Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

How the World ’s First Loneliness Minister Will Tackle ‘the Sad Reality of Modern Life’
Tracey Crouch knows what it’s like to feel frighteningly alone. After giving birth to her first child, Freddie, in 2016, the British lawmaker says that despite having a “network of friends, family and a wonderful partner,” she began feeling cut off from the world. It wasn’t a new sensation; Crouch says she also suffered from depression six years earlier, when she first became a member of parliament. It felt like she was “in a very dark place, a very lonely place” she recalls. Crouch’s experiences may inform her new role as the country’s first Minister for Loneliness, a role c...
Source: TIME: Health - April 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara John / London Tags: Uncategorized loneliness public health tracey crouch Source Type: news

How to Wipe Out Malaria for Good
Malaria has plagued humanity for thousands of years. Caused by a tiny parasite transported from person to person by a certain kind of mosquito, the disease poses a risk to nearly half the world’s population. The WHO attempted to eradicate malaria in the 1960s and while it succeeded in ridding many countries of the disease, it fell short of the goal due to growing drug resistance and by failing to focus enough attention on Africa. Every year on World Malaria Day, April 25, the malaria community celebrates progress made to date and focuses on the challenges ahead. This year is especially exciting as just this past Fri...
Source: TIME: Health - April 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Erin M. Stuckey Tags: Uncategorized Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Malaria World Malaria Day Source Type: news

TIME 100 ’s Giuliano Testa: We Should Think About Infertility As a ‘Wellbeing Issue’
Dr. Giuliano Testa, a transplant surgeon at Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas who led the medical team that performed the first successful uterus transplants in the United States, said Tuesday that he hopes “what we are doing is going to shed light on infertility for women.” “I personally never knew it was such a widespread issue,” Testa said at the TIME 100 Gala on Tuesday. “We should be thinking about it not just as a birth, but a wellbeing issue.” Testa attended the TIME 100 Gala after being named by TIME magazine as one of the most influential people in the world for his rol...
Source: TIME: Health - April 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized onetime T1002018 Source Type: news

How a New Kind of Autopsy Is Helping in the Fight Against Cancer
After Keith Beck died of bile duct cancer last year, family members said, more than 900 people showed up to pay respects to the popular athletic director at the University of Findlay in northwestern Ohio. Many were former students who recalled acts of kindness during Beck’s nearly 30-year career: $20 given to a kid who was broke, textbooks bought for a student whose parents were going through bankruptcy, a spot cleared to sleep on Beck’s living room floor. But few knew about Beck’s final gesture of generosity. The 59-year-old had agreed to a “rapid autopsy,” a procedure conducted within hours ...
Source: TIME: Health - April 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: JoNel Aleccia / Kaiser Health News Tags: Uncategorized Cancer healthytime Source Type: news

The FDA Is Cracking Down on ‘Juuling’ and Youth E-Cigarette Use
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced on Tuesday that it’s cracking down on the sale and marketing of e-cigarettes—such as Juuls—in hopes of combatting youth use of these popular products. Over the past few years, e-cigarettes have skyrocketed in popularity among young users, but Juuls are perhaps the best known brand. These sleek vapes, which are not legally available to minors, resemble flash drives, come in a wide array of flavors and contain as much nicotine per cartridge—which lasts about 200 puffs—as an entire pack of cigarettes. Juuling has infiltrated schools across the coun...
Source: TIME: Health - April 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

Heavy Drinking May Change the Bacteria In Your Mouth and Raise Gum Disease Risk
There’s still quite a bit scientists don’t know about the microbiome: the vast collection of microorganisms living within your body. What is becoming increasingly clear, however, is that your lifestyle habits, from the foods you eat to the medications you take, may influence these bacterial colonies. Even drinking seems to have an effect. A new study, published Tuesday in the journal Microbiome, finds that drinking alcohol may alter some of the approximately 700 types of bacteria in your mouth — and probably not for the better. The study finds that alcohol may give rise to strains of oral bacteria that ar...
Source: TIME: Health - April 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news

