Cornea Problem? Precise Bio Can Print You Out a New One
Winston-Salem, NC-based Precise Bio, a regenerative medicine company that is working on advancing the use of bio-printed tissue and organs to patients, recently launched a dedicated ophthalmology business unit to support attainment of near-term opportunities in the ophthalmology arena as it builds a portfolio of programs in additional indications. The company has developed what it calls a 4D bio-fabrication platform technology that comprises cell expansion, bio-materials, processes, and printing technology. According to Aryeh Batt, co-founder and CEO of Precise Bio, the company is the first to transplant a 3D-printed corne...
Source: MDDI - November 13, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: 3-D Printing Implants Source Type: news

What Causes Post-Inflammatory Hypopigmentation?
Discussion Hypopigmentation can be worrisome for many families because of cosmesis and the worry that “something is wrong.” The normal natural changes in skin-tone over the year due to different light exposure and wide variations within individuals is not something that many people are aware of. Post-inflammatory hypopigmentation is a common cause of hypopigmentation. Vitiligo is the most common cause of depigmentation. Vitiligo is an acquired, depigmenting disorder with typical lesions appearing as milky white macules with distinct margins that are not scaly. Hair (including eyebrows and eyelashes) can be dep...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - November 12, 2018 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

The 'sling' made of skin cells to soothe a sore shoulder  
The new treatment, known as the GraftJacket, reinforces the tissue and prevents future tears. It is made from human skin that has been processed to remove all the cells to prevent rejection. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

CRISPR gene editing will find applications in plastic and reconstructive surgery
(Wolters Kluwer Health) The CRISPR genome editing technique promises to be a 'transformative leap' in genetic engineering and therapy, affecting almost every area of medicine. That includes plastic surgery, with potential advances ranging from prevention of craniofacial malformations, to therapeutic skin grafts, to new types of rejection-free transplants, according to a paper in the November issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery ® , the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Philips board backs reappointment of CEO van Houten, CFO Bhattacharya | Personnel Moves – October 29, 2018
Royal Philips (NYSE:PHG) said today that its board of directors is backing the re-appointment of Frans van Houten as its president and CEO and Abhijit Bhattacharya as chief financial officer and board member. CEO van Houten has been at the head of Philips since 2011, while Bhattacharya joined the company in 2015, Amsterdam-based Philips said. During his time in the corner office, van Houten led the initial public offering for Philips Lighting in May 2016 and has increased R&D investments and led acquisitions including Volcano, Spectranetics, Wellcentive and VitalHealth. Board members will officially vote on a new ...
Source: Mass Device - October 29, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Featured aligntechnology Bovie Medical Corp. Clearside Biomedical cromsource Fisher & Paykel Healthcare Harvard Bioscience Inc. Ra Medical RenovaCare royalphilips Sight Sciences Source Type: news

'Mushrooms' and 'brushes' help cancer-fighting nanoparticles survive in the body
(Drexel University) For a number of innovative and life-saving medical treatments, from organ replacements and skin grafts to cancer therapy and surgery, success often depends on slipping past or fending off the body's immune system. In a recent development, aimed at aiding cancer detection and treatment, Drexel University researchers might have found the ideal surface texture for helping microscopic, medical helpers to survive in the bloodstream without being screened out by the body's natural defense mechanisms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 23, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Report: MiMedx held lower-cost grafts from federal hospitals
MiMedx (NSDQ:MDXG), already embroiled in an internal accounting snafu and several federal probes, reportedly held from government hospitals some of the lower-cost products it made available to private hospitals. In limiting its regenerative wound care offering to U.S. Veteran Affairs Dept. and other federal caregivers, Marietta, Ga.-based MiMedx ran up the tab on taxpayers, the Wall Street Journal reported. In September, MiMedx said a probe into its accounting practices turned up “conduct detrimental to the business or reputation of the company” on the part of four departed executives, following ...
Source: Mass Device - October 5, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Featured Legal News Regenerative Medicine Wound Care defensedepartment MiMedx Group Inc. U.S. Veterans Affairs Dept. (VA) Source Type: news

Isotopic split-skin graft for resurfacing of deliberate self-harm scars - Goutos I, Ogawa R.
We present a novel surgical approach for the revision of deliberate self-harm scars. The isotopic skin graft technique employs the harvest of a thin split-skin graft from the affected area, excision and closure of wide dermal scars with replacement of the ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

