRSA infections. However, S. aureus isolates with complete resistance to vancomycin have emerged in recent years. Vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA) is mediated by a vanA gene cluster, which is transferred from vancomycin-resistant enterococcus. Since the first VRSA isolate was recovered from Michigan, ...
Source: Journal of Advanced Research - Category: Research Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 9 October 2019Source: American Journal of Infection ControlAuthor(s): Kristen Pogreba-Brown, Erika Austhof, Katherine EllingsonThe case–case study design is a potentially useful tool for infection preventionists during outbreak or cluster investigations. This column clarifies terminology related to case–case, case–control, and case-case-control study designs. Examples of practical applications of the case–case study design include determining risk factors for health care–onset versus community-onset infections, or antibiotic-resistant versus antibiotic-susceptible infections.
Source: American Journal of Infection Control - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 8 October 2019Source: American Journal of Infection ControlAuthor(s): Jessica A. Kumar, Jennifer L. Cadnum, Annette L. Jencson, Curtis J. DonskeyChlorine-based disinfectants are commonly used in rooms of patients with Candida auris, but there is uncertainty regarding optimal concentrations that provide efficacy while minimizing the potential for adverse effects. We found that 2 chlorine-based disinfectants were effective against C auris with 1 minute of contact time at concentrations of 4,000 parts per million or higher. Lower concentrations were effective only with increased contact time...
Source: American Journal of Infection Control - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 12 October 2019Source: BurnsAuthor(s): Julia Elrod, Dirk Moellmeier, Clemens Schiestl, Christoph Mohr, Kathrin NeuhausAbstractBackgroundOptimal management of palmar hand burns in children is controversial. We aimed to compare function and aesthetics of retroauricular full thickness skin grafts (FTSG) to plantar glabrous split thickness skin grafts (STSG).Methods32 palmar grafts in paediatric burn patients were analysed: 19 retroauricular FTSG (group 1) and 13 thick plantar glabrous STSG (group 2). The latter were harvested at a thickness of 0.5 mm. The resulting plantar donor defec...
Source: Burns - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 11 October 2019Source: BurnsAuthor(s): Helen Zhang, Weikai Qu, Munier Nazzal, Jorge OrtizAbstractObjectiveTo determine if history of kidney transplant is an independent risk factor for increased incidence of wound infection and other morbidities in burn patients.BackgroundWhile the goal of immunosuppression post-organ transplantation is to prevent graft rejection, it is often associated with significant adverse effects such as increased susceptibility to infection, drug toxicity, and malignancy. Burn injuries lead to a dysregulated hypermetabolic state and a compromised cutaneous barrier,...
Source: Burns - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
I burnt out as a GP but in mental health I could take time with patients and, at last, make a difference“If you’re going to reject me, then reject me,” I said. I was deep in the bowels of Leicester University, being interviewed for a place at medical school. I was 35, a fact the learned professor interviewing me returned to again and again. How would I cope with the workload? Would the four hour s’ driving each day prove too much? How would I support myself through my studies? Concerns that travelled through my own mind. Unlike the questions I asked myself, though, the queries in that interview room...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: NHS Mental health Life and style Society Psychology Science & wellbeing Source Type: news
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Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle bowel flora candida food intolerances fungal overgrowth prebiotic probiotic sibo sifo small intestinal bacterial overgrowth undoctored Source Type: blogs
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