Genetic susceptibility to West Nile virus infection in Camargue horses

Publication date: Available online 10 April 2019Source: Research in Veterinary ScienceAuthor(s): K. Stejskalova, M. Cvanova, J. Oppelt, E. Janova, C. Horecky, E. Horecka, A. Knoll, A. Leblond, P. HorinAbstractWest Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic neurotropic virus capable to cause lethal meningoencephalitis (WNE) in infected hosts such as birds, horses, and humans. Due to their sensitivity, horses serve as sentinel species in areas at risk. We studied a population of Camargue horses living in Southern France in two zones with endemic WNV circulation where WNV outbreaks were recorded in 2000 and 2003–4. Two sets of microsatellite markers located in MHC and Ly49 genomic regions were genotyped as well as multiple SNPs in ten immunity-related candidate gene regions. Associations between genetic polymorphisms and resistance/susceptibility to WNE were tested. While single marker associations were weak, compound two-gene genotypes of SNPs located within the MAVS, NCR2 and IL-10 genes and microsatellites HMS082 and CZM013 were associated with susceptibility to WNE. Combinations of microsatellite markers CZM009, ABGe17402 and ABGe9019 were associated with simple seroconversion without clinical signs of WNE (resistance). In addition, a distribution of polymorphic markers between WNV-IgG seropositive horses and a control group of WNV-IgG seronegative horses was tested. One SNP in the OAS1 gene (NC_009151.3:g.21961328A>G) was significantly associated with the seropo...
Source: Research in Veterinary Science - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research

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Publication date: Available online 11 December 2019Source: Methods in MicrobiologyAuthor(s): Sukhadeo B. Barbuddhe, Jess Vergis, Deepak B. RawoolAbstractBrucellosis, caused by Brucella species, is a neglected, under reported and under recognized infection of worldwide distribution. Owing to its greater economic and zoonotic importance, control of brucellosis is a priority target set forth by the WHO and development agencies. The genus Brucella is comprised of 12 species. The four main species infecting humans and livestock populations include B. melitensis, B. abortus, B. suis, and B. canis. Brucellosis is a cause of acute...
Source: Methods in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Infection of humans by the larval stage of the tapeworms Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato or Echinococcus multilocularis causes the life-threatening zoonoses cystic echinococcosis (CE) and alveolar echinococcosis (AE). Although cystic liver lesions are a hallmark of both diseases, course, prognosis, and patients’ management decisively differ between the two. The wide and overlapping spectrum of morphologies and the limited availability of ancillary tools are challenges for pathologists to reliably diagnose and subtype echinococcosis. Here, we systematically and quantitatively recorded the pathologic spectrum in a c...
Source: The American Journal of Surgical Pathology - Category: Pathology Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
In this study, we assessed the tumor changes induced by denosumab in a national multicentric series of 35 cases (French Bone Pathology Group network—ResOs). Tissue specimens collected before and after denosumab treatment were investigated for RANKL, H3.3 G34W, p63, and Ki-67 expression, and for H3F3A mutation. These parameters were put in correspondance with clinical and radiologic presentation to identify prognostic factors, and more specifically, predictive markers of an optimal histologic response to denosumab, identified as a ≥50% loss in giant cells with fibrosis and ossification. The main changes in posttrea...
Source: The American Journal of Surgical Pathology - Category: Pathology Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 11 December 2019Source: Canadian Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Jennifer Cautela, Franck Rouby, Joe-Elie Salem, Joachim Alexandre, Ugo Scemama, Charles Dolladille, Ariel Cohen, Franck Paganelli, Stéphane Ederhy, Franck ThunyAbstractIsolated cases of acute coronary syndromes (ACSs) associated with immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) have been described without the establishment of a formal cause-and-effect relationship between treatment and adverse event.First, we reported a case of ACS after the first administration of an ICI and with a fatal recurrence in another coronary area im...
Source: Canadian Journal of Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
This study was carried out to explore the genetic characterization and its phylogenetic analysis of circulating Leptospira species, among the Aligarh region of western Uttar Pradesh in India, utilizing secY gene-based nucleotide sequence. A total of 190 human samples were included in the study. Positive samples were identified by ELISA, MAT and PCR. MAT was carried out utilizing local circulating Leptospira serovars. Four positive samples including two MAT positive samples were subjected to DNA sequencing for further confirmation and phylogenetic tree was constructed. Out of the total of 190 samples, 24 patients were found...
Source: Pathogens and Global Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Pathog Glob Health Source Type: research
In this study, we exposed apically well-differentiated human NECs cultured at the ALI to the related flaviviruses ZIKV, JEV, WNV, and Usutu virus (USUV). We selected these viruses due to the recent increasing evidences of potential threat to humans (Cadar et al., 2017; Simonin et al., 2018). We show that NECs are particularly susceptible to JEV and WNV infection and to other flaviviruses included in this study. Infection with each virus led to shedding of infectious virus particles through the apical and basolateral surfaces and triggered host mechanisms at the level of inflammatory and antiviral mediators. Given...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
In the summer of 2016, Jerome Goddard, a medical entomologist in Mississippi, received an email from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) with a desperate ask. The agency was conducting an “urgent” search for insect scientists around the U.S. who could take up to a six-month paid leave from work to help the CDC fight the Zika outbreak in the U.S., and possibly respond to areas with local transmission if needed. “That’s how bad it is—they need to borrow someone,” says Goddard, an extension professor of medical entomology at Mississippi State University. “We can&...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime public health Source Type: news
In this study we explore the potential for autochthonous, but not necessarily sustained, transmission of CHIKV in Canada. We used a stochastic mathematical model parameterized for Ae. albopictus under climatic conditions in the warmest months of the year in locations across Canada. We then combined the climatic suitability for CHIKV transmission potential in the warmest months of the year (condition C4) with climatic suitability indicators for the endemic presence of Ae. albopictus (condition C3) to produce risk maps identifying areas in Canada most suitable for autochthonous CHIKV transmission under recent and projected c...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Zika virus’ status as a global health threat may officially be over, but the disease’s impact is far from contained.  The World Health Organization decided in November to end its designation of Zika virus as a public health emergency, but that doesn’t mean that Zika virus has disappeared, explained Dr. Carlos Pardo-Villamizar, a clinical neurologist with an expertise in infectious disorders at Johns Hopkins Medicine. Alongside pressing concerns about how to prevent a resurgence of the disease, health care systems in Brazil and other countries that saw births of babies infected with the disease in ute...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
Introduction The impacts of rubella infection during pregnancy have been recognized since the pioneering work of Norman Gregg following introductions of this pathogen into communities in Australia during the Second World War1. Theoretical research into the characteristics of the population burden of pathogens with this unique manifestation followed2; and the teratogenic outcomes of rubella3 and their implications across diverse demographic, epidemiological and control settings4,5,6,7 are currently well described. In particular, in an endemic setting, incomplete vaccination coverage can lead to an increase in the teratogeni...
Source: PLOS Currents Outbreaks - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Source Type: research
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