Low mood, visual hallucinations, and falls - heralding the onset of rapidly progressive probable sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in a 73-year old: a case report - Klotz DM, Penfold RS.
BACKGROUND: Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is a rare and rapidly fatal neurodegenerative disease. Since clinicians may see only very few cases during their professional career, it is important to be familiar with the clinical presentation and progression, to pe... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

Update: Dura Mater Graft –Associated Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease — Japan, 1975–2017
(Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - March 8, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

The bright side of an infectious protein
(Max-Planck-Gesellschaft) Prions are self-propagating protein aggregates that can be transmitted between cells. The aggregates are associated with human diseases. Indeed, pathological prions cause mad cow disease and in humans Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The aggregation of prion-like proteins is also associated with neurodegeneration as in ALS. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 9, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Prions found in skin of people with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease
Researchers detected abnormal prion proteins in the skin of people who died from Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The results suggest that skin samples might be used to detect prion disease. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - December 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Spain reports atypical mad cow disease on farm: OIE
PARIS (Reuters) - Spain has reported case of atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) on a farm in the Castile and Leon region, the Paris-based World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) said on Monday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - November 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Alan Dickinson obituary
Geneticist who carried out groundbreaking research into the behaviour of diseases including scrapie and CJDThe geneticist Alan Dickinson, who has died aged 87, was aware even as a young man that he might not live to answer the question that dominated his career: what causes mind-rotting diseases such as scrapie in sheep and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in people? Such was the risk faced by a scientist who in the 1950s chose to specialise in a field then known as “slow viruses”.As these disorders, joined in the 1980s by mad cow disease, were reclassified over the years as transmissible spongiform encephalopat...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Emily Green Tags: Genetics Health BSE Society Rural affairs Source Type: news

Abnormal Proteins Discovered in Skin of Patients With Rare Brain Disease
Finding so-called prions in skin samples may lead to early diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. But the discovery also hints at possible risks from surgery. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - November 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DENISE GRADY Tags: Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Mad Cow Disease (Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy) Chronic Wasting Disease Brain Nobel Prizes National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases University of California, San Francisco Source Type: news

NIH scientists and collaborators find prion protein in skin of CJD patients
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) NIAID scientists and collaborators at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have detected abnormal prion protein in the skin of several people who died from Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). The scientists also exposed healthy mice to skin extracts from two CJD patients, and all developed prion disease. The study results raise questions about the possible transmissibility of prion diseases via medical procedures involving skin, and whether skin samples might be used to detect prion disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Getting under the skin of prion disorders
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) Infectious prion proteins -- the causative agents of the fatal neurodegenerative disorder Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease -- can be detected in the skin of afflicted individuals, researchers now report. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 22, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Researchers find infectious prions in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patient skin
(Case Western Reserve University) In a Science Translational Medicine study published today, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine researchers found that CJD patients also harbor infectious prions in their skin, albeit at lower levels. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 22, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Brain cell advance brings fresh hope for CJD therapies
(University of Edinburgh) Scientists at the University of Edinburgh have developed a new system to study Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in the laboratory, paving the way for research to find treatments for the fatal brain disorder. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 20, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Diabetes could be spread through toxic meat like mad cow disease
A new study inJournal of Experimental Medicine suggests diabetes may be spread through meat or blood transfusions by means of misshapen proteins.The Times (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - August 2, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Is diabetes infectious? It may be spread through meat
Researchers from the University of Texas found that ingesting protein 'seeds' may be responsible for diabetes, similar to the spread of mad cow disease from cattle to humans via infected beef. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Alabama finds atypical mad cow case, no human threat seen
(Reuters) - An 11-year-old cow in Alabama tested positive for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), commonly known as mad cow disease, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said on Tuesday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - July 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Mad Cow Disease in California
(Source: eMedicineHealth.com)
Source: eMedicineHealth.com - May 3, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Two older drugs could be 'repurposed' to fight dementia
Conclusion This early stage experimental research has demonstrated a beneficial neurological effect of trazodone and dibenzoylmethane on mice with diseases mimicking neurodegenerative diseases. It is important to acknowledge that this is animal research and therefore the drugs might not have the same effect when they are trialled on humans. That being said, trazodone is already an approved drug for depression and sleep problems and has therefore already passed safety tests. If the mechanisms of neurodegeneration in humans and mice are similar, it is possible trazodone could be used in the future in treating Alzheimer's and...
Source: NHS News Feed - April 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Older people Neurology Medication Source Type: news

Spain finds atypical mad cow case, sees no trade curbs
PARIS/MADRID (Reuters) - Spain has confirmed a case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), commonly known as mad cow disease, in the northwestern province of Castilla y Leon, the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) said on Friday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - March 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Spain confirms atypical mad cow case: OIE
PARIS (Reuters) - Spain has confirmed a case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), commonly known as mad cow disease, in the northwestern province of Castilla y Leon, the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) said on Friday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - March 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Prion Test For Rare, Fatal Brain Disease Helps Families Cope
Scientists now have a fairly noninvasive way to test for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, a rare form of dementia. A similar test, they say, might offer earlier diagnoses of Parkinson's and Alzheimer's.(Image credit: Keith Negley for NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rae Ellen Bichell Source Type: news

