FrankenSWINE? Scientists bring some functions in a pig's BRAIN ‘back to life’
A research team led by Yale School of Medicine obtained the pigs' brains from abattoirs and placed them in a system they created called BrainEx. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Behavioral disorders in kids with autism linked to reduced brain connectivity
(Yale University) More than a quarter of children with autism spectrum disorder are also diagnosed with disruptive behavior disorders. For the first time, Yale researchers have identified a possible biological cause: a key mechanism that regulates emotion functions differently in the brains of the children who exhibit disruptive behavior. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Yale study revives cellular activity in pig brains hours after death
Yale University scientists have succeeded in restoring basic cellular activity in pigs' brains hours after their deaths in a finding that may one day lead to advances in treating human stroke and brain injuries, researchers reported on Wednesday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - April 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

‘ Partly Alive ’ : Scientists Revive Cells in Brains From Dead Pigs
In research that upends assumptions about brain death, researchers brought some cells back to life — or something like it. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: GINA KOLATA Tags: Brain Ethics and Official Misconduct Animal Abuse, Rights and Welfare Research National Institutes of Health Nature (Journal) Yale University Nita Farahany your-feed-science Source Type: news

Experimental blood pumping system restores some function to brains of dead pigs, study says
A new experiment has raised questions as serious as those surrounding gene editing: A support system delivering artificial blood to pig brains prevented degradation of important neural functions, Yale researchers discovered. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - April 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists Restore Some Brain Activity in Recently Slaughtered Pigs
(NEW YORK) — Scientists restored some activity within the brains of pigs that had been slaughtered hours before, raising hopes for some medical advances and questions about the definition of death. The brains could not think or sense anything, researchers stressed. By medical standards “this is not a living brain,” said Nenad Sestan of the Yale School of Medicine, one of the researchers reporting the results Wednesday in the journal Nature. But the work revealed a surprising degree of resilience among cells within a brain that has lost its supply of blood and oxygen, he said. “Cell death in the brai...
Source: TIME: Science - April 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: MALCOLM RITTER / AP Tags: Uncategorized Brain Activity onetime Source Type: news

Scientists Restore Some Brain Activity in Recently Slaughtered Pigs
(NEW YORK) — Scientists restored some activity within the brains of pigs that had been slaughtered hours before, raising hopes for some medical advances and questions about the definition of death. The brains could not think or sense anything, researchers stressed. By medical standards “this is not a living brain,” said Nenad Sestan of the Yale School of Medicine, one of the researchers reporting the results Wednesday in the journal Nature. But the work revealed a surprising degree of resilience among cells within a brain that has lost its supply of blood and oxygen, he said. “Cell death in the brai...
Source: TIME: Health - April 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Uncategorized Brain Activity onetime Source Type: news

Scientists Restore Some Function In The Brains Of Dead Pigs
The cells regained a startling amount of function, but the brains didn't have activity linked with consciousness. Ethicists see challenges to assumptions about the irreversible nature of brain death.(Image credit: Stefano G. Daniele and Zvonimir Vrselja, Sestan Laboratory, Yale School of Medicine) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nell Greenfieldboyce Source Type: news

Scientists restore some functions in a pig ’s brain hours after death
New Yale research challenges long-held assumptions about the timing and irreversible nature of the cessation of some brain functions after death. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - April 17, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Scientists Bring Pig's Brain, Dead 4 Hours, Back to'Cellular Activity '
WEDNESDAY, April 17, 2019 -- The death of brain cells may not be as sudden, or as irreversible, as previously believed. Four hours after a pig's death, Yale scientists restored circulation and revived cellular activity within the dead animal's... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - April 17, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Sniffles and sneezes: A Q & A about allergies with Dr. Ryan Steele
An instructor of clinical medicine at Yale School of Medicine, Steele discusses allergy prevention, treatments, and other facts allergy sufferers need to know. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - April 17, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Scientists restore some functions in a pig's brain hours after death
(Yale University) Circulation and cellular activity were restored in a pig's brain four hours after its death, a finding that challenges long-held assumptions about the timing and irreversible nature of the cessation of some brain functions after death, Yale scientists report April 18 in the journal Nature. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New test could lead to personalized treatments for cystic fibrosis
The test combines high-speed video microscopy with a novel video analysis algorithm to measure the coordinated movement of cilia in the lungs. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - April 16, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

