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Study questions whether x-rays really need to be repeated
Current radiology practice gives radiologic technologists significant leeway...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Study: Reject pelvic x-rays if axial rotation exceeds 10° Study: Skip the x-rays after shoulder arthroplasty surgery Virtual coaching takes on x-ray training Are chest x-rays still useful for syncope patients? Take 2: Techs opt to repeat more head scans than radiologists (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - September 19, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Opening day of Dentsply Sirona World exceeded expectations
After much anticipation, the first day of the second annual Ultimate Dental Meeting concluded with high praiseLas Vegas, N.V. (Sept. 15, 2017) –After months of anticipation, Dentsply Sirona World 2017 has officially begun! This three-day event is the industry ’s only educational festival, and those in attendance have now experienced the Dentsply Sirona difference.The day started with the magnificent Opening General Session. With a ballroom submerged in darkness, LED light dancers wowed the audience with incredible illusions and captivating choreography. Immediately following, Group Senior Vice President of the ...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - September 15, 2017 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Tailored Treatment for Head-and-Neck Cancer Mystery
Treatment TermsHead and Neck Cancer Overview Rob Vaughn found a lump on his neck that turned out to be cancer that had spread from somewhere else in his body. The trouble was, doctors couldn ’t find the original site of the cancer. That made his treatment decisions difficult -- until two Duke specialists offered him options, including the option for watchful waiting instead of extensive treatment. Hero Image20170914_robvaughn_neckcancer_083_herocrop.jpg Preview Image Content Blocks Header A Search for the Source of Cancer ContentVaughn, a Charlotte, NC, father of two, was 47 and in good health when he felt th...
Source: dukehealth.org: Duke Health News - September 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: mf205 at duke.edu Source Type: news

Quality initiatives can reduce harm to newborns, shorten hospital stay and save millions
(Children's National Health System) A quality-improvement initiative by Children's National Health System's neonatal intensive care unit finds that these chest X-rays can be performed just twice weekly, lessening the chances of a breathing tube popping out accidentally, reducing infants' exposure to radiation and saving an estimated $1.6 million per year. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

AI algorithm speeds up assessment of bone age
Estimating patient age on radiographs can be a little burdensome for radiologists...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Bone age evaluations raise complex issues Migrants: How to determine age on pelvic x-rays Radiologists prefer CAD with fewer clicks Danish firm Visiana tackles bone age evaluation (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - September 14, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Edinburgh scientists develop camera to see through body  
Researchers from the universities of Edinburgh and Heriot-Watt believe the camera will help doctors track internal examinations as they occur, rather than relying on expensive X-rays. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

7 medtech stories we missed this week: Aug. 25, 2017
[Image from unsplash.com]From InspireMD’s Swiss distribution deal to CoreLink’s stackable guide wire launch, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth a mention. 1. InspireMD announces Swiss distribution deal InspireMD announced in an Aug. 25 press release that it has signed an agreement with 1a Medical to distribute the CGuard EPS (Embolic Prevention System). The new distributor is one of the leading medical distributors in Switzerland and plans to help launch the CGuard there. 2. EarlySense and SleepMed partnered for sleep apnea EarlySense and SleepMed are have forged a p...
Source: Mass Device - August 25, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Cosmetic/Aesthetic Diagnostics Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Laboratory Instruments/Laboratory Supplies Research & Development Surgical CoreLink EarlySense InspireMD Life Spine Inc. Medovex MedTech Prollenium SleepMed TechCa Source Type: news

Saudi-Irish study highlights major differences in MRI practice
An investigation of quality management for abdominal and pelvic MRI scans in...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Study: Reject pelvic x-rays if axial rotation exceeds 10° High-pitch, low-contrast CTA transforms abdominal studies 3D-printed phantoms take shape for PET/MRI pelvic use (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - August 18, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Cobalt in hip replacement parts found to cause Alzheimer's disease via heavy metals poisoning
(Natural News) Hip replacement parts are often made with cobalt, a toxic heavy metal. Doctors are now concerned that cobalt poisoning is causing Alzheimer’s among hip replacement recipients. As reported by the UK Daily Mail: The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency announced last month that patients would be called in for x-rays and blood... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New dentist office opens in Pelham
A new dentist office has opened in Pelham. Pelham Parkway Dentistry has opened in Cumberland Centre, according to the Shelby County Reporter. Dr. Nicholas Kentros is the sole practitioner. Pelham Parkway Dentistry accepts most forms of insurance. For those without coverage, the dental practice offers the "Shine Bright" program through whi ch they can receive routine exams, preventative cleaning, fluoride treatment and X-rays twice a year, in addition to restorative services, at a discount. Pelham… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - August 15, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Hanno van der Bijl Source Type: news

