Time of Death: New AI Technology Tries To Predict and Prevent Death

If you could know the exact day you die, would you want to? The question may not be as far-fetched as you might think, thanks to a new algorithm designed to analyze digital medical records and compare them to real-time health data to calculate the risk of impending health events. The FDA cleared technology from Excel Medical, known as the WAVE Clinical Platform, is being billed as the world’s first patient surveillance and predictive algorithm platform. The device was designed as an always-on remote monitoring platform that can track real-time data, such as vital signs, and use that information in conjunction with the user’s medical history and family medical history to calculate the risk of a potentially fatal impending health event. So far the platform has shown the ability to predict potentially deadly events such as a heart attack or respiratory failure as early as six hours before they occur. The technology works with an app to send alerts to the user, as well as to an on-call doctor through a smartphone app when a potentially fatal event is detected. In the technology’s first control group study, the WAVE platform was able to predict six unexpected deaths and produce actionable alerts to prevent death. “Everything we do as an organization aligns toward and supports the goal of eradicating unexpected deaths in hospitals,” Excel Medical GM Lance Burton said in a press release. “People may say zero unexpected deaths is una...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Digital Health Source Type: news

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In conclusion, we found a gradient of increasing blood pressure with higher levels of BMI. The fact that this gradient is present even in the fully adjusted analyses suggests that BMI may cause a direct effect on blood pressure, independent of other clinical risk factors. PRRX1 as a Possible Point of Control for Remyelination https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2018/12/prrx1-as-a-possible-point-of-control-for-remyelination/ Researchers here outline what is possibly a new point of intervention in the processes that maintain the myelin sheath that wraps nerves. This sheath is vital to the correct operatio...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In this study, we found that TNF-α resulted in an impairment of autophagic flux in microglia. Concomitantly, an increase of M1 marker expression and reduction of M2 marker expression were observed in TNF-α challenged microglia. Upregulation of autophagy via serum deprivation or pharmacologic activators (rapamycin and resveratrol) promoted microglia polarization toward M2 phenotype, as evidenced by suppressed M1 and elevated M2 gene expression, while inhibition of autophagy with 3-MA or Atg5 siRNA consistently aggravated the M1 polarization induced by TNF-α. Moreover, Atg5 knockdown alone was suffic...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, this is the first report to show that pyroptotic cell death occurs in the aging brain and that the inflammasome can be a viable target to decrease the oxidative stress that occurs as a result of aging. Reducing Levels of Protein Manufacture Slows Measures of Aging in Nematodes https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2018/12/reducing-levels-of-protein-manufacture-slows-measures-of-aging-in-nematodes/ Researchers here demonstrate that an antibiotic slows aging in nematode worms, providing evidence for it to work through a reduction in protein synthesis. Beyond a slowing of aging, one of the con...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study is the culmination of a decade of research that has repeatedly demonstrated that this vaccine can effectively and safely target in animal models what we think may cause Alzheimer's disease. I believe we're getting close to testing this therapy in people." Although earlier research established that antibodies significantly reduce amyloid buildup in the brain, researchers needed to find a safe way to introduce them into the body. A vaccine developed elsewhere showed promise in the early 2000s, but when tested in humans, it caused brain swelling in some patients. The new idea was to start with DNA codin...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study's researchers approached all people turning 85 in 2006 in two cities in the UK for participation. At the beginning of the study in 2006-2007, there were 722 participants, 60 percent of whom were women. The participants provided researchers with information about what they ate every day, their body weight and height measurements, their overall health assessment (including any level of disability), and their medical records. The researchers learned that more than one-quarter (28 percent) of very old adults had protein intakes below the recommended dietary allowance. The researchers noted that older adults w...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
When Nichelle Obar learned she was pregnant with her second child last year, she never expected that her pregnancy, or her baby, would make history. But when the 40-year-old food-and-beverage coordinator from Hawaii and her fiancé Christopher Constantino went to their 18-week ultrasound, they learned something was wrong. The heart was larger than it should have been, and there was evidence that fluid was starting to build up around the organ as well. Both were signs that the fetus was working extra hard to pump blood to its fast-growing body and that its heart was starting to fail. Obar’s doctor knew what coul...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized medicine Source Type: news
Abstract For nearly a century, the adult heart was considered as a post-mitotic organ. The discovery of a resident cardiac stem cell (CSC) population in the heart has dramatically undermined this notion with the support of encouraging preclinical and clinical studies aiming to regenerate the damaged heart after a myocardial infarction (MI). There are two ways to obtain CSCs for transplantation: Allogeneic and autologous sources. Autologous cells may be obtained from the patients' own tissue. Obtaining cells from diseased patients may contain a risk for altered stem cell characteristics. In addition to MI, these pa...
Source: Current Pharmaceutical Design - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Curr Pharm Des Source Type: research
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study indicates that frailty and other age-related diseases could be prevented and significantly reduced in older adults. Getting our heart risk factors under control could lead to much healthier old ages. Unfortunately, the current obesity epidemic is moving the older population in the wrong direction, however our study underlines how even small reductions in risk are worthwhile." The study analysed data from more than 421,000 people aged 60-69 in both GP medical records and in the UK Biobank research study. Participants were followed up over ten years. The researchers analysed six factors that could impa...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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