Patient-Reported Sexual Survivorship Following High-Dose Image-Guided Proton Therapy for Prostate Cancer.

CONCLUSIONS: Patient-reported pretreatment sexual function and comorbidities enables stratification and prediction of erectile function. EPIC subset questions with baseline comorbidities may potentially serve as a quick and practical clinical tool for predicting sexual survivorship. PMID: 31005217 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Radiotherapy and Oncology : journal of the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Radiother Oncol Source Type: research

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Abstract Lack of insulin or insulin resistance (IR) plays a central role in diabetes mellitus and makes diabetics prone to acute ischemic heart disease (AIHD). It has likewise been found that many cancer patients, including prostate cancer patients die of AIHD. Previously it has been delineated from our laboratory that dermcidin could induce anomalous platelet aggregation in AIHD and also impaired nitric oxide and insulin activity and furthermore dermcidin was also found in a few types of cancer patients. To determine the role of this protein in prostatic malignancy a retrospective case-control study was conducted...
Source: Bioscience Reports - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Tags: Biosci Rep Source Type: research
Did you know that adding color to your meals will help you live a longer, healthier life? Colorful fruits and vegetables can paint a beautiful picture of health because they contain phytonutrients, compounds that give plants their rich colors as well as their distinctive tastes and aromas. Phytonutrients also strengthen a plant’s immune system. They protect the plant from threats in their natural environment such as disease and excessive sun. When humans eat plant foods, phytonutrients protect us from chronic diseases. Phytonutrients have potent anti-cancer and anti-heart disease effects. And epidemiological research...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs
Conclusions and Perspectives In this review, we have discussed important milestones from the early description of “Serum-sickness” as being due to antibodies directed against Neu5Gc epitopes all the way to the present-day therapeutic implications of these antibodies in cancer therapy. Some of these milestones have been represented in a concise timeline (Figure 6). While the “Xenosialitis” hypothesis is well-supported in the human-like mouse models, it has yet to be conclusively proven in humans. It remains to be seen if “Xenosialitis” plays a role in other uniquely-human diseases. FI...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
We presented a new statistic T to use large public database as reference to reduce concern of potential population stratification. And the new statistic proposed here is effective to discover novel genome-wide significant loci with both small and large sample sizes. Author Contributions YW conceived the idea and developed the software. YL, MH, and XL contributed data analysis, generating tables and figures, and manuscript writing. YW, YL, MH, XL, YS, and LJ contributed the theoretical analysis and manuscript revision. MX helped support the GWAS datasets. YW, YL, MH, XL, MZ, JW, and MX contributed to scientific discussion...
Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
Matt Hancock hails ‘game-changer’ but critics raise racial bias and ‘fatalism’ concernsThe health secretary is calling for predictive genetic tests for common cancers and heart disease to be rolled out on the NHS without delay.Matt Hancock, speaking at the Royal Society on Wednesday, revealed he recently took a commercial genetic test that showed he was at heightened risk of developing prostate cancer, saying he was shocked by the result. Hancock called for a national debate about the ethical issues around testing for diseases, some of which could not readily be treated.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Genetics NHS Health policy Matt Hancock & wellbeing Science Race Life and style Politics Public services policy Society Biology UK news Conservatives Source Type: news
Matt Hancock claims technology is ‘a game-changer’ but critics raise racial bias and ‘fatalism’ concernsThe health secretary is calling for predictive genetic tests for common cancers and heart disease to be rolled out on the NHS without delay.Matt Hancock, speaking at the Royal Society on Wednesday, revealed he recently took a commercial genetic test that showed he is at heightened risk of developing prostate cancer, saying he was shocked by the result. Hancock called for a national debate about the ethical issues around testing for diseases, some of which could not readily be treated.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Genetics Matt Hancock NHS Science UK news Race Health Source Type: news
HOW TO live longer: We all know the importance of eating a healthy, balanced diet, but certain foods can do more to boost life expectancy than others. According to experts, a particular ‘trendy’ treat which has grown in popularity in recent times may help to fight against diseases like prostate cancer and heart disease.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
This article describes the public health impact of Alzheimer's disease (AD), including incidence and prevalence, mortality and morbidity, use and costs of care, and the overall impact on caregivers and society. The Special Report examines the use of brief cognitive assessments by primary care physicians as a tool for improving early detection of dementia. An estimated 5.8 million Americans have Alzheimer's dementia. By mid-century, the number of people living with Alzheimer's dementia in the United States may grow to 13.8 million, fueled in large part by the aging baby boom generation. In 2017, official death certificates ...
Source: Alzheimer's and Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research
Men with advanced prostate cancer are typically treated with drugs that prevent the body from making or using testosterone. A hormone (or an androgen, as it’s known), testosterone drives prostate cancer cells to grow faster, so shutting it down is essential to keeping the illness in check. About 600,000 men with advanced prostate cancer in the United States today are undergoing this type of anti-hormonal treatment, which is called androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). But even as ADT helps men live longer, it exerts a toll on the body. Men can lose muscle and bone mass, gain weight, and they face higher risks for heart...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Living With Prostate Cancer Prostate Knowledge Treatments HPK Source Type: blogs
This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. PMID: 30801679 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Clinical Prostate Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Clin Pharmacol Ther Source Type: research
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