How Gene Editing Could Save Coral Reefs
The powerful gene-editing tool CRISPR-Cas9 is taking the scientific world by storm. It gives researchers unprecedented power and precision in making tweaks to practically any gene in a plant or animal — and coral reefs could become its next beneficiary. In a paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers led by Phillip Cleves at Stanford University used CRISPR to edit three genes in corals growing in Australia’s Great Barrier Reef. Cleves manipulated the genes very early in the coral’s life cycle — just after fertilization of egg and sperm, when the coral is just...
Source: TIME: Health - April 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Genetics healthytime Source Type: news

Doctors Performed the First Full Penis and Scrotum Transplant on an American Military Vet
Physicians at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore have performed the first total penis and scrotum transplant in the world, the hospital announced on Monday. The surgery, which took place over 14 hours on March 26, was performed by a team of nine plastic surgeons and two urological surgeons. The penis and scrotum (without testicles) and partial abdominal wall came from a deceased donor. The recipient is a military veteran who was injured by an improvised explosive device (IED) blast in Afghanistan and wishes to remain anonymous. The hospital said he has recovered from the surgery and will be discharged...
Source: TIME: Health - April 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized Johns Hopkins medicine penis transplant Surgery transplants Source Type: news

Even Mild Brain Injuries May Increase Your Chances of Getting Parkinson ’s, Study Says
Even relatively mild brain injuries may increase your risk of developing the neurodegenerative condition Parkinson’s disease, according to a new study. The research, which was published Wednesday in the journal Neurology, found a strong connection between traumatic brain injuries such as concussions and a heightened risk of Parkinson’s, regardless of the severity of the injuries. The findings specifically pertain to veterans whose data had been recorded in Veterans Health Administration databases between 2002 and 2014. Compared to those who had never suffered a TBI, the increase in Parkinson’s risk &mdash...
Source: TIME: Health - April 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Research Source Type: news

CDC Warns Against Eating Any Kind of Romaine Lettuce After E. Coli Outbreak
American consumers are urged to stay away from salad for the time being, after an E. coli outbreak linked to romaine lettuce has spread to 16 states. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned against eating any kind of romaine lettuce grown in the Yuma, Arizona region, including whole heads and hearts of the green, and any chopped salads or salad mixes that contain it, in its latest update on the E. coli outbreak. The warning, which expanded from a prior notice urging buyers to throw out any store-bought chopped romaine lettuce, comes after new cases of E. coli were reported in Alaska. Alaska’s Departmen...
Source: TIME: Health - April 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mahita Gajanan Tags: Uncategorized onetime public health Source Type: news

Weekend Recipe: Peanut Butter Protein Balls That ’ll Help Fuel Your Workouts
These delicious protein balls take about five minutes to make and are the perfect portable breakfast or healthy snack on the run. I often make a batch over a weekend so I can just grab them out of the fridge during my busy week. They marry perfectly with your morning latte and tame that mid-afternoon craving for something sweet. If you’re a mad cyclist like I am, these protein balls are perfect to pack into the back of your cycling jersey as an energy snack or quick meal for those times when you need a pick me up. My protein balls are filled with simple ingredients: rolled oats, coconut, dates, Healthy Chef Protein ...
Source: TIME: Health - April 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Teresa Cutter — The Healthy Chef Tags: Uncategorized Food Source Type: news

Americans Are Filling Fewer Prescriptions for Opioids Amid Rising Fear of Addiction
(TRENTON, N.J.) — New data show that the number of prescriptions for opioid painkillers filled in the U.S. fell dramatically last year. They showed their biggest drop in 25 years. The decline comes amid increasing legal restrictions and public awareness of the dangers of addiction. A health data firm released a report Thursday showing a 9 percent average drop nationwide in the number of prescriptions for opioids filled by retail and mail-order pharmacies. All 50 states and the District of Columbia had declines of more than 5 percent. The U.S. is estimated to consume roughly 30 percent of all opioids used worldwide. ...
Source: TIME: Health - April 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Linda A Johnson / AP Tags: Uncategorized healthytime medicine onetime Source Type: news

