Americans Are Not Getting the Message About Exercising More and Sitting Less

Doctors and public health officials have been urging Americans to get more active and try to exercise at least 150 minutes per week at a moderate level, or 75 minutes weekly at a vigorous level. Even if you can’t fit in that much activity, studies show that any exercise is better than none when it comes to health benefits like lowering risk of diabetes, heart disease and obesity. But have all of these messages had an effect? That’s what researchers led by Dr. Wei Bao , an assistant professor of epidemiology at the University of Iowa, wanted to find out in a recent study. The first guidance for how much exercise adults should be doing for better health came in 2008 with the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. Those guidelines recommended that people exercise 150 minutes each week, and were updated a decade later in 2018. “We were curious about whether the guidelines released in 2008 led to an increase in physical activity over time,” says Bao. Bao and his team analyzed data from a representative sample of more than 27,000 adults in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, an ongoing annual assessment of American’s health, nutrition and exercise status. The resulting paper, published in JAMA Network Open, finds that rates of physical activity rates did not change much between 2007 and 2016. In the 2007-2008 survey, 63% of the participants engaged in the recommended amount of aerobic physical activity, and that share was about...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized embargoed study health sedentary Sitting Source Type: news

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(University of Pittsburgh) Overweight and obese vitamin D-deficient children who took a relatively high dose of vitamin D every day for six months had lower blood pressure and improved insulin sensitivity than their peers who took a lower dose. The study did not show improvements in other markers of cardiovascular and metabolic health, a finding that indicates vitamin D supplementation alone may not be the cure-all for children at highest risk for diabetes and heart disease.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
This study provides strong evidence that following a healthy lifestyle can substantially extend the years a person lives disease-free." Commentary on Recent Evidence for Cognitive Decline to Precede Amyloid Aggregation in Alzheimer's Disease https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/01/commentary-on-recent-evidence-for-cognitive-decline-to-precede-amyloid-aggregation-in-alzheimers-disease/ I can't say that I think the data presented in the research noted here merits quite the degree of the attention that it has been given in the popular science press. It is interesting, but not compelling if its role...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In recent years, mediation analysis has become a popular means to identify and quantify pathways linking an exposure to an outcome, thereby elucidating how a particular exposure contributes to the occurrence of a specific outcome. When a mediator is a modifiable risk factor, this opens up new opportunities for interventions to block (part) of the exposure`s effect on the outcome. Recent examples in Scandinavian Journal of Work Environment Health have addressed the mediating effect of wellbeing on the association between type of office and job satisfaction (1) and examined whether workplace social capital contributes to the...
Source: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health - Category: Occupational Health Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
(Natural News) Years of research have established a positive collaboration between estrogen and vitamin D to improve bone health. Now, recent research suggests that this dynamic duo could also play a role in staving off metabolic syndrome in postmenopausal women. Metabolic syndrome is described as a cluster of conditions – such as obesity, high blood...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
ConclusionsOverweight/obese females can shift their carbohydrate intake for higher cereal fiber to decrease T2DM risk, but GL may cancel-out this effect.
Source: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 13 January 2020Source: Medical Journal Armed Forces IndiaAuthor(s): Rajvir BhalwarAbstractMetabolic Syndrome (MetS) is a clustering of specific risk factors, namely, central obesity, raised blood pressure, impaired fasting glucose, raised triglycerides, and low levels of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C). This constellation is triggered by insulin resistance and its resultant hyperinsulinemia. The two most important and universally agreed causes of insulin resistance are increased body fat (particularly central obesity) and physical inactivity. Other causes include certain gene...
Source: Medical Journal Armed Forces India - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
This study shows reducing excess fat in general can reduce tongue size,” said Dr. Raj Dasgupta, a sleep specialist at Keck Medicine at the University of Southern California, who was not involved in the study. In the new paper, the researchers used MRI imaging to measure the effect on upper airways of a 10% weight loss in 67 obese patients. The images showed reducing tongue fat was the primary reason overall sleep apnea scores improved by 31%. “In fact, the more tongue fat you lost, the more your apnea improved,” said Schwab, who is the co-director of the Penn Sleep Center at Penn Medicine. Costs of sleep ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Syndicated CBSN Boston CNN Source Type: news
A, Sørensen M Abstract Exposure to traffic noise is associated with stress and sleep disturbances. The World Health Organization (WHO) recently concluded that road traffic noise increases the risk for ischemic heart disease and potentially other cardiometabolic diseases, including stroke, obesity, and diabetes. The WHO report focused on whole-day noise exposure, but new epidemiological and translational field noise studies indicate that nighttime noise, in particular, is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) through increased levels of stress hormones and vascular oxidative stress, lead...
Source: Annual Review of Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Annu Rev Public Health Source Type: research
You hear it all the time: the advice to “eat less processed food.” But what is processed food? For that matter, what is minimally processed food or ultra-processed food? And how do processed foods affect our health? What are processed and ultra-processed foods? Unprocessed or minimally processed foods are whole foods in which the vitamins and nutrients are still intact. The food is in its natural (or nearly natural) state. These foods may be minimally altered by removal of inedible parts, drying, crushing, roasting, boiling, freezing, or pasteurization, to make them suitable to store and safe to consume. Unproc...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs
Conclusions: Central obesity alone and compound obesity are associated with the risk of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes mellitus. Compound obesity but not central obesity alone is associated with the risk of coronary heart disease, but further research is needed to confirm it. There are no significant relationship between stroke and central obesity alone or compound obesity.
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
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