Michigan Dairy Worker Diagnosed With Bird Flu, Becoming Second U.S. Case Tied to Cow Outbreak
New York — A Michigan dairy worker has been diagnosed with bird flu — the second human case associated with an outbreak in U.S. dairy cows. The patient had mild eye symptoms and has recovered, U.S. and Michigan health officials said in announcing the case Wednesday. The worker had been in contact with cows presumed to be infected, and the risk to the public remains low, officials said. [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] A nasal swab from the person tested negative for the virus, but an eye swab tested positive, “indicating an eye infection,” the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and ...
Source: TIME: Health - May 22, 2024 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: MIKE STOBBE and JONEL ALECCIA / AP Tags: Uncategorized Disease Source Type: news

Daily Cannabis Use Outpaces Daily Drinking in the U.S., Study Says
Millions of people in the U.S. report using marijuana daily or nearly every day, according to an analysis of national survey data, and those people now outnumber those who say they are daily or nearly-daily drinkers of alcohol. Alcohol is still more widely used, but 2022 was the first time this intensive level of marijuana use overtook daily and near-daily drinking, said the study’s author, Jonathan Caulkins, a cannabis policy researcher at Carnegie Mellon University. [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] “A good 40% of current cannabis users are using it daily or near daily, a pattern that i...
Source: TIME: Health - May 22, 2024 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CARLA K. JOHNSON / AP Tags: Uncategorized News wire Source Type: news

What It ’ s Like to Be Deathly Afraid of Feet
Jordyn Bristow can’t remember how or why she became unbearably repulsed by feet. All she knows is that starting about three years ago, when she caught a glimpse of someone’s bare feet, she wanted to vomit. The urge hasn’t let up. “I start gagging—it’s horrible,” says Bristow, 18, who lives in Tasmania, Australia. She was recently at a grocery store when her dad pointed out an older man wearing flip-flops, which accentuated his cracked and apparently infected ingrown toenails. She started dry-heaving and had to leave the store and sit outside, struggling to catch her breath. [time-b...
Source: TIME: Health - May 22, 2024 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Angela Haupt Tags: Uncategorized Evergreen healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

Why Fish Oil Supplements Can Be Dangerous for the Heart
Most people are familiar with the best things to eat for a healthy heart: vegetables, low-fat dairy, and lean proteins like fish. Some fish like salmon also have the added benefit of being full of omega-3 fatty acids, which are healthy fats that can help to raise good cholesterol and lower triglycerides. Or so we thought. Studies on the benefits of fish oil, and fish oil supplements, haven’t been as conclusive when it comes to actually preventing heart disease for people who aren’t at higher risk. In the latest, published in BMJ, researchers report that people with no history of heart problems who regularly ...
Source: TIME: Health - May 21, 2024 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

Food Safety Tips You Should Know as Summer Heats Up
With Memorial Day weekend fast approaching, the start of the summer is in sight. As the weather gets hotter and people start eating and grilling outside again, it’s important to make sure that your food remains safe to eat. The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service released on Tuesday four important tips to keep people safe from foodborne illness. [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] “The bacteria that cause foodborne illness love the summertime as much as we do because they thrive and multiply quickly in warmer temperatures. This causes illnesses to spike during ...
Source: TIME: Health - May 21, 2024 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Chantelle Lee Tags: Uncategorized climate change News Desk Source Type: news

STIs Are Increasing In Many Regions, New WHO Report Finds
HIV, viral hepatitis, and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) collectively cause about 2.5 million deaths and 1.2 million cases of cancer each year, according to a new report from the World Health Organization (WHO). The report, released Tuesday, found that case notifications of STIs are increasing in many regions, and new HIV and viral hepatitis infections are not declining fast enough. Four curable STIs—syphilis, gonorrhea, chlamydia, and trichomoniasis—account for more than 1 million infections each day. Hepatitis-related deaths have also increased from 1.1 million in 2019 to 1.3 million in 2022. [time...
Source: TIME: Health - May 21, 2024 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Chantelle Lee Tags: Uncategorized News Desk Source Type: news

Which Is Better: Counting Your Steps or Timing Your Workout?
For years, federal physical activity guidelines have told Americans how much time they should spend moving each week: at least 150 minutes, or 75 minutes if workouts are particularly vigorous. But the popularity of wearable fitness devices has made many people obsessively track their step counts instead, often shooting for the goal of 10,000 per day (even though some studies suggest that number is arbitrary). [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] Is the length of your workout or your daily step count a better measure of wellness? “Both are good metrics,” says Dr. Rikuta Hamaya, a preventive-medici...
Source: TIME: Health - May 21, 2024 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