The Best Spring Superfoods to Fuel Your Workouts
This article originally appeared on Health.com (Source: TIME: Health)
Source: TIME: Health - April 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Susan Brickell / Health.com Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news

E. Coli Outbreak Blamed on Contaminated Lettuce Spreads to 16 States, CDC Says
Health officials said more people have reported cases of E. coli, as a multi-state outbreak linked to chopped romaine lettuce continues to spread. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said about 53 cases of E. coli have been reported across 16 states, with 18 new cases reported after April 13. Pennsylvania, Idaho, New Jersey and Montana reported the highest number of cases. The CDC said 31 people have been hospitalized, including five who have developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, a type of kidney failure. No deaths have been reported. The E. coli outbreak has been linked to romaine lettuce grown in Yuma, Arizona,...
Source: TIME: Health - April 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mahita Gajanan Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

Is Sushi Healthy? Here ’s Everything You Need to Know
Americans eat sushi in venues as varied as high-end restaurants and prepared foods sections of grocery stores — and many believe it’s a nutritious choice. But is sushi healthy? “Sushi has this halo of being healthy,” says Katherine Zeratsky, a registered dietitian nutritionist and associate professor of nutrition at Mayo Clinic. After all, traditional sushi has all the makings of a health food: it’s stuffed with fresh fish, wrapped in thin sheets of seaweed and presented in neat little rolls. But experts warn not to expect your weekly spicy tuna order to slim your waistline. One of the biggest...
Source: TIME: Health - April 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sophia Gottfried Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime Source Type: news

How Smoking Pot May Hurt the Teenage Brain
As access to legal marijuana continues to expand, both for recreational and medical uses, researchers say there are still plenty of unanswered questions about how increased use might affect the still-developing brains of adolescents and young adults. Studies so far have found that marijuana can affect short-term thinking skills in adults, including attention, memory and other higher cognitive functions. In the latest review of the studies on younger people, scientists found similar effects, but also revealed some surprising hints about how lasting those effects might be. In a study published in JAMA Psychiatry, J. Cobb Sco...
Source: TIME: Health - April 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Brain healthytime Source Type: news

You Asked: Is It Bad To Eat Foods That Give You Gas?
Maybe it’s the hummus platter at your favorite Mediterranean restaurant, or the cauliflower-and-broccoli side at your supermarket. Most of us are aware of our problem foods—stuff we’d eat all the time if it didn’t make us so gassy. If you’ve ever wondered where that gas comes from and whether it’s bad for you, the answers may surprise you. “Gas is the byproduct of the activity of the gut microbiota that live in our large bowel,” says Jane Muir, an associate professor of gastroenterology and head of translational nutrition science at Monash University in Australia. The human g...
Source: TIME: Health - April 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime Source Type: news

The Man With 3 Faces: A Frenchman Received Another Face After His First Transplant Died
(LONDON) — In a medical first, a French surgeon says he has performed a second face transplant on the same patient — who is now doing well and even spent a recent weekend in Brittany. Dr. Laurent Lantieri of the Georges Pompidou hospital in Paris first transplanted a new face onto Jerome Hamon in 2010, when Hamon was in his mid-30s. But after getting ill in 2015, Hamon was given drugs that interfered with the anti-rejection medicines he was taking for his face transplant. Last November, the tissue in his transplanted face began to die, leading Lantieri to remove it. That left Hamon without a face, a condition ...
Source: TIME: Health - April 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Maria Cheng / AP Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime Surgery Source Type: news

