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Seasonal affective disorder and non-seasonal affective disorders: results from the NESDA study - Winthorst WH, Roest AM, Bos EH, Meesters Y, Penninx BWJH, Nolen WA, de Jonge P.
BACKGROUND: Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is considered to be a subtype of depression. AIMS: To compare the clinical picture of SAD to non-seasonal affective disorders (non-SADs). METHOD: Diagnoses according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Ma... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Environmental Issues, Climate, Geophysics Source Type: news

Cold weather warning: THESE three serious conditions are more likely in winter
WINTER weather often comes with an outbreak of common colds and flu, but the season can also increase risk of stroke, asthma attacks and seasonal affective disorder. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - September 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Jubilant Life Sciences gets USFDA nod for anti-depressive drug
The approved product is the generic version of Wellbutrin XL of Valeant, which is used for the treatment of major depressive disorder and prevention of seasonal affective disorder. (Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News)
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - July 6, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

This Is Your Brain On Warm Weather
There’s just something about summer. People’s attitudes seem noticeably different with the sunshine. And that isn’t a coincidence: Research shows warmer weather can have a small influence, positively and even occasionally negatively, on your mindset.  We’ve rounded up just a few ways the toastier temperatures of summer can affect your mood. Check them out below: Spending time outdoors when it’s sunny is linked with a mood boost... The gold standard on this subject is a 2004 University of Michigan study that found people who spent at least 30 minutes outside in pleasant weather &mdas...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How the Month You Were Born Affects Your Personality, According to Science
Let’s agree on one thing first: Astrology is gibberish — gibberish with a nice line of charm bracelets, maybe, but gibberish all the same. Its fundamental premise — that the combined gravity of all of the planets at the moment you’re born determines your personality — is all by itself its undoing. As Newton knew, the gravity of any massive object is inversely proportional to the square of its distance. Even for a giant planet like Neptune, which is 2.7 billion miles (4.4 billion km) away, the amount of gravitational pull it exerted on you at birth was…let’s see…times 2.7&he...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - April 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized behavior birth month birth season onetime personality psychology the brain the human mind Source Type: news

Tanning's Allure Tied to Other Addictions
Some people with need for bronzed skin likely to drink too much alcohol or have depression, study finds Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Melanoma, Seasonal Affective Disorder, Sun Exposure (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - March 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Benefits Of Winter Hibernation
This article originally posted on michaelsunnarborg.com/blog -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

When It’s More Than the Winter Blues
By Stacy Simon The gifts have been opened, the holiday meals eaten, the visitors gone home, and the decorations put away for another year. As the fun and festivities become memories, this is the time of year many people feel a little let down or sad. Treating yourself to a movie, spending time with friends, doing volunteer work, or participating in physical activities you enjoy can help you cheer up and regain your emotional balance. RESOURCES: Depression in cancer patients But for some people, it isn’t that easy. Sadness that doesn’t go away or keeps you from enjoying things you usually like could be a sign ...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - January 2, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Coping with Cancer Source Type: news

Christmas is Over: Celebrate the Rest of the Year
So many weeks and days of preparation and then Christmas is over. Oh, maybe you were able to stretch it out over a few days with parties and visits to various relatives and friends but at some point the cookies are gone, the tree has to come down, the lights have to come off the house, the gifts get put away and — and — and — and then it’s over — all done — finished. The living room looks cavernous without the tree. The kids are fighting over the last candy cane. And you are — happy but exhausted; pleased the week went well but not so pleased to get back to ordinary life. Those of ...
Source: Psych Central - January 1, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Marie Hartwell-Walker, Ed.D. Tags: Happiness Holiday Coping Seasonal Affective Disorder Self-Help christmas Holiday Spirit Holidays new year's resolutions new years Winter Winter Blues Source Type: news

Behind the Headlines 2016 Quiz of the Year
In 2016, Behind the Headlines covered more than 300 health stories that made it into the mainstream media. If you've been paying attention you should find this quiz easy and fun. Answers are at the foot of the page (no peeking!).   In January 2016's health news... In a controversial study, monkeys were genetically engineered to develop what condition? Sex addiction Bipolar disorder Autism In a similarly controversial study, what psychological condition was dismissed as a "myth"? Seasonal affective disorder Agoraphobia Social anxiety disorder In February 2016's health news... Brain scans...
Source: NHS News Feed - December 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Special reports QA articles Source Type: news

