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Eating Frozen Yogurt, Low-Fat Dairy Products Raises Parkinson ’ s Risk, Study Finds
CBS Local– Low-fat dairy products — such as frozen yogurt — are shown to raise the risk of developing Parkinson’s disease, according to a new study conducted by researchers from Harvard University’s Chan School of Public Health. The study, published in Neurology, says that the risk of developing Parkinson’s for those who consume three or more servings of low-fat dairy products of a day is raised, while those consuming one or less servings per day have a lower risk of developing the disease. While the differences aren’t huge, and the overall risk of a person gett...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - June 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Parkinson's Disease study finds Source Type: news

Do you eat 'low-fat' branded food? Parkinson’s disease could be triggered by THIS
SHAKING hands and muscle stiffness are two of the main symptoms of Parkinson ’s disease; a new study has revealed eating too much low-fat dairy could trigger the condition. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - June 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Low-Fat Dairy Linked to Increased Parkinson's Risk Low-Fat Dairy Linked to Increased Parkinson's Risk
Low-fat dairy foods are associated with an increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease, results from a large prospective study show.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - June 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Low-fat dairy intake may raise Parkinson's risk
Researchers have uncovered a link between higher intake of low-fat dairy products - particularly skim or low-fat milk - and a greater risk of Parkinson's. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Parkinson's Disease Source Type: news

Low-fat dairy intake may raise Parkinson's risk
Researchers have uncovered a link between higher intake of low-fat dairy products - particularly skim or low-fat milk - and a greater risk of Parkinson's. (Source: Parkinson's Disease News From Medical News Today)
Source: Parkinson's Disease News From Medical News Today - June 8, 2017 Category: Neurology Tags: Parkinson's Disease Source Type: news

Does a Low-Fat Dairy Habit Boost Parkinson's Risk?
THURSDAY, June 8, 2017 -- Though you might think eating low-fat dairy foods is a healthy move, new research suggests the habit is tied to a slight rise in the risk of developing Parkinson's disease. Experts who reviewed the study stressed that the... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - June 8, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Low fat dairy raises risk of Parkinson's disease  
Eating three or more portions of low fat dairy a day raises risk by 34 per cent compared to eating less than one serving, say researchers from the University of Harvard. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Parkinson's warning: Three portions of low-fat dairy products a day raises your risk
EATING three or more portions of low-fat dairy products a day raise the risk of developing Parkinson's Disease, warns new research. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - June 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Review finds no link between dairy and heart attack or stroke risk
Conclusion This large meta-analysis of cohort studies demonstrated no increased risk to cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease or all-cause death from eating dairy products. The review has strengths in its large size and the fact it was able to analyse different types of dairy product, such as high and low-fat and everyday products such as cheese and yoghurt. However, there are a number of factors to consider: The results of a systematic review are only as good as the quality of the underlying studies. These are all observational studies and it's possible that unadjusted health and lifestyle factors are having an...
Source: NHS News Feed - May 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Heart/lungs Neurology Source Type: news

Eating Full-Fat Cheese Won ’ t Raise Chance Of Heart Attack, Study Finds
CBS Local —  Pass the cheese, please. While it may not be the healthiest thing in the world, a new study claims that full-fat dairy products are not as bad as once thought. Eating full-fat cheese, milk or yogurt does not increase the risk of a heart attack or stroke, according to a study published in European Journal of Epidemiology, via Guardian, The study was an in-depth analysis of 29 prior studies that looked at the link between dairy products and risk of cardiovascular disease or heart problems. Their findings were such that these dairy products have a “neutral” effect on those ar...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - May 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Cheese study finds Source Type: news

It's Time To Admit That 'Diet' Food Is Bogus
There are no quick fixes to be found at the grocery store. While some nutrition plans can help you achieve your weight loss or health goals, they probably don’t include foods with the word “diet” or “low-fat” on the label. For the casual follower of nutrition trends, this may sound obvious. But data on consumer habits show we’re still eating this stuff, according to Zhaoping Li, the director of the Center of Human Nutrition at the University of California-Los Angeles. Just take one look at the grocery aisle and you’ll see beloved brands like Halo Top and Arctic Zero ice cream,...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sat-Fat Bait And Switch
The pattern of provocations, proclamations and click-bait innuendo related to saturated fat is fairly clear to anyone who reads past the headlines. It’s entirely clear to anyone who actually reads the studies that are blithely cited, and routinely misrepresented, in a show of pseudo-erudition (look at me; I can cite a scientific paper!). Just about every missive inviting you to eat more bacon-cheeseburgers and pepperoni pizza or douse yourself with butter is a bait and switch, and those that are otherwise- are simply wrong. What do I mean? Here’s a short list of the bait that draws you in, and th...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Low-fat milk, yogurt may reduce depression risk
A study of more than 1,000 Japanese adults finds that higher intake of low-fat milk and yogurt may reduce the likelihood of developing depressive symptoms. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