Do I Still Need to Worry About Zika?
Warmer weather signals the onset of vacations, destination weddings and—unfortunately—mosquitoes. Since the Zika virus emerged three years ago in the Americas, cases have declined, but many people wonder if they still need to consider the mosquito-borne disease when making travel plans. “The bottom line is yes,” says Dr. Paul Mead, a medical officer in the CDC’s division of vector-borne diseases: Americans do still need to take precautions to protect against Zika. The CDC recommends that pregnant couples who live or travel to areas with Zika (a list that currently includes countries in Africa,...
Source: TIME: Health - April 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized healthytime places with Zika zika travel Source Type: news

NYC Mice Are Carrying Antibiotic-Resistant Germs
People who live in cities are used to the company of furry vermin. But a new study reveals that mice and men may be sharing much more than just living quarters. In a study published in the journal mBio, researchers led by Dr. Ian Lipkin, professor of epidemiology at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University, studied the gut microbes of 416 mice collected from mostly residential buildings all over New York City. Lipkin and his team did a thorough genetic analysis of the microbes they extracted from the feces of the mice, and found that they contained a number of disease-causing bacteria. Nearly 40% of the ...
Source: TIME: Health - April 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Bacteria healthytime Source Type: news

These Are the 6 Best Strength Exercises for Runners
This article originally appeared on Health.com (Source: TIME: Health)
Source: TIME: Health - April 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ashley Mateo / Health.com Tags: Uncategorized Exercise/Fitness healthytime onetime Source Type: news

This Is the Best Way to Treat Sore Muscles After a Workout
For many people, the mark of a good workout is waking up with sore muscles. Common as it is, though, there’s still a lot of uncertainty about soreness. Can you work out when you’re sore? Do you need to treat sore muscles? Is soreness a cause for concern? Dr. Ryan Lingor, a primary care sports physician at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City, answers all of your questions about muscle soreness. Is soreness bad? Not usually. “When people are initiating a new workout regimen, it’s very common to develop soreness,” Lingor says. Soreness is also common after people incorporate new mov...
Source: TIME: Health - April 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Exercise/Fitness healthytime onetime Source Type: news

New Studies Show Immune Treatments Could Be Key in the Fight Against Lung Cancer
Researchers report some of the most encouraging results yet for treating lung cancer with the latest immune-based treatments, most of which have been approved to treat other types of tumors. In three papers presented at the American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting, and published simultaneously in the New England Journal of Medicine, lung cancer experts found innovative ways to weaken lung tumors to improve people’s chances of surviving the disease. “There is definitely a high unmet need,” says Patrick Forde, assistant professor of oncology and associate member of the Bloomberg-Kimmel Instit...
Source: TIME: Health - April 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Cancer cancer immunotherapy Source Type: news

How a 27-Year-Old Math Whiz (and His Uber Driver) Found a Big Flaw in an IRS Tax Formula
Most people chat with their Uber driver about traffic or the weather. Sam Ferguson, on the other hand, spent one January Uber ride diving into tax math—and unearthed a big problem for many Obamacare customers. Ferguson, 27, a math Ph.D student at New York University, was on a trip to Iowa when he got to talking with his Uber driver about their jobs. The driver told Ferguson that he had trouble calculating the premium assistance he was eligible for under the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. People without job-based coverage making up to $48,560 are eligible for government help paying their monthly health ...
Source: TIME: Health - April 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Elizabeth O'Brien Tags: Healthcare Obamacare Taxes Source Type: news

Romaine Lettuce Caused An Ongoing E. Coil Outbreak, CDC Says
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Friday that a recent outbreak of E. coli in multiple states was linked to romaine lettuce grown in Yuma, Arizona. “Information collected to date indicates that chopped romaine lettuce from the Yuma, Arizona growing region could be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7 and could make people sick,” the CDC said in an update on Friday. The CDC said that no brand, distributor or supplier has been identified in connection with the E. coli outbreak. But it said that anyone who has bought romaine lettuce or salad mixes that contain romaine lettuce should throw it away, a...
Source: TIME: Health - April 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alana Abramson Tags: Uncategorized health onetime Source Type: news