Reminder: Suicides Don't Actually Increase Around The Holidays
Suicide rates are usually at their lowest during the month of December. But you wouldn’t know it based on stories in the media that link this time of year to self-harm. Nearly half of stories about holidays and suicide published during last year’s holiday season perpetuated the myth that they increase, according to a new analysis conducted by the Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania. “This information is simply not correct,” Dan Romer, research director of the APPC, told The Huffington Post. “This has been a hard myth to debunk.” The APPC has been tr...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 13, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Behind the Headlines 2016 Quiz of the Year
In 2014, Behind the Headlines has covered more than 500 health stories that made it into the mainstream media. If you've been paying attention you should find this quiz easy and fun. Why not test your knowledge of 2014's health news with our month-by-month quiz? Answers are at the foot of the page (no peeking!).   In January 2016's health news... In a controversial study, monkeys were genetically engineered to develop what disorder? 1) Sex addiction 2) Bi-polar disorder 3) Autism In a similarly controversial study, what psychological condition was dismissed as a "myth" 1) Seasonal af...
Source: NHS News Feed - December 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Special reports Source Type: news

Seasonal affective disorder could be reason for mood swings and lack of sex drive
Dutch researchers have found the number of people diagnosed with depression at psychiatric hospitals rises after the clocks go back for winter, as doctors warn November is the prime time. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 30, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How To Feel Happy When It's Pitch Black Out Morning And Night
If you’re feeling a bit less energetic and more in favor of curling up on your couch with takeout and Netflix now that the sun is setting around 4:30 p.m., you’re not alone. The so-called “winter blues” are real, Deirdre Conroy, associate professor of psychiatry at the University of Michigan, told The Huffington Post. Fewer hours of daylight in the winter months do affect our bodies and our moods. “This is not a made up ‘thing.’ This is a real phenomenon,” she explained. An estimated one to 10 percent of people, depending on the location, experience seasonal af...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

7 Very Good Reasons To Work Out That Don't Involve Weight Loss
There’s more to exercise than torching calories. Scientists have long made the connection between a healthy body and sharp mind. And a 2013 study led by Jill Barnes, chair of the 2017 World Congress on Exercise and the Brain, has resurfaced and might help explain why. “Our working hypothesis is that people with higher fitness have enhanced blood flow to their brain,” Barnes recently told the Wall Street Journal. This, in turn, improves cognitive function. The researchers studied how responsive the brains of both sedentary and recreationally active people were to stimuli in their environment. The blood ves...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 18, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Seasonal Depression (SAD)
Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD, Seasonal Depression) (Source: eMedicineHealth.com)
Source: eMedicineHealth.com - November 18, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Do dwindling daylight hours affect our health?
The latest advice distilled, from vitamin D deficiency to seasonal affective disorder (Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare)
Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare - November 16, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Housecall: Seasonal affective disorder
THIS WEEK'S TOP STORIES Seasonal affective disorder If the shorter days are leaving you moody and less energized, it could be seasonal affective disorder ? a type of depression related to changes in seasons. Here are the facts. Mindfulness exercises Stressed out by the election or upcoming holidays? Mindfulness exercises, a form of meditation, can [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - November 13, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Here's A Major Health Reason To Get Outside During The Wintertime
As the days get shorter and the chilly weather rolls in, we all want to curl up in a blanket and hibernate until spring rolls around. But making time to get outside in the sun, even when it’s cold out, could have bigger mood benefits than you might realize.  While the link between sunshine and mental health is nothing new, the most comprehensive study to date has shown that the association may be even stronger than previously realized.  New research from Brigham Young University, published this month in the Journal of Affective Disorders, finds that sunlight exposure is by far the greatest weather-related f...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 11, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Here's A Major Health Reason To Get Outside During The Wintertime
As the days get shorter and the chilly weather rolls in, we all want to curl up in a blanket and hibernate until spring rolls around. But making time to get outside in the sun, even when it’s cold out, could have bigger mood benefits than you might realize.  While the link between sunshine and mental health is nothing new, the most comprehensive study to date has shown that the association may be even stronger than previously realized.  New research from Brigham Young University, published this month in the Journal of Affective Disorders, finds that sunlight exposure is by far the greatest weather-related f...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 11, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Losing Daylight Can Trigger Seasonal Affective Disorder
The disorder can affect people in winter months as days grow shorter. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - November 7, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Ten reasons that you get... Sad  
Among the reasons may be seasonal affective disorder (SAD), a clinical depression which follows a seasonal pattern, with symptoms often tied to autumn and winter months. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)
Title: Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)Category: Diseases and ConditionsCreated: 11/8/1999 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 10/31/2016 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Depression General)
Source: MedicineNet Depression General - October 31, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Q and A: Seasonal affective disorder ? prevention and treatment
DEAR MAYO CLINIC: Is seasonal affective disorder considered depression? If so, should I be treated for it year-round even though it comes and goes? ANSWER: Seasonal affective disorder, or SAD, is a form of depression. Year-round treatment with medication for SAD may be recommended in some cases. But research has shown that, for many people [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - October 24, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Yes, The Change In Seasons Really Does Affect Your Mood
The leaves are starting to change, the days are getting shorter, the temperatures are dropping and the pumpkin spice euphoria of early September is starting to wear off. If you find yourself feeling a little less cheerful than you were during spring’s transformation into summer, rest assured it’s not your imagination: There is a science-backed reason you’re more likely to feel down in the cooler months. “It’s real,” Kathryn A. Roecklein, an associate professor in the department of psychology at University of Pittsburgh, told The Huffington Post.  The changes don’t necessa...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - October 6, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Treating seasonal affective disorder with cognitive behavioural therapy is comparable to light therapy
The overall lifetime prevalence of seasonal affective disorder (SAD) ranges as high as 9.7%.1 Light therapy, where bright artificial light is used to replace diminished sunlight, can be an effective non-drug treatment for SAD.2 However, alternative non-drug treatment approaches are also needed. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is an established and effective treatment for depressive disorders.3 Limited research examining CBT adapted specifically for SAD (CBT-SAD) is available. This paper reports initial findings from a large 5-year randomised clinical trial funded by the National Institute of Mental...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - October 3, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

