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Chandra Observatory: 15 Years of Glorious Pictures
You’ll never see the universe as beautifully as the Chandra Observatory can see it. That’s because Chandra—which is celebrating its 15th anniversary in high-Earth orbit—sees in x-ray frequencies and you don’t. It’s a pity, actually that we’re blind in that bandwidth, because so much of the cosmos makes itself known there. Signals coming from planets, comets, supernovas, from the dark matter in the vast spaces between galaxies, all emit x-ray energy. The portraits they paint, with false color added to make them visible to our eyes, are more than static snapshots. They are, instead, ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - July 22, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Josh Raab Tags: Uncategorized chandra NASA observatory satellite space x-rays Source Type: news

World's weirdest X-rays
The world's weirdest X-rays reveal a wide range of strange objects (Source: Telegraph Health)
Source: Telegraph Health - July 21, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: photograph X光 nails crowbar X-ray weird knife picture medical China pencil bullets X射线 Source Type: news

Moments in Radiology History: Part 16 -- Early nuclear medicine
After early efforts began to harness the power of x-rays for diagnosis and (more) (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - July 11, 2014 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Should You Get An Annual Pelvic Exam?
There are many common practices in medicine that are completely useless. For example, it was once common for patients to get a chest X-ray as part of their yearly physical. Someone finally questioned this practice and studied its utility. It turned out that chest X-rays used to screen for cancer failed twice: they often detected non-cancerous abnormalities that led to extensive work-ups, and they failed to catch cancers. The practice has fallen into disuse. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - July 3, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Peter Lipson Source Type: news

Ethan is a hero-- he kept his helmet on and avoided a serious injury.
Meet Ethan.   He suffered a head injury while riding his bike. His forehead was bleeding profusely and his worried parents took him to the emergency room where he had a several x-rays taken.   Although his helmet was cracked in the accident, we are happy to report that his head injury was minor.   Ethan, we're glad that you were wearing your helmet!  Keep up the good work!Sometimes a picture is worth a thousand words....if your child is resistant to wearing a helmet, perhaps Ethan's picture might help them see why it's important. (Source: Pediatric Health Associates)
Source: Pediatric Health Associates - July 2, 2014 Category: Pediatrics Source Type: news

Tanzania: Digital X-Rays to Be Supplied in Hospitals
[Daily News]Dodoma -The Deputy Minister of Sate in the Prime Minister's Office (Regional Administration and Local Government), Mr Kassim Majaliwa. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - June 30, 2014 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Astronomers Are Closer to Understanding Dark Matter
Astronomers have come closer to understanding dark matter — one of the most elusive substances in the universe — by using high-energy telescopes to study the gravitational force of vast groups of galaxies that are bound together by gravity, known as galaxy clusters. Dark matter — which astronomers also believe is the most prevalent type of matter in the universe — is invisible and doesn’t give off light, yet it’s existence is evident in the gravitational influence it exerts on stars and galaxies. Astronomers used NASA and European Space Agency (ESA) space-borne telescopes to determine th...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - June 26, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: melissahellmann Tags: Uncategorized astronomy dark matter esa galaxy cluster NASA space sterile neutrino universe Source Type: news

Spintronic technologies: Advanced light source provides new look at skyrmions
Researchers for the first time have used x-rays to observe and study skyrmions, subatomic quasiparticles that could play a key role in future spintronic technologies. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 25, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Puzzling X-rays point to dark matter
Astronomers using ESA and NASA high-energy observatories have discovered a tantalizing clue that hints at an elusive ingredient of our Universe: dark matter. Astronomers believe that dark matter is the dominant type of matter in the Universe -- yet it remains obscure. Now a hint may have been found by studying galaxy clusters, the largest cosmic assemblies of matter bound together by gravity. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 25, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Are 3-D Mammograms a Better Way to Screen for Breast Cancer?
A large new study compares digital mammography, what’s been state-of-the-art in clinical practice for around 15 years, with addition of a newer method called tomosynthesis. Like other kinds of mammography, tomosynthesis uses x-rays to generate breast images. But it does so in 3-D, almost like a mini-CT scan of the breast. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - June 25, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Elaine Schattner Source Type: news

Researchers hail promise of 3D breast scans for cancer detection
A type of breast scan called 3D mammography can detect significantly more potentially lethal tumours than traditional X-rays, research has shown. (Source: Nursing Times Breaking News)
Source: Nursing Times Breaking News - June 25, 2014 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Scientists use X-rays to look at how DNA protects itself from UV light
(DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory) The molecular building blocks that make up DNA absorb ultraviolet light so strongly that sunlight should deactivate them -- yet it does not. Now scientists have made detailed observations of a 'relaxation response' that protects these molecules, and the genetic information they encode, from UV damage. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 23, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

