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The Undifferentiated Carcinoma That Became a Melanoma The Undifferentiated Carcinoma That Became a Melanoma
What steps were taken to secure the correct diagnosis in this 62-year-old woman who presented with a lymph node metastasis of unknown origin in her left groin?Journal of Medical Case Reports (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - April 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology Journal Article Source Type: news

Toddler Who Lost Eye To Cancer Forms Special Bond With Toy That Looks Like Her
A 3-year-old girl who lost her eye to cancer found a special friend in a toy bunny with the same condition. Danielle Munger’s daughter Brynn was diagnosed with a rare cancer called undifferentiated sarcoma shortly after her first birthday when doctors discovered a tumor behind her left eye. As a result, she had to undergo multiple surgeries and ultimately lost her eye. Today, Brynn has been in remission for over 16 months. In honor of her third birthday in March, Danielle gave her daughter a custom-made bunny, who also has one eye. The Utah mom ordered the bunny from Jessica Sebastian of Sebastian Design. Danielle t...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Genes, Chance And Destiny: Siddhartha Mukherjee Chronicles The Human Genome’s Turbulent Future
At 46, Siddhartha Mukherjee, is a man driven by questions, by puzzles in science and society. In 2011, his first book, a 600-page book on the history of cancer, The Emperor of All Maladies, won a Pulitzer Prize, among other accolades. Time magazine lists the book among the one hundred most influential books written since 1923. His new and third book, The Gene, an Intimate History, published in 2016, sets out to tackle another crucial question that sits at the edge of science and society. This book is a finalist for the UK’s top award for nonfiction writing, the Baillie Gifford Prize, putting him in competition with a...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Genes, Chance And Destiny: Siddhartha Mukherjee Chronicles The Human Genome’s Turbulent Future
Genes, Chance and Destiny: Siddhartha Mukherjee Chronicles the Human Genome’s Turbulent Future At 46, Siddhartha Mukherjee, is a man driven by questions, by puzzles in science and society. In 2011, his first book, a 600-page book on the history of cancer, The Emperor of All Maladies, won a Pulitzer Prize, among other accolades. Time magazine lists the book among the one hundred most influential books written since 1923. His new and third book, The Gene, an Intimate History, published in 2016 (http://siddharthamukherjee.com/the-gene-an-intimate-history/), sets out to tackle another crucial question that sits at the e...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 28, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Researchers discover how faulty genetic instructions drive a deadly blood cancer in adults
A study has uncovered the genetic mechanism for how acute myeloid leukemia cells with a specific DNA mutation stay as undifferentiated cells, rather than maturing into healthy blood cells. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 23, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Researchers discover how faulty genetic instructions drive a deadly blood cancer in adults
(UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center) A study by UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers uncovered the genetic mechanism for how acute myeloid leukemia cells with a specific DNA mutation stay as undifferentiated cells, rather than maturing into healthy blood cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 23, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

[Report] Histone H3K36 mutations promote sarcomagenesis through altered histone methylation landscape
Several types of pediatric cancers reportedly contain high-frequency missense mutations in histone H3, yet the underlying oncogenic mechanism remains poorly characterized. Here we report that the H3 lysine 36–to–methionine (H3K36M) mutation impairs the differentiation of mesenchymal progenitor cells and generates undifferentiated sarcoma in vivo. H3K36M mutant nucleosomes inhibit the enzymatic activities of several H3K36 methyltransferases. Depleting H3K36 methyltransferases, or expressing an H3K36I mutant that similarly inhibits H3K36 methylation, is sufficient to phenocopy the H3K36M mutation. After the loss ...
Source: ScienceNOW - May 12, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Chao Lu Source Type: news

He's harnessing the regenerative power of stem cells
As a boy growing up in Soviet Russia, Denis Evseenko was drawn to the wonders of scientific discovery. Though closed off from many of the resources of the Western world at the time, it was a country that housed its own wealth of scientific institutions and provided a fertile and supportive environment for his inquisitive young mind. Early in his medical training Dr. Evseenko decided to focus entirely on research into embryonic stem cells, specifically the genesis of mesodermal tissues — a broad definition that includes blood, muscle, bone and cartilage. He was excited about the possibilities inherent in cutting-edge ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 4, 2014 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Dr. Denis Evseenko: harnessing the regenerative power of stem cells
As a boy growing up in Soviet Russia, Denis Evseenko was drawn to the wonders of scientific discovery. Though closed off from many of the resources of the Western world at the time, it was a country that housed its own wealth of scientific institutions and provided a fertile and supportive environment for his inquisitive young mind.   Dr. Denis Evseenko Early in his medical training Dr. Evseenko decided to focus entirely on research into embryonic stem cells, specifically the genesis of mesodermal tissues — a broad definition that includes blood, muscle, bone and cartilage. He was excited about the possibiliti...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 3, 2014 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Sca1+ pituitary adenoma cells
The role of tumor stem cells in benign tumors such as pituitary adenomas remains unclear. Donangelo and colleagues investigated whether the cells within pituitary adenomas that spontaneously develop in Rb+/− mice are hierarchically distributed with a subset being responsible for tumor growth. They find that Sca1+ cells derived from benign pituitary tumors exhibit an undifferentiated expression profile and tumor-proliferative advantages, and they propose that these cells could represent putative pituitary tumor stem/progenitor cells. Read the full article at Donangelo et al. (2014) Endocrine-Related Cancer 21 203...
Source: Society for Endocrinology - April 25, 2014 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Telomere Length Influences Cancer Cell Differentiation
Researchers from the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research in Tokyo have discovered that forced elongation of telomeres (extensions on the end of chromosomes) promotes the differentiation of cancer cells, probably reducing malignancy, which is strongly associated with a loss of cell differentiation. They report their findings in a manuscript published online ahead of print, in the journal Molecular and Cellular Biology. "Cancer cells may maintain short telomeres to maintain their undifferentiated state," says Hiroyuki Seimiya, a researcher on the study... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 1, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer / Oncology Source Type: news

Stem Cells for Cell-Based Therapies
The world of stem cells We know the human body comprises many cell types (e.g., blood cells, skin cells, cervical cells), but we often forget to appreciate that all of these different cell types arose from a single cell—the fertilized egg. A host of sequential, awe-inspiring events occur between the fertilization of an egg and the formation of a new individual: Embryonic stem (ES) cells are also called totipotent cells. The first steps involve making more cells by simple cell division: one cell becomes two cells; two cells become four cells, etc. Each cell of early development is undifferentiated; that is, it is no...
Source: ActionBioscience - December 28, 2012 Category: Biology Authors: Ali Hochberg Source Type: news

Stem Cells for Cell-Based Therapies
The world of stem cells We know the human body comprises many cell types (e.g., blood cells, skin cells, cervical cells), but we often forget to appreciate that all of these different cell types arose from a single cell—the fertilized egg. A host of sequential, awe-inspiring events occur between the fertilization of an egg and the formation of a new individual: Embryonic stem (ES) cells are also called totipotent cells. The first steps involve making more cells by simple cell division: one cell becomes two cells; two cells become four cells, etc. Each cell of early development is undifferentiated; that is, it is...
Source: ActionBioscience - December 28, 2012 Category: Biology Authors: Ali Hochberg Source Type: news