Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

Practical clinical trials can help find alternatives to opioids
Pressures on primary care doctors to move away from opioid pain management are increasing, but practitioners need practical, evidence-based information on how to employ multidisciplinary pain care successfully in everyday clinical practice. A senior investigator believes wider use of practical clinical trials and more emphasis on patient self-management are key solutions for achieving wider use of multidisciplinary pain care to improve patient function and help lower use and misuse of opioids. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 21, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Patients' own fat tissue can help treat joint problems
A new device gently suctions, processes and uses a patient ’s own fat tissue to provide a potential source of stem cells and growth factors to promote healing. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 21, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Wearable Devices Communicate Vital Brain Activity Information
What can we learn about emotions, the brain and behavior from a wristband? Plenty, according to a prominent engineer. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 20, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Insects resist genetic methods to control disease spread, study finds
Insects possess a naturally occurring resistance to the use of gene-editing technology to prevent diseases such as malaria, new research shows. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Triple play boosting value of renewable fuel could tip market in favor of biomass
A new process triples the fraction of biomass converted to high-value products to nearly 80 percent, also tripling the expected rate of return for an investment in the technology from roughly 10 percent (for one end product) to 30 percent. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Traffic-related air pollution linked to DNA damage in children
Children and teens exposed to high levels of traffic-related air pollution have evidence of a specific type of DNA damage called telomere shortening, reports a new study. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Caution urged in using PRP or stem cells to treat young athletes' injuries
Physicians, parents and coaches should be cautious when considering treating injured young athletes with platelet rich plasma (PRP), stem cells or other types of regenerative medicine, says a nationally recognized sports medicine clinician. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

First-ever global study finds massive health care inequity
A first-ever global study has found massive inequity of access to and quality of health care among and within countries, and concludes people are dying from causes with well-known treatments. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Self-ventilating workout suit keeps athletes cool and dry
A breathable workout suit with ventilating flaps that open and close in response to an athlete's body heat and sweat has now been developed by researchers. These flaps, which range from thumbnail- to finger-sized, are lined with live microbial cells that shrink and expand in response to changes in humidity. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Antibody for fighting cancer emerges
While studying the underpinnings of multiple sclerosis, investigators came across important clues for how to treat a very different disease: cancer. Researchers describe an antibody that can precisely target regulatory T cells which in turn unleashes the immune system to kill cancer cells. The team reports that the antibody decreased tumor growth in models of melanoma, glioblastoma and colorectal carcinoma, making it an attractive candidate for cancer immunotherapy. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Top 10 new species for 2017
A spider and an ant with names drawn from popular books, a pink katydid and an omnivorous rat made ESF's list of the Top 10 New Species for 2017. Also listed: a freshwater stingray, a bush tomato that appears to " bleed, " a devilish-looking orchid, a millipede with more than 400 legs, an amphibious centipede and a marine worm. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

ESF lists top 10 new species for 2017
A spider and an ant with names drawn from popular books, a pink katydid and an omnivorous rat made ESF's list of the Top 10 New Species for 2017. Also listed: a freshwater stingray, a bush tomato that appears to “bleed,” a devilish-looking orchid, a millipede with more than 400 legs, an amphibious centipede and a marine worm. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Mapping super massive black holes in the distant universe
Astronomers have constructed the first map of the Universe based on the positions of supermassive black holes, which reveals the large-scale structure of the Universe. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Older adults need tips on outdoor fall prevention
Many older adults have fallen outdoors but lack an understanding of the risks for falling and how to prevent them, warranting efforts for outdoor fall prevention, finds a new study. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Study finds need for educating older adults on outdoor fall prevention
Many older adults have fallen outdoors but lack an understanding of the risks for falling and how to prevent them, warranting efforts for outdoor fall prevention, finds a new study. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Storing a memory involves distant parts of the brain
In studies with mice, researchers discovered that to maintain certain short-term memories, the brain ’s cortex relies on connections with the thalamus. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Kamchatkan volcanic ash travels half the world
Geochemical fingerprinting links microscopic ash found on the bottom of a Svalbard lake to volcanic event happening 7,000 years ago and 5,000 km away. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Environmental pollutants in large Norwegian lakes
Scientists have discovered the presence of contaminants in the pelagic food chains in the lakes Mj øsa, Randsfjorden and Femunden in Norway, and in supplementary material of fish from Tyrifjorden and Vansjø, sampled in 2015. Mercury and persistent organic pollutants (cVMS, PCBs, PBDEs, PFAS) were analyzed in samples of fish from all lakes, as well as pelagic crustaceans in Mjøsa. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

