Moderate Exercise Might be More Effective at Combatting Pre-Diabetes

Contact: Amara Omeokwe Phone: 919-681-4239 Email: amara.omeokwe@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE ON Monday, July 18, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. -- Walking briskly on a regular basis may be more effective than vigorous jogging for improving glucose control in individuals with pre-diabetes, according to research from Duke Health.  The findings, published online July 15 in the journal Diabetologia, are the result of a randomized, six-month study of 150 participants, each of whom was designated as having pre-diabetes based on elevated fasting glucose levels.  Study participants were randomized into four groups. The first group followed an intervention modeled after the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), considered a gold standard, that aims to achieve a 7 percent body weight reduction over 6 months. The program requires cutting calories, eating a low-fat diet, and exercising. Study participants in this group adopted the diet changes, and performed moderate-intensity exercise equivalent to 7.5 miles of brisk walking in a week.  Other study participants were randomly assigned to receive exercise only, using different amounts and intensities: low-amount at moderate intensity (equivalent to walking briskly for 7.5 miles per week); high-amount at moderate intensity (equivalent to walking briskly for 11.5 miles per week); and high-amount at vigorous intensity (equivalent to jogging for 11.5 miles per week).    “We know the benefits of life...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

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Source: OnMedica Latest News - Category: UK Health Source Type: news
This study demonstrates for the first time that senescent cells secrete functional LTs, significantly contributing to the LTs pool known to cause or exacerbate idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Against Senolytics https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/11/against-senolytics/ There is no consensus in science that is so strong as to have no heretics. So here we have an interview with a naysayer on the matter of senolytic treatments, who argues that the loss of senescent cells in aged tissues will cause more harm to long-term health than the damage they will do by remaining. To be clear, I think this to be a ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Much of the long-term harm caused by excess visceral fat tissue is due to raised levels of chronic inflammation, the inappropriate over-activation of the immune system characteristic of both obesity and aging. Chronic inflammation accelerates the progression of near all of the common age-related conditions. There are numerous mechanisms via which fat tissue rouses an immune response: cellular debris that triggers immune cells into action; generation of excessive numbers of senescent cells; inappropriate signaling from fat cells that mimics the response to infection; infiltration of inflammatory macrophages into fat tissue;...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
AbstractPurpose of ReviewCommercialization of an automated epidermal harvesting device (CelluTome ™, Kinetic Concepts Inc., San Antonio, TX) in the last 6 years has led to numerous publications describing a growing number of clinical applications. The current article reviews this literature while summarizing outcomes.Recent FindingsA total of 20 published reports including 284 automated graft recipients have been published. Complete reepithelialization occurs in 50 –92% of recipient sites, often within 4–18 weeks of graft placement. Donor sites heal without scarring within 1–2 weeks.S...
Source: Current Dermatology Reports - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
I have been blogging recently about the rationale for the recent Google purchase of Fitbit (see:Google to acquire Fitbit, valuing the smartwatch maker at about $2.1 billion). At first glance, it's somewhat unusual because Google is primarily known for software and not hardware. On the other hand, the huge wellness and fitness market is an attractive target. A recent article speculated on the"real reason" for the purchase (see:The Real Reason Google Is Buying Fitbit) and below is an excerpt from the article:Google already has plenty of hardware and software chops. What else does it get out of the Fitbit d...
Source: Lab Soft News - Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Cost of Healthcare Diagnostics Health Wearable Healthcare Information Technology Healthcare Innovations Healthcare Insurance Hospital Financial Medical Consumerism Medical Research Point-of-Care Testing Preventive Medicine Test Kits Source Type: blogs
In announcing its planned $2.1 billion acquisition of fitness tracking company Fitbit, Google said the deal will “help spur innovation in wearables” — at least, that’s how Senior Vice President of Devices &Services Rick Osterloh put it in a blog post. If completed, the move would spell the end of an independent Fitbit, a 12-year-old hardware firm credited with popularizing the self-quantifying phenomenon that has so many of us comparing our daily step counts against our friends and loved ones. Google has already spent big money on wearable tech — in 2019, it paid $40 million for technology...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Google onetime Source Type: news
AbstractBackgroundAmong burn patients, research is conflicted, but may suggest that females are at increased risk of mortality, despite the opposite being true in non-burn trauma. Our objective was to determine whether sex-based differences in burn mortality exist, and assess whether patient demographics, comorbid conditions, and injury characteristics explain said differences.MethodsAdult patients admitted with burn injury —including inhalation injury only—between 2004 and 2013 were included. Inverse probability of treatment weights (IPTW) and inverse probability of censor weights (IPCW) were calculated using ...
Source: World Journal of Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Earlier this year, Medgadget reported on the FDA’s clearance of the SEM Scanner, a device created by Los Angeles-based Bruin Biometrics (BBI). The SEM Scanner is a wireless, handheld device that detects changes in sub-epidermal moisture as an i...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Critical Care Exclusive Medicine Plastic Surgery Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs
BOSTON (CNN) — Robert Chelsea just got a new face, and with it, he is the latest milestone in the burgeoning world of facial transplant surgery. He is the first African American to receive a full facial transplant, with a successful surgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. A black patient in Paris received a partial face transplant in 2007. At 68 years old, he’s the oldest person to undergo the surgery as well. “It’s a great wonder,” Chelsea told CNN in a phone interview on Friday. “This whole process gave me a whole new dimension on seeing myself.” After the standa...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health Offbeat Syndicated CBSN Boston Brigham and Women's Hospital Source Type: news
Robert Chelsea turned down the first face he was offered. It was a fine face, one that could have taken him off the transplant waiting list after just a couple months. But Chelsea—severely disfigured after a catastrophic car accident five years earlier—was in no hurry. He’d gotten used to tilting his head back so food and water wouldn’t fall out of his nearly lipless mouth. He knew how to respond compassionately to children who stared in shock and fear. The face, offered in May 2018, had belonged to a man with skin that was much fairer than what remained of Chelsea’s—so light that Chelse...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Healthcare Source Type: news
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