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New light on the 'split peak' of alcohols
For scientists probing the electronic structure of materials using RIXS, a persistent question has been how to account for "split peak" spectra seen in some hydrogen-bonded materials, but now researchers have performed an investigation of several types of liquid alcohols with RIXS and brought new perspective to this long-lasting debate. Researchers now show that the split peaks are tied to dynamic motions produced in response to the scattering X-rays themselves. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - October 14, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Concerns raised about late diagnosis of lung cancer
Conclusion This study found people who die early after their lung cancer diagnosis (within three months) were less likely to have had a chest X-ray and tended to have more GP visits on average in the four months prior to their diagnosis than those who lived longer. The researchers suggest that this could indicate there are "missed opportunities to identify them earlier", and this is what the media has focused on.  While the study found an association with the number of GP visits, the difference is relatively small (one visit on average). There are many factors that could have accounted for the number of vi...
Source: NHS News Feed - October 14, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Medical practice Source Type: news

Inner workings of powerful biochemical switch revealed
Using X-rays and neutron beams, a new study has revealed the inner workings of a master switch that regulates basic cellular functions, but that also, when mutated, contributes to cancer, cardiovascular disease and other deadly disorders. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - October 10, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

RSNA to show x-ray 'nature scenes' by Dutch medical physicist
What happens if you combine x-rays, creatures large and small, and a diorama? (more) (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - October 9, 2014 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Advanced X-ray, neutron beam imaging reveal workings of powerful biochemical switch PKA
(University of Utah Health Sciences) A University of Utah-led study using X-rays and neutron beams has revealed the inner workings of a master switch that regulates basic cellular functions, but that also, when mutated, contributes to cancer, cardiovascular disease and other deadly disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 9, 2014 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers unfold new details about a powerful protein
(University of California - San Diego) Using x-rays and neutron beams, a team of researchers from the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, University of Utah and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have teased out new information about Protein Kinase A, or PKA, a ubiquitous master switch that helps regulate fundamental cellular functions like energy consumption and interactions with hormones, neurotransmitters and drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 9, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Upper East Side Dental Now Offering $69 New Patient Special Including...
Upper East Side Dental is now offering a new patient special for only $69, where patients receive an exam, digital x-rays, camera tour and professional cleaning. In addition, the practice is offering...(PRWeb October 06, 2014)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/dentist-manhattan-nyc/new-patient-special/prweb12228833.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - October 7, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Responsible Use Of X-Rays In Dentistry For Children Is Aim Of New Education And Awareness Initiative
Children need smaller portions – this is true when it comes to eating meals, and when addressing topics such as imaging. It is under this premise that the profession of dentistry is joining the Image Gently campaign to raise awareness about special considerations needed for pediatric dental radiology, and to promote radiation safety. (Source: Medical Design Online News)
Source: Medical Design Online News - September 19, 2014 Category: Medical Equipment Source Type: news

Ultrasound as good as CT for initial diagnosis of kidney stones : study
NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Using the sound waves of an ultrasound to detect a painful kidney stone is just as effective as the X-rays of a CT scan, and exposes patients to much less harmful radiation, according to a new multicenter study. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - September 17, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

X-rays unlock a protein's SWEET side
Understanding just how sugar makes its way into the cell could lead to the design of better drugs for diabetes patients and an increase in the amount of fruits and vegetables farmers are able to grow. Researchers have recently uncovered one of these "pathways” into the cell by piecing together proteins slightly wider than the diameter of a strand of spider silk. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 15, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

X-rays unlock a protein's SWEET side
(DOE/Argonne National Laboratory) Understanding just how sugar makes its way into the cell could lead to the design of better drugs for diabetes patients and an increase in the amount of fruits and vegetables farmers are able to grow. Stanford University researchers have recently uncovered one of these 'pathways' into the cell by piecing together proteins slightly wider than the diameter of a strand of spider silk. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 15, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Synchrotron X-rays track fluids in the lungs
New non-invasive technique could help monitor cystic-fibrosis treatments (Source: PhysicsWeb News)
Source: PhysicsWeb News - September 13, 2014 Category: Physics Source Type: news