First treatment for cocaine addiction? Gene-edited skin graft could stop overdoses and curb cravings
Naloxone has saved tens of thousands from opioid overdoses and helped treat addiction. Nothing like that exists for coke, but University of Chicago research on mice may soon change that. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How skin begins: New research could improve skin grafts, and more
(University of Colorado at Boulder) University of Colorado Boulder researchers have discovered a key mechanism by which skin begins to develop in embryos. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New insights into what drives organ transplant rejection
(Brigham and Women's Hospital) Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital set out to understand why skin grafts have such a high rate of rejection, hoping to capitalize on new biological insights to not only explain why skin transplants provoke the immune system but also what treatments can be given to an organ prior to transplantation to decrease the likelihood of rejection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

An end to skin grafts?  New technique heals wounds by reprogramming skin cells
Skin grafts are risky in an increasing number of patients, partly due to rising rates of diabetes. This method by the Salk Institute could avoid dangerous outcomes. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

7 medtech stories we missed this week: August 3, 2018
[Image from unsplash.com]From Esaote launching its new ultrasound device to Nipro’s Infraredx launching in Japan, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Esaote launches new ultrasound devices Esaote announced in an Aug. 2 press release that it has launched its new MyLab X7, MyLab X6 and MyLab X5 ultrasound systems. The MyLab X7 offers faster and more reliable ultrasounds with intuitive usability and ergonomics. MyLab X5 has zero-click automatic that speeds up assessments and enhances image quality. 2. Bonesupport inks deal with MTF Biologics Bonesuppor...
Source: Mass Device - August 3, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: 510(k) Catheters Diagnostics Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Hospital Care Imaging Regulatory/Compliance Software / IT Ultrasound Bonesupport Esaote InfraReDx Inc. ivwatch MedTech Mindshare Medical Modulated Imaging MTF Bi Source Type: news

Innovative technique converts white fat to brown fat
(Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science) Increasing healthy brown fat might help weight management and reduce symptoms of diabetes. Columbia Engineers have developed a simple, innovative method to directly convert white fat to brown fat outside the body and then reimplant it in a patient. The technique uses fat-grafting procedures commonly performed by plastic surgeons, in which fat is harvested from under the skin and then retransplanted into the same patient for cosmetic or reconstructive purposes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why your child's next painkiller may be a VR headset
When Blaine Baxter suffered a major accident during one of his go-karting races, the long road to recovery involved multiple skin grafts and a lengthy hospital stay at Lucille Packard Stanford Children's Hospital. The painful daily dressing changes required as part of the healing process made him so anxious that doctors were forced to prescribe high-dose narcotics and anti-anxiety medication to calm him down. In looking for other options, Baxter’s pain management team tested out virtual reality… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - July 23, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Kevin Truong Source Type: news

Why your child's next painkiller may be a VR headset
When Blaine Baxter suffered a major accident during one of his go-karting races, the long road to recovery involved multiple skin grafts and a lengthy hospital stay at Lucille Packard Stanford Children's Hospital. The painful daily dressing changes required as part of the healing process made him so anxious that doctors were forced to prescribe high-dose narcotics and anti-anxiety medication to calm him down. In looking for other options, Baxter’s pain management team tested out virtual reality… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - July 23, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Kevin Truong Source Type: news

Skin Grafting in Pyoderma Gangrenosum Skin Grafting in Pyoderma Gangrenosum
This case of an allograft performed on a patient with pyoderma gangrenosum illustrates another option for this difficult-to-treat condition.ePlasty, Open Access Journal of Plastic Surgery (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - July 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Plastic Surgery & Aesthetic Medicine Journal Article Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson hits the Big Apple with latest JLabs site
Johnson & Johnson (NYSE:JNJ) opened its latest life science incubator in New York City, the healthcare giant said today. The 30,000-square-foot JLabs @ NYC is a collaboration between Johnson & Johnson Innovation, New York State and the New York Genome Center. Sited at the genome center in SoHo, the incubator is home to 26 startups and has room for four more, New Brunswick, N.J.-based J&J said. “Johnson & Johnson has deep entrepreneurial roots in New York and we are pleased to see our unique JLabs model applied in this rich ecosystem to foster the creation of new healthcare innovations that have t...
Source: Mass Device - June 21, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Funding Roundup Research & Development johnsonandjohnson Source Type: news

PolarityTE aims to ‘ wage war on skin grafts ’ with regenerative tech
PolarityTE wants to eliminate skin grafts with its platform of regenerative technology. The Utah-based biotech is still new to the industry, but co-founders Denver Lough and Ned Swanson are betting that their company can take on the clinical standard of care for wound management. “No other product, whether it be a drug, a biologic device, or a cell therapy type of product has been able to regenerate full thickness hair-bearing skin,” Lough, who serves as the company’s chairman, CEO, president & chief scientific officer, told Drug Delivery Business News. The two former Johns Hopkins resi...
Source: Mass Device - May 15, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Clinical Trials Regenerative Medicine Wall Street Beat Wound Care polarityte Source Type: news

