Cancer-fighting therapy shows promise as treatment to speed up wound healing

A type of targeted therapy that has shown promising results treating advanced melanoma could also be used to help speed up how the skin repairs itself from injury, UCLA researchers have found, providing a potential new way to accelerate healing of acute and chronic wounds. In the United States alone, chronic wounds affect more than 6.5 million people and an estimated $50 billion is spent annually treating these conditions. Many areas of medicine — from improving recovery times after surgery to reducing skin-related secondary effects of cancer treatments and other diseases — can benefit from speeding up the skin’s healing process. Aiming to meet this urgent and unmet need, the UCLA researchers investigated a new class of cancer therapy called BRAF inhibitors. These drugs work by blocking a mutated gene in melanoma, which rapidly shrinks the tumor. This can set off a cellular cascade in other skin cells in a process called paradoxical MAPK activation, which can lead to a variety of skin-related side effects, said Dr. Antoni Ribas, director of the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center Tumor Immunology Program and senior author of the study. “We set out to take advantage of our mechanistic understanding of these drugs and see if we could turn a side effect into a potentially beneficial effect,” Ribas said. “These agents have great potential to be used to develop topical treatments to greatly accelerate wound healing.” The three-year st...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

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Authors: Koehler LA, Hunter DW Abstract Axillary web syndrome (AWS) is a frequently overlooked problem that causes morbidity in the early post-operative period following cancer surgery with axillary lymph node removal (1-3). AWS, also known as “cording” was first described in 2001 by Moskovitz as “a visible web of axillary skin overlying palpable cords of tissue that are made taut by shoulder abduction” (1). Over a decade has passed since Moskovitz’s seminal article was published, and we still lack a good understanding of AWS. This condition has been suboptimally studied using widely d...
Source: Lymphology - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Lymphology Source Type: research
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Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Authors: Skowronski M, Risør MB, Andersen RS, Foss N Abstract Little is known about how people living in the aftermath of cancer treatment experience and manage worries about possible signs of cancer relapse, not as an individual enterprise but as socially embedded management. One-year ethnographic fieldwork was conducted in a coastal village of under 3000 inhabitants in northern Norway. Ten villagers who had undergone cancer treatment from six months to five years earlier were the main informants. During fieldwork, the first author conducted qualitative, semi-structured monthly interviews with them, and par...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research
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Source: Minerva Chirurgica - Category: Surgery Tags: Minerva Chir Source Type: research
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Source: CNN.com - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
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