The New Health Care: You Probably Don ’ t Need Dental X-Rays Every Year
For many people, it ’ s a needless expense that comes with needless risk. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - July 25, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: AUSTIN FRAKT Tags: Teeth and Dentistry X-Rays Medicine and Health Radiation Tumors Source Type: news

Researchers present key findings on detection of caries around the margins of amalgam restorations using four technologies
This study found that The Canary System ® can detect caries under the intact margins of amalgam restorations more accurately than Spectra, DIAGNOdent and visual examination.   Finding caries beneath intact amalgam margins is a challenging clinical problem because of the nature of the material.   Amalgam is dense, radiopaque and reflects light from its surface.   The study found that visual examination could not detect caries.   The glow or fluorescence from the amalgam prevented Spectra from detecting any marginal caries.   DIAGNOdent was unable to consistently differentia...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - July 22, 2016 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Beans, Beans, The Magical Food
It was discovered that my eight-year-old daughter is full of poop. Literally, full of poop. At a check-up appointment the doctor discovered that she doesn't empty everything and stool is sitting inside her little body that is causing problems. Shortly after this revelation I too went to the doctor. After x-rays were run, I was told I suffer from "chronic constipation" and was also full of crap. Yep. I only poop about every three to four days. While I can openly talk and write about pooping, I have an issue with actually going number two in front of people. Anxiety sets in if I have to go in public or, heaven f...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Lancet study maps 2015 MERS outbreak in South Korea
A single patient transmitted the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Saudi team releases new findings on MERS virus Lung x-rays predict mortality in MERS patients Chest CT details characteristics of MERS virus infection MERS not yet detectable by airport scanners 2nd U.S. case of MERS reported in Fla. (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - July 8, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

ACR Preliminary Summary of Radiology Provisions in the 2017 MPFS Proposed Rule
The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) released the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule (MPFS) proposed rule on Thursday, July 7. Upon initial review, the American College of Radiology (ACR) is pleased with several provisions within the rule. CMS has recognized the value provided by radiologists in providing mammography services through an increase in the physician work relative value units (RVUs) for diagnostic mammography and maintaining the current value for screening mammography. Additionally, ACR physicians and staff held numerous conference calls and meetings with CMS on the topic of appropriate use criteri...
Source: American College of Radiology - July 8, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

CMS Releases the Proposed Rule for the 2017 Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System
On July 1, 2016, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) released its proposed rule with 60-day comment period for changes to the calendar year (CY) 2017 hospital outpatient prospective payment system (HOPPS). In this rule, CMS proposes site-neutral payments, further restructures the imaging ambulatory payment classifications (APCs), expands its use of comprehensive APCs (C-APCs) and proposes a new modifier for reduction in film-based X-ray services. CMS is proposing to make site neutral payments to new off-campus sites that provide items and services to outpatients based on the Medicare Physician Fee Schedu...
Source: American College of Radiology - July 7, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Hello Jupiter! NASA Spacecraft Juno Arrives at Giant Planet
PASADENA, Calif. (AP) — Braving intense radiation, a NASA spacecraft reached Jupiter on Monday after a five-year voyage to begin exploring the king of the planets. Ground controllers at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory erupted in applause when the solar-powered Juno spacecraft beamed home news that it was circling Jupiter’s poles. The arrival at Jupiter was dramatic. As Juno approached its target, it fired its rocket engine to slow itself down and gently slipped into orbit. Because of the communication time lag between Jupiter and Earth, Juno was on autopilot when it executed the daring move. The spacecraft&r...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - July 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alicia Chang / Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized exploration jupiter NASA Science solar-power spacecraft Source Type: news

Red, White, and Blue in Space Photography
The image above might look like something many Americans will see at a 4th of July fireworks display. They depict a single galaxy, named the Southern Pinwheel Galaxy, or Messier 83, processed in red, white, and blue. What is the significance of these colors? In the case of the American flag, the colors were originally not assigned any meaning at all and perhaps were chosen simply to mimic the colors of the British flag. It was only later, when the country adopted an official U.S. seal, that the colors were assigned meaning. “White signifies purity and innocence. Red, hardiness and valour, and Blue… signifies v...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - July 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Marisa Gertz Tags: Uncategorized 4th of July Galaxies independence day NASA Science space space photography Source Type: news

