Peninsula Dog and Cat Clinic Now Using Sound DR Digital XRay System
(Source: Medical News (via PRIMEZONE))
Source: Medical News (via PRIMEZONE) - March 15, 2015 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Light: Going Beyond the Bulb
Caption: In this piece of art, light bulbs were placed in a medical X-ray machine. The artist then added color to the individual light bulbs to create the desired effect. Credit: Dr. Paula Fontaine/www.RadiantArtStudios.com Light is one of those things that we almost inevitably take for granted. In fact, many of us might not realize the extent that we overlook its contributions to our lives, because it's hard to see - literally -- just how much it does. The light that humans can detect with their eyes is but a mere fraction of the total light out there. Light takes many forms, including radio waves, microwaves, infrared...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 13, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Nigeria: Nigeria's Doing Well With HIV Control, But... - Camara, UNAIDS Coordinator
[Independent (Lagos)] BILALI CAMARA is the UNAIDS Country Coordinator in Nigeria, also doubles as the UNAIDS Focal Point for ECOWAS. In this interview with our Correspondent, HASSAN ZAGGI, Camara x-rays the current HIV situation in Nigeria, efforts of the government in the fight the scourge and what UNAIDS is doing to ensure ARVs are produced in Nigeria. He also spokes on many other issues. Excerpts: (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - March 12, 2015 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New angle on x-ray measurements
Criminal justice, cosmology and computer manufacturing may not look to have much in common, but these and many other disparate fields all depend on sensitive measurement of X-rays. Scientists have developed a new method to reduce uncertainty in X-ray wavelength measurement that could provide improvements awaited for decades. Accurate measurement of X-ray wavelength depends critically on the ability to measure angles very accurately and with very little margin for error. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 9, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Ella’s story: Two rare diseases and the NICU roller coaster ride
“Everyone tells you that the NICU is a roller coaster ride. What they don’t tell you is that it’s a customized roller coaster ride just for you. You never know what’s coming at you next,” says Carrie Shea, whose daughter Ella spent her first three months of life in Boston Children’s Hospital NICU. Today, Ella is a “remarkably normal little girl,” says Carrie. It’s quite a feat for the three-year-old who was born with GACI (generalized arterial calcification of infancy), an extremely rare condition with an 85 percent mortality rate, and diagnosed with PKU (phenylketonuri...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - March 5, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Lisa Fratt Tags: Our patients’ stories Source Type: news

Particles Come From All Over
In my last blog post, I talked about the work that has been ongoing while the Large Hadron Collider was undergoing repairs and maintenance in preparation for turning on and producing collisions at a new higher energy starting this spring. Of course we're looking forward to what will happen with this as it will be the highest energy for an accelerator. Meanwhile, the Universe's accelerators have been bombarding us with high energy particles, low energy particles and everything in between since the beginning of time. There are lots of ways we are looking at these particles with detectors on the earth and in the sky. There ar...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 4, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Orca Health Aims To Make Understanding Anatomy Easier
When you go to the doctor’s office for an injury, or to discuss an upcoming surgery, it’s hard to retain everything that’s thrown at you. The provider will likely explain what’s going on in words, point to some x-rays, even demonstrate the issue on a physical model before sending you home with a pile of handouts. But Orca Health, a company specializing in point-of-care apps, aims to replace that process with a digital model using demonstrations instead of explanations. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - February 26, 2015 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Sarah Hedgecock Source Type: news

Grandmother who died with a broken neck had been told for three WEEKS to take paracetamol instead of being taken to hospital for X-rays
Ruby Rice, 89, of Norfolk, died after becoming paralysed from the neck down as a result of the fall. It was only after she had suffered the pain for three weeks that she was taken to hospital for X-rays. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 26, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Rand Paul Misleads With Statements On NIH, Fruit Flies
The following post first appeared on FactCheck.org. Sen. Rand Paul made several misleading statements about the National Institutes of Health and some of the research that it funds. Paul claimed the NIH’s budget has been increasing “for years.” That’s not accurate even in raw dollars. And when adjusted for inflation, the budget has actually decreased over the last decade. He also suggested the NIH wasted $1 million on a study of whether male fruit flies prefer older or younger females, and in the process he belittled the impact of basic research using flies — which has yielded dozens of disc...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 19, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