Highest resolution ever with X-ray microscopy
Researchers used 'soft' X-rays to image structures only five nanometers in size. This resolution is the highest ever achieved with X-ray microscopy. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 10, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Continuing Bragg legacy of structure determination
Over 100 years since the Nobel Prize-winning father and son team Sir William and Sir Lawrence Bragg pioneered the use of X-rays to determine crystal structure, researchers have made significant new advances in the field. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 7, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Continuing Bragg legacy of structure determination
(University of Adelaide) Over 100 years since the Nobel Prize-winning father and son team Sir William and Sir Lawrence Bragg pioneered the use of X-rays to determine crystal structure, University of Adelaide researchers have made significant new advances in the field. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 7, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Balloon rise over fort sumner
In a few days, a balloon-borne telescope sensitive to the polarization of high-energy “hard” X rays will ascend to the edge of the atmosphere above Fort Sumner, N.M., to stare fixedly at black holes and other exotic astronomical objects. It will be carried aloft by a stratospheric balloon that will expand to a sphere large enough to hold a 747 jetliner the float height of 120,000 feet, three times the height at which commercial aircraft fly and on the edge of Earth’s atmosphere. Launching the balloon is not child’s play. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - August 29, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Giant balloon may soon rise over the desert, carrying aloft cutting-edge telescope
In a few days, a balloon-borne telescope sensitive to the polarization of high-energy “hard” X rays will ascend to the edge of the atmosphere above Fort Sumner, N.M., to stare fixedly at black holes and other exotic astronomical objects. It will be carried aloft by a stratospheric balloon that will expand to a sphere large enough to hold a 747 jetliner the float height of 120,000 feet, three times the height at which commercial aircraft fly and on the edge of Earth’s atmosphere. Launching the balloon is not child’s play. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - August 29, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Why some liquids are 'fragile' and others are 'strong'
Only recently has it become possible to accurately 'see' the structure of a liquid. Using X-rays and a high-tech apparatus that holds liquids without a container, a physicist has compared the behavior of glass-forming liquids as they approach the glass transition. The results are the strongest demonstration yet that bulk properties like viscosity are linked to microscopic ones like structure. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - August 27, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Breakfast 'not the most important meal of the day'
ConclusionThis trial aimed to measure the direct effect that eating breakfast or fasting before 12am has on energy balance and indicators of cardiovascular health in people living their normal daily lives. The trail has been carefully designed study and has taken extensive body measurements to try and measure the direct effects of breakfast or fasting upon the body. However, there are limitations to bear in mind: This was a small sample size. The target sample size for the trial for it to have statistical power to reliably detect differences between the group had been 70 people – 30 in each group – with the ai...
Source: NHS News Feed - August 26, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Lifestyle/exercise Obesity Source Type: news

For secure software: X-rays instead of passport control
Trust is good, control is better. This also applies to the security of computer programs. Instead of trusting “identification documents” in the form of certificates, JOANA, the new software analysis tool, examines the source text (code) of a program. In this way, it detects leaks, via which secret information may get out or strangers may enter the system from outside. At the same time, JOANA reduces the number of false alarms to a minimum. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - August 21, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

What One Quality Makes a Good Cartoon Better?
Do advertisers (and artists) prey on your anxieties?read more (Source: Psychology Today Anxiety Center)
Source: Psychology Today Anxiety Center - August 20, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Donna Barstow Tags: Anxiety Creativity Depression Therapy anxieties fear of doctors hidden fears subtext x-rays Source Type: news

New tool makes online personal data more transparent
XRay is a new tool that reveals which data in a web account, such as emails, searches, or viewed products, are being used to target which outputs, such as ads, recommended products, or prices. Determined to provide checks and balances on data abuse, XRay is designed to be the first fine-grained, scalable personal data tracking system for the web. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - August 18, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