Incredible video shows 'glue-gun-like' device printing skin
Scientists at the University of Toronto have designed a portable glue gun-like device that can 3D-print all three layers of skin to treat deep, severe flesh wounds that grafts often fail to fix in under two minutes. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Luke Skywalker's hand inspires scientists to create robotic skin
Scientists at the University of Bristol are engineering human skin on artificial robotic muscles that can stretch and bend the tissue just like in the real world. This living and moving skin equivalent represents a much more realistic model of human skin and it could have potential applications for burns patients needing skin grafts. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - May 3, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Health, Research, International; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, School of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bristol Dental School; Press Release Source Type: news

Luke Skywalker's hand inspires scientists to create robotic skin
(University of Bristol) Scientists at the University of Bristol are engineering human skin on artificial robotic muscles that can stretch and bend the tissue just like in the real world. This living and moving skin equivalent represents a much more realistic model of human skin and it could have potential applications for burns patients needing skin grafts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

4 Trends Advancing Medtech
For the past 20 years, the Medical Design Excellence Awards have celebrated medical products that improve the quality and accessibility of healthcare. Our finalists this year carry on this tradition, while also keeping in step with today’s high-tech digital and consumer trends. With the help of our esteemed jurors, we have identified four key trends in this year’s group of finalists: risk reduction; faster, more-efficient healthcare delivery; the influence of the Internet of Things; and the consumerization of healthcare. We’ve been tracking a few of these trends in past awards programs, so they’re n...
Source: MDDI - April 27, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Daphne Allen Tags: MD & M East (New York) Design Source Type: news

How 3D printed cells on the skin could enable wound healing
Researchers at the University of Minnesota are 3D printing electronics and cells directly on the skin that could create new methods for wound healing and enable biological agent detection. The Minnesota researchers used a customized, low-cost 3D printer to print electronics on a human hand. They’ve also successfully printed biological cells on a sin wound of a mouse. The researchers suggest that the new technique could create new medical treatments for wound healing and graft treatments. “We are excited about the potential of this new 3D-printing technology using a portable, lightweight printer costing les...
Source: Mass Device - April 25, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Research & Development Wound Care 3D printing MedTech University of Minnesota Source Type: news

CU Anschutz scientists awarded $3.8 million Department of Defense grant
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) Scientists from the Gates Center for Regenerative Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine are part of a consortium awarded $3.8 million from the US Department of Defense to move discoveries in stem cell-created skin grafts into the manufacturing stage, bringing further hope to victims of debilitating inherited skin diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Jefferson establishes burn center
Thomas Jefferson Uninversity has established a burn center to provide services – ranging from skin grafts to rehabilitation services to psychological counseling – to patients with serious and complex burns. Dr. William Hughes will serve as director of the center. Before coming to Jefferson, Hughes spent nearly 20 years as director for Temple University Health System's Bu rn Center — a program he established in 1999. Prior to that he practiced at the St. Agnes Burn Center in South Philadelphia.… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - February 15, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: John George Source Type: news

Why Pig Organs Could Be the Future of Transplants
Making human tissue in a lab has always been more sci-fi than sci-fact, but powerful genetic technologies may change that soon. For the most part, the only way to replace diseased or failing hearts, lungs, kidneys and livers is with donor organs. Even then, many people struggle to find a good biological match with a donor, and 8,000 die each year in the U.S. while waiting for an organ. In one promising solution to the shortage, researchers have been putting a new DNA editing tool called CRISPR through rigorous tests in organ regeneration. Last August, a group of scientists led by George Church, professor of genetics at Har...
Source: TIME: Health - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Longevity organ transplants Source Type: news

Avita wins expanded FDA compassionate use for ReCell device
Avita Medical (ASX:AVH) said today the FDA approved an expansion to the number of patients treatable by its ReCell device under the compassionate use investigational device exemption program by 20 individuals. The ReCell autologous cell harvesting device is designed to use the patient’s own skin cells to treat a variety of skin issues, including burns, reconstructive and cosmetic procedures, the company said. With the expansion, which is the fifth for the company, up to 88 patients with life-threatening injuries can be treated with the ReCell device. Patients eligible for treatment with the device are those...
Source: Mass Device - February 12, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Regenerative Medicine Wound Care avitamedical Source Type: news