An accident, paralysis, then an idea: How this entrepreneur created the OpenTable of health care
Jessica Harthcock knew it was bad when her body went numb. She was stunned and couldn't speak. But she'd heard the crunch. "I knew I just broke my neck," Jessica said. Jessica was a varsity springboard diver. Cross-training was encouraged, so Jessica also practiced gymnastics. And on the night of the accident, she over-rotated on a front double-tuck with a layout twist — and fractured her spine. From the X-rays, it almost looked like the spinal chord had been pushed off to the side, she said.… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Hospitals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Hospitals headlines - February 17, 2015 Category: Hospital Management Authors: Caroline McMillan Portillo Source Type: news

Revving EHR engines with Flash I/O
When clinicians complain about their EHR’s performance, long wait times are usually at the top of the list. Is it reasonable to expect that an EHR can deliver X-rays to a doctor as fast as an iPad opens its Photo library? It can be, thanks to dropping Flash memory prices. Cloud Computing Revving EHR engines with Flash I/O EMC’s hybrid cloud solution pushes data through bottlenecks Healthcare IT News news/revving-ehr-engines-flash-io ...
Source: Healthcare IT News - February 16, 2015 Category: Information Technology Authors: Gus Venditto Tags: Online Only Cloud Computing Source Type: news

Doctors share X-rays of the strangest things they've found stuck in people's rears
The X-ray images, such as this showing a jar of instant coffee inserted into rectum, have been shared by medical staff on Radiopaedia, a wiki for radiologists. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 5, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Betelgeuse Supernova
Astronomers have been waiting for this for a long time, and at some time in the not so distant future the brilliant red star in the constellation Orion will explode. What will it look like? Betelgeuse is so big and close its surface can be resolved with the Hubble Space Telescope! What we know. Betelgeuse is a red supergiant star located about 590 light years from Earth. If you were to replace our sun with this star, its outer surface would be located at about the orbit of Jupiter, but it is a variable star and its diameter has been directly measured to vary from about the orbit of Earth to the orbit of Saturn. It has a...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 2, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Two Vatican Mummies Declared Fake
They're fake! That's what archaeologists are saying about two mummies that have long been part of Vatican's collection of antiquities. The small mummies, each about two feet long, had been thought to contain the bodies of children or small animals that dated back to ancient Egypt. But when Vatican researchers analyzed the mummies using 3D CT scans, X-rays, DNA tests, and infrared and ultraviolet light, they found that the mummies actually contained a hodgepodge of adult human bones from the Middle Ages, along with a single nail dating back to the 19th Century, Catholic News Service reported. Archaeologists and experts...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 2, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Portable X-Ray Services Are On The Rise
Instead of waiting at an emergency room to be examined, many patients are now opting to have X-rays taken in their homes. Especially convenient for the elderly or patients with significant illnesses, portable X-ray machines can take as little as 20 minutes and may even be able to digitally transmit information to a radiologist. (Source: Medical Design Online News)
Source: Medical Design Online News - January 30, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Source Type: news

Speed of Sound: Ultrasound to the Rescue When X-Rays Fail
No abstract available (Source: Emergency Medicine News)
Source: Emergency Medicine News - January 30, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Speed of Sound Source Type: news

New instrument to study the extreme universe -- the X-Ray polarimeter X-Calibur
X-ray polarimetry promises to give qualitatively new information about high-energy astrophysical sources, such as black hole systems, the bright and active centers of galaxies, compact neutron stars, and gamma-ray bursts. The instrument will measure the polarization of 20-80keV X-rays. The detector is completed, tested, and fully calibrated and ready to be flown on a high-altitude balloon. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 28, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