New molecular target to improve neuroblastoma treatment
A new study has served to identify some genetic mutations that will help to improve the treatment of neuroblastoma. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Statistical safeguards in data analysis and visualization software
Computer scientists have shown a new way to help prevent users of data exploration software from making false discoveries. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

To curb medical errors, physicians must be better trained to admit mistakes
The medical community has made strides to normalize and encourage error disclosure for physicians and medical trainees in order to improve patient safety and health care outcomes, but these guidelines fall short when it comes to addressing the social psychology that influences how and when physicians and medical trainees disclose errors and how they manage the consequences of those errors. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Blood discovery could benefit preemies, help end platelet shortages
A new discovery may be the key to stopping shortages of vital blood-clotting cells that can represent the difference between life and death. The finding also could offer big benefits for premature babies. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Engineered protein enlisted to battle the MERS virus
Researchers converted a staple human ubiquitin protein into an anti-viral tool. Through subtle tweaks, they created an engineered version of the ubiquitin that binds more tightly and paralyzes a key enzyme in MERS to halt viral replication in cells. Other synthetic forms of ubiquitin can be quickly generated to target a diverse range of pathogens. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Can omega-3 help prevent Alzheimer's disease? Brain SPECT imaging shows possible link
The incidence of Alzheimer's disease is expected to triple in the coming decades and no cure has been found. Recently, interest in dietary approaches for prevention of cognitive decline has increased. In particular, the omega-3 fatty acids have shown anti-amyloid, anti-tau and anti-inflammatory actions in the brains of animals. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Lithium oxide on tokamak walls can improve plasma performance, physicists discover
A coating of lithium oxide on the inside of fusion machines known as tokamaks absorbs as much deuterium as pure lithium does, a team of physicists has discovered. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Predicting influenza outbreaks faster with a digitally-empowered wearable device
Through integration with a wearable thermometer, the Thermia online health educational tool has enabled prediction of seasonal influenza outbreaks in China one month earlier than before, according to a new study. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Researchers develop protocol to analyze many cells at once
With the new FISH-Flow protocol, researchers are able to evaluate multitudes of cells at once for telltale mRNA species and proteins. The blended procedure provides a chance to see how multiple kinds of immune cells are responding to a foreign substance, making it possible to detect the presence of disease faster and earlier. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Fueling the future
New research investigated the full life cycle impact of one promising'second-generation biofuel'produced from short-rotation oak. The study found that second-generation biofuels made from managed trees and perennial grasses may provide a sustainable fuel resource. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Understanding the architecture of our'second brain '
Scientists have made an important step in understanding the organization of nerve cells embedded within the gut that control its function -- a discovery that could give insight into the origin of common gastrointestinal diseases, including irritable bowel syndrome and chronic constipation. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Using seaweed to kill invasive ants
Scientists have developed an inexpensive, biodegradable, seaweed-based ant bait that can help homeowners and farmers control invasive Argentine ant populations. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Epigenetic program leading to vessel differentiation
Clarification of how human blood vessels are constructed is desperately needed to advance regenerative medicine. Researchers investigated the changes in gene functions that occur when stem cells become vascular cells. They found that the histone code, which alters the transcriptional state of the gene, changes over time as stem cells differentiate into blood vessels in response to a stimulus. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Herpetologists describe an elf frog from the elfin forests in southern Vietnam
Going under the common name of Elfin mountain toad, a new amphibian is recognized as one of the smallest representative of its group. The new species was identified from the highland wet forests of Langbian Plateau, Southern Vietnam. The discoverers gave it this name that derives from German and Celtic folklore because of the resemblance they found between the tiny delicate amphibians and elves - small magic creatures. Furthermore, their habitat is known as elfin forests. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Mesothelioma: New trial to fight cancer caused by asbestos
Patients with a hard-to-treat type of cancer are being given new hope in a ground-breaking clinical trial. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Study shows differences in brain activity between men, women who are obese
A new study of obese people suggests that changes in their brains ’ reward regions make them more prone to overeating, and that women and men exhibit different brain activity related to overeating. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Life in the Precambrian may have been much livelier than previously thought
The strange creatures that lived in the Garden of the Ediacaran more than 540 million years ago, before animals came on the scene, may have been much more dynamic than experts have thought. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Scientists to test Zika virus on brain tumors
In a revolutionary first, scientists will test whether the Zika virus can destroy brain tumor cells, potentially leading to new treatments for one of the hardest to treat cancers.   (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