Could Mad Cow Disease be about to return?
Tests carried out on an 18-year-old animal that died on a farm in County Galway, Ireland, found that it had bovine spongiform encephalopathy. But experts say there is no risk to meat lovers. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Ireland reports 'mad cow' case, says no risk to health
DUBLIN (Reuters) - Ireland said on Wednesday that a dead cow had been confirmed as having bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), known as mad cow disease, but said it had not entered the food chain and there was no risk to human health or beef's trade status. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - January 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

New method accurately detects prions in blood
A sensitive blood test accurately detected variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, an incurable and fatal neurodegenerative disorder. The method could be used to diagnose prion diseases and prevent disease transmission. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - January 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New Creutzfeldt-Jakob Diagnostic Test'100%' Accurate New Creutzfeldt-Jakob Diagnostic Test'100%' Accurate
A new test algorithm combining samples of cerebrospinal fluid and nasal swabbing should lead to definitive diagnosis of this prion disease.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines - January 6, 2017 Category: Neurology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

General Hospital actress Barbara Tarbuck dies of human mad cow disease at 74
Tarbuck's 14-year run on the ABC soap, from 1996 until 2010, was that of Lady Jane Jacks, the mother of Jax Jacks (Ingo Rademacher). She also had regular roles on Falcon Crest and Santa Barbara. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 30, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

[In Depth] New blood tests make strides in detecting prion disease
More than 10 years after peak of the "mad cow disease" epidemic that killed more than 200 people in Europe, the threat of the fatal brain disorder caused by eating contaminated meat is still real. Thousands of Europeans are thought to be asymptomatic carriers for variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, caused by misfolded proteins called prions. Because they can spread prions through blood donations, researchers have for years sought a test to safeguard blood supplies. Two papers published this week in Science Translational Medicine bring the field closer to that goal. They describe related methods for detecting prion...
Source: ScienceNOW - December 22, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Kelly Servick Tags: Biochemistry Source Type: news

Medical News Today: New blood test for prion disease looks promising
A new biochemical test that detects prions in blood shows promise for early, pre-symptom diagnosis of vCJD and improving safety of blood supply. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: CJD / vCJD / Mad Cow Disease Source Type: news

UTHealth research could lead to blood test to detect Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston) The detection of prions in the blood of patients with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease could lead to a noninvasive diagnosis prior to symptoms and a way to identify prion contamination of the donated blood supply, according to researchers at McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 21, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Mad Cow Disease and Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob
Disease (Source: eMedicineHealth.com)
Source: eMedicineHealth.com - November 17, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Urine test may detect Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease
Ryan MaassWASHINGTON, Oct. 4 (UPI) -- Researchers at the Medical Research Council in Britain have discovered it may be possible to test patients for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease using urine samples. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - October 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A urine test for Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease may be possible
Researchers at the MRC Prion Unit at UCL have found that it may be possible to determine whether or not a person has sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (sCJD) by testing their urine for the presence of abnormal prion proteins. (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - October 4, 2016 Category: Research Source Type: news

Urine test for CJD 'a possibility'
UK scientists believe urine could be used for a quick and simple way to test for CJD or "human mad cow disease". (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - October 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Prions can pass on beneficial traits, Stanford study finds
(Stanford University Medical Center) Prion proteins, best known as the agents of deadly brain disorders like mad cow disease, can help yeast survive hard times and pass the advantageous traits down to their offspring, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 3, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Newly discovered infectious prion structure shines light on mad cow disease
Groundbreaking research has identified the structure of the infectious prion protein, the cause of'mad cow disease'or BSE, chronic wasting disease in deer and elk and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, which has long remained a mystery. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 8, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

First Glimpse at Infectious Prion Shape
The preliminary structure of the misfolded protein that causes mad cow disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease looks like a coiled mattress spring. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - September 8, 2016 Category: Science Tags: Daily News, News & Opinion Source Type: news

Newly discovered infectious prion structure shines light on mad cow disease
(University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine& Dentistry) Groundbreaking research from the University of Alberta has identified the structure of the infectious prion protein, the cause of 'mad cow disease' or BSE, chronic wasting disease in deer and elk and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, which has long remained a mystery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 8, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Beneficial role clarified for brain protein associated with mad cow disease
Scientists have clarified details in understanding the beneficial function of a type of protein normally associated with prion diseases of the brain, such as bovine spongiform encephalopathy (commonly known as mad cow disease) and its human counterpart, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - August 8, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Impact of prion proteins on the nerves revealed for the first time
(University of Zurich) When prion proteins mutate, they trigger mad cow and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Although they are found in virtually every organism, the function of these proteins remained unclear. Researchers from the University of Zurich and the University Hospital Zurich now demonstrate that prion proteins, coupled with a particular receptor, are responsible for nerve health. The discovery could yield novel treatments for chronic nerve diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 8, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Properties of Graft-Associated Creutzfeldt-Jakob DiseaseProperties of Graft-Associated Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease
In this paper, the authors introduce a new method for identifying iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease using protein misfolding cyclic amplification. Laboratory Investigation (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - July 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pathology & Lab Medicine Journal Article Source Type: news

