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Is diabetes infectious? It may be spread through meat
Researchers from the University of Texas found that ingesting protein 'seeds' may be responsible for diabetes, similar to the spread of mad cow disease from cattle to humans via infected beef. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Alabama finds atypical mad cow case, no human threat seen
(Reuters) - An 11-year-old cow in Alabama tested positive for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), commonly known as mad cow disease, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said on Tuesday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - July 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Mad Cow Disease in California
(Source: eMedicineHealth.com)
Source: eMedicineHealth.com - May 3, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Two older drugs could be 'repurposed' to fight dementia
Conclusion This early stage experimental research has demonstrated a beneficial neurological effect of trazodone and dibenzoylmethane on mice with diseases mimicking neurodegenerative diseases. It is important to acknowledge that this is animal research and therefore the drugs might not have the same effect when they are trialled on humans. That being said, trazodone is already an approved drug for depression and sleep problems and has therefore already passed safety tests. If the mechanisms of neurodegeneration in humans and mice are similar, it is possible trazodone could be used in the future in treating Alzheimer's and...
Source: NHS News Feed - April 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Older people Neurology Medication Source Type: news

Spain finds atypical mad cow case, sees no trade curbs
PARIS/MADRID (Reuters) - Spain has confirmed a case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), commonly known as mad cow disease, in the northwestern province of Castilla y Leon, the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) said on Friday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - March 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Spain confirms atypical mad cow case: OIE
PARIS (Reuters) - Spain has confirmed a case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), commonly known as mad cow disease, in the northwestern province of Castilla y Leon, the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) said on Friday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - March 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Prion Test For Rare, Fatal Brain Disease Helps Families Cope
Scientists now have a fairly noninvasive way to test for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, a rare form of dementia. A similar test, they say, might offer earlier diagnoses of Parkinson's and Alzheimer's.(Image credit: Keith Negley for NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rae Ellen Bichell Source Type: news

Could Mad Cow Disease be about to return?
Tests carried out on an 18-year-old animal that died on a farm in County Galway, Ireland, found that it had bovine spongiform encephalopathy. But experts say there is no risk to meat lovers. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Ireland reports 'mad cow' case, says no risk to health
DUBLIN (Reuters) - Ireland said on Wednesday that a dead cow had been confirmed as having bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), known as mad cow disease, but said it had not entered the food chain and there was no risk to human health or beef's trade status. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - January 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

New method accurately detects prions in blood
A sensitive blood test accurately detected variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, an incurable and fatal neurodegenerative disorder. The method could be used to diagnose prion diseases and prevent disease transmission. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - January 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New Creutzfeldt-Jakob Diagnostic Test'100%' Accurate New Creutzfeldt-Jakob Diagnostic Test'100%' Accurate
A new test algorithm combining samples of cerebrospinal fluid and nasal swabbing should lead to definitive diagnosis of this prion disease.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines - January 6, 2017 Category: Neurology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

General Hospital actress Barbara Tarbuck dies of human mad cow disease at 74
Tarbuck's 14-year run on the ABC soap, from 1996 until 2010, was that of Lady Jane Jacks, the mother of Jax Jacks (Ingo Rademacher). She also had regular roles on Falcon Crest and Santa Barbara. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 30, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

[In Depth] New blood tests make strides in detecting prion disease
More than 10 years after peak of the "mad cow disease" epidemic that killed more than 200 people in Europe, the threat of the fatal brain disorder caused by eating contaminated meat is still real. Thousands of Europeans are thought to be asymptomatic carriers for variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, caused by misfolded proteins called prions. Because they can spread prions through blood donations, researchers have for years sought a test to safeguard blood supplies. Two papers published this week in Science Translational Medicine bring the field closer to that goal. They describe related methods for detecting prion...
Source: ScienceNOW - December 22, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Kelly Servick Tags: Biochemistry Source Type: news

Medical News Today: New blood test for prion disease looks promising
A new biochemical test that detects prions in blood shows promise for early, pre-symptom diagnosis of vCJD and improving safety of blood supply. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: CJD / vCJD / Mad Cow Disease Source Type: news