New dentist office opens in Pelham
A new dentist office has opened in Pelham. Pelham Parkway Dentistry has opened in Cumberland Centre, according to the Shelby County Reporter. Dr. Nicholas Kentros is the sole practitioner. Pelham Parkway Dentistry accepts most forms of insurance. For those without coverage, the dental practice offers the "Shine Bright" program through whi ch they can receive routine exams, preventative cleaning, fluoride treatment and X-rays twice a year, in addition to restorative services, at a discount. Pelham… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - August 15, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Hanno van der Bijl Source Type: news

GPs must consult panel to sending patients to hospital
The controversial scheme in the north east of England covers all non-urgent referrals – including requests for hip and knee surgery, cataract removal as well as x-rays and scans. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dentsply Sirona shares steady despite Q2 sales miss
Shares in Dentsply Sirona (NSDQ:XRAY) have fallen slightly today after the medical device maker met earnings per share expectations but missed sales consensus on Wall Street with its 2nd quarter earnings report. The York, Penn.-based company posted losses of $1.1 billion, or $4.58 per share on sales of $992.7 million for the 3 months ended June 30, seeing a massive 1096% swing from profits to losses while sales shrunk 2.9% compared with the same period during the previous year. Adjusted to exclude 1-time items, earnings per share were 65¢, just in line with the 65¢ consensus on Wall Street, where a...
Source: Mass Device - August 11, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News MassDevice Earnings Roundup Wall Street Beat Dentsply Sirona Source Type: news

Crystallography provides battle-plan blueprints for attacking disease-causing bacteria
(Trinity College Dublin) X-rays helped scientists to look under the bonnet of two common bacteria that opportunistically infect people, so as to better understand the mechanics involved. The blueprints may be used to design new drugs, which are badly needed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 9, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Listening to Our Patients
When was the last time any of us used a stethoscope and felt it made a difference either to clinch a diagnosis or to change the management of a sick patient? Diagnostic Tool or Neckwear? How many of us have had a patient with a history of hypertension, diabetes or myocardial infarction (MI), who presented with complaints of chest pain and shortness of breath? On exam, he might have been anxious and diaphoretic, with a heart rate of 130, respirations of 24, blood pressure of 190/110, bilateral pedal edema, oxygen saturation (SpO2) of 89% and 12-lead ECGs showing ST-elevation. Then you put your scope on hi...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 2, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neal Richmond, MD Tags: Patient Care Columns Source Type: news

X-rays pick out letters on ancient scrolls
Papyri buried in the eruption of Vesuvius can now be virtually unrolled (Source: PhysicsWeb News)
Source: PhysicsWeb News - August 2, 2017 Category: Physics Authors: Edwin Cartlidge Source Type: news

Spectral narrowing of x-rays
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - July 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Osborne, I. S. Tags: Physics twis Source Type: news

After bunion surgery, immediate x-rays predict recurrence risk
(Wolters Kluwer Health) For patients undergoing surgery to repair a bunion deformity of the foot, non-weight-bearing x rays taken immediately after surgery can provide a good estimate of the risk that the bunion will return over time, reports a study in the current issue of The Journal of Bone& Joint Surgery. The journal is published in partnership with Wolters Kluwer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 24, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Assisted-living facility may be built in existing medical office
A land use plan submitted to the Orange County Development Review Committee on July 13 proposes to locate a 240-bed, assisted-living facility on roughly 2 acres at 1287 N. Semoran Blvd. The applicant is Florida Engineering Group Inc., and the owner is Chau Family Holdings II LLC. The land use plan was listed as Dr. Chau Assisted Living Facility. The site currently is being used by medical office space tenant Son Chau M.D. The medical office offers services such as X-rays, a phar macy and laboratory… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - July 14, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Veronica Brezina Source Type: news

Assisted-living facility may be built in existing medical office
A land use plan submitted to the Orange County Development Review Committee on July 13 proposes to locate a 240-bed, assisted-living facility on roughly 2 acres at 1287 N. Semoran Blvd. The applicant is Florida Engineering Group Inc., and the owner is Chau Family Holdings II LLC. The land use plan was listed as Dr. Chau Assisted Living Facility. The site currently is being used by medical office space tenant Son Chau M.D. The medical office offers services such as X-rays, a phar macy and laboratory… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - July 14, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Veronica Brezina Source Type: news