‘We Made Little Spring Rolls With Their Feet.’ These Bears Are Getting Special Treatment for Their Wildfire-Burned Paws
(SAN FRANCISCO) — Veterinarians successfully used alternative medical treatments such as acupuncture on three wild animals burned in the Southern California wildfires, although one patient — a 5-month-old mountain lion — did keep eating his fish-skin and corn-husk bandages, vets at the University of California, Davis said Wednesday. Rescuers brought two adult bears, one of them pregnant, and the young mountain lion to veterinarians with the state Department of Fish and Wildlife and the university after the animals were hurt in the largest wildfire in state history. They were found in the Los Padres Nation...
Source: TIME: Health - January 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ellen Knickmeyer / AP Tags: Uncategorized animals APH healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Bluegrass Vascular launches pivotal study for Surfacer vascular access catheter
Bluegrass Vascular Technologies said it enrolled the first patients in a pivotal trial of its Surfacer “inside-out” vascular access catheter. The Surfacer device is designed to provide access to the jugular vein to restore central venous access in hemodialysis patients with blocked neck veins; it won CE Mark approval in the European Union in August 2016; Bluegrass later inked an EU distribution deal with Merit Medical (NSDQ:MMSI) that included an equity stake. Surfacer is designed to be threaded through the femoral vein up to and into blockages in the jugular, which acts as a stabi...
Source: Mass Device - January 18, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Clinical Trials Vascular Bluegrass Vascular Technologies Source Type: news

Gene-Tweaked Skin Grafts Save Boy's Life
Experimental genetically-corrected skin grafts used on 80 percent of a boy's body saved his life, doctors say. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - November 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Health Highlights: Nov. 9, 2017
Experimental genetically-corrected skin grafts used on 80 percent of a boy's body saved his life, doctors say. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - November 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Boy with rare disease gets most of skin replaced through gene therapy
Desperate to save a seven-year-old boy's life, doctors used experimental gene therapy to create new skin in a lab after skin graft attempts had failed. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - November 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Genetically modified skin grown from stem cells saved a 7-year-old boy ’ s life
Scientists reported Wednesday that they genetically modified stem cells to grow skin that they successfully grafted over nearly all of a child's body — a remarkable achievement that could revolutionize treatment of burn victims and people with skin diseases. The research, published in the journal Nature, involved a 7-year-old  boy who suffers from a genetic disease known as junctional epidermolysis […]Related:She signed up to be a surrogate mother — and unwittingly gave away her own childWhite House opioid commission calls for wide-ranging changes to anti-drug policiesScream...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - November 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Skin Regeneration Using an Amniotic-Derived Tissue Graft Skin Regeneration Using an Amniotic-Derived Tissue Graft
How might different processing modalities of amniotic tissues impact wound healing outcomes?Wounds (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - November 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: General Surgery Journal Article Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Q and A: Hair transplant treatment for hair loss
DEAR MAYO CLINIC: What is involved in a hair transplant, and how long does it last? How does this differ from hair plugs? I?m only 34 but have lost a lot of hair already and have tried hair-growth shampoo without much luck. ANSWER: A hair transplant is a form of skin graft that rearranges the [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - October 27, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

RenovaCare raises $2m on path to improve burn, wound care with its “ SkinGun ”
RenovaCare said this week it raised $2.3 million in a new direct offering to support its “SkinGun,” which CEO Thomas Bold thinks could be a significant boon to the burn and wound care industry. This summer, CEO Bold spoke to MassDevice.com about the company’s SkinGun and CellMist technologies and what he thinks they can do to improve outcomes and reduce pain compared to current wound care treatments. The company’s SkinGun uses a sample of stem cells collected from a patient’s healthy skin, which are isolated and placed into a water-based solution in a syringe, which is then attached to the dev...
Source: Mass Device - October 20, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Research & Development Wound Care RenovaCare Source Type: news

The Sweet Way to Heal Your Wounds
We enjoy outdoor activities. My family will be coming over this year and I will fire up the grill for a delicious BBQ grass-fed beef. We’ll play games like badminton and horseshoes. Now while these games can be fun, they can lead to cuts and bruises. I want to aim you with an unconventional solution for those wounds.  For years now, sugar’s been a dirty word. It’s been blamed for everything from obesity, heart disease and diabetes to tooth decay and acne. But there’s something they don’t know.  Sugar’s better for you than all those artificial sweeteners and substitutes out th...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 5, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Al Sears Tags: Anti-Aging Source Type: news

