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Cancer Facts and Figures: Death Rate Down 25% Since 1991
By Stacy Simon The death rate from cancer in the US has declined steadily over the past 2 decades, according to annual statistics reporting from the American Cancer Society. The cancer death rate for men and women combined fell 25% from its peak in 1991 to 2014, the most recent year for which data are available. This decline translates to more than 2.1 million deaths averted during this time period. “Cancer Statistics, 2017,” published in the American Cancer Society’s journal CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, estimates the numbers of new cancer cases and deaths expected in the US this year. The estimat...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - January 5, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: General Information Source Type: news

Genetic variants are associated with susceptibility to mouth and throat cancer
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) A number of genetic variants associated with susceptibility to oral cavity and pharyngeal cancer have been described in an international study published in Nature Genetics and coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer and involved 40 research groups in Europe, the United States, and South America. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 15, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

CDC: 40% of Cancer Cases in US Might Be Linked to Tobacco
By Stacy Simon New data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) show that 40% of cancers diagnosed in the US may have a link to tobacco use. The report was published in the November 11, 2016 issue of Vital Signs. Tobacco use is the leading preventable cause of cancer and cancer deaths. It can cause cancer of the liver, colon and rectum, lung, oral cavity, esophagus, pharynx (throat), larynx (voice box), stomach, pancreas, bladder, kidney, and cervix, and acute myeloid leukemia. According to the CDC, about 660,000 people in the US were diagnosed each year between 2009 and 2013 with a cancer related to toba...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - November 11, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Smoking/Tobacco Source Type: news

Smoking causes hundreds of genetic mutations
Conclusion This study serves to highlight the known harms of cigarette smoking. The research benefits from analysing thousands of different cancer cell lines, and carefully comparing the mutations found in smokers with those of non-smokers. It shows that there are differences between the two – even in cancers of the same type – with those from smokers generally tending to have a higher number of mutations and abnormal substitutions in the DNA sequence.  However, it can't tell us much more than that. For example, it can't tell us whether the same cell type and stage of lung cancer in a smoker is likely to...
Source: NHS News Feed - November 7, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Heart/lungs Source Type: news

[Perspective] How tobacco smoke changes the (epi)genome
Worldwide, more than 1 billion people are tobacco smokers. Cigarette smoking drastically increases the risk of lung cancer. However, many other cancer types also occur more frequently in smokers than in nonsmokers, including cancers of the oral cavity, larynx, pharynx, esophagus, liver, cervix, pancreas, bladder, and kidney. Genome sequencing efforts are beginning to provide more sophisticated clues as to the processes at work that are shaping the mutational landscape of tumors. On page 618 of this issue, Alexandrov et al. (1) focused specifically on smoking-associated cancers and dissected genetic and epigenetic differenc...
Source: ScienceNOW - November 3, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Gerd P. Pfeifer Tags: Cancer Source Type: news

Alcohol Is Even Deadlier Than You Think, Scientist Reminds Us
An opinion piece published in the scientific journal Addiction in July gathers evidence to argue that alcohol is a direct cause of cancer in several areas of the body. The article reviews 10 years’ worth of studies from several organizations, including the World Cancer Research Fund, the American Institute for Cancer Research and the International Agency for Research on Cancer. And its conclusions are dire.  Nearly 6 percent of cancer deaths worldwide can be linked to alcohol, including in people who drink light to moderate amounts of alcohol, according to author Jennie Connor, a profess...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - July 23, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Alcohol Is Even Deadlier Than You Think, Study Suggests
A new study suggests that alcohol is a direct cause of cancer in several areas of the body. The study, published Thursday in the scientific journal Addiction, consists of a major review of 10 years’ worth of studies from several organizations, including the World Cancer Research Fund, the American Institute for Cancer Research and the International Agency for Research on Cancer. And its conclusions are dire.  Nearly 6 percent of cancer deaths worldwide can be linked to alcohol, including in people who drink light to moderate amounts of alcohol, the study concludes. “From a public health perspective, a...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Alcohol Is Even Deadlier Than You Think, Study Suggests
A new study suggests that alcohol is a direct cause of cancer in several areas of the body. The study, published Thursday in the scientific journal Addiction, consists of a major review of 10 years’ worth of studies from several organizations, including the World Cancer Research Fund, the American Institute for Cancer Research and the International Agency for Research on Cancer. And its conclusions are dire.  Nearly 6 percent of cancer deaths worldwide can be linked to alcohol, including in people who drink light to moderate amounts of alcohol, the study concludes. “From a public health perspective, a...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - July 23, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Alcohol 'a direct cause of seven types of cancer'
Conclusion This narrative review aimed to summarise data from published biological and epidemiological research to discuss the strength of evidence that alcohol causes cancer. The author gives their main finding as a link between alcohol consumption and cancer at seven sites, and also that the highest risks seem to be associated with heavier drinking. However, they state there's no "safe" drinking threshold and that low to moderate consumption still contributes to a significant number of cancer cases. The biggest limitation of this review is that it doesn't appear to be systematic. The author provided no method...
Source: NHS News Feed - July 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Lifestyle/exercise Source Type: news