Weekend Recipe: Salmon Burgers With a Side of Sweet Potato Fries
Salmon burgers are probably one of my favourite meals to make at home. I often serve them with oven roasted sweet potatoes or a salad made from baby romaine lettuce and avocado mayonnaise that’s created by blending avocado with a little lemon, garlic, olive oil, water and sea salt. What I love about this recipe is that any leftovers can be enjoyed the next day. These burgers make a quick and easy, portable meal for lunchboxes, picnics and entertaining. Try them over steamed brown rice with a splash of wheat free tamari or over a massaged kale salad. They keep well in the fridge for up to three days. This recipe is fr...
Source: TIME: Health - April 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Teresa Cutter — The Healthy Chef Tags: Uncategorized Cooking Food Source Type: news

How Being a Night Owl Endangers Your Health
A new study found that night owls—people who like to stay up late—are more likely to die early compared to morning larks, who rise earlier. The new report, published in the journal Chronobiology International, analyzed a study of about half a million people from ages 30 to 73 and followed what happened to them over 6.5 years. They found that the people who identified themselves as “definite evening types” had a 10% higher risk of dying over the study period than people who said they were “definite morning types” at the start of the study. The researchers, from University of Surrey in E...
Source: TIME: Health - April 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized healthytime sleep Source Type: news

Does Taxing Soda Actually Stop People from Drinking It?
A new study suggests that people may drink significantly less soda when it costs more. The findings support a public health strategy—the so-called “soda tax,” or a sugary drink tax that raises the price of sugar-sweetened beverages—that has grown more popular in recent years. In the study, researchers analyzed the effects of Philadelphia’s sugary drink tax implemented in January 2017—one of the steepest in the U.S. at $0.015 per ounce, which was estimated to increase the cost of sugary drinks by as much as 20%. Researchers from Drexel University in Philadelphia looked at the short-term i...
Source: TIME: Health - April 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized healthytime public health Source Type: news

10 Foods Filled With Probiotics
The following story is excerpted from TIME’s special edition, 100 Most Healing Foods, which is available in stores, at the Meredith Shop and at Amazon. One of the most crucial parts of our body when it comes to health is our microbiome—the trillions of bacteria that live in our gut. Scientists are learning that the bacterial communities we live with are linked to everything from body weight to asthma to acne. Having the right balance of bugs may keep us well in the long term. Some bacteria in the gut are good for our health, while other strains raise our risk for disease. We shape our microbiome makeup thr...
Source: TIME: Health - April 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime Source Type: news

The CDC Is Investigating an E. Coli Outbreak Across 7 States
Health officials are investigating the cause of a multistate E. coli outbreak that has infected people across the country. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, along with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service and multiple states, are looking into what caused the outbreak after 17 people reported E. coli infections in seven states. According to the CDC, reports of illness from E. coli began on dates ranging from March 22 to March 31. New Jersey reported six cases of E. coli, Idaho reported four, Connecticut and Pennsylvania reported tw...
Source: TIME: Health - April 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mahita Gajanan Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

How Do You Know if Protein is ‘Complete’ or ‘Incomplete’?
This article originally appeared on Health.com (Source: TIME: Health)
Source: TIME: Health - April 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Cynthia Sass / Health.com Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Brace Yourselves: Spring Allergy Season Is Coming. Here ’s What to Expect and How to Handle It
A swath of the Northeast and mid-Atlantic, which had been continuously pummeled by winter storms — even in April — will be graced with warm weather later this week. After a seemingly interminable winter, its’s a chance to dig out lighter clothing and head outside into the sun. But, if you’re one of the roughly 7% of U.S. adults with seasonal allergies, you may want to stay inside a little longer. With the change in seasons comes spring allergies (followed by summer allergies). Here’s what you need to know about the upcoming allergy forecast. Is it going to be a bad allergy season this year? P...
Source: TIME: Health - April 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sarah Gray Tags: Uncategorized allergies healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Fake Marijuana Likely Laced With Rat Poison Has Killed 3 People and Sickened More Than 100
Fake marijuana likely contaminated with rat poison has killed three people in Illinois and caused severe bleeding in more than 100 others, including a few in four other states. The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has alerted doctors nationwide that patients with severe, unexplained bleeding may be additional cases. The CDC is helping Illinois authorities investigate the outbreak in that state, which began in early March. Illinois reported seven more cases on Tuesday, bringing the nationwide total to at least 116. Several patients and samples of so-called synthetic marijuana from Illinois have tested posi...
Source: TIME: Health - April 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lindsey Tanner / AP Tags: Uncategorized Marijuana onetime Source Type: news

