U.S.-South Africa Program for Collaborative Biomedical Research - Phase 2 (Infectious Diseases) (U01 Clinical Trial Optional)

Funding Opportunity RFA-AI-19-025 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to continue the U.S.-South Africa Program for Collaborative Biomedical Research into Phase 2. Research areas supported under this program include: tuberculosis; sexually transmitted infections; parasitic infections; arboviruses and emerging/re-emerging viral pathogens; and vector biology and control. This opportunity is specifically designed to promote partnerships between eligible NIH Intramural Research Program (IRP) investigators (e.g. those conducting research within the laboratories and clinics of the NIH) and eligible South African investigators (e.g., those conducting research in eligible laboratories in South Africa). In order to be eligible for this program, the application must include at least one NIH IRP investigator serving as a Project Scientist with an equal role in the conceptualization, design and execution of the research.
Source: NIH Funding Opportunities (Notices, PA, RFA) - Category: Research Source Type: funding

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Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Coronavirus outbreak World news Science Infectious diseases Australia news UK news US news Microbiology Medical research Source Type: news
Warming events are increasing in magnitude and severity, threatening ecosystems More at https://www.nsf.gov/discoveries/disc_summ.jsp?cntn_id=300702&WT.mc_id=USNSF_1 This is a Research News item.
Source: NSF Discoveries - Category: Science Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 3 June 2020Source: Social Science &MedicineAuthor(s): Christina A. Laurenzi, Sarah Skeen, Bronwyne J. Coetzee, Sarah Gordon, Vuyolwethu Notholi, Mark Tomlinson
Source: Social Science and Medicine - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
Authors: Meregildo ED Abstract Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a global health problem. In more developed countries, NCC is mainly a disease affecting immigrants. In developing countries, NCC is the most common parasitic disease of the nervous system and the main cause of acquired epilepsy. NCC is also an unrecognized cause of strokes and could account for 4%-12% of strokes. Here, I report a case of a 58-year-old woman who presented to the emergency department (ED) with severe headache, vomiting, and sudden loss of consciousness. Multiple NCC and Fisher grade 4 aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) were demonstrated...
Source: Infezioni in Medicina - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infez Med Source Type: research
Pathological infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis is still a major global health concern. Traditional diagnostic methods are time-consuming, less sensitive, and lack high specificity. Due to an increase in the pathogenic graph of mycobacterial infections especially in developing countries, there is an urgent requirement for a rapid, low cost, and highly sensitive diagnostic method. D29 mycobacteriophage, which is capable of infecting and killing M. tuberculosis, projects itself as a potential candidate for the development of novel diagnostic methods and phage therapy of mycobacterial infections. In our previous s...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Cellular reproduction defines life, yet our textbook-level understanding of cell division is limited to a small number of model organisms centered around humans. The horizon on cell division variants is expanded here by advancing insights on the fascinating cell division modes found in the Apicomplexa, a key group of protozoan parasites. The Apicomplexa display remarkable variation in offspring number, whether karyokinesis follows each S/M-phase or not, and whether daughter cells bud in the cytoplasm or bud from the cortex. We find that the terminology used to describe the various manifestations of asexual apicomplexan cel...
Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
AbstractIn South Africa (SA), hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is strongly associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). As HBV genotypes/subgenotypes and mutations can influence disease manifestation and progression, our aim was to molecularly characterize HBV in Black cancer patients, with and without HCC. The basal core promoter/precore (BCP/PC) and complete surface (S) regions of HBV isolates were amplified and sequenced from 55 HCC cases and 22 non-HCC cancer controls. Phylogenetic analysis of 43 polymerase/complete S region amplicons showed that the majority (88.4%) clustered with subgenotype A1, 4.7% with A2, and...
Source: Archives of Virology - Category: Virology Source Type: research
Funding Opportunity RFA-AI-19-024 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to continue the U.S.-South Africa Program for Collaborative Biomedical Research into Phase 2. Research areas supported under this program include: tuberculosis; sexually transmitted infections; parasitic infections; arboviruses and emerging/re-emerging viral pathogens; and vector biology and control.
Source: NIH Funding Opportunities (Notices, PA, RFA) - Category: Research Source Type: funding
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 009 The diagnosis of HIV is no longer fatal and the term AIDS is becoming less frequent. In many countries, people with HIV are living longer than those with diabetes. This post will hopefully teach the basics of a complex disease and demystify some of the potential diseases you need to consider in those who are severely immunosuppressed. While trying to be comprehensive this post can not be exhaustive (as you can imagine any patient with ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine AIDS art cryptococcoma cryptococcus HIV HIV1 HIV2 PEP PrEP TB toxoplasma tuberculoma Source Type: blogs
Gaurav Dhaka, BL Sherwal, Sonal Saxena, Yogita Rai, Jagdish ChandraIndian Journal of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS 2017 38(2):142-146 Introduction: A prospective cohort study was undertaken from November 2010 to March 2012 at Kalawati Saran Children's Hospital (KSCH), Lady Hardinge Medical College (LHMC), New Delhi. The study included all HIV positive children aged between 0-15 years that were registered in the anti-retroviral therapy (ART) centre during the study period. HIV +ve children enrolled at the ART centre were started on ART on the basis of CD4counts (National/NACO guidelines). Materials and Met...
Source: Indian Journal of Sexually Transmitted Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
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