Eagle Syndrome as a Cause of Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis.

Eagle Syndrome as a Cause of Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis. Can J Neurol Sci. 2019 Apr 01;:1-2 Authors: Zhang FL, Zhou HW, Guo ZN, Yang Y Abstract A 15-year-old teenager presented with a 2-month history of headache. Neurological examination was normal except for papilledema. Further lumbar puncture indicated intracranial hypertension (330 mm H2O). Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was normal but phase contrast-magnetic resonance venography (PC-MRV) (Figure 1(A)) suggested possible left transverse-sigmoid sinus thrombosis; subsequent contrast-enhanced 3D fat-saturated T1 volumetric isotropic turbo spin echo acquisition (VISTA) MRI (Figure 1(B)) confirmed the pathology. Hyper-coagulable panel results (including six steroid sex hormones, antithrombin III, protein C, protein S, lupus anticoagulant, and anticardiolipin antibodies) were all within normal range. In further examination, computed tomography (CT) venography images (Figure 1(C) and (D)) showed that the left jugular vein was compressed by the styloid process, consistent with Eagle syndrome.1 The patient who refused the recommended surgical treatment, however, chose anticoagulant therapy consisting of low-molecular weight heparin subcutaneous injection in addition to new oral anticoagulant. At 18-month follow-up, the patient reported no symptoms remained. PMID: 30932799 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Can J Neurol Sci Source Type: research

Related Links:

Abstract Polymorphisms in the LPA gene have been associated with aortic valve calcification (AVC). There are wide differences in the allelic frequencies, Lp(a) levels, and the association with AVC among ethnic groups. The aim of this study was to determine the association of the LPA gene polymorphisms with Lp(a) levels and risk of developing AVC, in Mexican-Mestizos population. Six LPA polymorphisms (rs10455872, rs7765803, rs6907156, rs1321195, rs12212807 and rs6919346) were genotyped by TaqMan assays in 1,265 individuals without premature coronary artery disease. The presence of AVC was determined by computed tomography. ...
Source: Genetics and Molecular Biology - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
Publication date: November 2019Source: International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, Volume 74Author(s): Trond Kongsvik, Øyvind Dahl, Ingunn Marie Holmen, Trine ThorvaldsenAbstractFew studies have explored the potential connection between safety climate and health issues. However, some recent research findings indicate that a poor safety climate can be considered a stressor that may be associated with physical symptoms and musculoskeletal complaints. This link is further explored in the present study on the basis of a questionnaire study of 446 sharp-end workers in the Norwegian aquaculture industry. The analysis ...
Source: International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics - Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research
Publication date: November 2019Source: European Urology Supplements, Volume 18, Issue 10Author(s): R. Rodrigues Fonseca, R. Lains Mota, I. Peyroteo, A. Bilé Silva, J.C. Santos, F. Alpoim Lopes, A. Covita, A. Canhoto, P. Monteiro, R. Nogueira, L. Abranches Monteiro
Source: European Urology Supplements - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Publication date: September 2019Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 26, Issue 5Author(s): Salem Almaani, Samir V. ParikhMembranous lupus nephritis (MLN) (Class V lupus nephritis [LN]) is a distinct form of LN defined by the presence of subepithelial immune complex deposits seen on kidney biopsy. MLN is often associated with the nephrotic syndrome. The histology of MLN closely resembles that of idiopathic (primary) membranous nephropathy (pMN). However, MLN typically has abundant mesangial deposits that are absent in primary membranous nephropathy. The clinical presentation, management, and prognosis of MLN d...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Publication date: September 2019Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 26, Issue 5Author(s): Latisha Heinlen, Eliza F. ChakravartyLupus nephritis is the most common organ-threatening manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus, affecting more than one-third of patients. Induction of remission and maintenance of relapse-free disease have been and continue to be a critical focus of investigation. Because the need for renal replacement therapy in those with an insufficient response to therapy is associated with significantly increased morbidity and mortality, providers and patients are willing to accept moderate...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Publication date: September 2019Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 26, Issue 5Author(s): Elizabeth S. Kotzen, Sanjeet Roy, Koyal JainAntiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and other causes of thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) negatively impact the renal outcomes of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus nephritis. Here we review the diagnosis and management of occlusive renal vascular lesions due to APS and other TMAs, with a focus on patients with SLE and lupus nephritis. The presence of a thrombotic event, unexplained hypertension, thrombocytopenia, or hemolytic anemia should prompt considerat...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Conclusion: Some patients with psychiatric syndromes and increased ANA titers may suffer from psychiatric variants of SLE, even if the American College of Rheumatology criteria for SLE are not met. Whether the psychiatric symptoms in our patient represent a prodromal stage with the later manifestation of full-blown SLE or a subtype of SLE with isolated CNS involvement remains unclear. Regardless, early diagnosis and initiation of immunosuppressive treatment are essential steps in preventing further disease progression and organ damage. Intrathecal ANAs with extractable nuclear antigen differentiation may be a more sensitiv...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Conclusions: Hyperuricemia in SLE patients is independently associated with the occurrence of stroke and peripheral neuropathy. It is also independently associated with hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and history of arterial thrombosis, which are the major stroke and myocardial infarction risk factors in SLE patients.RESUMO Objetivos: Avaliar a associa ção entre a hiperuricemia e diferentes manifestações neuropsiquiátricas e os fatores de risco para AVE em pacientes com lúpus eritematoso sistêmico (LES). Métodos: Este estudo foi feito em 204 pacientes com LES que foram i...
Source: Revista Brasileira de Reumatologia - Category: Rheumatology Source Type: research
Conclusions Rheumatologists should be aware of the possibility that Rhupus may be accompanied by progressive or life-threatening conditions such as APS, severe Raynaud’s syndrome with digital ulcers, pulmonary hypertension, or malignancies.
Source: Clinical Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Source Type: research
Conclusions Hyperuricemia in SLE patients is independently associated with the occurrence of stroke and peripheral neuropathy. It is also independently associated with hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and history of arterial thrombosis, which are the major stroke and myocardial infarction risk factors in SLE patients.
Source: Revista Brasileira de Reumatologia - Category: Rheumatology Source Type: research
More News: Brain | Canada Health | CT Scan | Headache | Hormones | Hypertension | Lumbar Puncture | Lupus | Migraine | MRI Scan | Neurology | Pathology | Thrombosis