Light alcohol consumption tied to increased risk of breast cancer in women
(NaturalNews) In 1987, a working group of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) – an agency of the World Health Organization (WHO) – listed cancers of the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, esophagus and liver as "causally related to the consumption of alcoholic... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Do These Four Things to Cut Your Cancer Risk
This study found that overall, 20% to 40% of carcinoma cases and about half of carcinoma deaths could potentially be prevented through certain lifestyle modifications. Here are the 4 lifestyle behaviors that if practiced throughout a lifetime, were found to be linked to a lower rate of cancer incidence and death: 1. Don't smoke The study revealed that smoking contributed to 48.5% of deaths from the 12 smoking-related cancers in the United States including lung, pancreas, bladder, stomach, colon/rectal and esophagus. The message here is plain and simple -- don't ever start smoking and if you already are, quit. Smoking ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

ACS Releases Long-term Care Guideline for Survivors of Head and Neck Cancer
By Stacy Simon The American Cancer Society has released a new Head and Neck Survivorship Care Guideline to help survivors of head and neck cancer and their primary care providers better manage their long-term care. The guideline addresses cancers of the oral cavity, tongue, lip, pharynx (throat), and larynx (voice box). Recommendations in the guideline may also apply to cancers of the salivary glands, nasal and paranasal sinuses, and nasopharynx. But it does not address cancers of the brain, thyroid, or esophagus because they are very different in terms of symptoms and treatment. RESOURCES: Head and Neck Cancer Survivor...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - March 23, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Laryngeal and Hypopharyngeal Cancer Salivary Gland Cancer Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancer Nasopharyngeal Cancer Source Type: news

Endoscopic techniques offer hope for throat cancer patients
(American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy) According to a study in the December issue of GIE: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the monthly peer-reviewed scientific journal of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE), endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) appears to be a safe and effective minimally invasive treatment for patients with superficial pharyngeal (throat) cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 17, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

How America Let Asbestos Kill Its Veterans
Discussions among doctors about the dangers of asbestos started in the early 1920s, and while the medical and scientific research communities released confirmations about its deadly side effects, the U.S. military didn’t heed their warnings and continued to build its vessels. 1922 Medical professionals held discussions linking asbestos to various health problems. 1924 Dr. W...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - November 9, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Veterans & Military Source Type: news

J. Silvio Gutkind
Associate Director, Basic ScienceJ. Silvio Gutkind received his Ph.D. in Pharmacy and Biochemistry from the University of Buenos Aires, Argentina. He was trained as a post-doctoral fellow at the NIMH and NCI, and joined the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), NIH, where he is currently the Chief of the Oral and Pharyngeal Cancer Branch. Dr. Gutkind is a national and international leader in the study of basic signal transduction mechanisms in cancer. He is recognized for his pioneering research aimed at unraveling the complexity of the intracellular signaling circuitry by which cell surface recep...
Source: PHRMA - September 10, 2015 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Ali Source Type: news

Something to chew on: Millions of lives blighted by smokeless tobacco
More than a quarter of a million people die each year from using smokeless tobacco, researchers have concluded. The study estimates that in 2010 alone smokeless tobacco resulted in more than 62,000 deaths due to cancers of the mouth, pharynx and esophagus and accounted for more than 200,00 deaths from heart disease. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - August 21, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

What are Medicare costs for patients with oral cavity, pharyngeal cancers?
(The JAMA Network Journals) Medicare costs for older patients with oral cavity and pharyngeal cancers increased based on demographics, co-existing illnesses and treatment selection, according to a report published online by JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 4, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Expression of SIP1 protein indicates poor prognosis in pharyngeal cancer
The expression of SIP1 protein in pharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma tumors often indicates an advanced tumor stage, a high risk of recurrence and a poor prognosis, according to research. Based on the results, SIP1 is a potential new prognostic factor for clinical use, helping to single out patients with more aggressive tumor behavior requiring more intensive therapy and closer follow-up. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 14, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Expression of SIP1 protein indicates poor prognosis in pharyngeal cancer
(University of Eastern Finland) The expression of SIP1 protein in pharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma tumours often indicates an advanced tumour stage, a high risk of recurrence and a poor prognosis, according to research from the University of Eastern Finland. Based on the results, SIP1 is a potential new prognostic factor for clinical use, helping to single out patients with more aggressive tumor behavior requiring more intensive therapy and closer follow-up. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 14, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Free mouth cancer exams available to public in dental surgeries
Approximately 300 cases of mouth and pharynx cancer detected in Ireland each year (Source: The Irish Times - Health)
Source: The Irish Times - Health - September 17, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Report charts head and neck cancers
Head and neck cancers include lip, tongue and oral cavity cancer, pharynx and tonsil cancer, larynx cancer, thyroid gland cancer, salivary glands cancer, nose, ear and sinus cancer. The aim of this report is to help end of life care commissioners and providers improve planning and service delivery in line with the needs and wishes of the patient. (Source: NHS Networks)
Source: NHS Networks - June 18, 2014 Category: UK Health Authors: Maria Axford Source Type: news