New drug mimics benefits of ketamine for depression
A new small-molecule drug called NV-5138 has produced a rapid antidepressant response similar to that of ketamine when tested in mice. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - April 16, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Health Tip: Signs of Dyslexia in Preschoolers
-- Signs of dyslexia can appear in a child's earliest years. For parents and teachers, looking for signs in preschoolers can help for early intervention, says the Yale Center for Dyslexia and Creativity. Preschoolers with dyslexia may: Have... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - April 16, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

How inland waters 'breathe' carbon -- and what it means for global systems
(Yale School of Forestry& Environmental Studies) A new Yale study reveals important insights into the factors that influence the release of greenhouse gases from rivers and streams, including a key relationship between storm events, ecology, and topography in moderating this release. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 16, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Genetic sequencing uncovers causes for mysterious liver disease in adults
A Yale study leads the way to explore the genetics of unexplained liver disease in adults — which accounts for up to 30% of cases. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - April 15, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Public health modeling course launching this summer at YSPH
The intensive summer course will prepare practicing professionals with the latest tools that they will need to address existing and emerging health challenges. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - April 15, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Platform to improve teacher quality wins $25,000 YSPH prize
Thanks to his startup EdSightful — a technology solution that aims to boost educational efficacy — Chris Cutrona is the winner of the 2019 Thorne Prize. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - April 12, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Scientist finds skin deep is very deep
Valentina Greco has made singular contributions to knowledge about the function of skin cells, some of which may limit cancer and aid stem cell regeneration. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - April 12, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Alumnus pledges $5 Million for professorship to advance LGBTQ mental health
YSM alum David Kessler ’55 M.D. is directing $5 million from his estate to form the David R. Kessler Endowed Professorship at the Yale School of Public Health. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - April 11, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Endowment to support student research
Jack Levin ’57 M.D. and his wife have made the generous commitment to establish the Jack and Francine Levin Yale-at-MBL Initiative for Student Research. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - April 11, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Scientists find another way HIV can hide from vaccines
New research into how the HIV virus forms so-called “trimers” on its surface to escape the immune system may help lead to more effective treatment. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - April 10, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Organ transplant: finding more ways to save lives
By using organs once thought to be unsuitable, tapping the liver ’s power to regenerate, and more, Yale Medicine experts are making the most of organ donations. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - April 10, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Text Messages Show Promise as Next Step for Improving Heart Health in China
Motivational text messages are a well-liked, feasible new way to provide additional support to Chinese patients with heart disease, reports a preliminary study by researchers at Yale and in China. However, the study did not prove that these targeted text messages led to an improvement in blood pressure control amongst the recipients, the intended outcome. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - April 10, 2019 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

The return of Cthulhu -- the small sea critter
(Yale University) Researchers at Yale, Oxford, the University of Leicester, Imperial College London, and University College London have identified a 430-million-year-old fossil as a new species related to living sea cucumbers. They named the creature Sollasina cthulhu, after H.P. Lovecraft's tentacled monster, Cthulhu. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 9, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Text messages show promise as next step for improving heart health in China
Motivational texts are a well-liked, feasible new way to provide additional support to Chinese patients with heart disease outside of the doctor ’s office. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - April 8, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

New tool helps find genetic culprits in cancer ’s spread
Using CRISPR gene editing technology, Yale researchers have devised a way to identify the complex processes that result in deadly metastasis. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - April 8, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

In cellular world, strong relationships the key to healing old wounds
For the first time, Yale scientists have identified new processes of cell movement in wound healing in outer layer tissue abrasions. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - April 8, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Dr. Barbara Kazmierczak named the Pfeiffer M.D.-Ph.D. Program Director
Kazmierczak focuses her research on bacterial and host factors that allow opportunistic infections to occur. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - April 8, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Text messages show promise as next step for improving heart health in China
(Yale University) Motivational text messages are a well-liked, feasible new way to provide additional support to Chinese patients with heart disease, reports a preliminary study by researchers at Yale and in China. However, the study did not prove that these targeted text messages led to an improvement in blood pressure control amongst the recipients, the intended outcome. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bennett and Kazmierczak appointed to endowed chairs
Anton M. Bennett and Dr. Barbara Kazmierczak were appointed to endowed professorships. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - April 4, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Anton Bennett appointed the Duberg Professor of Pharmacology
Bennett focuses his research on understanding how a family of enzymes known as protein tyrosine phosphatases regulate cell signaling. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - April 4, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Newly discovered seizure disorder mimics epilepsy
Recent research suggests that about 10% of epilepsy patients don ’t have epilepsy at all — they are experiencing “psychogenic non-epileptic seizure,” or PNES. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - April 4, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Bacterial nanowire mystery solved
(Yale University) Deep in the ocean or underground, where there is no oxygen, Geobacter bacteria 'breathe' by projecting tiny protein filaments called 'nanowires' into the soil, to dispose of excess electrons resulting from the conversion of nutrients to energy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 4, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