When Ignorance Is Deadly: Pacific Women Dying From Lack of Breast Cancer Awareness
Local women's NGO, Vois Blong Mere, campaigns for women's rights in Honiara, capital of the Solomon Islands. Credit: Catherine Wilson/IPSBy Catherine WilsonSYDNEY, Jan 28 2015 (IPS)Women now face a better chance of surviving breast cancer in the Solomon Islands, a developing island state in the southwest Pacific Ocean, following the recent acquisition of the country’s first mammogram machine.But just a week ahead of World Cancer Day, celebrated globally on Feb. 4, many say that the benefit of having advanced medical technology, in a country where mortality occurs in 59 percent of women diagnosed with cancer, depends ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - January 28, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Catherine Wilson Tags: Asia-Pacific Civil Society Development & Aid Editors' Choice Education Featured Gender Global Governance Headlines Health Human Rights Population Poverty & MDGs Projects Regional Categories Women's Health Annals of Global H Source Type: news

Child swallows SpongeBob SquarePants
Doctor stunned to see freckled cartoon character in x-rays of 16-month old boy (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - January 27, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Report: Many medical imaging tests performed in U.S. are unnecessary
A new report finds doctors are using CT scans and x-rays tests too frequently, exposing patients to high levels of radiation when safer options could be used (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - January 27, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

SpongeBob SquarePants Discovered Inside Child (PHOTOS)
Bet the baby wishes they had swallowed a krabby patty. A doctor in Saudi Arabia was stunned to discover a SpongeBob pendent lodged inside a toddler's trachea. Dr. Ghofran Ageely, a radiology resident at King Abdulaziz University Hospital, in Jeddah shared these photos of x-rays that revealed the Nickelodeon star smiling, with his tongue sticking out. "I opened the frontal view and was shocked. 'SpongeBob,' I screamed!!!" Ageely wrote in an email to LiveScience. I was amazed by the visible details. You can see his freckles, shoes and fingers…AMAZING." The Spongebob pendent, which belonged to th...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 27, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Risks of cancer-causing radiation from X-rays, CT scans
A new investigation from Consumer Reports found the number of CT scans grew from 3 million a year in 1980 to 80 million today, and up to one-third of them could be unnecessary. Consumer Reports deputy content editor Trisha Calvo joins "CBS This Morning" to discuss the story. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - January 27, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NASA Releases Stunning Space Photos To Kick Off The 'International Year Of Light'
The United Nations has declared 2015 the International Year of Light in order to "highlight to the citizens of the world the importance of light and optical technologies in their lives, for their futures, and for the development of society." NASA seems more than eager to help with the effort. It's just released a set of spectacular photos (see below) taken by its Chandra X-Ray Observatory space telescope. "From a distant galaxy to the relatively nearby debris field of an exploded star, these images demonstrate the myriad ways that information about the universe is communicated to us through light," t...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 25, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

X-Rays Open Secrets Of Ancient Scrolls
Scientists have used a particle accelerator to read ancient scrolls without unrolling them. The breakthrough could potentially be used to decipher hundreds of texts.» E-Mail This (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - January 22, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Geoff Brumfiel Source Type: news

Scientists Unlock Secrets of Ancient Scrolls Near Pompeii
This study, without compromising the physical integrity of the roll, has not merely discovered traces of the ink inside it, but has also helped identify with a certain likelihood the style of handwriting used in the text, along with its author,” the researchers conclude in the report. “It holds out the promise that many philosophical works form the library of the ‘Villa dei Papiri’, the contents of which have so far remained unknown, may in future be deciphered without damaging the papyrus in any way.” [CNET] (Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories)
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - January 20, 2015 Category: Science Authors: racheljanik Tags: Uncategorized ancient history Archaeology Pompeii Science technology Volcano Source Type: news

Two hip dysplasia surgeries feed Anna’s interest in medicine
Boston Children’s Hospital strives to create a comfortable, supportive environment for all of its patients. Still, most can’t wait to leave the sterile hospital halls and return to the comfort of their own homes. Anna, a 20-year-old college student from N.H., has other thoughts. “I can’t wait to come back to Boston Children’s.” Diagnosis: Hip impingement Anna first started experiencing hip pain at age 17 and thought she had injured herself during a ballet class. But the pain persisted, sending her a to local orthopedic surgeon, who referred her to Young-Jo Kim, MD, PhD, in Boston Childr...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - January 20, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Lisa Fratt Tags: Our patients’ stories Child and Adult Hip Preservation Program hip dysplasia our patients' stories pincer impingement Young-Jo Kim Source Type: news

