Norway Is The First Country To Ban Deforestation
Norway is so woke to deforestation, it's the first nation to outlaw it.  On May 24, Norway committed to zero deforestation, reports UN partner Climate Action. The groundbreaking move means that the nation pledges to ban any product in its supply chain that contributes to the deforestation of rainforests through the government’s public procurement policy.  “This is an important victory in the fight to protect the rainforest. Over the last few years, a number of companies have committed to cease the procurement of goods that can be linked to destruction of the rainforest,” Nils Hermann ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 7, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Meet Paz: Paraguay’s HLHS pioneer
Before Maria de la Paz was born, her parents Violeta Gustale and Orlando Cazal learned their unborn daughter had a complex congenital heart disease called hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). With HLHS, the left side of the newborn’s heart is so underdeveloped that it cannot pump enough oxygenated blood throughout the body. The standard treatment is a series of three corrective surgeries to re-route blood flow through the heart. The first surgery is performed at birth, the second at six months and the third about two or three years later. Violeta and Orlando were presented with four options: Travel from their hom...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - April 20, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Erin Horan Tags: Our Patients’ Stories congenital heart disease Dr. Christopher Baird Dr. Pedro del Nido HLHS Source Type: news

These Travel Photos Are Dino-Mite
For extinct beasts, these dinosaurs sure get around. Then again, it helps to have Jorge Saenz as your tour guide. The Paraguay-based photographer is helping some toy terrestrials see South America as he documents their travels under the hashtag #dinodinaseries. The adventure started in Bolivia with a green brachiosaurus named Dino. When Dino became a hit, Saenz picked up a few friends for him, including “Dina the Stegosaurus, Spiny the Spinosaurus, and Brachy, a brown brachiosaurus who also happens to be Dino’s girlfriend,” Saenz explained, according to BoredPanda. Since then, the curious dinosaurs have b...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 15, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

MassDevice.com +3 | The top 3 medtech stories for March 3, 2016
Say hello to MassDevice +3, a bite-sized view of the top three medtech stories of the day. This feature of MassDevice.com’s coverage highlights our 3 biggest and most influential stories from the day’s news to make sure you’re up to date on the headlines that continue to shape the medical device industry.   3. Virtual Incision’s inside-the-body surgical robot logs 1st-in-human use Virtual Incision this week announced the 1st-in-human use of its miniaturized robotically assisted surgical device, which was used in a colon resection procedures in Paraguay. The RASD is designed to operate entirely wit...
Source: Mass Device - March 3, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: News Well Plus 3 Source Type: news

Virtual Incision’s inside-the-body surgical robot logs 1st-in-human use
Virtual Incision this week announced the 1st-in-human use of its miniaturized robotically assisted surgical device, which was used in a colon resection procedures in Paraguay. The RASD is designed to operate entirely within the abdominal cavity via a single surgical incision. A spinout from the University of Nebraska, Virtual Incision raised $11.2 million last summer to fund a feasibility trial of the device. The company said the patients in Asunción, Paraguay, who are “recovering well,” were treated as part of the trial. “To the best of our knowledge, this is the 1st time an active miniaturized robot...
Source: Mass Device - March 3, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Clinical Trials Robot-Assisted Surgery Virtual Incision Corp. Source Type: news

The Latest On Zika: Experts Are Divided Over Genetically Modified Mosquitos
The Zika virus, which is spread by the Aedes aegypti mosquito, is strongly suspected to be linked to a new wave of microcephaly cases in Brazil. Babies born with the birth defect have smaller heads and sometimes brains that aren't fully developed, which can result in life-long developmental problems.    Zika is currently spreading through Central and South America and the Caribbean, and with the high volume of news about the virus, it's tough to stay up-to-date. Check out our full coverage, or read our daily recaps. Here are four updates, opinions and developments to know about now:   1. ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 16, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What Pregnant Women Should Know About Zika Virus
On Monday, the World Health Organization declared a "public health emergency of international concern" due to the cluster of birth defects potentially linked to Zika virus.   No one is probably more concerned about this connection than the world’s pregnant women, especially those who are living in an area where there is ongoing Zika virus transmission. While the virus’ symptoms (fever, headache, joint pain, conjunctivitis) are no cause for alarm and rarely require hospitalization, the disease is suspected of causing severe birth defects like microcephaly, when a baby is born with an abnormally small head. ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 2, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

