A Tribute to Robert M Veatch (1939-2020)
by Lainie Friedman Ross, MD, PhD On November 9, 2020, the bioethics community lost one of its pioneering and iconic figures, and I lost a mentor and friend. I first met Bob in person in June 1991 when I participated in the Intensive Bioethics Program at the Kennedy Institute of Ethics at Georgetown University. Our meeting was not coincidental:  I had called and requested to be in his small group weeks before the course began.  Having no prior coursework in philosophy, I had matriculated into Yale University’s Department of Philosophy in September 1989, inspired by Paul Ramsey’s undergr...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 18, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Featured Posts In Memoriam Source Type: blogs

The Supreme Court's Latest Ruling on Drug Liability and its Implications for Future Failure-to-Warn Litigation
Christopher Morten (New York University), Aaron S. Kesselheim (Harvard Medical School), Joseph Ross (Yale University), The Supreme Court's Latest Ruling on Drug Liability and its Implications for Future Failure-to-Warn Litigation, J. L. Med.& Ethics (2021, Forthcoming): For many years,... (Source: HealthLawProf Blog)
Source: HealthLawProf Blog - November 5, 2020 Category: Medical Law Authors: Katharine Van Tassel Source Type: blogs

Public Health Amici Curiae Brief in Support of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Eviction Moratorium
Emily A. Benfer (Wake Forest University), J.L. Pottenger (Yale University), Richard Tenenbaum (Yale University), Wingo Smith, Emilia Todd (Wake Forest University), Salvatore Minopoli (Yale University), Patrick Monaghan (Yale University), Jacqui Oesterblad (Yale University), Evan Walker-Wells (Yale University), Logan Wren (Yale... (Source: HealthLawProf Blog)
Source: HealthLawProf Blog - November 3, 2020 Category: Medical Law Authors: Katharine Van Tassel Source Type: blogs

A Tribute to Albert R. Jonsen (1931-2020)
by Nancy S. Jecker, Ph.D. Dr. Albert Rupert Jonsen passed away October 21, 2020 at his home in San Francisco at the age of 89. He was known as “Al” to his many colleagues and friends, which I am fortunate to be among. A pioneer and founder of the field of bioethics, Al had been an ordained Roman Catholic Priest and completed a doctoral degree in religious studies at Yale University in 1967, yet left the active priesthood in 1976 to marry his wife, Liz Jonsen.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 2, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Featured Posts In Memoriam Source Type: blogs

Dr Jane Cooke Wright
I recommend Christie Watson's book about her experience of nursing, The language of kindness (1).  There is a chapter about cancer nursing, which mixes Watson's experience of nursing cancer patients with her experience of her father living with cancer, and being nursed by a Marie Curie Nurse.In that chapter, Watson mentions Dr Jane Cooke Wright (1919-2013), clinical oncologist, who discovered the anticancer properties of methotrexate, and investigated anticancer agents in vitro.  She was one of the founders of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, which was started because the America Association for Ca...
Source: Browsing - November 1, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: Black History Month medical history Source Type: blogs

Masking Up: A COVID-19 Face-off between Anti-Mask Laws and Mandatory Mask Orders for Black Americans
Caroline Lawrence (Yale Law School), Masking Up: A COVID-19 Face-off between Anti-Mask Laws and Mandatory Mask Orders for Black Americans, Ca. L. Rev. Online (2020, Forthcoming): Mandatory PPE orders during COVID-19 have forced Black Americans to weigh the dangers of... (Source: HealthLawProf Blog)
Source: HealthLawProf Blog - October 29, 2020 Category: Medical Law Authors: Katharine Van Tassel Source Type: blogs

The Mental Health Pandemic that Did Not Need to Be
by Bandy X. Lee, MD, Mdiv Mary Trump’s recent article pinpointed our problem with “the Goldwater rule”: “in March 2017, shortly after [Donald Trump] was inaugurated, the APA didn’t just reaffirm the rule—it expanded it past the point of coherence.”  This incoherence is the reason why we held an ethics conference at Yale School of Medicine by the title, “Does Professional Responsibility Include a Duty to Warn?” the very next month.  It drew national attention and led to the public-service book, The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump: 37 Psychiatri...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - October 27, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Bandy Lee Tags: Featured Posts Politics Psychiatric Ethics Source Type: blogs