UTHealth research could lead to blood test to detect Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston) The detection of prions in the blood of patients with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease could lead to a noninvasive diagnosis prior to symptoms and a way to identify prion contamination of the donated blood supply, according to researchers at McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 21, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Mad Cow Disease and Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob
Disease (Source: eMedicineHealth.com)
Source: eMedicineHealth.com - November 17, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Urine test may detect Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease
Ryan MaassWASHINGTON, Oct. 4 (UPI) -- Researchers at the Medical Research Council in Britain have discovered it may be possible to test patients for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease using urine samples. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - October 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A urine test for Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease may be possible
Researchers at the MRC Prion Unit at UCL have found that it may be possible to determine whether or not a person has sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (sCJD) by testing their urine for the presence of abnormal prion proteins. (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - October 4, 2016 Category: Research Source Type: news

Urine test for CJD 'a possibility'
UK scientists believe urine could be used for a quick and simple way to test for CJD or "human mad cow disease". (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - October 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Prions can pass on beneficial traits, Stanford study finds
(Stanford University Medical Center) Prion proteins, best known as the agents of deadly brain disorders like mad cow disease, can help yeast survive hard times and pass the advantageous traits down to their offspring, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 3, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Newly discovered infectious prion structure shines light on mad cow disease
Groundbreaking research has identified the structure of the infectious prion protein, the cause of'mad cow disease'or BSE, chronic wasting disease in deer and elk and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, which has long remained a mystery. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 8, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

First Glimpse at Infectious Prion Shape
The preliminary structure of the misfolded protein that causes mad cow disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease looks like a coiled mattress spring. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - September 8, 2016 Category: Science Tags: Daily News, News & Opinion Source Type: news

Newly discovered infectious prion structure shines light on mad cow disease
(University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine& Dentistry) Groundbreaking research from the University of Alberta has identified the structure of the infectious prion protein, the cause of 'mad cow disease' or BSE, chronic wasting disease in deer and elk and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, which has long remained a mystery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 8, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Beneficial role clarified for brain protein associated with mad cow disease
Scientists have clarified details in understanding the beneficial function of a type of protein normally associated with prion diseases of the brain, such as bovine spongiform encephalopathy (commonly known as mad cow disease) and its human counterpart, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - August 8, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Impact of prion proteins on the nerves revealed for the first time
(University of Zurich) When prion proteins mutate, they trigger mad cow and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Although they are found in virtually every organism, the function of these proteins remained unclear. Researchers from the University of Zurich and the University Hospital Zurich now demonstrate that prion proteins, coupled with a particular receptor, are responsible for nerve health. The discovery could yield novel treatments for chronic nerve diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 8, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Properties of Graft-Associated Creutzfeldt-Jakob DiseaseProperties of Graft-Associated Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease
In this paper, the authors introduce a new method for identifying iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease using protein misfolding cyclic amplification. Laboratory Investigation (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - July 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pathology & Lab Medicine Journal Article Source Type: news

USF professor studying similarities in Alzheimer's and CTE from head injuries
(University of South Florida (USF Innovation)) A USF physics professor studying chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a recently discovered brain disease in athletes who have suffered repeated brain trauma from on-field collisions, suggests possibility that CTE can start when an on-field collision generates a 'seed' that spreads within the damaged brain, comparable to 'prion diseases,' such as 'mad cow disease,' where a damaged protein can transmit its damaged state to its healthy counterparts and subsequently induces spreading of protein abnormality. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 9, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

New assay offers improved detection of deadly prion diseases
Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), or prion diseases, are a family of rare progressive, neurodegenerative illnesses that affect both humans and animals. TSE surveillance is important for public health and food safety because TSEs have the potential of crossing from animals to humans, as seen with the spread of mad cow disease, or bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). A new study describes an advanced assay that offers better sensitivity than currently available tests for detecting a prion disease affecting elk. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 8, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

New assay offers improved detection of deadly prion diseases
(Elsevier Health Sciences) Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), or prion diseases, are a family of rare progressive, neurodegenerative illnesses that affect both humans and animals. TSE surveillance is important for public health and food safety because TSEs have the potential of crossing from animals to humans, as seen with the spread of mad cow disease, or bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). A study in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics describes an advanced assay that offers better sensitivity than currently available tests for detecting a prion disease affecting elk. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 8, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Can Alzheimer’s be transmitted between people?
The latest effort has been launched by researchers in Canada who will be studying the brains of four people who died after transplants gave them Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