An Illustrated Guide To The Zika Outbreak
In October 2015, Brazilian health authorities notified the World Health Organization that an alarming number of Brazilian babies had been born with microcephaly, a rare, debilitating birth defect with lifelong consequences. Researchers quickly linked the spike in birth defects to the outbreak of a little-known tropical disease called Zika virus, which is transmitted by mosquito. Since its discovery in Uganda in 1947, Zika virus has popped up in different African and Asian countries, but no widespread outbreaks had occurred until 2013, when the virus infected an estimated 11 percent of the population of French Polynesi...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

An Illustrated Guide To The Zika Outbreak
In October 2015, Brazilian health authorities notified the World Health Organization that an alarming number of Brazilian babies had been born with microcephaly, a rare, debilitating birth defect with lifelong consequences. Researchers quickly linked the spike in birth defects to the outbreak of a little-known tropical disease called Zika virus, which is transmitted by mosquito. Since its discovery in Uganda in 1947, Zika virus has popped up in different African and Asian countries, but no widespread outbreaks had occurred until 2013, when the virus infected an estimated 11 percent of the population of French Polynesi...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 22, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Pregnant Women Shouldn't Travel To Countries With Zika Virus, CDC Says
People traveling to Central America and South America, as well as some islands in the Caribbean, should take special precautions against mosquito bites because of an outbreak of Zika virus, a previously rare disease that may be linked to serious birth defects. Pregnant women should consider avoiding the region, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advised. The CDC on Friday issued a "Level 2" travel notice for Brazil, Colombia, El Salvador, French Guiana, Guatemala, Honduras, Martinique, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Suriname, Venezuela and Puerto Rico, as well as the Caribbean islands Haiti and Martinique....
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 16, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mosquito Virus May Have Caused Brain Damage In Thousands Of Babies
RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — In the early weeks of Angelica Pereira's pregnancy, a mosquito bite began bothering her. At first it seemed a small thing. But the next day she awoke with a rash, a headache, a fever and a burning in her eyes. The symptoms disappeared within four days, but she fears the virus has left lasting consequences. Pereira's daughter Luiza was born in October with a head more than an inch (3 centimeters) below the range defined as healthy by doctors, a rare condition known as microcephaly that often results in mental retardation. A neurologist soon gave Pereira and her husband more bad news: The brain da...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 28, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

What You Need To Know About The Zika Virus
By: Mindy Weisberger Published: 12/16/2015 10:51 AM EST on LiveScience Infections with Zika virus, which is carried by mosquitos, are on the rise across the Americas, raising concerns among health officials. Although the virus is generally not life-threatening, evidence suggests that it may be responsible for recent increases in birth defects in Brazil and French Polynesia, where infections are more common.  On Thursday (Dec. 10), officials in Panama announced the country's first case of locally acquired Zika virus — meaning that a person caught the disease from a mosquito in that country, rather than while trav...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 16, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Zika virus infection – Paraguay
On 27 November 2015, the National IHR Focal Point of Paraguay notified PAHO/WHO of 6 laboratory-confirmed autochthonous cases of Zika virus infection in the city of Pedro Caballero, which is located in the northeast of the country and shares borders with Brazil. The diagnoses were made by the national reference laboratory, the Central Public Health Laboratory of the Ministry of Health, through reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique. Cases were identified from clusters of febrile patients whose samples tested negative for dengue and chikungunya. They presented with fever, headache, myalgia, art...
Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks - December 3, 2015 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: dengue [subject], dengue haemhorragic fever, dengue fever, dengue virus, headache [subject], headache, migraine, chronic headache, health services [subject], Disease outbreak news [doctype], Paraguay [country], Region of the Americas [region] Source Type: news

The medical devices market in Latin America
By Kate Jablonski, Emergo Group Most people don’t realize it, but taken together, the major Latin American countries—Brazil, Mexico, Colombia, Chile, and Argentina—represent the third largest economy in the world, with a healthcare expenditure comparable to China and India. Their combined GDP exceeds $4.25 trillion and the medical device industry has grown into a significant combined market. It’s no surprise that medical device companies have their eye on Latin America. Starting points: Mexico & Brazil Mexico is the second largest country south of the US and a favorable starting point for medical device compani...
Source: Mass Device - November 18, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: Blog Emergo Group Source Type: news

Reduction in Amazon deforestation avoids 1,700 deaths per year
(Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo) Because of decreasing deforestation and emissions from forest fires in the Amazon, the amount of particulate matter, ozone, carbon monoxide and other atmospheric pollutants released by burning biomass has fallen by 30 percent on average in dry season in Brazil, Paraguay, Bolivia and Argentina. This improvement in the region's air quality may be helping to prevent the premature deaths of some 1,700 adults per year throughout South America, according studies made in Brazil, UK and USA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 26, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news