Privacy in Pandemic: Law, Technology, and Public Health in the COVID-19 Crisis
Tiffany C. Li (Yale Law School), Privacy in Pandemic: Law, Technology, and Public Health in the COVID-19 Crisis, 52 (3) Loyola U. Chic. L. J. (2021, Forthcoming): The COVID-19 pandemic has caused millions of deaths and disastrous consequences around the... (Source: HealthLawProf Blog)
Source: HealthLawProf Blog - October 26, 2020 Category: Medical Law Authors: Katharine Van Tassel Source Type: blogs

A Trillion Dollar Question: Who Should Pay for COVID-19?
Sebastian Guidi (Yale Law School), Nahuel Maisley (University of Buenos Aires), A Trillion Dollar Question: Who Should Pay for COVID-19? NYU L. Rev. (2021, Forthcoming) Who should bear the costs of the COVID-19 pandemic? While multilateral institutions are beginning to... (Source: HealthLawProf Blog)
Source: HealthLawProf Blog - October 25, 2020 Category: Medical Law Authors: Katharine Van Tassel Source Type: blogs

Why Is So Much Redistribution In-Kind and Not in Cash? Evidence from a Survey Experiment
Zachary D. Liscow (Yale University), Abigail D. Pershing (Yale Law School), Why Is So Much Redistribution In-Kind and Not in Cash? Evidence from a Survey Experiment, SSRN: Basic economic theory prescribes that redistribution typically take the form of cash rather... (Source: HealthLawProf Blog)
Source: HealthLawProf Blog - October 21, 2020 Category: Medical Law Authors: Katharine Van Tassel Source Type: blogs

Erica Turret, The Affordable Care Act's Litigation Decade
Abbe R. Gluck (Yale University), Erica Turret, The Affordable Care Act's Litigation Decade, 108 (6) Georgetown L. J. (2020): The ACA is the most challenged statute in American history. The first constitutional challenges were filed moments after the law was... (Source: HealthLawProf Blog)
Source: HealthLawProf Blog - October 19, 2020 Category: Medical Law Authors: Katharine Van Tassel Source Type: blogs

How to Make COVID-19 Contact Tracing Apps Work: Insights From Behavioral Economics
Ian Ayres (Yale University), Alessandro Romano (Bocconi University), Chiara Sotis (London School of Economics& Political Science), How to Make COVID-19 Contact Tracing Apps Work: Insights From Behavioral Economics, SSRN: Due to network effects, Contact Tracing Apps (CTAs) are only... (Source: HealthLawProf Blog)
Source: HealthLawProf Blog - October 17, 2020 Category: Medical Law Authors: Katharine Van Tassel Source Type: blogs

How I Got Here: A Webinar on Following Your Own Career Path
There is no single avenue to a scientific career—the paths are as diverse as the people who pursue them. In a recent webinar, two NIGMS-supported researchers shared their unique journeys as scientists and their advice for those seeking careers in the field. The webinar is part of a series from NIGMS created for the research training community—students, postdocs, and faculty. Experts focus on topics from infectious disease modeling to virtual teaching and learning.  Enrique M. De La Cruz, Ph.D., and Tracy Johnson, Ph.D., discuss managing pivotal career decision points, weighing short- and lo...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - October 14, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Chrissa Chverchko Tags: Being a Scientist Cool Videos Source Type: blogs

Fortune favors the bold: How a physician lives up to that motto
My seven-year-old son ’s soccer club motto was “Audentes Fortuna Juvat,” which translates as “fortune favors the bold.”  Many years later, I discovered that this concisely stated philosophy is adhered to by the Trumbull College at Yale University, several U.S. Navy ships, and the 80th TAC Fighter Squadron, amo ng others. In reflecting on my own path […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 9, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/sandra-r-weitz" rel="tag" > Sandra R. Weitz, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Physician Practice Management Source Type: blogs