It Seemed Like Such a Good Idea (Gwen Moritz Editor's Note)
I wish I were as fat as I was the first time I thought I was fat, so something in Senior Editor Mark Friedman’s health column last week jumped out at me: Dr. Bruce Murphy, CEO of the Arkansas Heart Hospital, included artificial sweeteners in a list of factors contributing to the obesity epidemic that led his company to add weight-loss surgery to its menu of services. Last year, The New York Times revealing that, in the 1960s when I was a tot, the sugar industry actually paid researchers “to play down the link between sugar and heart disease and promote saturated fat as the culprit instead.” As a result of...
Source: Arkansas Business - Health Care - March 27, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Low-fat meal may boost costly cancer drug
HealthDay News Eating a low-fat meal when taking an expensive prostate cancer drug can cut the cost of the drug by three-quarters, a new study indicates. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - February 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Truth, And The Tribulations Of Randomized Diet Trials
This study has not been done. This study will not be done. Whatever you do, don’t hold your breath waiting for it.But, so what?Let’s contrast our ostensible need for this RCT to how we know what we know about putting out house fires.First, there has never been, to the best of my knowledge, a RCT to show that water is a better choice than gasoline. Do you think we need such a trial, to establish the legitimacy of the basic theme (i.e., use water) of the “right” approach? Would you, and your home, be willing to participate in such a trial when you call 911- knowing you might random...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Low-Fat Meal May Boost Costly Cancer Drug
FRIDAY, Feb. 17, 2017 -- Eating a low-fat meal when taking an expensive prostate cancer drug can cut the cost of the drug by three-quarters, a new study indicates. " We know this drug [Zytiga] is absorbed much more efficiently when taken with food, " ... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 17, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Scientists May Have Figured Out Why Olive Oil Is So Healthy
(Reuters Health) - A traditional Mediterranean diet with added olive oil may be tied to a lower risk of heart disease at least in part because it helps maintain healthy blood flow and clear debris from arteries, a Spanish study suggests.“A Mediterranean diet rich in virgin olive oil improves the function of high-density lipoproteins, HDL, popularly known as `good’ cholesterol,” said lead study author Dr. Alvaro Hernáez of the Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute in Barcelona.This type of diet typically includes lots of fruits and legumes that are rich in antioxidants as well as plenty of veg...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists May Have Figured Out Why Olive Oil Is So Healthy
(Reuters Health) - A traditional Mediterranean diet with added olive oil may be tied to a lower risk of heart disease at least in part because it helps maintain healthy blood flow and clear debris from arteries, a Spanish study suggests.“A Mediterranean diet rich in virgin olive oil improves the function of high-density lipoproteins, HDL, popularly known as `good’ cholesterol,” said lead study author Dr. Alvaro Hernáez of the Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute in Barcelona.This type of diet typically includes lots of fruits and legumes that are rich in antioxidants as well as plenty of veg...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 14, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Taking a high-priced cancer drug with a low-fat meal can cut cost by 75%
Taking one-fourth the standard dose of a widely used drug for prostate cancer with a low-fat breakfast can be as effective – and four times less expensive – as taking the standard dose as recommended: on an empty stomach. The finding has significant financial implications. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 14, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Taking a high-priced cancer drug with a low-fat meal can cut cost by 75 percent
(University of Chicago Medical Center) Taking one-fourth the standard dose of a widely used drug for prostate cancer with a low-fat breakfast can be as effective -- and four times less expensive -- as taking the standard dose as recommended: on an empty stomach. The finding has significant financial implications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 13, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