USF professor studying similarities in Alzheimer's and CTE from head injuries
(University of South Florida (USF Innovation)) A USF physics professor studying chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a recently discovered brain disease in athletes who have suffered repeated brain trauma from on-field collisions, suggests possibility that CTE can start when an on-field collision generates a 'seed' that spreads within the damaged brain, comparable to 'prion diseases,' such as 'mad cow disease,' where a damaged protein can transmit its damaged state to its healthy counterparts and subsequently induces spreading of protein abnormality. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 9, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

New assay offers improved detection of deadly prion diseases
Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), or prion diseases, are a family of rare progressive, neurodegenerative illnesses that affect both humans and animals. TSE surveillance is important for public health and food safety because TSEs have the potential of crossing from animals to humans, as seen with the spread of mad cow disease, or bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). A new study describes an advanced assay that offers better sensitivity than currently available tests for detecting a prion disease affecting elk. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 8, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

New assay offers improved detection of deadly prion diseases
(Elsevier Health Sciences) Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), or prion diseases, are a family of rare progressive, neurodegenerative illnesses that affect both humans and animals. TSE surveillance is important for public health and food safety because TSEs have the potential of crossing from animals to humans, as seen with the spread of mad cow disease, or bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). A study in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics describes an advanced assay that offers better sensitivity than currently available tests for detecting a prion disease affecting elk. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 8, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Can Alzheimer’s be transmitted between people?
The latest effort has been launched by researchers in Canada who will be studying the brains of four people who died after transplants gave them Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

France confirms case of mad cow disease
PARIS (Reuters) - France's agriculture ministry confirmed on Thursday that a case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), or mad cow disease, had been discovered in the northeastern region of Ardennes. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - March 24, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Fayetteville hospital fights Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease
An Arkansas hospital shut down its operating rooms and sterilized surgical equipment after a possible diagnosis of a rare brain disease, state health officials said. The disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob, was detected in a patient at Washington Regional Medi... (Source: WDSU.com - Health)
Source: WDSU.com - Health - March 17, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A toxic byproduct of hemoglobin could provide treatments for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease
Scientists at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have identified a novel mechanism that could be used to protect the brain from damage due to stroke and a variety of... (Source: Parkinson's Disease News From Medical News Today)
Source: Parkinson's Disease News From Medical News Today - March 8, 2016 Category: Neurology Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

New clues that Alzheimer’s may have been spread during surgery
ConclusionThis latest research adds some evidence to the possibility that amyloid beta proteins could have been passed on during certain types of treatment, which introduced substances derived from donor brains or pituitary glands into the body. However, these types of treatment are no longer used. The theory is far from certain, and other possible causes need to be investigated. Even if the theory was proven, we don't know that having these proteins introduced into the brain in this way would cause Alzheimer's disease. All the evidence showing amyloid protein in the brain after medical treatment has come from studies of t...
Source: NHS News Feed - January 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology Medical practice Source Type: news

Behind the Headlines' Top Five of Top Fives 2015
In this study, researchers wanted to see why this is and if there could be any human applications.Researchers collected white blood cells from African and Asian elephants. They found that elephants have at least 20 copies of a gene called TP53. TP53 is known to encourage cell "suicide" when DNA is damaged, stopping any potential cancer in its tracks. In contrast, humans are thought to have only a single copy of the TP53 gene.Of course the big question – the elephant in the room, if you will – is how we can boost TP53 activity in humans to stimulate a similar protective effect. The simple answer is: we...
Source: NHS News Feed - December 24, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: QA articles Medical practice Special reports Source Type: news

Behind the Headlines Top Five of Top Fives 2015
In this study, researchers wanted to see why this is and if there could be any human applications. Researchers collected white blood cells from African and Asian elephants. They found elephants have at least 20 copies of a gene called TP53. TP53 is known to encourage cell "suicide" when DNA is damaged, stopping any potential cancer in its tracks. In contrast, humans are thought to have only a single copy of the TP53 gene. Of course the big question – the elephant in the room, if you will – is how we can boost TP53 activity in humans to stimulate a similar protective effect. The simple answer is: we do...
Source: NHS News Feed - December 24, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: QA articles Medical practice Special reports Source Type: news

Inside The NASA Mission To Answer 'What Is Life?'
“Why would NASA want to study a lake in Canada?” Three different border guards asked me variations on that question, and while they ultimately let me pass, it was obvious they didn’t understand. Why is NASA interested in a lake in Canada? And what business is it of mine? As exotic environments go, Pavilion Lake in British Columbia is rather ordinary. Certainly it’s remote – the closest major city is Vancouver, a long drive away over the mountains. The closest towns are light dustings of houses over the dry slopes, and the road winds for dozens of kilometers of empty desert country between them...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 6, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news