My New Book on Supreme Court Confirmation Battles
Ilya ShapiroWhen Justice Charles Evans Whittaker retired in March 1962 after just over five years on the Supreme Court, John F. Kennedy had his first opportunity to shape the high court. The youthful president selected a man of his own generation, Byron White. White had met JFK in England while on a Rhodes Scholarship —after having been runner‐​up for the Heisman Trophy and spending a year as the highest ‐​paid player in the NFL—and the two became fast friends.White was a vigorous 45 and serving as the deputy attorney general under Robert F. Kennedy. Kennedy formally nominated him on...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - October 4, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Ilya Shapiro Source Type: blogs

Who ’s Afraid of Section 1498? A Case for Government Patent Use in Pandemics and Other National Crises
Christopher Morten (New York University), Charles Duan (R Street Institute), Who ’s Afraid of Section 1498? A Case for Government Patent Use in Pandemics and Other National Crises, 22 Yale J.L.& Tech. (2020, Forthcoming): COVID-19 has created pressing and widespread... (Source: HealthLawProf Blog)
Source: HealthLawProf Blog - October 3, 2020 Category: Medical Law Authors: Katharine Van Tassel Source Type: blogs

Weekly Overseas Health IT Links – 03 October, 2020.
 Here are a few I came across last week. Note: Each link is followed by a title and few paragraphs. For the full article click on the link above title of the article. Note also that full access to some links may require site registration or subscription payment. ----- https://mhealthintelligence.com/news/study-finds-underserved-communities-are-receptive-to-mhealth-tools Study Finds Underserved Communities Are Receptive to mHealth Tools A study launched by the Yale School of Medicine finds that underserved communities will use mHealth tools to gather data and participate in studies if those tools are well-designed and ...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - October 2, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David G More MB PhD Source Type: blogs

Trying to Make AI Less Squirrelly
By KIM BELLARD You may have missed it, but the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI) just announced its first annual Squirrel AI award winner: Regina Barzilay, a professor at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL).   In fact, if you’re like me, you may have missed that there was a Squirrel AI award.  But there is, and it’s kind of a big deal, especially for healthcare – as Professor Barzilay’s work illustrates.  The Squirrel AI Award for Artificial Intelligence for the Benefit of Humanity (Squirrel AI is a Chi...
Source: The Health Care Blog - September 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Artificial Intelligence Health Tech AI Kim Bellard Regina Barzilay Squirrel AI award Source Type: blogs

Ethics, Guidelines, Standards, and Policy: What Telemedicine During COVID-19 Tells Us about Broadening the Ethical Scope
Bonnie Kaplan (Yale University), Ethics, Guidelines, Standards, and Policy: What Telemedicine During COVID-19 Tells Us about Broadening the Ethical Scope, Cam. Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics (2020, Forthcoming): The coronavirus crisis is causing considerable disruption and anguish. However, the COVID-19 pandemic... (Source: HealthLawProf Blog)
Source: HealthLawProf Blog - September 27, 2020 Category: Medical Law Authors: Katharine Van Tassel Source Type: blogs

Reading the Findings: Location, Text, Context and Textualism As the ACA Returns to the Court
Abbe R. Gluck (Yale University), Reading the Findings: Location, Text, Context and Textualism As the ACA Returns to the Court, 130 Yale L.J.F (2020, Forthcoming): This fall, in California v. Texas, the Supreme Court is being asked to invalidate the... (Source: HealthLawProf Blog)
Source: HealthLawProf Blog - September 25, 2020 Category: Medical Law Authors: Katharine Van Tassel Source Type: blogs

Deadline for Submissions to the Yale Law Journal
The Yale Law Journal requested that we post the following announcement: The deadline for articles and essays submissions for Vol. 130 of the Yale Law Journal will close on Wednesday, Sept 23, 2020. The journal editors encourage authors with articles... (Source: HealthLawProf Blog)
Source: HealthLawProf Blog - September 20, 2020 Category: Medical Law Authors: Katharine Van Tassel Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, September 21st 2020
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 20, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Doctors Urge Caution in Interpretation of Research in Times of COVID-19
September 9, 2020 To:       American College of Cardiology American College of Chest Physicians American College of Physicians American College of Radiology American Heart Association American Society of Echocardiography American Thoracic Society European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging European Society of Cardiology European Society of Radiology Heart Rhythm Society Infectious Disease Society of America North American Society of Cardiovascular Imaging Radiologic Society of North America Society of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Soci...
Source: The Health Care Blog - September 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: COVID-19 Medical Practice Patients Physicians myocarditis Saurabh Jha Source Type: blogs