Study: Low-dose radiation linked to harmful long-term cardiovascular effects
Radiation from x-rays, even in as low doses such as those required for recurrent CT imaging, could have long-term harmful effects on the cardiovascular system, according to a new study. While it’s known that high-dose ionizing radiation exposure, be it medical or environmental, can lead to symptoms suggesting an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, the study showed that even low exposure doses are associated with significantly increased risk of cardiovascular damage for up to decades after. Results from the study were published in the International Journal of Radiation Biology. Researchers at the German Research...
Source: Mass Device - July 14, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Cardiovascular Clinical Trials Imaging Source Type: news

Ask Well: Why Does My Dentist Give Me So Many X-Rays?
Dentists should not rely on a blanket policy on X-rays for all patients, according to guidelines set out by the American Dental Association. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - July 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CATHERINE SAINT LOUIS Tags: Teeth and Dentistry X-Rays Computerized Axial Tomography (CAT Scans) Radiation Source Type: news

Our family ’s journey of the heart
When our son Nicholas was 5 weeks old, we brought him and his twin sister Emmy to our pediatrician for what we thought was a routine well visit. Though the twins had been born four weeks early, Nicholas had only been in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) for a few days with low blood sugar and jaundice. Both babies seemed healthy and we had no major concerns. However, as we watched our pediatrician listen to Nicholas’ heart and pulse, we realized something wasn’t right. He told us the pulse in Nicholas’ lower extremities was weaker than the pulse in his upper body. He suspected Nichola...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - July 10, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Liz Wilson Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories autism spectrum disorder Cardiac Neurodevelopmental Program coarctation of the aorta Dr. Anjali Sadhwani Dr. Caitlin Rollins Dr. Christopher Baird Dr. Samantha Butler Source Type: news

Kenya: Governors Ask Labour CS to Intervene as Nurses' Strike Bites
[Nation] A few public hospitals are now attending to patients requiring services such as dialysis, X-rays and laboratory tests as the nurses' strike enters its second month. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - July 9, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Pepsi-SAXS: New method of protein analysis that is 50 times faster than analogues
(Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology) One of the techniques used to study proteins is the analysis of X-rays scattered from them. Pepsi-SAXS stands for 'polynomial expansions of protein structures and interactions' and 'small-angle X-ray scattering.'It has been shown that Pepsi-SAXS is five to 50 times faster than the previously used methods. At the same time, the accuracy is on a par with them. " (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 7, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Hospital is sued after her it didn't spot cancer
This is the latest in a string of scandals facing Worcestershire Acute Hospital NHS Trust where more than 11,000 X-rays have allegedly gone reported since the beginning of this year. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

7 medtech stories we missed this week: June 30, 2017
[Image from unsplash.com]From ConforMIS touting its knee replacement study to Consulting Radiologists’s new breast cancer detection tool, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Study: Low-dose CT scanning improves Ankylosing Spondylitis assessment A new study has shown that low-dose computed tomography (LD-CT) is more sensitive than X-rays for monitoring disease progression in people who have Ankylosing Spondylitis, according to a June 15 press release. LD-CT has previously been proven to be sensitive and reliable when assessing bone growth in different pat...
Source: Mass Device - June 30, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Big Data Business/Financial News Cardiac Assist Devices Cardiovascular Clinical Trials Diagnostics Implants Oncology Research & Development Respiratory Cefaly conformis Consulting Radiologists Hemovent Image Stream Medical Me Source Type: news

50,000 metal hip replacement patients RECALLED to hospital for X-rays over toxic fears
THOUSANDS of patients with ‘metal on metal’ hips are being recalled for tests after experts revealed they could be toxic. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - June 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Toxicity warning: ‘Metal on metal’ hip replacement patients recalled for X-rays
THOUSANDS of patients with ‘metal on metal’ hips are being recalled for tests after experts revealed they could be toxic. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - June 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

MIT Report: IBM Watson, machine-learning plays “ overhyped ”
IBM (NYSE:IBM) Watson Health, and other machine-learning company’s immediate impact on healthcare may have been significantly overhyped, promoting a timeline  that it may not be able to reach, according to a new article from MIT’s Technology Review. The fault lies not with the company, however, but the complexity and relative unavailability of data that it and others machine-learning systems needs to “learn,” according to the article. Machine learning processes require constant adjustments to internal processing routines to produce the highest possible percentage of correct answers to a se...
Source: Mass Device - June 28, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Software / IT IBM Watson Health Source Type: news