Smoking 'increases risk of breast cancer in older women by almost a fifth'
Study published in British Journal of Cancer found women who used to smoke were still 7% more at risk of diseaseSmoking increases the risk of breast cancer in older women by almost a fifth, a study has found. The discovery adds to a growing weight of evidence linking exposure to tobacco smoke with the disease.US scientists who tracked the progress of around 186,000 women aged 50 to 71 found that those who smoked were 19% more likely to develop breast cancer than those who had never smoked. Women who once smoked but then kicked the habit were still 7% more at risk.The results held true even after accounting for alcohol cons...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 19, 2014 Category: Science Tags: The Guardian United States World news Health Smoking Medical research Society Cancer UK news Breast cancer Science Source Type: news

Hepatitis C Infection and Higher Risk of Death From Non-liver CancersHepatitis C Infection and Higher Risk of Death From Non-liver Cancers
In addition to their increased risk of death from hepatocellular carcinoma, chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients also have a higher mortality rate from non-Hodgkin lymphoma and pancreatic, rectal, and oral and pharyngeal cancers. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Gastroenterology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Gastroenterology Headlines - February 26, 2014 Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Roll-ups 'as hazardous as factory made cigarettes'
Conclusion This was a valid opinion piece highlighting the dangers of smoking roll-up cigarettes. Though it is not a systematic review of all of the available evidence, it is backed up by selected relevant surveys and product information. It highlights the need to view any type of tobacco smoking as dangerous. All forms of smoking damage your health and increase your risk of cancer and other smoking-related diseases. If you are still smoking, contact the NHS Stop Smoking support service who can help you to quit. Analysis by Bazian. Edited by NHS Choices. Follow Behind the Headlines on Twitter. Join the Healthy Evide...
Source: NHS News Feed - February 12, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Lifestyle/exercise Source Type: news

UK's annual cancer diagnosis numbers rise by 50,000 in a decade
Cancer numbers have gone up mainly because people are living longer but alcohol and obesity have also contributed to riseThe number of people being diagnosed with cancer each year in Britain has increased by 50,000 over the past decade, according to figures published on Tuesday.Cancer numbers have gone up primarily because people are living longer although alcohol and obesity are also playing a part in the rise in the numbers.Cancer Research UK, which released the figures, said there has been an increase in the number of diagnoses from around 283,000 cases in 2001 to 331,487 in 2011. Most cancers are a result of the ageing...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 14, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Tags: The Guardian Obesity News Health Medical research Society Cancer UK news Alcohol Science Source Type: news

Growing number of young adults with oropharyngeal cancer linked to HPV
The human papillomavirus (HPV) may be to blame for the alarming increase of young adults with oropharyngeal cancer, according to researchers from Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. The study reveals an overall 60 percent increase from 1973 and 2009 in cancers of the base of tongue, tonsils, soft palate and pharynx in people younger than age 45. Among Caucasians, there was a 113 percent increase, while among African-Americans the rate of these cancers declined by 52 percent during that period of time... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - September 26, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Ear, Nose and Throat Source Type: news

Pharyngeal Exercises to Treat Cancer
(Ivanhoe Newswire) – Recent studies show patients who develop pharyngeal (lung) cancer may have a greater chance of getting better by performing swallowing exercises. (Source: Medical Headlines From Ivanhoe.com)
Source: Medical Headlines From Ivanhoe.com - September 23, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Heartburn Raises Cancer Risk, Antacids May Offer ProtectionHeartburn Raises Cancer Risk, Antacids May Offer Protection
Gastric reflux is a strong independent risk factor for cancers of the larynx and pharynx, but the use of antacids appears to lower that risk. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - May 29, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Frequent Heartburn May Lead to Throat Cancer
According to a study published in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention (from American Association for Cancer Research), frequent heartburn was associated with cancers of the throat and vocal cords among nonsmokers and nondrinkers. The study also stated that the use of antacids, but not prescription medications (such as proton pump inhibitors) or home remedies, had a protective effect. "Previous studies examining gastric reflux and cancers of the head and neck have generated mixed results," said Scott M. Langevin, Ph.D., postdoctoral research fellow at Brown University in Providence, R.I. ...
Source: About Heartburn / Acid Reflux - May 24, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Alcohol Plays A Huge Role In Cancer Deaths In The U.S.
We have known for years that sun exposure can lead to skin cancer and smoking can lead to lung cancer. Now a new report reveals that drinking alcohol is responsible for 3.5 percent of all cancer deaths in the U.S. The findings, published in the American Journal of Public Health, outline the cancer risks linked to alcohol use. This is the first major examination of this topic in over 30 years. The researchers analyzed cancers of the: rectum colon esophagus liver female breast larynx pharynx mouth The investigators examined surveys, 2009 U... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 16, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer / Oncology Source Type: news

Coffee, Tea, and Fatal Oral/Pharyngeal CancerCoffee, Tea, and Fatal Oral/Pharyngeal Cancer
This study examined the potential protective effects of both caffeinated and decaffeinated varieties. American Journal of Epidemiology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 1, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Internal Medicine Journal Article Source Type: news