An in-between black hole
Syncopated x-rays reveal a black hole that is neither star-sized nor supermassive (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 18, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Black Holes? I’ll Take a Medium, Please
In one sense, black holes are just ridiculously exotic. Their surface gravity is so powerful that even something as fast as light can’t escape (that’s why they’re black). And what’s actually inside a black hole isn’t just strange: it’s literally indescribable by any known law of physics. MoreNow We Know How This Giant, Earth-Bound Asteroid Is Held Together, We Can Learn How to Destroy ItWhat the ‘Supermoon’ Looked Like Around the WorldHungry Heroes: 25 Percent of Military Families Seek Food Aid NBC News'We Have Had Enough': Ferguson Rally Remembers Michael Brown NBC NewsMore ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - August 17, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Michael Lemonick Tags: Uncategorized astronomy Source Type: news

Pictures in five seconds: Digital x-ray imaging
Wanting to replace the medical equipment for taking X-rays, experts in Mexico have created a system of digital x-ray imaging, which replaces the traditional plaque by a solid detector, which delivers results in five seconds. Analog equipment take six minutes to develop the traditional film. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - August 8, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Most kids with blunt torso trauma can skip the pelvic X-ray
(American College of Emergency Physicians) Pelvic x-rays ordered as a matter of course for children who have suffered blunt force trauma do not accurately identify all cases of pelvic fractures or dislocations and are usually unnecessary for patients for whom abdominal/pelvic CT scanning is otherwise planned. A study published online in Annals of Emergency Medicine last week casts doubt on a practice that has been recommended by the Advanced Trauma Life Support Program, considered the gold standard for trauma patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 6, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Chemist develops X-ray vision for quality assurance
A researcher has developed a method that uses X-rays for the rapid identification of substances present in an indeterminate powder. The new technique has the capacity to recognize advanced biological molecules such as proteins. The method therefore has enormous potential in both food production and the pharmaceutical industry, where it opens up new opportunities for the quality assurance of protein-based medicines, for example. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - July 24, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Chandra Observatory: 15 Years of Glorious Pictures
You’ll never see the universe as beautifully as the Chandra Observatory can see it. That’s because Chandra—which is celebrating its 15th anniversary in high-Earth orbit—sees in x-ray frequencies and you don’t. It’s a pity, actually that we’re blind in that bandwidth, because so much of the cosmos makes itself known there. Signals coming from planets, comets, supernovas, from the dark matter in the vast spaces between galaxies, all emit x-ray energy. The portraits they paint, with false color added to make them visible to our eyes, are more than static snapshots. They are, instead, ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - July 22, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Josh Raab Tags: Uncategorized chandra NASA observatory satellite space x-rays Source Type: news

World's weirdest X-rays
The world's weirdest X-rays reveal a wide range of strange objects (Source: Telegraph Health)
Source: Telegraph Health - July 21, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: photograph X光 nails crowbar X-ray weird knife picture medical China pencil bullets X射线 Source Type: news

Moments in Radiology History: Part 16 -- Early nuclear medicine
After early efforts began to harness the power of x-rays for diagnosis and (more) (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - July 11, 2014 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Should You Get An Annual Pelvic Exam?
There are many common practices in medicine that are completely useless. For example, it was once common for patients to get a chest X-ray as part of their yearly physical. Someone finally questioned this practice and studied its utility. It turned out that chest X-rays used to screen for cancer failed twice: they often detected non-cancerous abnormalities that led to extensive work-ups, and they failed to catch cancers. The practice has fallen into disuse. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - July 3, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Peter Lipson Source Type: news

Ethan is a hero-- he kept his helmet on and avoided a serious injury.
Meet Ethan.   He suffered a head injury while riding his bike. His forehead was bleeding profusely and his worried parents took him to the emergency room where he had a several x-rays taken.   Although his helmet was cracked in the accident, we are happy to report that his head injury was minor.   Ethan, we're glad that you were wearing your helmet!  Keep up the good work!Sometimes a picture is worth a thousand words....if your child is resistant to wearing a helmet, perhaps Ethan's picture might help them see why it's important. (Source: Pediatric Health Associates)
Source: Pediatric Health Associates - July 2, 2014 Category: Pediatrics Source Type: news

