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Genetics and immunology of alopecia areata
NIH Director ’ s Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series For the past 20 years, Dr. Christiano's research has focused on understanding the molecular processes that lead to inherited skin and hair disorders in humans. Her research career began with the discovery of genetic mutations associated with epidermolysis bullosa, a skin disease that causes severe blistering. Dr. Christiano's recent work has focused on the investigation of the underlying genetic causes of and identification of potential therapies for alopecia areata, an autoimmune form of hair loss.For more information go tohttps://oir.nih.gov/walsAir date: 3/1/2017 3...
Source: Videocast - All Events - February 27, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

The microbiota as instructor and arbiter of immune responses in health and disease
NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series Dr. Littman ’ s laboratory applies molecular and genetics tools to study how T lymphocytes develop and participate in inflammation and how HIV interacts with the host innate immune system. Dr. Littman isolated the genes for the CD4 and CD8 co-receptors and determined how their expression is regulated and their signaling influences selection of helper and cytotoxic cells. His group discovered that the nuclear receptor ROR  t regulates differentiation of Th17 cells and lymphoid tissue inducer cells and that it can be targeted for autoimmune disease therapy. He and his co...
Source: Videocast - All Events - February 6, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Oh to be seventeen again: IL-17 signaling in fungal immunity and autoimmune disease
Immunology Interest Group Seminar Series The IL-17 family constitutes a distinct subclass of pro-inflammatory cytokines with unique structures and signaling properties. Signals from IL-17 mediate immunity to extracellular pathogens, particularly the commensal fungus Candida albicans. Conversely, dysregulated IL-17 signal transduction drives pathogenesis in autoimmune conditions, including psoriasis. This talk will discuss both sides of this dual-acting cytokine, from the perspective of IL-17 receptor-induced signal transduction mechanisms. Biography: Dr. Sarah Gaffen received her BS in Biological Sciences from Carnegie Mel...
Source: Videocast - All Events - February 3, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

The multi-faceted role of the IgG glycan
Immunology Interest Group Seminar Series Beyond their role in pathogen neutralization, antibodies mediate pathogen control and clearance via the recruitment of innate immune effector functions including phagocytosis and cytotoxicity but also via the homeostatic regulation of the immune activation. Two modifications to the constant domain of the IgG antibody control this biological activity: 1) the irreversible genomic selection of isotype/subclass and 2) a more subtle alteration in Fc-glycosylation, that together provide instructions to the innate immune system . Because glycosylation alters the affinity of antibodies for ...
Source: Videocast - All Events - January 12, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Secrets and Lyase: New Roles of S1P Signaling in the Immune System
Immunology Interest Group Seminar Series Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) signaling plays critical roles in the cardiovascular and immune systems. We have recently characterized a mouse that lacks the S1P transporter SPNS2. SPNS2-deficient mice have only a minor reduction in blood S1P and hence grossly normal vascular permeability, but a dramatic reduction in lymph S1P and hence severely disrupted lymphocyte trafficking. These mice have revealed unexpected functions of S1P gradients in positioning immune cells within lymphoid organs, as well as in supporting lymphocyte survival. Dr. Susan Schwab is Associate Professor at the ...
Source: Videocast - All Events - December 8, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Big Data to individualize management of chronic diseases -- Science Nation
Some chronic conditions, such as the autoimmune disease scleroderma, are especially difficult to treat because patients exhibit highly variable symptoms, complications and treatment responses. The process of finding an effective treatment for an individual can be frustrating for doctors, and ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - December 2, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: video