Wild Light Show, Strange Sounds Coming From Jupiter As Juno Spacecraft Approaches Orbit
Jupiter is putting on quite a show -- with both sound and light.   A new Hubble image shows a stunning light show, capturing an aurora display on the largest planet in our solar system:  How about that light show? @NASA_Hubble sees #Jupiter aurora, days before my orbit arrival https://t.co/RADsYS7vOJ pic.twitter.com/yTRmDHEWlt— NASA's Juno Mission (@NASAJuno) June 30, 2016 Jupiter's auroras cover areas bigger than the entire Earth, are hundreds of times more energetic and never cease, the European Space Agency said in a news release.  Unlike auroras here, which are caused by so...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - July 1, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Study Questions Long Spine Boards as Clinically Necessary
The Research Clemency BM, Bart JA, Malhotra A, et al. Patients immobilized with a long spine board rarely have unstable thoracolumbar injuries. Prehosp Emerg Care. 2016;20(2):266-272. The Science The authors looked at trauma victims transported to their Level 1 trauma centers on backboards to evaluate if their use is being performed unnecessarily. They examined data from 5,593 patients over a four-year period from 2010 to 2013. They included all EMS trauma victims delivered on long spine boards, then examined each patient's medical record to determine whether or not spinal X-rays a...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - July 1, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Keith Wesley, MD, FACEP Tags: Columns Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

X-ray echoes of a shredded star provide close-up of 'killer' black hole
Billions of years ago in the heart of a distant galaxy, a monster black hole shredded a passing star and emitted X-rays. Now astronomers are using X-ray echoes to study a newly awakened black hole for the first time. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 22, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

After 5-Year Trek, NASA Spacecraft Juno Prepares For Dangerous Final Stretch To Jupiter
Hollywood, eat your heart out: It seems the blockbuster of the summer may belong to NASA. In a dramatic, film trailer-esque video released this week, the space agency detailed its nail-biting final approach to exploring Jupiter.  NASA’s JUpiter Near-polar Orbiter (Juno) is scheduled to enter the gas giant's orbit on July 4. It will be the first time a spacecraft has come so close to the “biggest and baddest planet in the solar system,” NASA said. In the video, images of Jupiter flash across the screen as ominous music and dramatic utterances are heard in the background. “It’s a monst...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 17, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Too Much of a Good thing
By Drs. David Niesel and Norbert Herzog Parents worry if their children are getting a good diet that will allow them to grow up healthy and strong. It came as somewhat of a shock when parents of a toddler in Spain were told their child was suffering from scurvy, a lack of vitamin C. After all, wasn't scurvy what plagued sailors of old? It could not be the case in modern Spain. The pregnancy was uneventful and his birth weight was a respectable 6.8 pounds. He received the recommended vaccinations and for the first two and a half months of life was fed a cow's milk based formula in lieu of human breast milk. He developed ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 16, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Chinese doctors pull a 4cm NEEDLE from a baby's throat after accidentally swallowing it
The one-year-old, from Xi'an, Shaanxi Province, China, was rushed to hospital hours after she gulped down the metal spike. X-rays showed one end was poking her tonsils. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New X-ray method allows scientists to probe molecular explosions
Researchers have used the high-intensity, quick-burst X-rays to look at how the atoms in a molecule change when the molecule is bombarded with X-rays. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 15, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Care quality hit by delays in doctors accessing scans and x-rays
Patients care is suffering as a result of the health service’s inefficient x-ray and clinical imaging systems, HSJ has learned. (Source: HSJ)
Source: HSJ - June 15, 2016 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

On Mars, Curiosity finds signs of an explosive volcanic past
Bombarding Martian rock with X-rays, NASA’s Curiosity rover has dug up the first mineral evidence of an explosive type of volcano on Mars that can also be found on Earth. The findings, described in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could hint at the complex dynamics beneath the... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - June 14, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

Little girl dreamed of walking with her twin sister but NHS refuses to fund surgery
Jasmine Moxom, 3, had scans and X-rays before being referred to Bristol Hospital to prepare for surgery. But hopes of running around with twin Summer are in doubt now the NHS won't fund it. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 13, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

X-rays Questioned for Asthma Exacerbation Without Fever, HypoxiaX-rays Questioned for Asthma Exacerbation Without Fever, Hypoxia
Radiography should not be used routinely to detect pneumonia in young children with asthma who do not have fever or hypoxia, according to new research. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Radiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Radiology Headlines - June 8, 2016 Category: Radiology Tags: Pulmonary Medicine News Source Type: news