Tanzania: Digital X-Rays to Be Supplied in Hospitals
[Daily News]Dodoma -The Deputy Minister of Sate in the Prime Minister's Office (Regional Administration and Local Government), Mr Kassim Majaliwa. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - June 30, 2014 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Astronomers Are Closer to Understanding Dark Matter
Astronomers have come closer to understanding dark matter — one of the most elusive substances in the universe — by using high-energy telescopes to study the gravitational force of vast groups of galaxies that are bound together by gravity, known as galaxy clusters. Dark matter — which astronomers also believe is the most prevalent type of matter in the universe — is invisible and doesn’t give off light, yet it’s existence is evident in the gravitational influence it exerts on stars and galaxies. Astronomers used NASA and European Space Agency (ESA) space-borne telescopes to determine th...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - June 26, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: melissahellmann Tags: Uncategorized astronomy dark matter esa galaxy cluster NASA space sterile neutrino universe Source Type: news

Spintronic technologies: Advanced light source provides new look at skyrmions
Researchers for the first time have used x-rays to observe and study skyrmions, subatomic quasiparticles that could play a key role in future spintronic technologies. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 25, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Puzzling X-rays point to dark matter
Astronomers using ESA and NASA high-energy observatories have discovered a tantalizing clue that hints at an elusive ingredient of our Universe: dark matter. Astronomers believe that dark matter is the dominant type of matter in the Universe -- yet it remains obscure. Now a hint may have been found by studying galaxy clusters, the largest cosmic assemblies of matter bound together by gravity. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 25, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Are 3-D Mammograms a Better Way to Screen for Breast Cancer?
A large new study compares digital mammography, what’s been state-of-the-art in clinical practice for around 15 years, with addition of a newer method called tomosynthesis. Like other kinds of mammography, tomosynthesis uses x-rays to generate breast images. But it does so in 3-D, almost like a mini-CT scan of the breast. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - June 25, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Elaine Schattner Source Type: news

Researchers hail promise of 3D breast scans for cancer detection
A type of breast scan called 3D mammography can detect significantly more potentially lethal tumours than traditional X-rays, research has shown. (Source: Nursing Times Breaking News)
Source: Nursing Times Breaking News - June 25, 2014 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Scientists use X-rays to look at how DNA protects itself from UV light
(DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory) The molecular building blocks that make up DNA absorb ultraviolet light so strongly that sunlight should deactivate them -- yet it does not. Now scientists have made detailed observations of a 'relaxation response' that protects these molecules, and the genetic information they encode, from UV damage. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 23, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

New weapon found in the war against superbugs
Conclusion Antibiotic resistance is already causing thousands of deaths annually and is now considered a major threat, ranking alongside terrorism and climate change. Gram-positive bacteria such as E. coli, salmonella and Klebsiella are particularly resistant to antibiotics. This study shines a useful light on how such bacteria build a protective outer coating against attack. It is still early days, but the findings could pave the way for the development of new drugs that attack this process. As Mark Fielder, professor of medical microbiology at Kingston University, said: "The work reported is at a very early stage,...
Source: NHS News Feed - June 19, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical practice Medication Source Type: news

Muon detector could help UK reduce carbon emissions
A specialist detector which is set to play a fundamental part in helping the UK reduce its carbon emissions is being developed. Muon detectors which exploit cosmic-ray muons, a natural radiation to see through kilometers of rock -- in a similar way to X-rays being used to see inside a patient's body -- are being developed to improve monitoring of the process of subsurface carbon storage. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 13, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