SENS Research Foundation Issues 2020 Annual Report
The SENS Research Foundation, like the Methuselah Foundation it emerged from, is one of the more important organizations involved in the creation and shaping of the present R&D communities focused on treating aging as a medical condition. In earlier days, advocates and philanthropic programs were attempting to sway the research community (and the world at large) into taking intervention in aging seriously at all. In other words to accept that the evidence was strongly in favor of the plausibility of rejuvenation therapies, that the evidence had been strongly in favor for a long time, and that the long-standing reluctan...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 16, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs

Sewage Data As A Surprising Predictor For COVID-19 Cases
You might not think much of them, but bodily fluids offer a treasure trove of information for medical diagnoses. Indeed, scientists are now looking past the drain and directly into sewage to gather data about COVID-19.  You might not have heard about it, but it turns out it is possible to detect and measure the amount of virus DNA in sewage samples which can predict case number by about 7-10 days in advance. Several countries are already employing this method to predict infection cases; and it is yet another example of an unusual association between a data source and outcomes. Combining the information gathered fro...
Source: The Medical Futurist - September 7, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Prans Tags: Healthcare Design Security & Privacy prediction rna epidemiology gastrointestinal covid sewage data covid-19 cdc wastewater Yale Source Type: blogs

What to do when one size does not fit all
Alert: rant ahead. Early in my career working in persistent pain management, it was thought that “chronic pain is chronic pain is chronic pain” and pretty much anything that helped one person would help the next. Over time we’ve learned a lot more about persistent pain: the mechanisms differ a lot between neuropathic mechanisms and nociplastic mechanisms. Even within these groups, the mechanisms are very different. We’ve also learned a lot more about the psychosocial variables that are associated with prolonged disability and distress when pain persists. Some of the earliest work by Turk and coll...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - September 6, 2020 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: BronnieLennoxThompson Tags: Chronic pain Groupwork Interdisciplinary teams Pain conditions Research Science in practice Source Type: blogs

Covid Saliva Testing - Cheaper is Better
Saliva testing for Covid-19 may just be better than nasal swabs and cheaper too. It's preliminary, but Yale University has published a letter inThe New England Journal of Medicinethat showed saliva testing from the mouth picked up more positive Covid-19 patients than nasopharyngeal swab testing. The patients they studied were already hospitalized and had tested positive for Covid-19. They re-tested them with nasal and saliva tests and found at 1 to 5 days after diagnosis 81% of saliva samples were positive compared to 71% of the nasal swabs. And at 6-10 days after diagnosis, 76% of the saliva sampl...
Source: EverythingHealth - September 4, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: blogs

Revisting Health Information Technology Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues and Evaluation: Telehealth/Telemedicine and COVID-1
Bonnie Kaplan (Yale University), Revisting Health Information Technology Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues and Evaluation: Telehealth/Telemedicine and COVID-19, Int ’l J. Med. Info. (2020, Forthcoming): Background: Information technologies have been vital during the COVID-19 pandemic. Telehealth and telemedicine services, especially, fulfilled... (Source: HealthLawProf Blog)
Source: HealthLawProf Blog - August 29, 2020 Category: Medical Law Authors: Katharine Van Tassel Source Type: blogs

TWiV 655: Minority health with Robert Fullilove
Sociomedical scientist Robert Fullilove joins TWiV to discuss disparities in minority health; FDA announces an EUA on Yale’s SalivaDirect, protection of the upper and respiratory tract of mice after intranasal inoculation with an adenovirus-vectored SARS-CoV-2 spike gene, and listener questions. (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - August 21, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: This Week in Virology adenovirus coronavirus COVID-19 HIV/AIDS minority health mucosal immunity pandemic SalivaDirect SARS-CoV-2 vaccine viral viruses Source Type: blogs