US Dept of HHS pulls the trigger on $24m contract option with Avita Medical
Avita Medical (ASX:AVH) said today it is executing a $24.3 million expanded contract option with the US Department of Health and Human Services to support development and procurement of its ReCell devices. The option is related to an original contract between Avita Medical and the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority division of the HHS, and will extend Avita’s Project Bioshield contract through Sept. 2022, the Cambridge, U.K.-based company said. The company originally won the BARDA contract in Sept. 2015, providing an initial $16.9 million to support eventual FDA premarket approval for its ReC...
Source: Mass Device - September 21, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Regenerative Medicine avitamedical Source Type: news

Bolstering Skin Grafts With a Surgical Scrub Brush Bolstering Skin Grafts With a Surgical Scrub Brush
How does the dry, sterile surgical scrub brush compare with other options for the bolstering of skin grafts?ePlasty, Open Access Journal of Plastic Surgery (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - September 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Plastic Surgery & Aesthetic Medicine Journal Article Source Type: news

A natural ligand for the orphan receptor GPR15 modulates lymphocyte recruitment to epithelia
We describe the purification from porcine colonic tissue extracts of an agonistic ligand for GPR15 and its functional characterization. In humans, this ligand, which we named GPR15L, is encoded by the gene C10ORF99 and has some features similar to the CC family of chemokines. GPR15L was found in some human and mouse epithelia exposed to the environment, such as the colon and skin. In humans, GPR15L was also abundant in the cervix. In skin, GPR15L was readily detected after immunologic challenge and in human disease, for example, in psoriatic lesions. Allotransplantation of skin from Gpr15l-deficient mice onto wild-type mic...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - September 12, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Suply, T., Hannedouche, S., Carte, N., Li, J., Grosshans, B., Schaefer, M., Raad, L., Beck, V., Vidal, S., Hiou-Feige, A., Beluch, N., Barbieri, S., Wirsching, J., Lageyre, N., Hillger, F., Debon, C., Dawson, J., Smith, P., Lannoy, V., Detheux, M., Bitsch Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

Gene therapy trial offers hope for Harry
Harry and his father at Dana/Farber-Boston Children’s In their Brookline home-away-from-home, 2-year-old Duy Anh “Harry” Le plays with blocks and pop-up toys on the floor with his mother, Thao Nguyen. He is lively and happy, and his skin is clear. He looks almost nothing like the sickly baby covered in eczema who arrived in Boston from his native Vietnam in November of 2016 to participate in a gene therapy clinical trial for Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome. Children with the potentially life-threatening, inherited immune system deficiency have difficulty producing platelets, the blood component that fosters clot...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - August 23, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Irene Sege Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center Dr. Sung-Yun Pai gene therapy Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome Source Type: news

Pain and itch outcome trajectories differ among European American and African American survivors of major thermal burn injury
Over half of individuals experiencing major thermal burn injury (MThBI) receive an autologous skin graft (autograft), in which skin is removed from a healthy " donor " site and transplanted to the burn site. Persistent pain/itch at the graft site are major causes of suffering and disability in MThBI survivors. African Americans have a higher risk of MThBI, and in other clinical settings African Americans experience a greater burden of pain and itch relative to European Americans. However, to our knowledge, ethnic differences in skin graft site pain/itch outcomes after MThBI have not been assessed. We evaluated sk...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - August 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Early ambulation after-grafting of lower extremity burns
Early ambulation of lower extremity burns that undergo a skin graft may help to avoid some of the complications associated with immobilization. Despite recent evidence supporting early ambulation, post-operative immobilization following lower extremity skin grafting is still a common practice. The purpose of this single centre, observational study was to retrospectively assess the outcomes of lower extremity skin graft cases dressed with a multi-layer compression bandage who were ambulated in the immediate post-operative period (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - August 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Skin Graft-based Gene Therapy Treats Diabetes in Mice
A small patch of engineered cells makes an enzyme that stimulates insulin release. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - August 4, 2017 Category: Science Tags: Daily News,The Scientist Source Type: news

Skin transplants could treat type 2 diabetes and obesity
Scientists have described a novel approach using CRISPR and skin grafts to boost insulin levels and reduce weight in mice. The study was published inCell Stem Cell.Science Daily (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - August 4, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Genetically engineered skin grafts may help with diabetes, obesity
Genetically engineered skin grafts are effective on wild type mice with healthy immune systems, but diet-induced diabetes and obesity, study finds. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Genetics Source Type: news

Engineered Skin Cells Control Type 2 Diabetes in Mice
'Therapeutic skin grafts' might someday treat multiple diseases, researchers saySource: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Diabetes Type 2, Genes and Gene Therapy, Stem Cells (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - August 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news