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Acupuncture's Role in Solving the Opioid Epidemic: Evidence, Cost-Effectiveness, and Care Availability for Acupuncture as a Primary, Non-Pharmacologic Method for Pain Relief and Management –White Paper 2017

Publication date: November 2017 Source:Journal of Integrative Medicine, Volume 15, Issue 6 Author(s): Arthur Yin Fan, David W. Miller, Bonnie Bolash, Matthew Bauer, John McDonald, Sarah Faggert, Hongjian He, Yong Ming Li, Amy Matecki, Lindy Camardella, Mel Hopper Koppelman, Jennifer A.M. Stone, Lindsay Meade, John Pang The United States (U.S.) is facing a national opioid epidemic, and medical systems are in need of non-pharmacologic strategies that can be employed to decrease the public's opioid dependence. Acupuncture has emerged as a powerful, evidence-based, safe, cost-effective, and available treatment modality suitable to meeting this need. Acupuncture has been shown to be effective for the management of numerous types of pain conditions, and mechanisms of action for acupuncture have been described and are understandable from biomedical, physiologic perspectives. Further, acupuncture's cost-effectiveness can dramatically decrease health care expenditures, both from the standpoint of treating acute pain and through avoiding addiction to opioids that requires costly care, destroys quality of life, and can lead to fatal overdose. Numerous federal regulatory agencies have advised or mandated that healthcare systems and providers offer non-pharmacologic treatment options for pain. Acupuncture stands out as the most evidence-based, immediately available choice to fulfil these calls. Acupuncture can safely, easily, and cost-effectively be incorporated into hospital settings as...
Source: Journal of Integrative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research

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[Image from The.Comedian on Flickr]The opioid epidemic is one of the deadliest problems facing the U.S. today. Through the development of new pain management devices, medtech could be a leader in solving the crisis. The prescription opioid overdose crisis in America didn’t start until the late 1990s, when pharmaceutical companies touted prescription painkillers that weren’t supposed to be addictive. As a result, medical professionals more frequently prescribed opioid painkillers. Since then, opioid-related deaths have seen a steady increase. From 2000 to 2014, nearly half a million Americans died from a drug ov...
Source: Mass Device - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Hospital Care mHealth (Mobile Health) Pain Management Patient Monitoring Avancen Halyard Health MedTech Myoscience nevro opioid crisis Regenesis Biomedical Inc. Source Type: news
Authors: Passik SD, Heit HA, DeGeorge M Abstract This supplement is dedicated to an exploration of the science, potential utility, and the current state of abuse-deterrent formulations (ADF) of opioid analgesics. There are many stakeholders in the search for safer pain treatments in general, and safer opioid therapy in particular. Healthcare providers, patients, third-party payors, law enforcement and government regulators, the pharmaceutical industry, and the media all have a stake in seeing pain treated and addiction and overdose avoided. As it applies to ADFs, obviously not everyone has a stake in seeing that AD...
Source: Journal of Opioid Management - Category: Addiction Tags: J Opioid Manag Source Type: research
“I made myself a hypodermic injection of a triple dose of morphia and sank down on the couch in my consulting room … I told her I was all right, all I wanted was twenty-four hours’ sleep, she was not to disturb me unless the house was on fire.” – Axel Munthe, MD, The Story of San Michele (1929) When people in this country mention the opioid epidemic, most of the time it is in the context of addiction with its ensuing criminality and social deprivation, and the focus is on opioids’ medical complications like withdrawal, overdose, and death. But that is only one of the opioid ep...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Meds Pain Management Primary Care Source Type: blogs
Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey delivered his State of the State Address Monday in Phoenix and said he would call a special session to deal with the epidemic of opioid addiction. Ducey said in his speech more than 800 Arizonans had died from opioid overdoses over the past year. “These are real lives and real people. Gone,” Ducey said. “Someone’s mom, their dad. Daughters and sons. All ages. All incomes. Families, marriages and lives torn apart, tragically and unex pectedly because of a potent drug…
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - Category: Biotechnology Authors: Source Type: news
In a December 28, 2017column for theWashington Post entitled, “Opioid Abuse in the US Is So Bad It’s Lowering Life Expectancy. Why Hasn’t the Epidemic Hit Other Countries?,” Amanda Erickson succumbs to the false narrative thatmisdiagnoses the opioid overdose crisis as beingprimarily a manifestation of doctors over-prescribing opioids, goaded on by greedy, unethical pharmaceutical companies. The National Survey on Drug Use and Healthrevealed less than 25% of people using opioids for non-medical reasons get them through a prescription. Astudy reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
Alexander Gettler Once again, last year’s outstanding examples of long-form journalism dealing with topics related to medical toxicology were dominated by coverage of the opioid crisis, its origins and the resulting carnage. The must-read article of the year was “The Family That Built a Empire of Pain,” Patrick Radden Keefe’s massive history of the Sacklers, one of America’s richest clans, much of whose wealth comes from their ownership of Purdue Pharma and the marketing and distribution of Oxycontin. The article, which appeared in the New Yorker, notes that the clan’s patriarch, Ar...
Source: The Poison Review - Category: Toxicology Authors: Tags: Medical 2017 Alexander awards opioids Purdue Pharma Sackler Source Type: news
By HANS DUVEFELT, MD “I made myself a hypodermic injection of a triple dose of morphia and sank down on the couch in my consulting-room….I told her I was all right, all I wanted was twenty-four hours’ sleep, she was not to disturb me unless the house was on fire.” – Axel Munthe, MD, The Story of San Michele (1929) When people in this country mention the opioid epidemic, most of the time it is in the context of addiction with its ensuing criminality and social deprivation, and the focus is on opioids’ medical complications like withdrawal, overdose and death. But that is only one of the...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs
By KAREN SIBERT, MD Just say No to Fentanyl. No, I’m not talking about putting fentanyl into my own veins — a remarkably bad idea. I’m questioning the habitual, reflex use of fentanyl, a synthetic opioid, in clinical anesthesiology practice. I’ve been teaching clinical anesthesiology, supervising residents and medical students, in the operating rooms of academic hospitals for the past 18 years. Anesthesiology residents often ask if I “like” fentanyl, wanting to know if we’ll plan to use it in an upcoming case. My response always is, “I don’t have emotional relationship...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs
On December 11, 2017, the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) issued statements of support for several policy proposals focused on resolving the opioid crisis. The proposals included: limits on prescribing, a ban on prescribing of Schedule II opioids in an office setting, ongoing prescriber training, and expanded access to addiction treatment options. Along with the policy proposals came an announcement that PhRMA and the Addiction Policy Forum have entered into a multi-year, multi-million dollar initiative to combat the opioid crisis and implement the Forum's plan to help solve the opioid crisis....
Source: Policy and Medicine - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
On December 5, 2017, the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies held a hearing to discuss the opioid epidemic and the possible role that Congress could play in the prevention, treatment, and recovery. Senator Roy Blunt, the Subcommittee Chairman, opened the hearing by discussing the fact that overdose related deaths outnumber the deaths at the peak of the AIDS/HIV epidemic. Overdose deaths have also overtaken automobile accident fatalities to become the number one cause of accidental death in the United States. Senator Blunt also spoke about the three propos...
Source: Policy and Medicine - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
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