Dissolvable tablets don’t work for people with severe allergies to grass pollen

It’s summertime and—if you’re in Eugene, Oregon—the livin’ is sneezy. Eugene is the nation’s top spot for allergies this week according to IMS Health, a health information company that provides allergy alerts for cities across the nation. Eugene residents can blame their runny noses and itchy eyes on the city’s abundant grasses, which are currently spewing high levels of pollen into the air. Eugene is just the tip of the allergy iceberg. If you live near a patch of green, you routinely inhale pollen. You’re in good company if your body reacts to it. More than 50 million Americans have pollen allergies or hay fever. If you have a troublesome allergy to grass pollen but have resisted getting allergy shots, you might have cheered last year when the FDA approved a no-needles alternative a daily tablet you let dissolve under your tongue. Unfortunately, an analysis of 13 controlled clinical trials published online this week by JAMA Internal Medicine indicates that dissolvable tablets are only slightly more effective than placebos in curtailing classic symptoms of grass pollen allergy—runny nose, itchy eyes, and tickly throat. To make matters worse, more than 60% of people who used the tablets experienced irritating side effects. “I was disappointed when I saw the data indicating how ineffective they are,” says Dr. Nicolas BuSaba, associate professor of otology and laryngology at Harvard Medical School. However, Dr. B...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Asthma and Allergies dissolvable tablets grass pollen allergies Source Type: news

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AbstractPurpose of ReviewThe purpose of this review was to explore mechanisms, causes, and therapies of itchy conditions involving organs beyond the skin including the eyes, ears, nose, and genital region.Recent FindingsConditions which cause itch in these locations vary from skin diseases that extend to these areas (i.e., atopic dermatitis, seborrheic dermatitis, and psoriasis) to allergic conditions (i.e., allergic rhinitis and conjunctivitis) and to neuropathic conditions that relate to afferent nerve fiber damage (i.e., lumbosacral radiculopathies in genital disease) as well as some psychological components. Similar to...
Source: Current Allergy and Asthma Reports - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
(HAMBURG, Pa.) — The spring breezes of 2020 are carrying more than just tree pollen. There’s a whiff of paranoia in the air. For millions of seasonal allergy sufferers, the annual onset of watery eyes and scratchy throats is bumping up against the global spread of a new virus that produces its own constellation of respiratory symptoms. Forecasters are predicting a brutal spring allergy season for swaths of the U.S. at the same time that COVID-19 cases are rising dramatically. That’s causing angst for people who never have had to particularly worry about their hay fever, other than to stock up on antihista...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 News Desk wire Source Type: news
A population-based survey including 3239 urban children (age: 9.0±2.4 y.) in Batumi, Georgia showed a low prevalence of pediatric asthma (diagnosed asthma: 1.8%) and a follow-up clinical examination of survey participants who had no asthma diagnosis but reported asthmatic symptoms revealed 107 previously unknown cases of asthma (undiagnosed asthma: 3.3%). The goal of the study was to verify hypothesis that diagnosed and undiagnosed asthma differ in terms of coexisting allergic disorders. Questionnaire-derived data were used to compare both groups in terms of allergic symptoms (sneezing/runny nose, watery/itchy eyes,...
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Paediatric respiratory epidemiology Source Type: research
When I worked at Greenpeace for five years before I attended medical school, a popular slogan was, “think globally, act locally.” As I write this blog about climate change and hay fever, I wonder if wiping off my computer that I’ve just sneezed all over due to my seasonal allergies counts as abiding by this aphorism? (Can you clean a computer screen with a tissue?) Come to think of it, my allergies do seem to be worse in recent years. So do those of my patients. It seems as if I’m prescribing nasal steroids and antihistamines, recommending over-the-counter eye drops, and discussing ways to avoid all...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Allergies Environmental health Source Type: blogs
Discussion Atopic dermatitis (AD) has a prevalence of 3-5% in the overall U.S. population but is increasing with an estimated 10-15% lifetime risk in childhood. It is even more common in children of color with a prevalence in African-American/black children of 17% and Hispanic children of 14%. Health care utilization data also appears to support more severe disease in children of color also. Atopic dermatitis or eczema is a common dermatological skin problem which characteristically is a pruritic, papular eruption with erythema. Like most papulosquamous eruptions it often occurs in intertrigenous areas in people with alle...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, predominantly type 2 inflammatory skin disease that affects up to 10% of adults and 20% of children [1 –5]. Moderate-to-severe AD is characterized by extensive eczematous lesions, pronounced persistent, severe itch [6–8], substantial pain and discomfort [9–12], and is frequently associated with other type 2 (atopic/allergic) comorbidities, e.g. asthma, allergic rhinitis, chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyposis (CRSwNP), eosinophilic esophagitis, and food allergies [8,13–15], and a significant disease burden, e.g.
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - Category: Dermatology Authors: Source Type: research
Grains can play havoc with your skin. The prolamin proteins, such as gliadin,  trigger autoimmune skin reactions and turn antibodies against the skin enzymes, their lectins fan the fires of inflammation, their proteins provoke allergies, and their amylopectins send blood sugar and insulin sky-high and provoke the skin-disrupting hormone insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF). The whole grain package adds up to an impressive collection of skin conditions that can take a variety of forms, from simple red, itchy rashes to scaly, oily raised patches to large vesicles to gangrene. B...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates Source Type: blogs
Grains can play havoc with your skin. The prolamin proteins, such as gliadin,  trigger autoimmune skin reactions and turn antibodies against the skin enzymes, their lectins fan the fires of inflammation, their proteins provoke allergies, and their amylopectins send blood sugar and insulin sky-high and provoke the skin-disrupting hormone insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF). The whole grain package adds up to an impressive collection of skin conditions that can take a variety of forms, from simple red, itchy rashes to scaly, oily raised patches to large vesicles to gangrene. B...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates Source Type: blogs
This study is a multi-center, pragmatic, two-parallel group, assessor-blind, superiority, individually randomized controlled trial. Atopic dermatitis infants (N  = 650) 7–13 weeks old who develop an itchy rash within the previous 28 days are randomly assigned to the aggressive treatment or the conventional treatment in a 1:1 ratio. The primary outcome is oral food challenge-proven IgE-mediated hen’s egg allergy at the age of 28 weeks.DiscussionThis is a novel pragmatic RCT study to examine the efficacy of early aggressive treatment for atopic dermatitis to prevent later food allergy...
Source: Clinical and Translational Allergy - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
ConclusionsSelf-reported adult-onset AD is common and has distinct phenotypes with lesional predilection for the hands and/or head/neck.
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
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