The Neglect of Persons with Severe Brain Injury in the United States: An International Human Rights Analysis
Tamar Ezer (Yale University), Megan S. Wright (Penn State), Joseph Fins (Weill Cornell Medical College), The Neglect of Persons with Severe Brain Injury in the United States: An International Human Rights Analysis, 22(1) Health and Human Rights J. 265 (2020):... (Source: HealthLawProf Blog)
Source: HealthLawProf Blog - August 10, 2020 Category: Medical Law Authors: Katharine Van Tassel Source Type: blogs

Health Justice Strategies to Combat the Pandemic: Eliminating Discrimination, Poverty, and Health Inequity During and After COVID-19
Emily A. Benfer (Wake Forest University), Seema Mohapatra (Indiana University), Lindsay F. Wiley (American University), Ruqaiijah Yearby (St. Louis University), Health Justice Strategies to Combat the Pandemic: Eliminating Discrimination, Poverty, and Health Inequity During and After COVID-19, Yale J. Health... (Source: HealthLawProf Blog)
Source: HealthLawProf Blog - August 10, 2020 Category: Medical Law Authors: Katharine Van Tassel Source Type: blogs

The Management Script in Action: Putting a Practical Tool to Work
In our recent Academic Medicine Perspective, we proposed the term “management script” as a concept for teaching management reasoning. Analogous to the illness script, an essential component of diagnostic reasoning, management scripts are high-level, precompiled, conceptual knowledge structures of the courses of action that a clinician might undertake to address a patient’s health care problem(s). Not to be confused with a checklist, where specific interventions are mandated in a sequence, management scripts are more like a menu: a collection of options in various categories (e.g., appetizers, courses, des...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - August 4, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured care management decisions clinical decision making residency training residents Source Type: blogs

Polly at Seventeen
Today is the seventeenth anniversary ofSchuyler' s diagnosis of polymicrogyria.There have been times in the past seventeen years when that felt like a thing to be memorialized, a great tragedy like a hurricane or an assassination, both of which feel like an appropriate description of how it felt to stand in the face of such an event and watch someone I loved taken away from me.But over the years, I guess that's changed, or at least blunted. Schuyler wasn't taken away by her diagnosis. Her little monster didn't arrive that day; it merely stated its long-overdue" How do you do? " I thought I learned about the futur...
Source: Schuyler's Monster: The Blog - July 30, 2020 Category: Disability Authors: Rob Source Type: blogs

Summoning a New Artificial Intelligence Patent Model: In the Age of Pandemic
Shlomit Yanisky-Ravid (Yale Law School), Regina Jin, Summoning a New Artificial Intelligence Patent Model: In the Age of Pandemic, SSRN: To combat the fast-moving spread of the pandemic we need an equally speedy and powerful tool. On the forefront against... (Source: HealthLawProf Blog)
Source: HealthLawProf Blog - July 28, 2020 Category: Medical Law Authors: Katharine Van Tassel Source Type: blogs

The Walmart Effect: Testing Private Interventions to Reduce Gun Suicide
This article tests the impact of Walmart ’s corporate decisions to end the sale of... (Source: HealthLawProf Blog)
Source: HealthLawProf Blog - July 28, 2020 Category: Medical Law Authors: Katharine Van Tassel Source Type: blogs

Doctors and Democracy: Why Vote-By-Mail is Good Public Health
Rob Palmer Josh Hyman Isaac Freedman By ROB PALMER, ISAAC FREEDMAN, and JOSH HYMAN Suppose tomorrow you were informed that patients could no longer have medications delivered to their homes. Thus, in the midst of the worst pandemic in recent history, your patients would have to go to pharmacies to get essential medications. Undoubtedly, you’d be puzzled, wondering why your patients must needlessly put themselves and others in harms’ way to care for their own health. In light of the change, you might even debate if it’s worth the risk of getting your own medications.  Thankfully, th...
Source: The Health Care Blog - July 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: COVID-19 Health Policy Isaac Freedman Josh Hyman public health Rob Palmer Vote By Mail Source Type: blogs

