A case of metastatic brain tumor mimicking an expanding thalamic hematoma.

Conclusions: When cerebral hemorrhage occurs in a cancer patient, we must consider the possibility of hemorrhage due to a brain metastasis. PMID: 30775057 [PubMed]
Source: Surgical Neurology International - Category: Neurosurgery Tags: Surg Neurol Int Source Type: research

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In conclusion, this study demonstrates the concept of combining docetaxel with the biodegradable microparticles at the point of care is technically feasible for achieving an effective drug-device combination tissue scaffold. This approach could provide an effective new approach for delivering adjuvant chemotherapy following radical prostatectomy. PMID: 31735095 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Drug Delivery - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Drug Deliv Source Type: research
In this study, a redox-sensitive CPT-OA conjugate containing the disulfide bond (CPT-SS-OA) was used to deliver the lactone-stabilized CPT for the improved antitumor efficacy. A non-sensitive CPT-OA was used as control to illuminate the role of disulfide bond. Both CPT-SS-OA and CPT-OA formulated in cremophor EL micelles (CM) displayed multiple therapeutic advantages: small diameter (∼14 nm), efficient cellular internalization, prolonged blood circulation, and favorable biodistribution. However, only CPT-SS-OA/CM achieved the superior chemotherapeutic efficacy over CPT solution in the Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cancer ...
Source: Drug Delivery - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Drug Deliv Source Type: research
Authors: Zan Y, Dai Z, Liang L, Deng Y, Dong L Abstract Sorafenib (SOR) is a multi-kinase inhibitor that was approved as the first-line systematic treatment agent of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the anti-cancerous effect of SOR is dramatically impaired by the drug resistance, insufficient accumulation at tumor tissues, and limited tumor inner penetration. To combat the above issues, the PLA-based nanoparticles were first fabricated and co-loaded with SOR and plantamajoside (PMS), natural herbal medicines that possess excellent anti-cancerous effect on many types of drug resistant cancers. Then, the poly...
Source: Drug Delivery - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Drug Deliv Source Type: research
Yong Zhao1, Peijuan Liu1, Zhiqian Xin1, Changhong Shi1, Yinlan Bai2, Xiuxuan Sun3, Ya Zhao1, Xiaoya Wang1,4, Li Liu1,5, Xuan Zhao1,4, Zhinan Chen3* and Hai Zhang1,6* 1Laboratory Animal Center, Air Force Medical University, Xi’an, China 2Department of Microbiology, Air Force Medical University, Xi’an, China 3Department of Cell Biology, National Translational Science Center for Molecular Medicine, Air Force Medical University, Xi’an, China 4College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, China 5Key Laboratory for Space Bioscience and Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nor...
Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
In this study, to improve our understanding of the role of ATP1A1 in the malignant phenotype and pathogenesis of GSCs, we evaluated ATP1A1 expression in GBMs of different grades and in two primary GSC lines established from human GBM tissues. We evaluated the role of ATP1A1 in GSC growth, its interactions with Src, and the activation of the ERK1/2 and AKT pathways. Our results revealed that ATP1A1 acts as an oncogene in our GSC models and targeting ATP1A1/Src may suppress GSC proliferation and growth. Materials and Methods Cell Isolation and Culture Human brain GBM tissues were from pathologically confirmed surgical spe...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Conclusions This review describes how leukocyte-heparanase can be a double-edged sword in tumor progression; it can enhance tumor immune surveillance and tumor cell clearance, but also promote tumor survival and growth. We also discuss the potential of using heparanase in leukocyte therapies against tumors, and the effects of heparanase inhibitors on tumor progression and immunity. We are just beginning to understand the influence of heparanase on a pro/anti-tumor immune response, and there are still many questions to answer. How do the pro/anti-tumorigenic effects of heparanase differ across different cancer types? Does...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
ConclusionsDOACs can be safely administered to patients with brain tumors. In patients with primary brain tumors (i.e. glioma), DOACs appear to be safer than LMWH and should be considered for this indication.Figure.DisclosuresZwicker: Incyte: Research Funding; Parexel: Consultancy; Quercegen: Research Funding; Daiichi: Honoraria.
Source: Blood - Category: Hematology Authors: Tags: 332. Antithrombotic Therapy: Poster II Source Type: research
ConclusionIn patients with malignant intracranial tumors, there is no difference in the risk of ICH or other bleeding events between those on therapeutic anticoagulation with a DOAC or LMWH.DisclosuresNo relevant conflicts of interest to declare.
Source: Blood - Category: Hematology Authors: Tags: 332. Antithrombotic Therapy: Poster II Source Type: research
AbstractPatients with primary or metastatic brain tumors are at increased risk of developing venous thromboses. However, the potential benefit of therapeutic anticoagulation in these patients must be weighed against the deadly complication of intracranial hemorrhage. In this review, we summarize available evidence and recent studies of intracranial bleeding risks in primary and metastatic tumors and the impact of therapeutic anticoagulation. We find that for the majority of primary and treated metastatic brain tumors, the risk of spontaneous bleeding is acceptable and not further increased by careful therapeutic anticoagul...
Source: The Oncologist - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Lung Cancer, Neuro-Oncology, Symptom Management and Supportive Care Source Type: research
Abstract Patients with primary or metastatic brain tumors are at increased risk of developing venous thromboses. However, the potential benefit of therapeutic anticoagulation in these patients must be weighed against the deadly complication of intracranial hemorrhage. In this review, we summarize available evidence and recent studies of intracranial bleeding risks in primary and metastatic tumors and the impact of therapeutic anticoagulation. We find that for the majority of primary and treated metastatic brain tumors, the risk of spontaneous bleeding is acceptable and not further increased by careful therapeutic ...
Source: The Oncologist - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Oncologist Source Type: research
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