6 Benefits To Going Outside In The Fall And Winter
Even though it's getting colder, there's no reason to become a couch potato. Over the years a rich body of scientific research into the benefits of being outside has shown time and again that the more often we get out of the house, the happier and healthier we become. Here are six reasons why you should put on your favorite flannel or jacket and head outside, rain, snow or shine. Fight Seasonal Depression Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) is a biological condition in which your body produces depression-like symptoms as a result of decreased exposure to sunlight and low levels of vitamin D. While you can't sunbathe in 60...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 30, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Book Review: Listening, Learning, Caring & Counselling
Australian mental-health expert Dr. Cate Howell, the author of Listening, Learning, Caring & Counselling: The Essential Manual for Psychologists, Psychiatrists, Counsellors and Other Healthcare Professionals on Caring for Their Clients, has over thirty years’ experience in the healthcare field and began in occupational therapy. Her specialty is mental health and she is trained in clinical hypnosis, couple therapy, cognitive therapy, acceptance and commitment therapy, and interpersonal therapy. She wrote this book not as a skills training resource, but as a guide to her way of counseling which she calls, “li...
Source: Psych Central - September 24, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Stan Rockwell, PsyD Tags: Book Reviews Career Cognitive-Behavioral Disorders General Health Insurance Mindfulness Professional Psychiatry Psychological Assessment Psychology Psychotherapy Students Treatment Anxiety Disorder books for mental health pro Source Type: news

Light Therapy May Boost Low Libido in Men Light Therapy May Boost Low Libido in Men
Light therapy similar to that used to treat seasonal affective disorder may increase sexual desire in men with a low libido via an increase in testosterone levels, an Italian study suggests.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Psychiatry Headlines)
Source: Medscape Psychiatry Headlines - September 20, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Psychiatry News Source Type: news

Blue and white light for seasonal affective disorder
Perhaps it’s the northern climate. Perhaps it’s that people at my office work a lot in the absence of office windows. But there are a lot of seasonal affective disorder lamps around me. The one in... (Source: Family Practice News)
Source: Family Practice News - August 16, 2016 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Depression & Vitamin D Deficiency
This study examined 10 randomized trials (nine were randomized placebo-controlled trials [RCTs]; one was a randomized blinded comparison trial) and 20 observational (cross-sectional and prospective) studies (Okereke & Singh, 2016). What did the researchers find? In 13 of the observational studies, they found a correlation between vitamin D deficiency and mood (e.g., depression). But in the placebo-controlled, randomized trials — the gold standard of drug and supplemental research — they found something very different. “Results from all but one of the RCTs showed no statistically significant differenc...
Source: Psych Central - July 9, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Depression Disorders General Psychology Treatment Depression Causes help with depression Mood Disorder Seasonal Affective Disorder Vitamin D vitamin d and depression vitamin d and mood vitamin d deficiency Source Type: news

Depression & Vitamin D Deficiency
This study examined 10 randomized trials (nine were randomized placebo-controlled trials [RCTs]; one was a randomized blinded comparison trial) and 20 observational (cross-sectional and prospective) studies (Okereke & Singh, 2016). What did the researchers find? In 13 of the observational studies, they found a correlation between vitamin D deficiency and mood (e.g., depression). But in the placebo-controlled, randomized trials — the gold standard of drug and supplemental research — they found something very different. “Results from all but one of the RCTs showed no statistically significant differenc...
Source: Psych Central - July 9, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Depression Disorders General Psychology Treatment Depression Causes help with depression Mood Disorder Seasonal Affective Disorder Vitamin D vitamin d and depression vitamin d and mood vitamin d deficiency Source Type: news