Should you see a chiropractor for back pain?
Treatment TermsSpine Overview Nearly everyone suffers from back pain at some point. One treatment option is chiropractic care, which includes spinal manipulation (also called manual manipulation). A review of research, published in theJournal of the American Medical Association, found that spinal manipulation can help relieve pain and improve function in people with acute low-back pain, one of the most common types of back pain. Content Blocks ContentDuke chiropractorEugene Lewis, DC, MPH, answers questions about how chiropractic care can help. Section Features Text Content Header What kinds of conditions does a ch...
Source: dukehealth.org: Duke Health News - June 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: mf205 at duke.edu Source Type: news

When Can a Doctor Help Your Back Pain?
Treatment TermsBack pain TagsBack pain Sub-Title Answers to Common Back Pain Questions Overview More than eight in 10 people will experience back pain at some point in their lives. In most cases, the pain goes away over time. If your back pain is severe or does not improve, you may need medical care. Here are answers to some common questions about back pain and tips on when to seek help. Content Blocks Header Why Does My Back Hurt? ContentThere are various reasons why your back can hurt, including muscle pain, disc pain, joint pain, or nerve pain. In most cases, these are not harmful or dangerous. “There are...
Source: dukehealth.org: Duke Health News - June 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: mf205 at duke.edu Source Type: news

Google ’ s DeepMind Health AI biz inks another deal with UK NHS Trust
Google‘s (NSDQ:GOOG) DeepMind Health AI division said this week it inked a deal with the UK’S Taunton and Somerset NHS Foundation Trust to implement its physician and nurse focused mobile alert application, Streams, over the next 5 years. The Streams application is designed to provide physicians with timely information about patients with acute kidney failure, including blood test data and other info required to make important care decisions. The mobile application aims to keep physicians and nurses attention focused on patients who need attention most immediately, the company said. The application will also pr...
Source: Mass Device - June 23, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Hospital Care Patient Monitoring Software / IT DeepMind Google Inc. Source Type: news

Ask Well: Do M.R.I. Scans Cause Any Harm?
Magnetic resonance imaging doesn ’ t carry the radiation risks of X-rays or PET scans. But there are safety issues to watch out for. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - June 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: KAREN WEINTRAUB Tags: Magnetic Resonance Imagers Medical Devices X-Rays Radiation Accidents and Safety Source Type: news

Understanding X-Rays
(Source: eMedicineHealth.com)
Source: eMedicineHealth.com - June 23, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

The Medical Emergency Of Otto Warmbier
All that the doctors who treated Cincinnati, Ohio resident Otto Warmbier knew is what they had seen or maybe read in the news. They knew he had just been released on June 13 from imprisonment in North Korea where he had been held by for more than 17 months. He had been sentenced in March 2016 to 15 years of hard labor for allegedly removing a propaganda poster from a wall at a Pyongyang hotel where he had been staying. The University of Virginia honors student had been visiting the authoritarian state during a five-day trip with a group called Young Pioneer Tours, which is a group out of China – an important note. Ot...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Thinking Machines: From Magic to Normal
“Technology made large populations possible; large populations now make technology indispensable.”                – Joseph Krutch (Writer)Since the 19th century, we have undergone several stages of machine revolutions.The first stage was mechanisation. The advent of modern production methods eased and sped up manufacturing, massively increasing output and ushering in the Industrial Revolution.The late 60s brought the age of the working computer. In 1967, an IBM infomercial, ‘The Paperwork Explosion’, predicted a dystopi...
Source: EyeForPharma - June 22, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Jacqui Sanders Source Type: news

Thinking Machines: From Magic to Normal
“Technology made large populations possible; large populations now make technology indispensable.”                – Joseph Krutch (Writer)Since the 19th century, we have undergone several stages of machine revolutions.The first stage was mechanisation. The advent of modern production methods eased and sped up manufacturing, massively increasing output and ushering in the Industrial Revolution.The late 60s brought the age of the working computer. In 1967, an IBM infomercial, ‘The Paperwork Explosion’, predicted a dystopi...
Source: EyeForPharma - June 22, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Jacqui Sanders Source Type: news

Thinking Machines: From Magic to Normal
“Technology made large populations possible; large populations now make technology indispensable.”                – Joseph Krutch (Writer)Since the 19th century, we have undergone several stages of machine revolutions.The first stage was mechanisation. The advent of modern production methods eased and sped up manufacturing, massively increasing output and ushering in the Industrial Revolution.The late 60s brought the age of the working computer. In 1967, an IBM infomercial, ‘The Paperwork Explosion’, predicted a dystopi...
Source: EyeForPharma - June 22, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Jacqui Sanders Source Type: news