New weapon found in the war against superbugs
Conclusion Antibiotic resistance is already causing thousands of deaths annually and is now considered a major threat, ranking alongside terrorism and climate change. Gram-positive bacteria such as E. coli, salmonella and Klebsiella are particularly resistant to antibiotics. This study shines a useful light on how such bacteria build a protective outer coating against attack. It is still early days, but the findings could pave the way for the development of new drugs that attack this process. As Mark Fielder, professor of medical microbiology at Kingston University, said: "The work reported is at a very early stage,...
Source: NHS News Feed - June 19, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical practice Medication Source Type: news

Muon detector could help UK reduce carbon emissions
A specialist detector which is set to play a fundamental part in helping the UK reduce its carbon emissions is being developed. Muon detectors which exploit cosmic-ray muons, a natural radiation to see through kilometers of rock -- in a similar way to X-rays being used to see inside a patient's body -- are being developed to improve monitoring of the process of subsurface carbon storage. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 13, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

X-rays reveal the mysteries of fire-ant rafts
Fire ants may be famous for their vicious sting, but they’re also remarkable builders, able to quickly assemble a working raft out of their own bodies and sail through dangerous flash flood waters. But their secrets of living masonry have remained shrouded from view.  (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - June 12, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Scoliosis surgery: from tears to smiles
Fifteen-year-old Taylor Gomes approached her pre-operative appointment for scoliosis surgery as many teens might—in tears. “She came out of the appointment smiling. Not many people have that effect on Taylor,” says her mother Holly Gomes of Danvers, Mass. Holly credits Taylor’s orthopedic surgeon Michael Glotzbecker, MD, of Boston Children’s Hospital’s Department of Orthopedic Surgery, with her daughter’s 180-degree shift in attitude. A local pediatrician diagnosed Taylor with scoliosis when she was 8 years old, and measured her curve annually with back x-rays during her well-child...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - June 11, 2014 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Lisa Fratt Tags: All posts Department of Orthopedic Surgery MD Michael Glotzbecker our patients' stories scoliosis Source Type: news

Funky ferroelectric properties probed with X-rays
Ferroelectric materials like barium titanate, a ceramic used in capacitors, are essential to many electronic devices. Typical ferroelectric materials develop features called domain walls with unusual properties -- such as lines of electrical conduction completely different from the surrounding material. These properties are technologically useful but poorly understood. Now scientists have demonstrated the ability of a powerful imaging tool to provide new insight into the mystery of why domain walls behave in their peculiar ways. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 10, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Imaging Hikes Ca Risk in Kids With Heart Disease (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- The cancer risk associated with standard x-rays was low for most children with heart disease, but kids with complex conditions who required repeat CT scans or cardiac catheterizations had a significantly higher lifetime risk, researchers reported. (Source: MedPage Today Nephrology)
Source: MedPage Today Nephrology - June 9, 2014 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: news

Lifetime cancer risk from heart imaging low for most children; rises with complex tests
(Duke University Medical Center) Children with heart disease are exposed to low levels of radiation during X-rays, which do not significantly raise their lifetime cancer risk. However, children who undergo repeated complex imaging tests that deliver higher doses of radiation may have a slightly increased lifetime risk of cancer, according to researchers at Duke Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 9, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Scientists reveal details of calcium 'safety-valve' in cells
(DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory) The New York Consortium on Membrane Protein Structure used X-rays at Brookhaven Lab's National Synchrotron Light Source to decipher the atomic level structure of a protein that regulates the level of calcium in cells, providing clues about a key signaling agent that can trigger programmed cell death and potentially leading to new anticancer drug targets. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 6, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Keeping twin dancers on their toes
Eighteen-year-old twins Sasha and Lise Ramsay are like two peas in a pod. They started dancing at 3, fell in love with ballet by age 6 and will both enter the ballet program at Brigham Young University in the fall. The girls are also mirror-image twins, which means some features, like cowlicks in the hair, are opposite each other. When Sasha was diagnosed with os trigonum syndrome, a tiny extra bone behind her right heel, at 15, the family expected Lise to follow in her footsteps. And she did. True to mirror-image form, Lise’s os trigonum developed opposite her twin’s—in her left heel. The syndrome makes ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - June 3, 2014 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Lisa Fratt Tags: All posts Dance medicine Section Division of Sports Medicine os trigonum our patients' stories Source Type: news

