Is there any benefit in adding postoperative adjuvant concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy for penile cancer with regional lymph node metastasis?

Is there any benefit in adding postoperative adjuvant concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy for penile cancer with regional lymph node metastasis? Minerva Urol Nefrol. 2019 Jul 25;: Authors: Choo R, Nehra A, Zattoni F, Pagliaro LC, Karnes RJ Abstract PURPOSE: To evaluate whether there is any benefit in adding postoperative adjuvant concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy (RT-CHT) for penile cancer with regional lymph node metastasis (RLNM). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A single institution, retrospective study was conducted for a total of 23 patients with RLNM from penile squamous cell carcinoma. All underwent a definitive surgical intervention for both primary tumor and RLNM. Of these, 11 patients received adjuvant concurrent RT and CHT within 3 months after surgery (RT-CHT Group), while 12 patients received no additional treatment (Surveillance Group). Overall survival was calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method. The difference in survival between the two groups was tested using the log-rank test. A potential prognostic factor for survival was evaluated using a univariate Cox-proportional hazards model. RESULTS: Median follow-up for the entire group was 15.8 months (17.1 months for the RT-CHT group and 10.7 months for the Surveillance Group). Overall survival at 1 and 2 years were 54.5% and 27.2%, respectively, for the RT-CHT Group, compared to 57.1% and 28.4% for the Surveillance Group (log-rank=0.68). On a univariate analysis, the number of invo...
Source: Minerva Urologica e Nefrologica - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: Minerva Urol Nefrol Source Type: research

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Chemotherapy may be a valuable treatment option as neoadjuvant treatment for locally advanced penile cancer according to some previous studies, but the rarity of the sample and the Lack of large-scale clinical...
Source: BMC Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Research article Source Type: research
We present a 74-year-old male with sebaceous cell carcinoma of the penis. He underwent excision of the primary lesion with bilateral inguinal lymph node dissection followed by adjuvant chemotherapy.
Source: Urology Annals - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Source Type: research
For locally advanced (including inguinal and pelvic lymph node metastatic disease) and distant metastatic penile squamous cell carcinoma (PSCC), multimodal treatments utilizing surgery, chemoradiotherapy and/or chemotherapy continue to be the most popular treatment regimen. Although several chemotherapy regimens combined with surgery have achieved encouraging short-term efficacies, long-term survival for those patients remains poor [1,2]. For patients with chemotherapy-failed experience, therapeutic options are even more limited.
Source: Urologic Oncology: Seminars and Original Investigations - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Original article Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: EGFR mono-antibody may be a potential modality for locally advanced PSCC patients after chemotherapy failure. Further large-scale clinical studies are needed to elucidate the role of human papillomavirus status and critical gene mutations in the clinical response to EGFR-targeted therapy. PMID: 30446465 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Urologic Oncology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Urol Oncol Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Penile cancer is curable in all early stages with the appropriate treatment, but its prognosis depends crucially on the proper management of the regional (i.e., inguinal) lymph nodes. In many countries, the treatment of this rare disease entity has been centralized. PMID: 30375327 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Deutsches Arzteblatt International - Category: General Medicine Tags: Dtsch Arztebl Int Source Type: research
Publication date: August 2018Source: European Urology Supplements, Volume 17, Issue 6Author(s): Andrea NecchiAbstractPenile squamous cell carcinoma (PSCC) is a very rare disease and its prognosis primarily depends on regional lymph node involvement. Although a cure can be obtained in patients with a low metastatic burden using surgery as standalone option, combined modality therapy is required for more advanced cases. In patients with multiple fixed or bulky inguinal lymph nodes, and in those with enlarged pelvic lymph nodes, chemotherapy is moderately effective, with an objective response rate of approximately 50% if a tr...
Source: European Urology Supplements - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Publication date: August 2018Source: European Urology Supplements, Volume 17, Issue 6Author(s): Oliver W. Hakenberg, Desiree Dräger, Andreas ErbersdoblerAbstractIn the treatment of penile cancer, there is a need for prognostic and predictive factors allowing assessment of the likelihood of lymph node metastasis, as this would greatly facilitate clinical decision-making for invasive staging of inguinal nodes. Furthermore, systemic chemotherapy in metastatic disease has limited efficacy and more effective additional or second-line therapies are needed. There is a great interest in personalised and targeted therapies at ...
Source: European Urology Supplements - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Publication date: August 2018Source: European Urology Supplements, Volume 17, Issue 6Author(s): Andrea NecchiAbstractPenile squamous cell carcinoma (PSCC) is a very rare disease and its prognosis primarily depends on regional lymph node involvement. Although a cure can be obtained in patients with a low metastatic burden using surgery as standalone option, combined modality therapy is required for more advanced cases. In patients with multiple fixed or bulky inguinal lymph nodes, and in those with enlarged pelvic lymph nodes, chemotherapy is moderately effective, with an objective response rate of approximately 50% if a tr...
Source: European Urology Supplements - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Publication date: August 2018Source: European Urology Supplements, Volume 17, Issue 6Author(s): Oliver W. Hakenberg, Desiree Dräger, Andreas ErbersdoblerAbstractIn the treatment of penile cancer, there is a need for prognostic and predictive factors allowing assessment of the likelihood of lymph node metastasis, as this would greatly facilitate clinical decision-making for invasive staging of inguinal nodes. Furthermore, systemic chemotherapy in metastatic disease has limited efficacy and more effective additional or second-line therapies are needed. There is a great interest in personalised and targeted therapies at ...
Source: European Urology Supplements - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
The case for nonsurgical therapy of nonmetastatic penile cancer, Published online: 27 June 2018; doi:10.1038/s41585-018-0040-yDespite the considerable detrimental effects associated with penectomy, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the penis is most commonly treated with surgery. However, SCC at other locations can be successfully managed using chemotherapy and radiation. Here, Jonathan Tward makes a case for organ-sparing treatments for penile cancer, based on data from treatment of SCC at other body sites.
Source: Nature Reviews Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Source Type: research
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