Germs, genes, and host defense
Cisca Wijmenga has a long standing interest in understanding the molecular basis of the host immune system and how genetic variation leads to dysregulation of a proper immune response. She is particular interested in diseases associated such an imbalance, in particular celiac disease (a common autoimmune disorder) and candidiasis (a common infectious agent causing sepsis) . Her research group focusing on the regulatory networks of immune cells and their perturbation by genetic variation or physiological stressors like infectious agents or dietary gluten. To this end she founded a functional genomics cohort (LIfeLines Deep)...
Source: Videocast - All Events - November 7, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Stressed out: a novel approach to cancer immunotherapy
NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Inaugural William Paul Lecture Dr. Glimcher is president and CEO of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston and a former dean of Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City. Prior to her work at Cornell, Dr. Glimcher was a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, where she headed one of the top immunology programs in the world. As an immunologist, her primary research interests are elucidating the molecular pathways that regulate the immune system, critical for both the development of protective immunity and for the pathophysiologic immune responses underlying autoimmune...
Source: Videocast - All Events - November 7, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Imaging Chemokine Function in Disease
Immunology Interest Group Dr. Luster studied medicine at Cornell University Medical College and obtained a Ph.D. degree under mentorship of Drs. Jeffrey Ravetch and Zanvil Cohn at the Rockefeller University. As a graduate student, he discovered and characterized the IFN-gamma-inducible protein 10 (IP-10/CXCL10) (Nature 1985; 315:672-676)! He completed residency and a clinical fellowship in medicine and infectious diseases at Massachusetts General Hospital and post-doctoral training in the laboratory of Dr. Philip Leder at Harvard Medical School. In 1994, he joined the faculty of Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts Ge...
Source: Videocast - All Events - June 15, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Driving CARs to BARs: The Road to Engineered Specific Human T Regulatory Cells
Immunology Interest Group David W. Scott, Ph.D. is Vice Chair for Research in the Department of Medicine at the Uniformed Services School of Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD. An alumnus of Antioch College, he received his M.S. degree from the University of Chicago and Ph.D. from Yale University in 1969. Following a post-doctoral fellowship at Oxford University, he has held tenured faculty positions at Duke University, the University of Rochester, and the University of Maryland Medical School. He assumed his current position in September 2010. Dr. Scott has contributed to over 200 research papers on several subjects on immuno...
Source: Videocast - All Events - June 10, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

The Role of PTPN22 in Autoimmunity and Viral Immunity.
Dr. Linda Sherman received her Ph.D. from M.I.T. in Biology, and did postdoctoral research in immunology at Albert Einstein Medical College and Harvard Medical School, after which she started her laboratory at The Scripps Research Institute, where she remained throughout her career. She has served on advisory panels for the National Science Foundation, The American Cancer Society, The Juvenile Diabetes Foundation, and The National Institutes of Health. She was a member of the Advisory Council to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease from 2002-2006. She has served on numerous committees for the...
Source: Videocast - All Events - March 24, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Interleukin 35 (IL-35) and IL-35-producing Regulatory B Cells (i35-Bregs): Critical Regulators of Autoimmune Diseases.
Presented by: Charles E. Egwuagu, Ph.D., M.P.H.; Chief, Molecular Immunology Section; Laboratory of Immunology, National Eye Institute, NIH Category: ImmunologyAired date: 02/24/2016 (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - February 25, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Past Events Source Type: video

Interleukin 35 (IL-35) and IL-35-producing Regulatory B Cells (i35-Bregs): Critical Regulators of Autoimmune Diseases.
Immunology Interest Group Charles E. Egwuagu is Chief of the Molecular Immunology Section, National Eye Institute (NEI), NIH. He received his Ph.D in Epidemiology and Microbiology from Yale University Graduate School and a Master of Public Health (M.P.H) degree in Infectious Disease Epidemiology from Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut. Dr. Egwuagu did a 2-year Post-doctoral Fellowship in Molecular Immunology at NEI/NIH and then served as a Commissioned Officer of the United States Public Health Service (PHS) for 10 years, attaining the rank of Captain (06). Research in the Egwuagu laboratory is on autoreacti...
Source: Videocast - All Events - February 18, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Unexpected roles for innate immunity in human Th1 responses
Immunology Interest Group The evolutionary ancient complement system is critical in the protection against infection via direct destruction of pathogens and mobilization and activation of innate and adaptive immune cells. Our current understanding of the complement system is rooted in two key paradigms: Complement operates as a serum (fluid phase) effector system and activation of complement is commonly connected with only a pro-inflammatory outcome – thus, increased or unwanted complement activation is thought to be also the cause of many autoimmune diseases. Recent work, however, indicates that complement activation, e...
Source: Videocast - All Events - October 26, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Danger-based immunology course, session five: Autoimmunity
This is the fifth session of the Danger-based immunology course. We will start with the basics of the generation of immunological self tolerance and then move to autoimmunity. We will discuss the possibility that there are at least five different categories of autoimmune disease and go through the basis of each category.Air date: 10/27/2015 11:30:00 AM (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - October 13, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Transcriptional Regulation of Treg and TH17 Differentiation
Immunology Interest Group Dr. Vijay Kuchroo is the Samuel L. Wasserstrom Professor of Neurology and the Director of the Evergrande Center for Immunologic Diseases at Harvard Medical School. Throughout his career, Dr. Kuchroo’s primary focus has been to investigate the pathogenic and regulatory mechanisms in autoimmune diseases. His interest in regulatory T cells began during his post-doctoral fellowship in Dr. Martin Dort’s laboratory at Harvard Medical School where he analyzed antigen-specificity and requirements for the suppressive activity of regulatory T cells. As an independent investigator, Dr. Kuchroo continued...
Source: Videocast - All Events - June 23, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Neutrophils in the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune diseases: casting the NET widely
Presented by: Mariana J. Kaplan, M.D. Senior Investigator and Chief, Systemic Autoimmunity Branch, NIAMS, NIHCategory: NIH Director's SeminarsAired date: 05/08/2015 (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - May 11, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Past Events Source Type: video