France confirms case of mad cow disease
PARIS (Reuters) - France's agriculture ministry confirmed on Thursday that a case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), or mad cow disease, had been discovered in the northeastern region of Ardennes. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - March 24, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Fayetteville hospital fights Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease
An Arkansas hospital shut down its operating rooms and sterilized surgical equipment after a possible diagnosis of a rare brain disease, state health officials said. The disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob, was detected in a patient at Washington Regional Medi... (Source: WDSU.com - Health)
Source: WDSU.com - Health - March 17, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A toxic byproduct of hemoglobin could provide treatments for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease
Scientists at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have identified a novel mechanism that could be used to protect the brain from damage due to stroke and a variety of... (Source: Parkinson's Disease News From Medical News Today)
Source: Parkinson's Disease News From Medical News Today - March 8, 2016 Category: Neurology Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

New clues that Alzheimer’s may have been spread during surgery
ConclusionThis latest research adds some evidence to the possibility that amyloid beta proteins could have been passed on during certain types of treatment, which introduced substances derived from donor brains or pituitary glands into the body. However, these types of treatment are no longer used. The theory is far from certain, and other possible causes need to be investigated. Even if the theory was proven, we don't know that having these proteins introduced into the brain in this way would cause Alzheimer's disease. All the evidence showing amyloid protein in the brain after medical treatment has come from studies of t...
Source: NHS News Feed - January 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology Medical practice Source Type: news

Behind the Headlines' Top Five of Top Fives 2015
In this study, researchers wanted to see why this is and if there could be any human applications.Researchers collected white blood cells from African and Asian elephants. They found that elephants have at least 20 copies of a gene called TP53. TP53 is known to encourage cell "suicide" when DNA is damaged, stopping any potential cancer in its tracks. In contrast, humans are thought to have only a single copy of the TP53 gene.Of course the big question – the elephant in the room, if you will – is how we can boost TP53 activity in humans to stimulate a similar protective effect. The simple answer is: we...
Source: NHS News Feed - December 24, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: QA articles Medical practice Special reports Source Type: news

Behind the Headlines Top Five of Top Fives 2015
In this study, researchers wanted to see why this is and if there could be any human applications. Researchers collected white blood cells from African and Asian elephants. They found elephants have at least 20 copies of a gene called TP53. TP53 is known to encourage cell "suicide" when DNA is damaged, stopping any potential cancer in its tracks. In contrast, humans are thought to have only a single copy of the TP53 gene. Of course the big question – the elephant in the room, if you will – is how we can boost TP53 activity in humans to stimulate a similar protective effect. The simple answer is: we do...
Source: NHS News Feed - December 24, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: QA articles Medical practice Special reports Source Type: news

Inside The NASA Mission To Answer 'What Is Life?'
“Why would NASA want to study a lake in Canada?” Three different border guards asked me variations on that question, and while they ultimately let me pass, it was obvious they didn’t understand. Why is NASA interested in a lake in Canada? And what business is it of mine? As exotic environments go, Pavilion Lake in British Columbia is rather ordinary. Certainly it’s remote – the closest major city is Vancouver, a long drive away over the mountains. The closest towns are light dustings of houses over the dry slopes, and the road winds for dozens of kilometers of empty desert country between them...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 6, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Inside The NASA Mission To Answer 'What Is Life?'
“Why would NASA want to study a lake in Canada?” Three different border guards asked me variations on that question, and while they ultimately let me pass, it was obvious they didn’t understand. Why is NASA interested in a lake in Canada? And what business is it of mine? As exotic environments go, Pavilion Lake in British Columbia is rather ordinary. Certainly it’s remote – the closest major city is Vancouver, a long drive away over the mountains. The closest towns are light dustings of houses over the dry slopes, and the road winds for dozens of kilometers of empty desert country between them...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 6, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