Enbrel Eases Nonradiographic Spinal Pain
(MedPage Today) -- Patients with early axial spondyloarthritis who had not yet developed sacroiliitis visible on x-rays nonetheless benefited from treatment with etanercept (Enbrel), a phase IIIb clinical trial found. (Source: MedPage Today Primary Care)
Source: MedPage Today Primary Care - May 31, 2014 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

The Basics of Peptic Ulcers
Peptic ulcers can cause a variety of symptoms, and these vary from patient to patient. Some patients with ulcers have minimal, unusual, or even no symptoms at all. Others may have every symptom. This is why it is very important to consult your doctor if you have any concerns. It is important to understand the causes of peptic ulcers. In the past, it was believed stress and diet caused peptic ulcers. Later, researchers stated stomach acids (hydrochloric acid and pepsin) contributed to the majority of ulcer formation. Today, however, research shows that most ulcers develop as a result of infection with a bacterium called ...
Source: About Heartburn / Acid Reflux - May 19, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cancer diagnosis can’t shake these first-time parents
In some ways, Katelyn Silva and Joe Lauzon are typical first-time parents. They bombard their newborn son Joey’s doctor with questions: Is it OK to give him Tylenol? Is he taking enough formula? Is green poop OK? And people they meet are sharing pictures of their son. The difference is that Katelyn and Joe are asking an oncologist, Suzanne Shusterman, MD, of Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorder Center, their questions, and Joey’s baby pictures are x-rays and MRI exams shared among a team of physicians. Having a baby is tough “Having a baby is tough. Having a baby with cancer is...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - May 13, 2014 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Lisa Fratt Tags: All posts Cancer childhood cancer Source Type: news

Too close for comfort: Difficult to diagnose craniosynostosis case leads to unique discovery
When Luke and Emily Hawkins first learned that their daughter Norah may have been born with a birth defect called craniosynostosis—meaning the sutures of her skull may have fused too early—they were understandably worried. A child’s skull typically takes years to fully fuse, allowing the brain room to grow and develop during her formative years. But if the skull fuses too soon, as Norah’s doctor suspected might have been the case with her, it can create excess pressure on the brain that can lead to developmental delays, learning disabilities and possible cosmetic issues. It was a lot for the first-t...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - April 23, 2014 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tripp Underwood Tags: All posts Source Type: news

The Reason We Can’t Find MH 370 Is Because We’re Basically Blind
Men have played golf on the moon. Images transmitted from the surface of Mars have become utterly commonplace. The Hubble Space Telescope can see 10 billion to 15 billion light-years into the universe. MoreMen Charged With Toppling Ancient Rock Formation Avoid Jail Time Huffington PostHere's An Updated Tally Of All The People Who Have Ever Died From A Marijuana Overdose Huffington PostPeaches Geldof's Funeral Set for Monday PeopleRangers score three in third to take Game 1 vs. Flyers Sports Illustrated'Scandal' recap: 'The Price of Free and Fair Elections' Entertainment WeeklyBut a mere three miles under the sea? That&rsqu...
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - April 18, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Charlie Campbell Tags: Uncategorized Aviation Environment exploration garbage patches Malaysia Airlines missing jet MH370 sea waste tragedy Source Type: news

The Reason We Can’t Find MH 370 Is That We’re Basically Blind
Men have played golf on the moon. Images transmitted from the surface of Mars have become utterly commonplace. The Hubble Space Telescope can see 10 billion to 15 billion light-years into the universe. MoreMen Charged With Toppling Ancient Rock Formation Avoid Jail Time Huffington PostHere's An Updated Tally Of All The People Who Have Ever Died From A Marijuana Overdose Huffington PostLindsay Lohan Reveals She Had a Miscarriage PeopleBlazers force overtime, edge Rockets 122-120 to take Game 1 Sports Illustrated'Game of Thrones' recap: 'Breaker of Chains' Entertainment WeeklyBut a mere three miles under the sea? That’...
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - April 18, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Charlie Campbell Tags: Uncategorized Aviation Environment exploration garbage patches Malaysia Airlines missing jet MH370 sea waste tragedy Source Type: news

Top medicine articles for April 2014
A collection of some interesting medical articles published recently:Vitamin D supplements are taken by nearly half of American adults. Low levels of vitamin D are a result, not a cause, of poor health. Therefore, supplement may not help http://buff.ly/Ml153n -- Vitamin D supplement sales increased more than 10-fold, from $24 million in 2002 to $605 million in 2011 (US data) http://buff.ly/Mo7Ykj"Is Your Stethoscope Going to Join Typewriter in the Storage Closet?" http://buff.ly/1dILsbh - However, you can't listen to lungs with ultrasound.Coffee Hydrates as Well as Water http://buff.ly/1i5Rc3V - Study defined mod...
Source: Clinical Cases and Images - April 10, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Health News of the Day Source Type: news