X-rays reveal the mysteries of fire-ant rafts
Fire ants may be famous for their vicious sting, but they’re also remarkable builders, able to quickly assemble a working raft out of their own bodies and sail through dangerous flash flood waters. But their secrets of living masonry have remained shrouded from view.  (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - June 12, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Scoliosis surgery: from tears to smiles
Fifteen-year-old Taylor Gomes approached her pre-operative appointment for scoliosis surgery as many teens might—in tears. “She came out of the appointment smiling. Not many people have that effect on Taylor,” says her mother Holly Gomes of Danvers, Mass. Holly credits Taylor’s orthopedic surgeon Michael Glotzbecker, MD, of Boston Children’s Hospital’s Department of Orthopedic Surgery, with her daughter’s 180-degree shift in attitude. A local pediatrician diagnosed Taylor with scoliosis when she was 8 years old, and measured her curve annually with back x-rays during her well-child...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - June 11, 2014 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Lisa Fratt Tags: All posts Department of Orthopedic Surgery MD Michael Glotzbecker our patients' stories scoliosis Source Type: news

Funky ferroelectric properties probed with X-rays
Ferroelectric materials like barium titanate, a ceramic used in capacitors, are essential to many electronic devices. Typical ferroelectric materials develop features called domain walls with unusual properties -- such as lines of electrical conduction completely different from the surrounding material. These properties are technologically useful but poorly understood. Now scientists have demonstrated the ability of a powerful imaging tool to provide new insight into the mystery of why domain walls behave in their peculiar ways. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 10, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Imaging Hikes Ca Risk in Kids With Heart Disease (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- The cancer risk associated with standard x-rays was low for most children with heart disease, but kids with complex conditions who required repeat CT scans or cardiac catheterizations had a significantly higher lifetime risk, researchers reported. (Source: MedPage Today Nephrology)
Source: MedPage Today Nephrology - June 9, 2014 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: news

Lifetime cancer risk from heart imaging low for most children; rises with complex tests
(Duke University Medical Center) Children with heart disease are exposed to low levels of radiation during X-rays, which do not significantly raise their lifetime cancer risk. However, children who undergo repeated complex imaging tests that deliver higher doses of radiation may have a slightly increased lifetime risk of cancer, according to researchers at Duke Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 9, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Scientists reveal details of calcium 'safety-valve' in cells
(DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory) The New York Consortium on Membrane Protein Structure used X-rays at Brookhaven Lab's National Synchrotron Light Source to decipher the atomic level structure of a protein that regulates the level of calcium in cells, providing clues about a key signaling agent that can trigger programmed cell death and potentially leading to new anticancer drug targets. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 6, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Keeping twin dancers on their toes
Eighteen-year-old twins Sasha and Lise Ramsay are like two peas in a pod. They started dancing at 3, fell in love with ballet by age 6 and will both enter the ballet program at Brigham Young University in the fall. The girls are also mirror-image twins, which means some features, like cowlicks in the hair, are opposite each other. When Sasha was diagnosed with os trigonum syndrome, a tiny extra bone behind her right heel, at 15, the family expected Lise to follow in her footsteps. And she did. True to mirror-image form, Lise’s os trigonum developed opposite her twin’s—in her left heel. The syndrome makes ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - June 3, 2014 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Lisa Fratt Tags: All posts Dance medicine Section Division of Sports Medicine os trigonum our patients' stories Source Type: news

Enbrel Eases Nonradiographic Spinal Pain
(MedPage Today) -- Patients with early axial spondyloarthritis who had not yet developed sacroiliitis visible on x-rays nonetheless benefited from treatment with etanercept (Enbrel), a phase IIIb clinical trial found. (Source: MedPage Today Primary Care)
Source: MedPage Today Primary Care - May 31, 2014 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

The Basics of Peptic Ulcers
Peptic ulcers can cause a variety of symptoms, and these vary from patient to patient. Some patients with ulcers have minimal, unusual, or even no symptoms at all. Others may have every symptom. This is why it is very important to consult your doctor if you have any concerns. It is important to understand the causes of peptic ulcers. In the past, it was believed stress and diet caused peptic ulcers. Later, researchers stated stomach acids (hydrochloric acid and pepsin) contributed to the majority of ulcer formation. Today, however, research shows that most ulcers develop as a result of infection with a bacterium called ...
Source: About Heartburn / Acid Reflux - May 19, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news