To Sleep, Perchance, to Dream - A Mental Health Moonshot
Dreams and Depression Depression is a major problem we face that is increasing in severity with each year. Here are three interesting facts you may not have known about depression and sleep. 1. People who suffer depression show altered REM sleep architecture compared to those who are not depressed. 2. A common side-effect of anti-depressants is that they suppress REM sleep. 3. REM sleep deprivation has shown to be beneficial in treating depression symptoms. What is REM sleep? REM sleep is when we dream. It is also known as 'Paradoxical Sleep', because our brain looks like it is awake according to its electrical activit...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 8, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

How To Become A Morning Person
Time to finally wake up and get that proverbial worm. For SELF, by Amy Marturana. Photo: Tara Moore / Getty We all have that friend that somehow jumps out of bed at the first chime of her alarm, and gets started with her packed day with a perky attitude. If she does it without a drip of coffee, it's even more maddening. For the rest of us, productivity before noon feels like an impossible goal, and the snooze button is at once our arch nemesis and savior. We dream of what life would be like if we could actually get stuff done before heading into the office--imagine how many more happy hours you could make it to if you ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Book Review: Nutritional Essentials for Mental Health
As the old phrase goes, “you are what you eat.” Following a recovery from autoimmune disease, thyroid disorder, and several other health issues, I learned the hard way that what you put into your body has a direct impact on each and every cell. In the comprehensive work, Nutritional Essentials for Mental Health: A Complete Guide to the Food-Mood Connection, Leslie Korn, PhD, explains not only why the food we eat has the specific impact it does, but also how to address a client’s specific mental health challenges through prescriptive diet and nutrition. For the student or professional clinician, Nutritiona...
Source: Psych Central - April 14, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Bethany Duarte Tags: Book Reviews Diet & Nutrition Disorders General Healthy Living Herbs & Supplements Professional Psychiatry Psychology Self-Help Students Treatment Autoimmune Disease books on nutrition books on nutrition and mental health eat Source Type: news

No evidence for seasonal affective disorder, says researcher
A long dark winter can be mentally and physically exhausting, but a recent study published in the journal of Clinical Psychological Science challenges the idea that it's making people depressed. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - April 3, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/North Source Type: news

7 Ways Spring Affects Your Mood
As Ernest Hemingway once wrote, "When spring came, even the false spring, there were no problems except where to be happiest."  Aside from being a master of words, Hemingway also has the benefit of being right about the season's effect: Spring fever is probably real. If you've noticed a little extra something in your step because of the weather, it's no coincidence. Warmer days have a direct influence on your mood and behavior. Below are just some of the ways toasty temperatures affect your attitude: 1. Being outdoors in the sun is linked with a mood boost... The gold standard on this subject is a ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 1, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

7 Game-Changing Things We've Learned About Sleep This Past Year
Sleep is one of the most essential elements of life. Every single human has experienced it, but when it comes to sleep, there is still so much we don't know. Why, for example, do we dream? And why can some people fall asleep within seconds, while others have to count sheep for an hour before getting some rest? As research on shut-eye continues to expand, two things remain clear: Sleep is really good for you and sleep deprivation is really bad for you. But there have been some other interesting small findings along the way as well. In honor of World Sleep Day March 18, we rounded up a few of the maj...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 18, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

7 Game-Changing Things We've Learned About Sleep This Past Year
Sleep is one of the most essential elements of life. Every single human has experienced it, but when it comes to sleep, there is still so much we don't know. Why, for example, do we dream? And why can some people fall asleep within seconds, while others have to count sheep for an hour before getting some rest? As research on shut-eye continues to expand, two things remain clear: Sleep is really good for you and sleep deprivation is really bad for you. But there have been some other interesting small findings along the way as well. In honor of World Sleep Day March 18, we rounded up a few of the maj...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 18, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Seasonal affective disorder treatment: Choosing a light therapy box
If you have seasonal affective disorder, don't spend a lot of money on a light box until you learn what features to consider. (Source: MayoClinic.com Full Feed)
Source: MayoClinic.com Full Feed - March 16, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Can OCD Be Seasonal?
My son Dan’s obsessive-compulsive disorder was at its very worst around January-March of 2008. After floundering and fighting our way through a maze of disorienting treatments and programs for OCD, we finally found the right help for Dan in the form of exposure and response prevention (ERP) therapy. Exactly one year later we were almost, though not quite, back to square one. At that time, I sat in the psychiatrist’s office with Dan as the doctor talked about OCD often going in cycles. I was terrified. Was Dan slipping back to not being able to eat again? Was all his hard work doing ERP for nothing? As it turns ...
Source: Psych Central - March 12, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Janet Singer Tags: Disorders Family General Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Personal Stories Psychology Seasonal Affective Disorder Treatment Anxiety exposure and response prevention Fluoxetine Major Depressive Disorder Obsessions Relapse Selective Source Type: news