X-rays reveal 1,300-year-old writings inside later bookbindings
The words of the 8th-century Saint Bede are among those that have been found by detecting iron, copper and zinc – constituents of medieval inkMedieval manuscripts that have been hidden from view for centuries could reveal their secrets for the first time, thanks to new technology.Dutch scientists and other academics are using an x-ray technique to read fragments of manuscripts that have been reused as bookbindings and which cannot be deciphered with the naked eye. After the middle ages manuscripts were recycled, with pages pasted inside bindings to strengthen them. Those fragments may be the unique remains of certain...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 4, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Dalya Alberge Tags: Books Culture Science World news Netherlands Europe Source Type: news

Risks of X-Rays for Cancer Diagnosis May Be a Mystery to Most PatientsRisks of X-Rays for Cancer Diagnosis May Be a Mystery to Most Patients
Most patients lack basic knowledge about the risks of radiation exposure from X-rays and other diagnostic imaging tests used to detect cancer, a recent study suggests. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Radiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Radiology Headlines - June 3, 2016 Category: Radiology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Therapeutic antibody eculizumab caught in action
Scientists have used X-rays to understand how the therapeutic antibody eculizumab prevents our immune system from destroying red blood cells and damaging kidney tissue. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 3, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

The therapeutic antibody eculizumab caught in action
(Aarhus University) In collaboration with Alexion Pharmaceuticals, Inc., scientists from Aarhus University have used X-rays to understand how the therapeutic antibody eculizumab prevents our immune system from destroying red blood cells and damaging kidney tissue. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 3, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Scoliosis X-rays are safer with lower-radiation technology
Treatment Terms Scoliosis and other spinal abnormalities Additional SEO Keywords scoliosis, spinal curvature, curvature of the spine, spinal curve, X-ray, X-ray radiation, radiation exposure SEO Meta Description Scoliosis requires Ellie Garman to have frequent X-rays. New EOS low-radiation dose technology makes those X-rays safer. Author MaryAnn Fletcher Overview New technology helps Duke doctors monitor Ellie Garman’s scoliosis (curvature of the spine) while reducing her X-ray radiation exposure. Hero Image elliegarman_blog_0_0.jpg Preview Image ...
Source: dukehealth.org: Duke Health News - June 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: mf205 at duke.edu Source Type: news

Stung by Yelp reviews, health providers spill patient secrets
by Charles Ornstein, ProPublica. The story was co-published with The Washington Post. Burned by negative reviews, some health providers are casting their patients’ privacy aside and sharing intimate details online as they try to rebut criticism. In the course of these arguments — which have spilled out publicly on ratings sites like Yelp — doctors, dentists, chiropractors and massage therapists, among others, have divulged details of patients’ diagnoses, treatments and idiosyncrasies. One Washington state dentist turned the tables on a patient who blamed him for the loss of a molar: &ldquo...
Source: Mass Device - May 31, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: Business/Financial News Hospital Care Source Type: news

Tasty fat: X-rays finding the blueprint of why fat is yummy
Over three years, a research team has collected increasingly complex samples of edible fat for research. They are using new data to characterize the nanoscale structure of different kinds of edible fats and applying the data to a model that predicts the effect of processes like heating and mixing on fat structure. If food manufacturers understand the unique structures of different fat compositions, they can better mimic the desirable tastes and textures of unhealthy fats with healthier alternatives, potentially impacting diseases closely tied to diet, according to a new article. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 27, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Does this Ankle Need an X-ray? There's an App for That
The Ottawa Rules, a set of rules used around the world to help health professionals decide when to order x-rays and CT scans, are now available as a free mobile health app. Developed by emergency department physicians at The Ottawa Hospital and the University of Ottawa, the Ottawa Rules are evidence-based decision trees that help physicians determine whether a scan is needed for injured bones, cutting down on unnecessary radiation and wait times. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - May 23, 2016 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Development Research and Development Source Type: news