More Than a Body of Knowledge
Earlier this month, researchers at Emory University issued a warning that the U.S. could be at risk of yet another measles outbreak. Although the disease is highly contagious and potentially fatal, measles is also highly preventable - if, an individual is vaccinated. Unfortunately, not everyone understands this or the basic science behind immunizations. Why? Because there is a significant lack of scientific literacy throughout the country. For far too many people, the word "science" itself can be distancing. It conjures up stereotypical caricatures of turgid textbooks, disheveled and incoherent adults in lab coa...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - October 28, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Predicting decline and survival in severe acute brain injury: the fourth trajectory - Creutzfeldt CJ, Longstreth WT, Holloway RG.
Illness trajectories depicting how function declines to death with certain diseases, such as cancer, can help with palliative care. Creutzfeldt and colleagues propose a fourth trajectory is needed for patients with severe acute brain injury to improve d... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - October 10, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Welsh government reports 'mad cow' case, says no risk to health
LONDON (Reuters) - The Welsh government said on Thursday that a dead cow on a farm in Wales had been confirmed as having bovine spongiform encephalopathy, known as mad cow disease, but said it had not entered the food chain and there was no risk to human health. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - October 1, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Alzheimer's 'seeds' found in seven CJD victims' brains
Conclusion This small study raises questions about how a group of relatively young people with CJD came to have amyloid protein deposits in their brains when they died. But it doesn't answer those questions. The theory that amyloid proteins were transferred, along with prions, through growth hormone therapy is still just that: a theory. There are other possibilities – for example, the prions could have somehow encouraged the growth of amyloid protein. That would mean people who are already infected with prions are at an increased risk of early-onset Alzheimer's disease. However, it's also important to remember no-on...
Source: NHS News Feed - September 10, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology Source Type: news

No evidence that Alzheimer's can be transmitted through surgery
This study has made a possible link in four cases of specific treatment with growth hormone before 1985, but it is important not to jump to conclusions about what this important, but small, research study might mean.  There has never been a proven case of transmission by neurosurgery. Modern surgical equipment in the UK is very safe and the NHS has extremely stringent procedures to make sure of this. These include using single-use instruments where possible, and developing special equipment that reduces the risk of contamination. If single-use instruments cannot be used, then there are processes in place to trac...
Source: NHS News Feed - September 9, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology QA articles Source Type: news

Prion trials and tribulations: Finding the right tools and experimental models
Prions are fascinating, enigmatic, and might teach us not only about rare prion diseases like Creutzfeld-Jakob disease, mad cow disease, or scrapie, but also about other more common neurodgenerative diseases. Two studies report progress with novel tools and paradigms to study prion disease. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - July 2, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Prion trials and tribulations: Finding the right tools and experimental models
(PLOS) Prions are fascinating, enigmatic, and might teach us not only about rare prion diseases like Creutzfeld-Jakob disease, mad cow disease, or scrapie, but also about other more common neurodgenerative diseases. Two studies published on July 2 in PLOS Pathogens report progress with novel tools and paradigms to study prion disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 2, 2015 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Solving the next step in the mystery of prions
Working towards the ultimate goal to develop therapeutics to treat diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, ALS, and BSE (Mad Cow Disease), scientists are investigating the physical principles underlying the formation of misfolded protein aggregates. The aggregates of misfolded proteins -- proteins that clump together in the 'wrong' structure -- feature prominently in these fatal degenerative diseases. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 25, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Can Cannibalism Fight Brain Disease? Only Sort Of.
Can cannibalism fight a rare brain disease? That’s what multiple headlines have suggested this week, but don’t pick up your fork just yet. A study published Wednesday in the scientific journal Nature found that people of Papua New Guinea’s Fore tribe -- a group that formerly consumed the brains of family members at funerals -- are now resistant to a rare, degenerative brain disease called Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). However, the reason that they developed this resistance to the disease is because their brain-eating practice led to a major outbreak of kuru -- a specific type of CJD -- in the 1950s, ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 12, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Could brain-eating cannibals provide the key to treating CJD?
This study used genetically modified mice to test whether this genetic mutation was protective against kuru and CJD. The tests showed that mice with this genetic mutation were indeed resistant to these prion diseases.The results suggest that this mutation could be responsible for the kuru resistance seen in the survivors. It is hoped this finding may eventually help to develop effective treatments for prion diseases, but much more research will be needed to get to that point. Links To The Headlines Eating brains helped Papua New Guinea tribe become disease resistant, claims research. The Daily Telegraph, June 10 2015Eating...
Source: NHS News Feed - June 11, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology Source Type: news

Naturally occurring genetic variation gives complete resistance in prion diseases
Researchers at the Medical Research Council's Prion Unit have identified a naturally occurring variant of the human prion protein that produces resistance to prion diseases such as... (Source: Parkinson's Disease News From Medical News Today)
Source: Parkinson's Disease News From Medical News Today - June 11, 2015 Category: Neurology Tags: CJD / vCJD / Mad Cow Disease Source Type: news