Scientists Are Studying Weight-Loss Drugs for Way More Than Weight Loss
The new weight-loss drugs Wegovy and Zepbound are in high demand, and the clamoring will only increase in coming years, experts predict. That’s because drugs like these, which rely at least in part on the appetite-regulating hormone GLP-1, are being investigated not just for weight loss and diabetes, but also for a wide range of other conditions. “Weight loss is only part of it,” says Dr. Ian Neeland, chair of the American Heart Association’s obesity science committee and an associate professor of medicine at Case Western Reserve University. [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] Here&...
Source: TIME: Health - May 21, 2024 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

Do You Need More Sunscreen When It ’ s Hot Outside?
Dermatologists recommend that people wear SPF on any exposed skin any time they go outside, 365 days a year. But let’s be honest: many of us stock up on SPF around Memorial Day, then forget about it once Labor Day passes. Only about 13% of U.S. adults actually wear sunscreen every single day, survey data show. Is it really so bad to wear sunscreen only when it’s hot and sunny outside? It’s understandable, says Dr. Abel Torres, chair of the University of Florida College of Medicine’s dermatology department—but that doesn’t mean it’s the best choice. [time-brightcove not-tgx=R...
Source: TIME: Health - May 21, 2024 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Evergreen healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

EPA warns of increasing cyberattacks on water utilities
(WASHINGTON) — Cyberattacks against water utilities across the country are becoming more frequent and more severe, the Environmental Protection Agency warned Monday as it issued an enforcement alert urging water systems to take immediate actions to protect the nation’s drinking water. About 70% of utilities inspected by federal officials over the last year violated standards meant to prevent cyberthreats, the agency said. Officials urged even small water systems to improve protections against cyberattacks, noting that recent assaults from adversarial nation states like Russia and Iran have impacted water sys...
Source: TIME: Health - May 20, 2024 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: MICHAEL PHILLIS and MATTHEW DALY / AP Tags: Uncategorized Crime Source Type: news

Pediatricians Reverse Decades-Old Advice Against HIV-Positive Mothers Breastfeeding
People with HIV can breastfeed their babies, as long as they are taking medications that effectively suppress the virus that causes AIDS, a top U.S. pediatricians’ group said Monday in a sharp policy change. The new report from the American Academy of Pediatrics reverses recommendations it had in place since the start of the HIV epidemic in the 1980s. It recognizes that routinely prescribed drugs can reduce the risk of transmitting HIV via breast milk to less than 1%, said Dr. Lisa Abuogi, a pediatric HIV expert at the University of Colorado and lead author of the report. [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true...
Source: TIME: Health - May 20, 2024 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: JONEL ALECCIA / AP Tags: Uncategorized News Desk wire Source Type: news

A New Test Predicts Who Will Benefit Most from Weight-Loss Drugs
As popular as the new group of weight-loss drugs like Wegovy and Zepbound are, not everyone responds to them in the same way. In a new presentation at the Digestive Disease Week conference in Washington, Mayo Clinic associate professor of medicine Dr. Andres Acosta reported that a genetic test he developed can identify which people are most likely to respond to semaglutide (Wegovy) and which are not. The test, called MyPhenome, from a company Acosta co-founded called Phenomix, relies on a combination of genetic and other factors to categorize people into different types of weight gain. Acosta identified about two doz...
Source: TIME: Health - May 20, 2024 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

What ’s the Most Refreshing Drink That ’ s Not Water?
For about 30 summers, Mindy Haar worked as the head lifeguard at a sleepaway camp in the Catskill Mountains. The teenage lifeguards under her charge wouldn’t always remember to drink water, so she remembers constantly nudging them to guzzle more H2O. The reminders worked. “I don’t recall any of my staff becoming dehydrated,” says Haar, who is now chair of the department of interdisciplinary health sciences at New York Institute of Technology. [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] Even if you’re not a lifeguard on duty under the blazing summer sun, staying hydrated is essential for v...
Source: TIME: Health - May 20, 2024 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Perri Ormont Blumberg Tags: Uncategorized Evergreen freelance healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

Health Experts are Watching a More Dangerous Version of Mpox
Cases of a new group of mpox viruses are rising, potentially posing a risk to people around the world, according to health officials at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). So far, the cases have been centered in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and have not spread beyond Central African countries where the virus remains endemic, the CDC wrote in a report on May 16. But health officials are concerned because this group of viruses—known as clade I mpox viruses—is known to cause more severe illness than the clade II viruses responsible for the previous mpox outbreaks in 2022, which...
Source: TIME: Health - May 17, 2024 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

What to Eat Before and After Your Workout
Through the ages, humans have fueled their most physically demanding efforts with meaty proteins. Ancient Greeks loaded up on red meat before Olympic contests, and medieval knights recovered from war with venison and pork. The tradition continues today, with world-record-setting weightlifters breakfasting on chicken thighs, eggs, and bacon. But experts recommend that the modern, average person eat several other foods before and after tough workouts, even if the knights may have tossed them from their castle windows. [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] The missing ingredients During exercise, blood carrie...
Source: TIME: Health - May 17, 2024 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Matt Fuchs Tags: Uncategorized Evergreen freelance healthscienceclimate Source Type: news