Treatment for Seasonal Affective Disorder
Seasonal affective disorder(SAD) — also known as the winter blues or winter depression — is a seasonal but serious disorder that impacts many people with the changing of the seasons (from fall into winter, or from spring into summer). Luckily there are a number of effective treatment options for anyone who is suffering from seasonal affective disorder. Light Boxes Research has found that the majority of those suffering from the winter blues experienced relief solely from the regular use of light boxes. Light boxes emit high intensities of light of 2,500 to 10,000 lux (as compared to a normal light fixture that ...
Source: Psych Central - March 11, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Antidepressants Depression Disorders Medications Psychotherapy Seasonal Affective Disorder Treatment help for the winter blues help for winter depression seasonal affective disorder treatment treatment for sad treatment for seasonal Source Type: news

Seasonal Affective Disorder: Does It Really Exist?
BOSTON (CBS) – Many people think they suffer from Seasonal Affective Disorder or SAD, but some experts say that SAD should not be considered a separate psychiatric illness and does not affect the vast majority of Americans. As Dr. Mallika Marshall explains, a certain subset of the general population is most at risk. A change in season can cause a drastic change in mood for Joel Remmer of Boston. “I don’t want to get out of bed,” says Joel. “I don’t want to talk to anyone. I don’t want to eat. Just leave me alone.” Tufts Medical Center psychiatrist Nassir Ghaemi has been treat...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - March 10, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: deanreddington Tags: Health Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Watch Listen Dr. Mallika Marshall Seasonal Affective Disorder Source Type: news

5 Surprising Ways Your Genes Can Affect Your Sleep
How can some people get by on six hours of sleep, while others struggle with anything less than nine? Why does depression often go hand in hand with poor sleep? And why is good sleep so critical to overall metabolism? The answers to all of these questions may lie in our genes. Although the science of sleep is still young, scientists have uncovered a number of surprising ways that genes might affect your sleep. Here are five:  1. "Short-sleepers" can get by on just 4 to 6 hours a night. In 2009, researchers at the University of California, San Francisco discovered a gene mutation that allows some people ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 29, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Newly discovered gene 'causes disturbed sleep and seasonal affective disorder'
Scientists from University of California, San Francisco revealed a mutation on the PER3 gene - which is part of the circadian gene family - can cause both unusual sleep and seasonal depression. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Seasonal affective disorder: first human gene mutation discovered
Researchers have uncovered the first human gene mutation that is directly linked to seasonal depression, shedding light on why some people are more vulnerable to the condition. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Depression Source Type: news

Your brain performs better when it's cold outside
It was terrifyingly cold in New York this weekend, and this cold snap occurred right as we're entering the postholiday doldrums. It's around the time of the year when people start to talk about seasonal changes to their mood and energy level — most commonly, seasonal affective disorder, or SAD. While SAD is a relatively new condition — it stems from research in the '80s — it has become a huge part of how we in the colder climes discuss winter. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - February 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How to Get More Sleep
By Stacy Simon Are you getting enough sleep at night? According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), about 70 million Americans have sleep problems that keep them awake when they want to sleep, and lead to drowsiness when they want to be alert. The NIH says adults need 7-8 hours of sleep each night to be well-rested, but that most people get less than that. They recommend these tips for getting a good night’s sleep: RESOURCES: Sleep tips for people in cancer treatment Go to sleep at the same time each night, get up at the same time each morning, and avoid naps after 3pm. Avoid caffeine and alcohol l...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - February 17, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: General Information Source Type: news

Excessive Tanning Could Be A Sign Of A Deeper Problem
(Reuters Health) - Women who use indoor tanning salons are more likely to have mood or body issues than the average person, suggests new research.  Compared to the general population, women who reported tanning at least 10 times in the last year were more likely to be obsessed with real or imaginary flaws in their appearance, to have episodes of depression related to changes in seasons and to have high stress levels.  "It may be the case in clinical settings that when we see people who do a lot of tanning, it may be a flag to look at other mental health issues," said senior author Sherry Pagoto of the U...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 6, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news