A Diet Of Alternative Facts
The events culminating in our election outcome were characterized as the advent of a “post truth era.” We have since devolved from post-truth, to “alternative facts:” essentially, a choice between bald-faced lies about verified reality ― or delusion, calling out for medical care. Either way, we are being fed a daily diet of unpalatable (to most of us), insalubrious (for all of us) deceit. Tempting as it is to address that matter, I have a related case to make that keeps me ensconced more decisively in my native professional purview. We are now all dealing with a diet of alternative ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Here's How Americans Ended Up Eating Too Much Sugar
Sugar is the tobacco of the new century, according to investigative science journalist and author Gary Taubes.  With a powerful lobby and a huge consumer base, there are obvious parallels to tobacco, which for decades we didn’t know to be addictive and linked to lung cancer and other diseases. Taubes says sugar is making us dependent and sick, too.  “You can’t think of sugar as a benign pleasure,” Taubes, who is the author of the new book The Case Against Sugar, argued during a recent Facebook Live interview with HuffPost’s “The Scope.”  The average American consumes...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Here's How Americans Ended Up Eating Too Much Sugar
Sugar is the tobacco of the new century, according to investigative science journalist and author Gary Taubes.  With a powerful lobby and a huge consumer base, there are obvious parallels to tobacco, which for decades we didn’t know to be addictive and linked to lung cancer and other diseases. Taubes says sugar is making us dependent and sick, too.  “You can’t think of sugar as a benign pleasure,” Taubes, who is the author of the new book The Case Against Sugar, argued during a recent Facebook Live interview with HuffPost’s “The Scope.”  The average American consumes...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

How Do I Know If I’m Eating Enough Healthy Fat?
  “Dr. Hyman, how do I know if I’m eating enough fat?” a reader recently asked me. This is an excellent question and one of my favorite subjects because I wholeheartedly believe eating the right amount and type of fat plays a crucial role in shaping health and well-being. Doctors, patients and readers are often completely confused about fat, clinging to myths and misinformation that prevents them from understanding the latest science to lose weight and achieve optimal health. You’re familiar with many of these myths: Fat makes us fat, fat contributes to heart disease, and fat leads to obesity. ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

4 Big Fat Food Lies That Make You Fat And Sick
Since the release of my book Eat Fat, Get Thin, I’ve noticed fierce debates on social media and other news sources about things like calorie counting, eating vs. avoiding fat and genetics. When it comes to overall health and weight loss, there’s an excess of advice out there. Unfortunately, most of it is terrible, misguided, outdated and scientifically disproven. This ubiquitously poor advice can create weight loss roadblocks and even damage your health. Here are four prevalent misguided myths that drive me nuts. Myth #1 – All Calories are Created Equal A calorie is a calorie, right? Wrong. This myth that...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Diet rich in processed meat 'may worsen asthma symptoms'
Conclusion This study adds to concerns that cured meats like bacon, ham and sausage may be harmful to our health. Curing was long used to preserve meat before the days of refrigeration. It often involves the use of salt, which in itself may be bad for health, and produces compounds called nitrites. Nitrites are thought to cause inflammation to the airways, which might worsen asthma symptoms. This study does not in itself prove cured meats worsen asthma symptoms. Previous studies have not shown this, and this study does have some limitations. For example, it may not have completely accounted for confounding factors, and...
Source: NHS News Feed - December 21, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Heart/lungs Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Short-term, low-carb diets better for weight loss than low-fat diets
A new clinical review concludes that low-carb diets are safe and effective. Low-carb diets are more effective than low-fat diets in the short-term. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 18, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Low-carb diets may be more effective than low-fat diets
Amy WallaceCHICAGO, Dec. 13 (UPI) -- Analysis of a decade of research found people on low-carb diets lost slightly more weight than people on low-fat diets. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - December 13, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Low-carb diets safe in short term, more effective for weight loss than low-fat diets
People deciding between low-carb and low-fat diets should know the research shows a slight advantage for low-carb diets when it comes to weight loss, according to an article published today in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association. Physicians from the Mayo Clinic in Arizona found low-carb diets (LCDs), including Atkins, South Beach and Paleo, to be safe for up to six months. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - December 13, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Low-carb diets safe in short term, more effective for weight loss than low-fat diets
(American Osteopathic Association) Mayo Clinic researchers analyzing more than a decade of research found people on low-carb diets lost between 2.5 to 8.8 more pounds than people on low-fat diets. The research review also found low-carb diets to be safe in the short-term; i.e., up to six months -- despite concerns that they often lead to greater consumption of meats, which has been linked to increased cancer risk. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 13, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Claim high-fat diets can prevent diabetes 'unproven'
Conclusions This small trial aimed to see whether there is a difference between strictly controlled low-GI diets that contain the same amount of energy, but are either predominantly fat or carbohydrate based. Overall, researchers found the diets caused both weight and fat reduction, with little difference between the two – with the exception of minor differences in certain blood sugar and cholesterol markers, the significance of which is difficult to interpret. These could just be down to chance. The researchers were careful to control the diets and other lifestyle aspects to try to ensure any observed effects ...
Source: NHS News Feed - December 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes Food/diet Source Type: news