Neutrophils in the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune diseases: casting the NET widely
NIH Director's Seminar Series Systemic autoimmune diseases comprise a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by a failure in self-tolerance to a wide variety of intracellular autoantigens, and include conditions like systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody associated-vasculitis. Work at the Systemic Autoimmunity Branch has focused on characterizing the role that aberrant neutrophils play in the promotion of loss of immunological tolerance, amplification of inflammatory responses and direct end-organ damage in these diseases. One characteristic of ne...
Source: Videocast - All Events - May 4, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Insights into the role of innate immunity in human lupus
Immunology Interest Group Virginia Pascual, is a pediatric rheumatologist with long standing interest in Translational Research and a focus on Human Autoimmunity. She currently serves as co-Director of the Baylor Institute for Immunology Research, Program Director of an Autoimmunity Center of Excellence directed toward the study of human lupus and the Baylor-based Human Immunology Program Consortium Center focused on vaccine responses in health and disease. Dr. Pascual has worked for more than a decade on understanding the pathogenesis of a wide array of chronic and acute immune-mediated diseases, including Systemic Lu...
Source: Videocast - All Events - April 30, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Use of spherical nucleic acid nanoconjugates to accelerate closure of diabetic wounds
NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series The Paller lab studies the role of gangliosides (sphingolipids), which regulate lipid raft-based signaling, in skin, particularly in diabetic wound healing and skin cancer. The lab uses DNA- and RNA-nanoconjugates as topical gene therapy to treat diabetic ulcers, psoriasis, skin cancer and other skin overgrowth disorders, and rare genetic skin problems. Dr. Paller is the PI of Northwestern's Skin Disease Research Center, which includes 3 Cores dedicated to providing service to researchers of skin biology. As a pediatric dermatologist, Dr. Paller specializes in genetic (esp...
Source: Videocast - All Events - March 25, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Kenneth C. Gorson, MD - Improving Outcomes in Individuals With Autoimmune Neuromuscular Diseases: Practical Considerations for Identification, Differential Diagnosis, and Management
Improving Outcomes in Individuals With Autoimmune Neuromuscular Diseases: Practical Considerations for Identification, Differential Diagnosis, and Management (Source: Peerview CME/CE Video Podcast - Internal Medicine International)
Source: Peerview CME/CE Video Podcast - Internal Medicine International - November 10, 2014 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: PVI, PeerView Institute for Medical Education Tags: Science, Medicine Source Type: video

Thomas H. Brannagan III, MD - Ensuring Proper Diagnosis and Management of Autoimmune Neuromuscular Diseases: Case-Based Discussion on CIDP and MMN
Discussion on CIDP and MMN (Source: Peerview CME/CE Video Podcast - Neurology International)
Source: Peerview CME/CE Video Podcast - Neurology International - June 11, 2013 Category: Neurology Authors: PVI, PeerView Institute for Medical Education Tags: Science, Medicine Source Type: video