Britain's brightest star | Stephen Curry
A new video explains how a particle accelerator built to produce X-rays billions of times brighter than the sun is revealing the workings of life at the molecular levelIf you have ever gazed at a crystal of salt or a sparkling diamond and wondered to yourself how its internal structure might be revealed using light generated by a particle accelerator, then wonder no more. Thanks to the Royal Institutions Ed Prosser and funding from the Science and Technology Facilities Council, a short video released today explains how the intense X-rays beams produced at the £400 million Diamond Light Source, a silver doughnut that ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 10, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Stephen Curry Tags: Physics Biology Science Source Type: news

Britain's brightest star
A new video explains how a particle accelerator built to produce X-rays billions of times brighter than the sun is revealing the workings of life at the molecular level Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 10, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Stephen Curry Tags: Physics Biology Science Source Type: news

Beth Israel Doctors Using Google Glass In ER
BOSTON (CBS) — Doctors at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center are the first in the country to be using Google Glass technology to save valuable seconds. Google introduced the Glass technology in 2013 and only a limited number of people have been able to try it. Beth Israel Deaconess is the first hospital in the world to use the high-tech classes for direct patient care. Dr. Steven Horng is an emergency room physician who spearheaded a program to bring the technology to the ER. What they do is project an image of the patient’s screens so information about the patient is obtained right away. Information lik...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - April 9, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kckatzman Tags: Health Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Watch Listen Beth Israel CBS Boston Google Glass Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

What are the Possible Causes of Lung Nodules?
Lung nodules are found in 1 in 500 x-rays done in the United States and can cause considerable anxiety. What are the most common benign and cancerous causes? (Source: About.com Lung Cancer)
Source: About.com Lung Cancer - April 8, 2014 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: health Source Type: news

Watching for a black hole to gobble up a gas cloud: Gas cloud's fate illuminates growth of supermassive black holes
G2, a doomed gas cloud, is edging closer to Sgr A*, the hungry supermassive black hole at the Milky Way's center. The closest approach between the two is predicted to occur any day now. Astrophysicists have been watching closely, and the data do not show enhanced emission in the X-rays. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 4, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

X-Ray Crystallographic Studies of Metalloproteins
Many proteins require metals for their physiological function. In combination with spectroscopic characterizations, X-ray crystallography is a very powerful method to correlate the function of protein-bound metal sites with their structure. Due to their special X-ray scattering properties, specific metals may be located in metalloprotein structures and eventually used for phasing the diffracted X-rays by the method of Multi-wavelength Anomalous Dispersion (MAD). How this is done is the principle subject of this chapter. Attention is also given to the crystallographic characterization of different oxidation states of redox ...
Source: Springer protocols feed by Protein Science - March 27, 2014 Category: Biochemistry Source Type: news

Gout isn't always easy to prove: CT scans help catch cases traditional test misses
Gout is on the rise among U.S. men and women, and this piercingly painful and most common form of inflammatory arthritis is turning out to be more complicated than had been thought. The standard way to check for gout is by drawing fluid or tissue from an affected joint and looking for uric acid crystals, a test known as a needle aspirate. That usually works, but not always: In a new study, X-rays known as dual-energy CT scans found gout in one-third of patients whose aspirates tested negative for the disease. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 26, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

The history of the radiation damage in occupations - Okazaki R.
In the year following Röntgen's discovery of X-rays in 1895, approximately 60 cases of hand dermatitis and hair loss induced by radiation were reported. People using X-rays in their occupation, including X-ray tube manufacturers, physicians, and engineers... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - March 26, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

Could Botox be used to treat severe asthma?
Conclusion This small study involved 11 people who had severe asthma symptoms despite optimised treatment and who had abnormal vocal cord movement which was not improved by speech therapy. The results suggest that Botox injections into one of the vocal cords improved asthma control and the airway size at the level of the vocal cords was increased. However, there were no changes in measures of lung function. As the researchers point out, this study was not controlled or blinded and a placebo effect cannot be excluded. It is also not known how long any effect would last, as participants were only assessed for one ...
Source: NHS News Feed - March 25, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical practice Medication Heart/lungs Source Type: news