Physicists read scrolls scorched by ancient volcano
X-rays reveal writing on papyrus destroyed by Mount Vesuvius eruption (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - January 20, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

World's weirdest X-rays
The world's weirdest X-rays reveal a wide range of strange objects (Source: Telegraph Health)
Source: Telegraph Health - January 16, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: photograph X光 nails crowbar X-ray weird knife picture medical China pencil bullets X射线 Source Type: news

Smart farming technique to boost yields, cut fertilizer pollution
Researchers are using X-rays to help farmers increase yields and cut water pollution following an unexpected discovery in a pea and bean crop. Scientists hope to combine two new technologies to provide a rapid "same day" measurement of soil phosphorus availability, enabling farmers and growers to make more informed decisions about fertilizer application. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 15, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Compact batteries enhanced by spontaneous silver matrix formations
A conductive silver matrix forming inside an otherwise poorly performing battery enhances its efficiency and potential applications. X-rays revealed where, when, and how these nanoscale "bridges" emerge. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 8, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Record-breaking black hole outburst detected
Last September, after years of watching, astronomers observed and recorded the largest-ever flare in X-rays from a supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 6, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Dazzling! NuSTAR captures sun's portrait in solar X-rays
It’s time to see the sun in a whole new light – X-ray light. NASA’s NuSTAR space telescope has taken a stunning portrait of our home star in high-energy X-rays. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - December 25, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Nasa’s NuSTAR probe takes first spectacular, Christmassy picture of the sun
Nasa’s NuSTAR probe has taken its first picture of the sun — and the stunning image  shows X-rays streaming off the star. (Source: The Independent - Science)
Source: The Independent - Science - December 23, 2014 Category: Science Tags: Science Source Type: news

Sun sizzles in high-energy X-rays
For the first time, a mission designed to set its eyes on black holes and other objects far from our solar system has turned its gaze back closer to home, capturing images of our sun. NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, has taken its first picture of the sun, producing the most sensitive solar portrait ever taken in high-energy X-rays. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 23, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Stunning X-Ray Portrait Of The Sun Snapped By NASA's NuSTAR Space Telescope
NuSTAR may have been built to observe black holes and other objects in deep space, but NASA's supersensitive space telescope can also do a bang-up job of imaging the sun. Just have a look at this glorious new photo released by the space agency on Dec. 22. (Click on image below for large size--story continues below.) X-rays stream off the sun in this image combining data from NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) space telescope, overlaid on a photo taken by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The photo is the first taken of the sun by NuSTAR and is the "most sensitive solar portrait ever taken...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 22, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Radiologist recommendations for chest CT have high clinical yield
A substantial percentage of patients who receive radiologist recommendations for chest CT to evaluate abnormal findings on outpatient chest X-rays have clinically relevant findings, including cancer, according to a new study. Researchers said the findings show that radiologist recommendations for additional imaging (RAIs) after chest X-rays represent valuable contributions to patient care. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 22, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