ACR 2016: Radiation warning reduces portable x-ray use
Requiring referring physicians to view a warning about radiation dose before...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Hospital slashes response time for stat mobile x-ray Study: Emergency patients get duplicate x-ray, CT exams Decision model cuts unnecessary wrist x-rays by 22% UCLA group cuts unnecessary x-rays for pelvic trauma Portable x-ray tops list of near-miss errors in radiology (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - May 20, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Why Do We Run To Doctors For Everything? Because We Can.
My husband and I are approaching the time of life when the statistics say people our age start to see doctors more often. My question is: Why? Why do we -- why does anyone -- rush to see a doctor for every little ache, pain and sniffle? Here's why: because we can. We treat health insurance as a medical care plan instead of treating it as insurance against catastrophic illness. We think that because health insurance will "cover" something -- and that we pay hefty premiums for that coverage -- we therefore have the right to see a doctor for whatever ails us. We take a "better safe than sorry" attitud...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Massachusetts dentist to pay back $300k to state over X-rays
A dentist based in western Massachusetts is being asked to repay nearly $300,000 to the state, after allegedly improperly billing MassHealth for services. The state found in an audit that both Hampshire Family Dental of Northampton, and Orchard Family Dental of Indian Orchard in Springfield, both owned by Dr. Samer Tahoun, improperly billed the state’s Medicaid office for X-rays of individual teeth. Full-mouth X-rays are often done as part of routine dental exams, but individual tooth X-rays… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - May 17, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jessica Bartlett Source Type: news

Document scanning service adds x-rays to repertoire
Micro Com Systems, a document scanning service bureau in Vancouver, British...Read more on AuntMinnie.com (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - May 16, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Does this ankle need an X-ray? There's an app for that
(Ottawa Hospital Research Institute) The Ottawa Rules, a set of rules used around the world to help health professionals decide when to order x-rays and CT scans, are now available as a free mobile health app. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 9, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Dentsply Sirona beats expectations with post-merger Q1
Dentsply Sirona (NSDQ:XRAY) topped expectations with its 1st quarterly results since closing closing the $5.6 billion merger in February created the world’s largest dental equipment maker. York, Pa.-based Dentsply Sirona posted profits of $125.0 million, or 70¢ per share, on sales of $772.6 million for the 3 months ended March 31, for profit growth of 95.3% on sales growth of 17.7% compared with Q1 2015. Adjusted to exclude 1-time items, earnings per share were 69, 6 ahead of the consensus on Wall Street, where analysts were looking for sales of $741.8 million. “I am very pleased that our co...
Source: Mass Device - May 6, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Dental MassDevice Earnings Roundup Mergers & Acquisitions Wall Street Beat Dentsply Sirona Source Type: news

Two Ways Technology Helps Red Cross Earthquake Response
American Red Cross disaster relief has taken on many forms since our inception in 1881, when Clara Barton dispatched two men to help distribute relief goods and cash for victims of a Michigan forest fire. Fast forward more than 130 years, and we’re still using whatever means necessary to provide support and relief to disaster victims, sometimes even to disasters across the globe. We have been thrilled to see a couple news outlets take notice, covering the innovative ways our staff is using technology to assist in a disaster. The Washington Post, in “How a bunch of tech geeks h...
Source: Red Cross Chat - May 3, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Sarah Layton Tags: Disaster Response International Mapping Source Type: news

Diagnostic imaging and cancer risk
Advice on counselling patients about the cancer risks of radiation delivered by X-rays and CT scans. (Source: GP Online Education)
Source: GP Online Education - May 3, 2016 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Saudi team releases new findings on MERS virus
Research from Saudi Arabia, the epicenter of the Middle East respiratory syndrome...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Lung x-rays predict mortality in MERS patients Chest CT details characteristics of MERS virus infection MERS not yet detectable by airport scanners 2nd U.S. case of MERS reported in Fla. 1st MERS case appears in U.S. (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - May 2, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Duke Expert: What Parents Should Ask Before Their Kids’ X-Rays, CT Scans
Contact: Samiha KhannaPhone: 919-419-5069Email: samiha.khanna@duke.eduhttps://www.dukehealth.org FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on APRIL 26, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. -- Whether a child is complaining of intense stomach pain or has a head injury after a car crash, doctors may recommend a computed tomography, or CT scan, to investigate possible injuries. CT scans use ionizing radiation to create images of bones, organs, blood vessels and other soft tissues. The technology is widely available, provides quick and detailed results, and its use is growing worldwide, according to a recent report from the World Health Organization. With increased...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - April 27, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Imaging Advantage partners with MIT to create X-ray imager AI
Cloud-based radiology service company Imaging Advantage said today it launched a machine learning research initiative with faculty members from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital. The project, titled Singularity Healthcare, seeks to develop an artificial intelligence engine to pre-read digital x-rays and identify potential injuries or diseases while continuously learning from Imaging Advantage’s 7-billion image database, the company said. “Inconsistency in testing and access to care contribute significantly to $1 trillion of waste in th...
Source: Mass Device - April 22, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Imaging Software / IT Imaging Advantage Source Type: news