Electrical engineers shrink plasma devices to resist radiation
University of Utah electrical engineers fabricated the smallest plasma transistors that can withstand high temperatures and ionizing radiation found in a nuclear reactor. Such transistors someday might enable smartphones that take and collect medical X-rays on a battlefield, and devices to measure air quality in real time."These plasma-based electronics can be used to control and guide robots to conduct tasks inside the nuclear reactor," says Massood Tabib-Azar, a professor of electrical and computer engineering. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 21, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical Devices / Diagnostics Source Type: news

Tiny transistors for extreme environs: Engineers shrink plasma devices to resist radiation
Electrical engineers have fabricated the smallest plasma transistors that can withstand high temperatures and ionizing radiation found in a nuclear reactor. Such transistors someday might enable smartphones that take and collect medical X-rays on a battlefield, and devices to measure air quality in real time. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 20, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Ten-minute breath test that can detect breast cancer: New kit is as accurate as X-rays and reduces need for mammograms
The BreathLink kit is being developed by a US firm and is already on sale in Europe. It is hoped it will lead to more woman coming forward for testing, saving lives. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 7, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dark matter looks more and more likely after new gamma-ray analysis
Scientists describe as 'extremely interesting' new analysis that makes case for gamma rays tracing back to Wimp particlesOriginal story reprinted with permission from Quanta Magazine, an editorially independent division of SimonsFoundation.org whose mission is to enhance public understanding of science by covering research developments and trends in mathematics and the physical and life sciences.Not long after the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope took to the sky in 2008, astrophysicists noticed that it was picking up a steady rain of gamma rays pouring outward from the center of the Milky Way galaxy.This high-energy radiati...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 4, 2014 Category: Science Tags: theguardian.com United States World news Science Space Source Type: news

Nikola Tesla's ashes spark row between Serbian scientists and Orthodox church
Officials face backlash after decision to move inventor's remains from Tesla museum in Belgrade and rebury them in churchA furious dispute has erupted between Serbian scientists and the Orthodox church after it was announced that the remains of the inventor Nikola Tesla will be reburied in a church.A pioneer in fields such as electricity, radio and x-rays, Tesla had 300 patents under his name by the time he died in 1943 and is revered by some as one of the most important scientific brains of the late 19th and early 20th century.Tesla died in the US where he had spent much of his life, but in 1957 his ashes were moved to th...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 4, 2014 Category: Science Tags: theguardian.com Nikola Tesla World news Europe Serbia Christianity Religion Science Source Type: news

Nanodiffraction opens up new insights into the physics of life: enables X-rays of living cancer cells
Gottingen-based scientists working at DESY's PETRA III research light source have carried out the first studies of living biological cells using high-energy X-rays. The new method shows clear differences in the internal cellular structure between living and dead, chemically fixed cells that are often analysed. "The new method for the first time enables us to investigate the internal structures of living cells in their natural environment using hard X-rays," emphasises the leader of the working group, Prof. Sarah Koster from the Institute for X-Ray Physics of the University of Gottingen. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 3, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical Devices / Diagnostics Source Type: news

A molecular ballet under the X-ray laser: taking images of free molecules
An international team of researchers has used the world's most powerful X-ray laser to take snapshots of free molecules. The research team choreographed a kind of molecular ballet in the X-ray beam. The conventional way to determine the atomic structure of molecules is to "freeze" them in a crystal and illuminate them with bright X-rays. However, many molecules are extremely difficult to crystallize. In particular, this is a problem with many biomolecules. There are existing techniques to image single molecules, but none of these is fast enough to catch the ultra-fast motion of molecules. With their new work, the...
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 28, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

X-rays From Other Galaxies Could Emanate From Particles of Dark Matter
Findings support case for midweight dark matter particles called sterile neutrinos (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 28, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Researchers X-ray living cancer cells
Scientists have carried out the first studies of living biological cells using high-energy X-rays. "The new method for the first time enables us to investigate the internal structures of living cells in their natural environment using hard X-rays,' emphasizes the leader of the working group. "Thanks to the ever-greater resolution of the various investigative techniques, it is increasingly important to know whether the internal structure of the sample changes during sample preparation." In future, the new technique will make it possible to study unchanged living cells at high resolution. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 27, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Researchers X-ray living cancer cells
(Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY) At Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron's PETRA III research light source, scientists have carried out the first studies of living biological cells using high-energy X-rays. 'The new method for the first time enables us to investigate the internal structures of living cells in their natural environment using hard X-rays,' emphasizes the leader of the working group, Professor Sarah Köster from the University of Göttingen. The researchers present their work in the scientific journal Physical Review Letters. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 27, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Dark field illuminates X-ray imaging
New technique uses discarded X-rays to unmask materials (Source: PhysicsWeb News)
Source: PhysicsWeb News - February 26, 2014 Category: Physics Source Type: news