Logical fallacy the infinity
I regularly try to propound principles of critical thinking here, looks like I'm going to have to issue another installment. One of the most annoying tactics of argumentation is called premise shifting, sometimes overlapping with the red herring fallacy. Example:Simplicio: Black Lives Matter/anti-racism protestors haven't targeted universities because they are hypocrites. Why aren't they demanding that Yale and Brown change their names?Sagrado: Anti-racism protesters were targeting universities long before the murder of George Floyd and the subsequent uprising. (By the way they have been demanding that Yale change its name...
Source: Stayin' Alive - July 12, 2020 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

“When Blood Breaks Down”: It Can Break Your Heart
By CHADI NABHAN, MD, MBA, FACP “The goal for me and for my clinical and research colleagues is to put ourselves out of a job as quickly as possible”. This is how Mikkael Sekeres ends his book “When Blood Breaks Down” based on true stories of patients with leukemia. I share Mikkael’s sentiments and have always stated that I’d be happy if I am out of a job caring for patients with cancer. To his and my disappointment, this wish is unlikely to ever come true, especially when dealing with leukemia. With almost 15 years of experience, Sekeres possesses a wealth of knowledge and pati...
Source: The Health Care Blog - July 2, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Medical Practice Physicians Book Review Chadi Nabhan hematology Mikkael Sekeres Oncology When Blood Breaks Down Source Type: blogs

Gastrointestinal Diseases in America: The Costly Impact on Employers and Patients
SPONSORED POST By SAM HOLLIDAY Medically reviewed by Jenny Blair, MD Gastrointestinal diseases like inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are more prevalent—and costlier—than many employers realize. Up to 70 million Americans are affected by gastrointestinal (GI) diseases each year—twice as many people as those living with diabetes (34.2 million).[1],[2] Overall direct healthcare costs for GI diseases are estimated to be $136 billion each year in the U.S., more than heart disease ($113bn) and mental health disorders ($99bn...
Source: The Health Care Blog - June 25, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Health Tech gastrointestinal diseases Oshi Health Sam Holliday Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: June 13, 2020
This week’s Psychology Around the Net dives into the benefits of using mindfulness to address the looming mental health crisis in business, why playing hard to get as a mating strategy can actually work, how shaking your booty with your grandma and grandpa can boost both their physical and mental health, and more. Stay well, friends! How We Justify Victim-Blaming, Scapegoating, and Systemic Abuse: Rebecca Mandeville explains the “just-world” hypothesis and how it relates to victim-blaming, scapegoating, and systemic abuse. The Power of 10 Minutes: How Mindfulness Can Address the Looming Mental Health Cri...
Source: World of Psychology - June 13, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Psychology Around the Net Career COVID-19 Creativity dance therapy grandchildren Grandparents hobby pandemic Paranoia quarantine Scapegoating systemic abuse Victim blaming Source Type: blogs

The Facts About the L-1 Visa Program
ConclusionMultinational companies play an exceptionally important role in the United States. U.S. parent companies account for nearly a  quarter of all private sector output, nearly half of all exports, and nearly three quarters of all private research and development.[44] More than 30 million American workers ’ jobs depend on multinationals. The U.S. government should not further upend investment and job growth by these companies in the United States during the economic recovery. The unemployment rate in computer occupations where many L‐​1s are employed did not increase at all during the downturn,[45] and ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - June 10, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: David J. Bier Source Type: blogs

5 Role Models to Help Us Cope with the Pandemic
How do you dig deep to withstand the ongoing stress and requirements of life during a pandemic? Look to the role models: seniors. Seniors have a depth of experience confronting crises and using creative problem-solving skills that summon the higher instincts of the human spirit. They have experience showing up. They reached within to draw on character and integrity, and learned what it means to come through a recovery. From the Great Depression to World War II to 9/11, they did what was needed. Right now, they can be a fountain of hope.  There are countless examples of people who had to switch to plan B and not only s...
Source: World of Psychology - June 9, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BJ Kittredge Tags: Aging Self-Help coronavirus COVID-19 Elderly seniors Source Type: blogs

