Learning to Let Go: Accepting a Helping Hand to Avoid Burnout

You're reading Learning to Let Go: Accepting a Helping Hand to Avoid Burnout, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. The World Health Organization has finally recognized burnout as a legit medical condition, thus distinguishing it from simply being tired or overworked. Burnout is much more than being temporarily exhausted due to an increased workload or responsibilities – it’s characterized by overwhelming stress, emotional fatigue, lack of motivation, feelings of detachment and cynicism towards your job, and bordering on a general sense of depression and disillusionment. People suffering from burnout can’t find joy and pleasure in their work anymore. To be more precise, they’re seriously considering quitting as a way out of this situation. According to a recent Gallup study, 23% of full-time employees have reported feeling burned out at work very often or always, while 44% have said they feel burned out sometimes. However, this modern-day epidemic can be prevented and kept at bay by saying yes to a helping hand. Connect With Others Building a workplace culture which encourages the spirit of community and puts emphasis on warm and friendly relationships with your colleagues and partners can be crucial in preventing burnout. By connecting with others from your work environment and industry, it will be much e...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: featured happiness health and fitness burnout career advice mental health stress time management Source Type: blogs

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What does physical pain have to do with depression, and vice versa? On today’s Psych Central Podcast, our guest, Dr. Jack Stern, a board-certified neurosurgeon specializing in spinal surgery, explains the psychology of pain and how the two are inextricably linked. Dr. Stern describes how pain can lead to depression and how depression can intensify physical pain. We also find out why opioids don’t work for chronic pain, and how past pain affects current pain. Join us for an in-depth discussion on physical pain and mental health. SUBSCRIBE &REVIEW Guest information for ‘Dr. Jack Stern- Chronic Pain&r...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Chronic Pain Depression Disorders General Interview Mental Health and Wellness Podcast Psychology The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs
This study tested the hypothesis that state-level anger proneness would be associated with a greater increase in rates of opioid overdose death. METHODS: This was a secondary analysis of state-level data on FFM traits, opioid overdose deaths, and other classes of preventable death. Robust mixed models tested whether change in rates of opioid overdose death from 2008 to 2016 was moderated by state-level anger proneness. RESULTS: State-level anger proneness was significantly associated with greater increases in rates of opioid overdose deaths (B = 1.01, standard error = 0.19, P
Source: The American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Care - Category: Palliative Care Authors: Tags: Am J Hosp Palliat Care Source Type: research
OBJECTIVES: High rates of healthcare worker (HCW) burn-out have led many to label it an 'epidemic' urgently requiring interventions. This prospective pilot study examined the efficacy, feasibility and evaluation of the 'Three Good Things' (3GT) interventio...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news
There’s an urgent need to lower the staggering levels of physician burnout around the globe as it results in reduced quality of life for the medical community, decreased levels of patient care – and a worsening human resources crisis in the long run. While technology, especially EHRs, are often considered as an essential factor contributing to physician burnout, we expect artificial intelligence to significantly reduce the administrative burden an improve medical professionals’ work experience in the future. < The rough numbers of physician burnout The emotional and mental well-being of medical p...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine administration administrative AI burnout digital health EHR future health technology Healthcare Innovation medical medical records physician physician burnout Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, there are many anti-aging strategies in development, some of which have shown considerable promise for slowing down aging or delaying the onset of age-related diseases. From multiple pre-clinical studies, it appears that upregulation of autophagy through autophagy enhancers, elimination of senescent cells using senolytics, transfusion of plasma from young blood, neurogenesis and BDNF enhancement through specific drugs are promising approaches to sustain normal health during aging and also to postpone age-related diseases. However, these approaches will require critical assessment in clinical trials to determ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
By SANJ KATYAL The absence of burnout does not equal wellness. While the focus on physician burnout as an epidemic is finally gaining more attention, we may be missing a larger issue. Most physicians are not burned out. We are able to function. We get through our days, make it to some of our kids’ activities and even manage to go out to dinner on the weekends. We survive the work week as we look forward to our next vacation. We do this because that is what we have always done. We put our heads down and do our work. We often project ourselves past the next exam or to the next stage of our lives to help us get through...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Physicians Psychology mindfulness Physicans physician burnout positive psychology Source Type: blogs
There is a severe and worsening epidemic of physician burnout in the United States, which threatens the health of doctors and patients alike. What is burnout? How does it affect doctors? And, how can this affect patient care? Finally, what can be done about this issue, to breathe life and energy back into the field of medicine? What does physician burnout look like? Burnout among doctors is generally described in terms of a loss of enthusiasm for one’s work, a decline in satisfaction and joy, and an increase in detachment, emotional exhaustion, and cynicism. It manifests in disproportionately high rates of depression...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Managing your health care Source Type: blogs
When a doctor in your hospital system kills himself, the entire medical staff receives a mass email informing everyone of “Dr. So-and-So’s sudden unexpected death”. Thoughts and prayers for his family and loved ones. Perhaps a link to your Employee Assistance Program is provided, for those who may need counseling or grief assistance.  This is followed later that day with another email detailing the schedule for the final arrangements. Calling hours. Funeral. Directions to the church.Not everyone will have known the physician. So most scan the email and then go about thei...
Source: Buckeye Surgeon - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS: All US medical students, physicians in training, and practicing physicians are at significant risk of burnout. Its prevalence now exceeds 50%. Burnout is the unintended net result of multiple, highly disruptive changes in society at large, the medical profession, and the healthcare system. Both individual and organizational strategies have been only partially successful in mitigating burnout and in developing resiliency and well-being among physicians. Two highly effective strategies are aligning personal and organizational values and enabling physicians to devote 20% of their work activities to the part of th...
Source: Diseases of the Colon and Rectum - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Original Contributions: Physician Well-Being Source Type: research
By AL LEWIS While prevention efforts have largely been focused on chronic disease, spurred in part by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) insistence that 86% of healthcare dollars are spent on patients with chronic illness, it turns out that the largest, fastest-growing and possibly most preventable diagnosis is arguably the most acute diagnosis of all: septicemia. Septicemia is any persistent systemic blood-borne bacterial infection, generally caused by contamination from an invasion of the bloodstream by an outside pathogen, and generally not easily addressed with antibiotics. Its many complicati...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs
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