YSPH video contest spotlights public health issues, student creativity
A $2,500 top prize went to Saskia Comess, M.P.H. ’19, for her video “What About the Air We Breathe?” about the threat of fine particulate matter in toxic air. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - April 3, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Racial disparities persist in access to kidney transplants
Despite a system designed to reduce inequities, patients from underserved groups are still more likely to be listed as “inactive” — ineligible for a new kidney. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - April 3, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Racial disparities persist in access to kidney transplants
(Yale University) In a new study of patients awaiting kidney transplants, Yale researchers found significant racial disparities. This occurred despite a new system designed to reduce inequities, the researchers said. The study was published in JAMA Surgery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Heavy drinking and alcoholism marked by distinct sets of genes
According to new research, among 18 risk genes for drinking, eight are connected with heavy drinkers only, and five are linked only to alcoholism. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - April 2, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

USFA: Connecticut On-Duty Death
The U.S. Fire Administration has announced the official on-duty death of Firefighter/Paramedic James "Woody" Woodman, 55, of the West Haven Fire Department on March 29, 2019. Firefighter/Paramedic James “Woody” Woodman was a member of Recruit Class #15 at the Connecticut State Fire Academy. Only two days after being out of the academy, on October 5, 1999, Woodman was part of an ambulance crew transporting a child who had been struck by a vehicle to the Yale-New Haven Hospital. As they neared the hospital, the ambulance was broadsided by a bus and rolled over multiple times. Woodman sustained a traumat...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - April 1, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: News Ambulances & Vehicle Ops Operations Source Type: news

USFA: Connecticut On-Duty Death
The U.S. Fire Administration has announced the official on-duty death of Firefighter/Paramedic James "Woody" Woodman, 55, of the West Haven Fire Department on March 29, 2019. Firefighter/Paramedic James “Woody” Woodman was a member of Recruit Class #15 at the Connecticut State Fire Academy. Only two days after being out of the academy, on October 5, 1999, Woodman was part of an ambulance crew transporting a child who had been struck by a vehicle to the Yale-New Haven Hospital. As they neared the hospital, the ambulance was broadsided by a bus and rolled over multiple times. Woodman sustained a traumat...
Source: JEMS Operations - April 1, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: News Ambulances & Vehicle Ops Operations Source Type: news

Friedland honored for career's work in South Africa
Dr. Gerald Friedland, professor emeritus and senior research scientist in medicine, was honored for his work in HIV prevention and care in South Africa. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - April 1, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Study links insurance coverage to access to hospital care
Patients who are uninsured or on Medicaid are more likely to be transferred, discharged, or not admitted when seeking care in hospital emergency departments. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - April 1, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Knock down barriers in global physician training
In a new position paper, authors including Yale ’s Tracey Rabin advocate for changes to the “observership” model of short-term clinical training. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - March 28, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Yale faculty featured in new HBO documentary on stress
Yale scientists Amy Arnsten and Rajita Sinha are among experts featured in a new HBO documentary “One Nation Under Stress,” which premiered March 25. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - March 28, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Engineered vessels evolve into living tissue
In a new study, Yale researchers have found that specially bioengineered blood vessels can transform into living tissue after human implantation. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - March 27, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Why measles matters
Yale Medicine experts discuss the importance of vaccination and herd immunity in preventing highly contagious — and possibly fatal — diseases like measles. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - March 27, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Colloquium will unify knowledge about mental health across disciplines
The first-ever Yale Mental Health Colloquium which is open to invited guests only, will take place on Saturday, March 30 at the Yale School of Management. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - March 26, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Unresolved injury, not fibrosis, contributes to cisplatin-induced CKD
New Yale research offers new insight into the progression of acute kidney injury to chronic kidney disease caused by use of the chemotherapy drug cisplatin. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - March 26, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news