‘Adopted’ embryo program produces new style extended families
Scientists are researching the emergence of a new style of family creation that sees couples " adopt " embryos and, after the child is born, remain in  contact with the donors and in many cases develop a special relationship with them. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Disrupted fat breakdown in the brain makes mice dumb
A new study opens a new perspective with regard to the development of dementia. The scientists blocked the breakdown of a certain fat molecule in the mouse brain. As a result the animals exhibited learning and memory problems. Also the quantity of Alzheimer-specific proteins in their brains increased significantly. The researchers now have a clue as to why the mice become dumb. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Urine test finds what makes people say no to blood pressure lowering pills
More than one third of 1,400 people with high blood pressure have not been taking their blood pressure medication, new research has found. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Mislocalized calcium channel causes insulin secretion defect in diabetes
Researchers have studied beta cells of type-2 diabetic donors, and find that a mislocalized calcium channel contributes to the failed insulin secretion associated with the disease. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

New hope for slow-healing wounds
MicroRNAs are interesting target structures for new therapeutic agents. They can be blocked through synthetic antimiRs. However, to date it was not possible to use these only locally. Researchers have now successfully achieved this in the treatment of impaired wound healing with the help of light-inducible antimiRs. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

How cancer cells flood the lung
Lung cancer patients are particularly susceptible to malignant pleural effusion, when fluid collects in the space between the lungs and the chest wall. Researchers have discovered a novel mechanism that causes this to happen. Their study also shows that various active substances could potentially be used to treat this condition. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Shapeshifting materials: Using light to rearrange macroscopic structures
Researchers have created self-assembling molecules which can be broken down by ultraviolet light to recombine into novel macroscopic shapes. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Nutritional properties of mushrooms are better preserved when they are grilled or microwaved
Culinary treatments (boiling, microwaving, grilling, and deep frying) influence on proximate composition and antioxidant capacity of most cultivated mushrooms worlwide. A study has shown that microwaving and grilling are the best processes to maintain the nutritional profile of mushrooms. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Light exposure in the evening improves performance in the final spurt
Athletes often have to compete late in the evening, when they are no longer able to perform at their best. However, researchers have shown that athletes who are exposed to blue light before competing can significantly increase their performance in the final spurt. The blue light had no impact on the athletes ’ maximum performance. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Tau prevents synaptic transmission at early stage of neurodegeneration
Tau proteins are involved in more than twenty neurodegenerative diseases, including various forms of dementia. These proteins clump together in patients ’ brains to form neuronal tangles: protein aggregation that eventually coincides with the death of brain cells. A research team has now discovered how tau disrupts the functioning of nerve cells, even before it starts forming tangles. They immediately suggest a way to intervene in this process. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Synthesis of molecular hydrogen: Novel method sets benchmark for platinum-free electrocatalysts
A new paper describes a new approach to revolutionize the production of molecular hydrogen. This gas is considered to be one of the most promising energy carriers of the future. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

In a neutron-rich tin nucleus, electromagnetism can win over the strong force
The atomic nucleus offers a unique opportunity to study the competition between three of the four fundamental forces known to exist in nature, the strong nuclear interaction, the electromagnetic interaction and the weak nuclear interaction. Only the much weaker gravitational force is irrelevant for the description of nuclear properties. Although in general the decay of an excited nuclear state follows the hierarchy of these forces, there are sometimes exceptions. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Erectile dysfunction medicines do not cause melanoma, analysis of large studies finds
Use of the erectile dysfunction drug Viagra does not cause the development of melanoma, a deadly form of skin cancer, a new report concludes. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

How RNA formed at the origins of life
A single process for how a group of molecules called nucleotides were made on the early Earth, before life began, has been suggested by a team of researchers. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news