This Is What All Effective Weight Loss Diets Have In Common
Low-fat, low-carb, low-sugar, high-protein, Mediterranean -- with so many diets out there and new, sometimes-conflicting research coming out all the time on the best ones for weight loss, how can you possibly know which one will be the most effective in helping you shed pounds? And for doctors and scientists who spend their time designing and carrying out studies, fad diets make for an added challenge. But instead of trying to figure out which diet is best overall, doctors and scientists should focus on determining which diet is best for a certain person, said Christopher Gardner, a research professor of medicine at the St...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 28, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Do we have it backward on giving kids low fat milk instead of whole?
Children who drank whole milk tended to be leaner and have higher vitamin D levels than those who drank low fat or skim milk, a study by Toronto researchers has found. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - November 16, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

To Your Health: NLM update: Low-fat diets reconsidered
Listen to the To Your Health: NLM update on Low-fat diets reconsidered. The transcript is also available. Low-fat diets do not result in reduced body fat or better health outcomes and should be reconsidered as a strategy for adults to lose weight, suggests a recent viewpoint published in the Journal of the American Medical Association... (Source: What's New on MedlinePlus)
Source: What's New on MedlinePlus - November 14, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Of Plate, State And The Calculus Of Hope
In my customary purview- nutrition, public health, disease prevention- I have had cause to lament periodically the apparent hegemony of Newton’s third law. For every silly action we’ve taken over recent decades to address the effects of badly constituted diet on weight and health, we have appended an opposing, but comparably misguided reaction. Believe it or not, this pertains to the high drama of our current political situation, too. Let’s start with our plates; the state of the State can wait. In principle, and famously, we had advice some decades ago to reduce our intake of dietary fat. ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Less carbs, more fat: ketogenic diet makes migraine patients' headaches disappear
Before the ketogenic diet became the latest low-carb diet trend, it was used to treat childhood epilepsy. Doctors had observed that fasting reduced the amount of seizures, and eating mainly fat and little else mimicked the effect of starvation in the brain. In recent years, researchers have made similar positive observations with migraines. Cherubino Di Lorenzo studies the effect of a ketogenic diet on migraine patients and, in his latest paper, their brains at the Sapienza University of Rome. ResearchGate: What is a ketogenic diet? Cherubino di Lorenzo: The ketogenic diet is a particular nutritional regimen that mimics...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - October 27, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

3 Reasons Why You Don’t Need To Fear Dietary Fat, According To Experts
For years, diet-culture and the media has demonized dietary fat. The 80s ushered in the low-fat diet craze, and our societal fear of fat has been prevalent ever since. Although fat is currently not as vilified as it’s been in the past, there are still many people who experience anxiety and guilt surrounding the consumption of high-fat foods. Additionally, fear-mongering surrounding the source and type of fat is increasingly common. For instance, there is an emerging trend of labeling some types of fat as “good” and others as “bad.” As a psychotherapist who specializes in treating individuals w...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 20, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Health Tip: Kids Don't Need a Low-Fat Diet
-- It's important for kids to eat well and to practice healthy habits, but a low-fat diet isn't necessary and may even be harmful, experts say. The American Academy of Pediatrics explains: If dietary fats are replaced by added sugars in a child's... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - October 17, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Health Tip: Kids Don't Need a Low-Fat Diet
Title: Health Tip: Kids Don't Need a Low-Fat DietCategory: Health NewsCreated: 10/17/2016 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 10/17/2016 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Kids Health General)
Source: MedicineNet Kids Health General - October 17, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Source Type: news

When Choosing Cheese, Low-Fat May Not Matter
Cheese with a regular fat content may be as healthy a choice as the low-fat version. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NICHOLAS BAKALAR Tags: Cheese Oils and Fats Diet and Nutrition Cholesterol Source Type: news