Flash Physics: X-rays reveal virus structure, Qatar blockade could affect helium supplies, LISA gets go-ahead
Today's selection of need-to-know updates from the world of physics (Source: PhysicsWeb News)
Source: PhysicsWeb News - June 22, 2017 Category: Physics Authors: Sarah Tesh Source Type: news

A Runner ’s Comeback: From Multiple Fractures to a 50-Mile Race
Treatment TermsOrthopaedicsAnkle pain and ankle injurySports medicine CategoriesFamily health Author MaryAnn Fletcher Overview In April 2017, Harry Mendez Jr. crossed the finish line of a 50-mile race, exhausted but triumphant. The 35-year-old Durham resident had completed triathlons and endurance events before, but none had demanded the strength, commitment, and perseverance this one had. Just nine months earlier, he ’d been in Duke University Hospital, pins and rods holding his lower left leg together, wondering if he’d ever run again. Hero Imageharrymendez_blog.jpg Preview Image Content Blocks Conte...
Source: dukehealth.org: Duke Health News - June 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: mf205 at duke.edu Source Type: news

Low-dose CT scanning improves assessment of ankylosing spondylitis patients
(European League Against Rheumatism) The results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology 2017 showed that low dose computed tomography is more sensitive than conventional radiographs (X-rays) in the monitoring of disease progression in patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Abdominal X-rays Decreased in Children With Constipation Abdominal X-rays Decreased in Children With Constipation
A simple, cost-effective intervention decreased rates of unnecessary abdominal X-rays in children seen in the ED for constipation, a new study has found.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - June 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Emergency Medicine News Source Type: news

Argonne X-rays used to help identify a key Lassa virus structure
(DOE/Argonne National Laboratory) Research done at Argonne National Laboratory's Advanced Photon Source was vital to the process of identifying the structure, which provides a guide for designing a Lassa virus vaccine. Lassa virus is endemic to Africa and kills thousands of people a year; it is particularly deadly for pregnant women. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Forensic technique uses forehead X-rays to assess age of juvenile remains
(North Carolina State University) Forensic anthropology researchers have developed a technique that can provide an approximate age for juveniles and young people based on an X-ray of the frontal sinus region of the skull. The technique can be used to help identify human remains in forensic cases, as well as to determine age ranges in archaeological research or for living people for whom no records are available. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 5, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Child abuse-nonaccidental injury (NAI) and abusive head trauma (AHT)-medical imaging: issues and controversies in the era of evidence-based medicine - Barnes P.
Imaging technology started being used many years ago to help detect child abuse using x-rays used to look at the bones including the skull and make the diagnosis. Doctors would then look in the eyes and see retinal hemorrhages. Then maybe a neurosurgeon wo... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Health Care Heroes 2017 Outstanding Physician Nonhospital-based Dr. Elizabeth Glazier
​Dr. Elizabeth Glazier, with her modern-day black bag, can literally bring the clinic to the patient, offering sophisticated diagnostics such as mobile X-rays and treatments like joint injections and immunizations. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - May 30, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Japanese group refines digital chest x-ray algorithm
Researchers in Japan have refined an algorithm that someday could be used to...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Algorithm identifies misfiled chest x-rays in PACS Biological 'fingerprints' help identify mislabeled chest x-rays (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - May 29, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Dad's Shares Safety Warning For Parents Whose Kids Play Baseball
A Pennsylvania dad’s viral Facebook post is spreading a safety message for parents of young baseball players.  On May 16, John Curtin posted a photo of his son’s Under Armour heart guard shirt ― a special garment designed to protect athletes from potentially deadly blows to the chest.  “For all you parents that have children that pitch, do me a favor and run out and buy a heart guard shirt for your child,” Curtin wrote in the caption. “My 11 year old Ryan wears one, and it literally might have saved his life today.” The dad described his son’s scary ordeal.  &...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

‘Radiating Shoe Sales’
By: Vanessa Burrows Since the discovery of X-rays in the late 19th century, the technology has enhanced health care in a variety of ways. Like many cutting-edge scientific developments, however, it also has inspired uses of uncertain therapeutic value. That was the case with the shoe-fitting fluoroscope, the subject of the latest episode of FDA’s history video series. Marketed as a scientific method for optimizing shoe fit, the fluoroscope appeared in shoe stores nationwide from the 1920s to the 1960s. But the machines not only didn’t do what they promised, they also exposed children, their parents, and store c...
Source: Mass Device - May 23, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Blog FDA Voice Source Type: news