Prion Test For Rare, Fatal Brain Disease Helps Families Cope

Scientists now have a fairly noninvasive way to test for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, a rare form of dementia. A similar test, they say, might offer earlier diagnoses of Parkinson's and Alzheimer's.(Image credit: Keith Negley for NPR)
Source: NPR Health and Science - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Source Type: news

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In a nutshell, dementia is a symptom, and Alzheimer's disease is the cause of the symptom. When someone is told they have dementia, it means that they have significant memory problems as well as other cognitive difficulties, and that these problems are severe enough to get in the way of daily living.....Dementia presents as a group of symptoms, and Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia.When someone is told they have Alzheimer's or dementia,it means they have significant memory problems as well as other cognitive and behavioral issues.Most of the time dementia is caused by Alzheimer's disease.By Bob DeMar...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - Category: Neurology Tags: Alzheimer's Dementia Alzheimer's disease alzheimer's vs dementia symptoms the difference between alzheimer's and dementia Source Type: blogs
DiscussionIncreased NFL levels are a common feature in neurodegenerative dementias.
Source: Alzheimer's and Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research
Dementia presents as a group of symptoms, and Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia.By Bob DeMarcoAlzheimer's Reading RoomWhen someone is told they have Alzheimer's or dementia,it means they have significant memory problems as well as other cognitive and behavioral issues.Most of the time dementia is caused by Alzheimer's disease.There is great confusion about the difference betweenAlzheimer's anddementia.In a nutshell, dementia isn't a specific disease. Instead, dementia describes a group of symptoms affecting memory, thinking and social abilities severely enough to interfere with daily functioning. Alz...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimer's Alzheimer's Dementia Alzheimer's disease alzheimer's symptoms alzheimer's vs dementia the difference between alzheimer's and dementia Source Type: blogs
DISCUSSION: Increased NFL levels are a common feature in neurodegenerative dementias. PMID: 29391125 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The Journal of Alzheimers Association - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Alzheimers Dement Source Type: research
Discussion Increased NFL levels are a common feature in neurodegenerative dementias.
Source: Alzheimer's and Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research
Conclusion This early stage experimental research has demonstrated a beneficial neurological effect of trazodone and dibenzoylmethane on mice with diseases mimicking neurodegenerative diseases. It is important to acknowledge that this is animal research and therefore the drugs might not have the same effect when they are trialled on humans. That being said, trazodone is already an approved drug for depression and sleep problems and has therefore already passed safety tests. If the mechanisms of neurodegeneration in humans and mice are similar, it is possible trazodone could be used in the future in treating Alzheimer's and...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Older people Neurology Medication Source Type: news
The mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus (MDT) is one of the largest thalamic nuclei and is a typical association nucleus, participating in several cortico-subcortical networks, primarily those involving the prefrontal cortex.1–3 Pathologic involvement of the MDT or its cortical connections contributes to the cognitive, emotional, and behavioral manifestations of stroke4–6; metabolic disorders, such as Wernicke encephalopathy7; inflammatory disorders, such as multiple sclerosis8; prion disorders, such as fatal familial insomnia9 and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease10; and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer d...
Source: Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS OF NEUROSCIENCE RESEARCH Source Type: research
Dementia describes a group of symptoms and is not a disease. Alzheimer's is a disease that evidences symptoms of dementia.Alzheimer's Reading RoomOne of the most frequently asked questions I receive (FAQ) is,What is the Difference Between Alzheimer ’s and DementiaSome believe Alzheimer's is worse than dementia. Some people use the words interchangeably (like me). This of course is the source of much of the confusion about how dementia and Alzheimer's differ.Let's get right to it.Touch and Kindness in Dementia CareBy Bob DeMarcoAlzheimer's Reading RoomSubscribe to the Alzheimer's Reading RoomWhen you to the grocery st...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimers care alzheimers caregiving dementia help for caregivers difference between alzheimers and dementia family caregiving help alzheimer's help with dementia Source Type: blogs
One major public health problem in older people is the occurrence of neurocognitive disorders such as dementia. The prevalence of dementia has increased over the last years, especially in people 85 years and older [1]. It is estimated that globally 35.6 million people live with dementia [2]. The most common type of dementia is Alzheimer's disease [3]. It accounts for 60% to 80% of cases [3]. Other forms of dementia are: (i) vascular dementia, (ii) mixed forms of dementia, (iii) Lewy body dementia, (iv) frontotemporal dementia, and (v) dementia caused by other degenerative conditions (e.g., Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Parkin...
Source: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Source Type: research
By Ringhauser, Holly DO; Glantz, Sanford MD; Havasy, Stephen P. MD A 74-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with altered mental status for one week. The patient's husband said the patient had been in her usual state of health until seven days earlier, when she got lost on the way home from a restaurant that she had frequented for several decades. She had become increasingly confused and unable to care for herself, and was now unable to finish a sentence or ambulate without assistance. The patient had been seen by her primary physician and a neurologist. She had blood work, a CT scan, and an MRI performed,...
Source: The Case Files - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: research
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