Doctor: Low fat diets stuffed with misconceptions (Opinion)
Americans have known that the low-fat diet doesn't work for the last 40 years, so why do we still cling to it? (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - October 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

FDA Wants To Know What You Consider A 'Healthy' Food Product
What do you consider a healthy food product? As a nutritionist, what comes to my mind are whole foods such as fruits, vegetables, nuts, beans, and fish. Few people would debate such foods as being healthy and nutritious. What gets tricky is how the definition pertains to many foods with package labels that are allowed to make claims such as "healthy," "low in fat" or "good source of." The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced last week that it plans to redefine what "healthy" means on packaged food labels. For decades, FDA had defined a product as "healthy" i...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Saturated Fat Remains The Major Issue For Heart Disease
It is funny how two lives can run parallel courses thousands of miles apart to eventually become intertwined. I am a cardiologist trained in interventional therapy (stents) for coronary artery disease (CAD) who has become a passionate advocate of lifestyle and prevention of CAD before stents are needed. I exercise daily using high-intensity protocols. I am appalled by the current status of hospital food. I emphasize the need for increased fruits and vegetables in the diet with reduced added sugars and value the pattern of eating in the Mediterranean (MED) basin as a model for balanced nutrition. I am a student of the volum...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 20, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What The World’s Healthiest Diets Have In Common
To research his 2010 book The 5 Factor World Diet, celebrity trainer and nutritionist Harley Pasternak traveled to the healthiest countries around the world to learn more about what made their meals extra nourishing. He noted that Japanese people eat a wonderful variety of seaweeds, and that Chinese people tried to incorporate at least five different colors in every meal. But Pasternak also came away with some valuable observations about how different the North American way of life was compared to many other countries. For starters, we eat much bigger portions than people in other countries. We don’t prioritize eat...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What The World’s Healthiest Diets Have In Common
To research his 2010 book The 5 Factor World Diet, celebrity trainer and nutritionist Harley Pasternak traveled to the healthiest countries around the world to learn more about what made their meals extra nourishing. He noted that Japanese people eat a wonderful variety of seaweeds, and that Chinese people tried to incorporate at least five different colors in every meal. But Pasternak also came away with some valuable observations about how different the North American way of life was compared to many other countries. For starters, we eat much bigger portions than people in other countries. We don’t prioritize eat...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 4, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Dynamic Diet -- Focus On Nutrients And Whole Foods Instead Of Calories
In conclusion, do not fall for calorie counting - it can easily become a trap. It can be really difficult to turn that mentality off even when you don't want to do it anymore. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Moderate Exercise Might be More Effective at Combatting Pre-Diabetes
Contact: Amara Omeokwe Phone: 919-681-4239 Email: amara.omeokwe@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE ON Monday, July 18, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. -- Walking briskly on a regular basis may be more effective than vigorous jogging for improving glucose control in individuals with pre-diabetes, according to research from Duke Health.  The findings, published online July 15 in the journal Diabetologia, are the result of a randomized, six-month study of 150 participants, each of whom was designated as having pre-diabetes based on elevated fasting glucose levels.  Study participants were randomized into fo...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - July 19, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Summer is the perfect time to fine tune your diet
It’s July, and the year 2016 is half over! If in January you promised yourself that you’d eat healthier, it’s not too late! In fact, summer is a great time to fine tune and upgrade your diet. The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans is a good roadmap. Here’s how you can get started. Establish a healthy eating pattern Rather than focus on nutrients, percentages, or grams, let’s eat real, whole food. Vegetables are the go-to food. Most are low in calories, high in fiber, and full of nutrients Fruit, especially whole fruits, are also key players in eating healthfully. They are loaded with ...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - July 14, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katherine D. McManus, MS, RD Tags: Diet and Weight Loss Health Healthy Eating Source Type: news

Study finds link between saturated fats and early death
Conclusion It's confusing when advice about healthy eating seems to change with each study published, and the experts say different things. However, when you look closely, the two studies mentioned here do not necessarily contradict each other. The researchers who carried out last year's summary of research warned that their conclusions might change based on future studies, and said they had "very low" confidence in the results, because of the quality of the studies that had previously been carried out. We concluded last year that the summary did not rule out the possibility that saturated fat might be ...
Source: NHS News Feed - July 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Heart/lungs Source Type: news