Young Children Believe Intervening In Antisocial Behaviour Is A Universal Duty. Adults Don ’t
By Emily Reynolds When witnessing harmful behaviour, most of us hope for intervention of some kind: if we see someone receiving abuse on public transport, for example, it’s likely we want to see some action taken. Who we want to intervene in such acts, however, is more divisive. Some believe social norms should be enforced by authorities, whilst others stress that responsibility should be shared amongst us all. An interesting example of this is the discussion around policing, with abolitionists arguing that much of the work done by the police would be better led by communities themselves. Our politics may inform...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - June 8, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: bullying Developmental Social Source Type: blogs

We Can ’ t Breathe
This study reinforces calls to treat police violence as a public health issue . Racially unequal exposure to the risk of state violence has profound consequences for public health, democracy, and racial stratification.” Credit: Edwards, Lee, Esposito/PNAS The problem goes beyond police violence.  We incarcerate far more people than any other country — per capita or in absolute numbers — and those prisoners are much more likely to be minorities (especially men).  Black men have a 1 in 3 lifetime chance of being imprisoned, Latino men 1 in 6, versus white men’s 1 in 17.&...
Source: The Health Care Blog - June 3, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Health disparities Politics COVID-19 george floyd Kim Bellard Source Type: blogs

Network Medicine in the Fight Against COVID-19
COVID-19 forced stakeholders in the healthcare landscape to adopt a new perspective in this sphere. Telemedicine rose to fame as a ready-made solution; artificial intelligence’s contribution became more apparent from early outbreak predictions to resource management; and digital health technologies lent a helping hand early on. Another promising area joining the fight is network medicine, a branch of network science. The latter field studies the interaction between actors within a network. Such analyses are applicable to virtually any sector, from the world wide web through social networks to how molecules interac...
Source: The Medical Futurist - May 21, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Prans Tags: Network medicine Artificial Intelligence Biotechnology Telemedicine & Smartphones AI MIT coronavirus covid covid19 vaccine research pandemic network science Albert-László Barabási Source Type: blogs

Practicing Emotional Awareness During the COVID-19 Pandemic
When COVID-19 emerged as a clear and present public health threat, most people felt the same range of emotions: somewhere along the spectrum of fear and anxiety. People are still feeling this way of course. But as initial shock wears off, people are settling into a new normal. As new studies emerge predicting longer and longer periods of social distancing, we’re starting to strap ourselves in for the long haul. In some ways, this is a step up from fear and uncertainty. But it also brings a range of new emotions—and all of them have an important mental health impact. A major component of mental health is emotio...
Source: World of Psychology - May 4, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Mental Health America Publishers coronavirus COVID-19 Emotional Awareness Feelings Source Type: blogs

Yale ’s Ventilator Splitter Receives FDA Emergency Use Authorization
Vent Multiplexor LLC announced that it received FDA Emergency Use Authorization for its device that can split a single ventilator so that it can be used by two patients simultaneously. The Vent Multiplexor device was developed by a team of students and faculty at Yale University and Yale New Haven Hospital. It is a patent-pending co-ventilation device intended for temporary use when two patients both require emergency mechanical ventilation when only one ventilator is available. Importantly, the device allows ventilator sharing between two patients whose lung capacities and ventilator setting requirements are different...
Source: Medgadget - April 20, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Cici Zhou Tags: Cardiology Critical Care Public Health Source Type: blogs

7 Assumptions Your Brain Can ’t Help But Make
You're reading 7 Assumptions Your Brain Can’t Help But Make, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. We all want to believe we are tough to fool. The problem is, even if you are not so gullible, your brain still works a certain way, making associations that create vulnerability to being easily fooled, or fooling yourself. It takes work to release yourself from these natural assumptions that are presumed to originate from a mix of hard wiring and cultural conditioning. Getting beyond them is surely ...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - April 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mike Bundrant Tags: featured psychology self education assumptions nlp pickthebrain self improvement Source Type: blogs

What 3 years of sitting on Japanese toilets taught me
The first time I stepped foot in Japan was the summer of 2014. I was a wide-eyed, overzealous sophomore at Yale, all packed and ready to embark on a 2-month journey to Tokyo for a Japanese study abroad program that I only enrolled in so that my language proficiency would be tolerable enough to get […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 19, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/jay-wong" rel="tag" > Jay Wong < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions COVID-19 coronavirus Infectious Disease Source Type: blogs