How to naturally cure tooth decay and gum disease
(NaturalNews) If you're weary of high dentist bills -- as well as exposure to X-rays, fluoride and toxic fillings -- a natural and straightforward approach to dental health comes as a welcome relief. Considering that amalgam fillings are one of the top sources of heavy metal exposure... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 18, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Colliding Galaxies Mount 'Spectacular Light Show' In New NASA Image
Just in time for the holidays, NASA has released a new photo showing a spectacular light show created by a pair of merging galaxies 130 million light-years from Earth. The photo is a composite image of the spiral galaxies NGC 2207 and IC 2163, located in the constellation Canis Major. (Story continues below image.) Spiral galaxies NGC 2207 and IC 2163. The image is a mash-up of X-rays captured by NASA's Chandra X-Ray Observatory (shown in pink), visible light data from the Hubble Space Telescope (shown in red, green, and blue), and infrared data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope (shown in red). What makes NGC 2207 ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 17, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Live 3-D images to be taken from inside materials
X-rays are a tried and tested way to investigate components and materials. Researchers are now developing an X-ray detector capable of delivering particularly high-quality 3-D images in real time. This will make it possible to precisely reconstruct even the processes going on inside materials and e.g. provide a reliable way of detecting minoscule faults. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 15, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Dark Matter Signal May Have Been Found In Mysterious X-Ray Data
After a decades-long search, astronomers may finally have found the first sign of dark matter. That's the invisible substance that scientists believe makes up the bulk of our universe, since visible matter accounts for only about 20 percent of our universe's mass. While scientists can observe dark matter indirectly by looking at its gravitational effects on visible matter, they have struggled to come up with tangible evidence that proves the stuff exists--until now. This week, a team of researchers from Switzerland and the Netherlands announced that they may have detected the signal of decaying dark matter particles. ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 13, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Did European scientists find dark-matter signal buried in X-rays?
Scientists say they may have discovered a possible dark matter signal coded in the X-rays emanating from two bright objects in the sky. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - December 13, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Earth's most abundant mineral finally has a name
An ancient meteorite and high-energy X-rays have helped scientists conclude a half century of effort to find, identify and characterize a mineral that makes up 38 percent of the Earth. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 12, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Researchers detect possible signal from dark matter
Scientists have picked up an atypical photon emission in X-rays coming from space, and say it could be evidence for the existence of a particle of dark matter. If confirmed, it could open up new perspectives in cosmology. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 11, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Improved treatment for cancer patients: Topical steroid cream
Researchers have shown how a topical steroid cream frequently used  to treat common skin conditions, can be used to improve dermatitis in cancer patients. Radiotherapy uses X-rays to destroy cancer cells but this can often lead to a severe skin reaction involving redness, pain and blistering similar to sunburn. The trial of this cream -- mometasone furoate--was so successful that the patients in the research will now be offered this instead of the existing treatment. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 9, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

For Women With Dense Breasts, More Mammograms May Not Be The Answer
WASHINGTON (AP) — More women are learning their breasts are so dense that it's more difficult for mammograms to spot cancer. But new research suggests automatically giving them an extra test isn't necessarily the solution. Screening isn't the only concern. Women whose breast tissue is very dense have a greater risk of developing breast cancer than women whose breasts contain more fatty tissue. Laws in 19 states require women to be told if they have dense breasts after a mammogram, with Missouri's and Massachusetts' requirements taking effect in January. Similar legislation has been introduced in Congress. What's no...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 9, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

NASA-funded FOXSI to observe X-rays from Sun
NASA regularly watches the Sun in numerous wavelengths because different wavelengths provide information about different temperatures and processes in space. Looking at all the wavelengths together helps to provide a complete picture of what's occurring on the sun over 92 million miles away -- but no one has been able to focus on high energy X-rays from the Sun until recently. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 9, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Many Chest X-Rays In Children Are Unnecessary
Researchers at Mayo Clinic found that some children are receiving chest X-rays that may be unnecessary and offer no clinical benefit to the patient, according to a study presented recently at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). (Source: Medical Design Online News)
Source: Medical Design Online News - December 5, 2014 Category: Medical Equipment Source Type: news

Unnecessary Chest X-Rays on Kids Common
(MedPage Today) -- 88% done at one center had no clinical impact. (Source: MedPage Today Pediatrics)
Source: MedPage Today Pediatrics - December 4, 2014 Category: Pediatrics Source Type: news

Pulsars with black holes could hold the 'Holy Grail' of gravity
The intermittent light emitted by pulsars, the most precise timekeepers in the universe, allows scientists to verify Einstein’s theory of relativity, especially when these objects are paired up with another neutron star or white dwarf that interferes with their gravity. However, this theory could be analysed much more effectively if a pulsar with a black hole were found, except in two particular cases, according to researchers. Pulsars are very dense neutron stars that are the size of a city (their radius approaches ten kilometers), which, like lighthouses for the universe, emit gamma radiation beams or X-rays when t...
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 4, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Many chest x-rays in kids unnecessary, study says
Doctors at the Mayo Clinic say that a large percentage of pediatric chest x-rays did not alter which treatment the doctor prescribed. Also, patients who undergo meniscus surgery can have more risk of arthritis. Eboni Williams reports on the day's top medical news. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - December 3, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news