Ignoring radiology recommendations puts patients at risk
Referring physicians who ignore recommendations by radiologists for follow-up...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Communication errors weigh heavy in radiology How to identify and minimize common errors in breast imaging CMS pushes back deadline for imaging decision support Simulator training helps nonrads read chest x-rays ACR offers praise for IOM report on diagnostic errors (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - April 22, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Zimbabwe: Accident Victims Pay Upfront for Oxygen, Blood Transfusion
[New Zimbabwe] ZIMBABWE's emergency preparedness is so deplorable that all response units have virtually collapsed with patients forced to pay for blood transfusion, drip, oxygen and X-rays, a pressure group has said. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 19, 2016 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Ultrasound May Be Best to Spot Kids' Pneumonia
Avoided radiation exposure of standard chest X-rays, and didn't miss any cases (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - April 13, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Lung Ultrasound May Be Best to Spot Pneumonia in Kids: Study
Avoided radiation exposure of standard chest X-rays, and didn't miss any cases (Source: U.S. News - Health)
Source: U.S. News - Health - April 13, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Lung Ultrasound May Be Best to Spot Pneumonia in Kids
Avoided radiation exposure of standard chest X-rays, and didn't miss any cases Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Children's Health, Pneumonia, Ultrasound (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - April 13, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Lung Ultrasound May Be Best to Spot Pneumonia in Kids: Study
WEDNESDAY, April 13, 2016 -- Lung ultrasounds may offer a safer, yet equally effective, alternative to chest X-rays for diagnosing pneumonia in children, researchers report. "Ultrasound is portable, cost-saving and safer for children than an X-ray... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - April 13, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Lung Ultrasound May Be Best to Spot Pneumonia in Kids: Study
Avoided radiation exposure of standard chest X-rays, and didn't miss any cases (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - April 12, 2016 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: webmaster at doctorslounge.com Tags: Oncology, Pediatrics, Pulmonology, Radiology, News, Source Type: news

Lung ultrasound safe diagnosis method for pneumonia in children
Stephen FellerNEW YORK, April 12 (UPI) -- Using ultrasound may be a better, cheaper, easier method of imaging children's lungs for pneumonia diagnosis than X-rays, according to a recent study. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - April 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cancer is 3 times more likely for doctors and nurses who handle X-rays
Healthcare professionals are at higher risk of orthopaedic problems with their back, neck or knees - as well as cataracts, skin lesions and even cancer - if they regularly handle X-rays. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Healthcare providers in cath labs may be harmed by radiation
(Reuters Health) – Healthcare workers in labs where patients undergo heart procedures guided by X-rays may be at higher risk for cataracts, skin lesions, bone disorders or cancer than other healthcare workers, according to a new study. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - April 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

This Lightweight Metal Foam May Be The Future Of Bulletproof Armor
A composite metal foam that stops armor-piercing bullets in their tracks could be the future of bulletproof body and vehicle armor, scientists say. Afsaneh Rabiei, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at N.C. State University, has developed the lightweight material over a number of years. Rabiei's team filmed footage that shows a 7.62 mm x 63 mm M2 projectile being fired at the foam. The bullet is completely obliterated on impact, and turns to dust. According to a statement, the "lighter than metal plating" material has "obvious implications for creating new types of body and vehicle armor....
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 11, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

NLM History of Medicine Lecture on April 12: The Analog Patient: Imagining Medicine at a Distance in the Television Era
You are invited to join the next National Library of Medicine History of Medicine lecture, which will be live-streamed on Tuesday, April 12, 2016 from 8:00am to from 9:00am PT.  Jeremy Greene, MD, PhD, will speak on “The Analog Patient: Imagining Medicine at a Distance in the Television Era.” Dr. Greene is Associate Professor of Medicine and the History of Medicine, Elizabeth Treide and A. McGehee Harvey Chair in the History of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Greene’s presentation is part of Images & Texts in Medical History: A Workshop in Methods, Tools, & Data from the Digital Huma...
Source: Dragonfly - April 5, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Emily Glenn Tags: News from NLM Source Type: news