5 Easy Ways to Spring Clean Your Health
No matter how good your intentions, it can be difficult to stay healthy during winter: the season of comfort food, cozy sweaters and Netflix marathons. But with spring finally here, you’re likely ready to shed your cold-weather cocoon and return to the healthy habits of seasons past. Here are the five things to do to spring clean your health and jumpstart your warmer weather routines, according to experts. Prioritize good sleep. “It’s the most important biorhythm, but too often ignored. For the average adult, the aim is eight to nine hours of sleep a night. Your bedroom needs to be as quiet and dark as po...
Source: TIME: Health - April 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime Wellness Source Type: news

You Asked: What Is Inflammation, And Why Should I Care About It?
Your body can heal itself, which is pretty miraculous when you sit back and think about it. If you suffer a cut or infection—or if a disease, allergen or virus finds its way into you—your immune system reacts by sending specialized white blood cells to the affected area. These white blood cells can repair damage, stop the spread of infection or illness and in some cases eradicate the intruder. This whole response is called inflammation. “Inflammation is an activation of cells and cell-derived components that have the job of fighting invasions, and in some cases just sponging up or clearing out damaged cel...
Source: TIME: Health - April 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized healthytime medicine Source Type: news

‘It Can Be Incredibly Isolating.’ Mariah Carey Opens Up About Her Bipolar II Disorder
Pop star Mariah Carey revealed her “struggles” with bipolar II disorder, after almost two decades of silence. “I’m just in a really good place right now, where I’m comfortable discussing my struggles with bipolar II disorder,” the singer told People. “I’m hopeful we can get to a place where the stigma is lifted from people going through anything alone. It can be incredibly isolating. It does not have to define you and I refuse to allow it to define me or control me.” Bipolar II is a mental health condition characterized by extreme mood swings that vacillate between emot...
Source: TIME: Health - April 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized mental health onetime Source Type: news

The Key to Longevity for the World ’s Oldest Man Alive? Sumo Wrestling and Hot Springs
(TOKYO) — Masazo Nonaka has enjoyed soaking in northern Japan’s hot springs for many years — probably longer than most people. The supercentenarian, whose family has run a hot springs inn for four generations, was certified Tuesday as the world’s oldest living man, at age 112 years, 259 days. Nonaka received the certificate from Guinness World Records in a ceremony at his home in Ashoro, on Japan’s northern main island of Hokkaido, and celebrated with a big cake decorated with berries. Born on July 25, 1905, Nonaka grew up in a large family and succeeded his parents running the inn. The 105-ye...
Source: TIME: Health - April 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized Japan onetime Source Type: news

The Key to Longevity for the World ’s Oldest Person Alive? Sumo Wrestling and Hot Springs
(TOKYO) — Masazo Nonaka has enjoyed soaking in northern Japan’s hot springs for many years — probably longer than most people. The supercentenarian, whose family has run a hot springs inn for four generations, was certified Tuesday as the world’s oldest living man, at age 112 years, 259 days. Nonaka received the certificate from Guinness World Records in a ceremony at his home in Ashoro, on Japan’s northern main island of Hokkaido, and celebrated with a big cake decorated with berries. Born on July 25, 1905, Nonaka grew up in a large family and succeeded his parents running the inn. The 105-ye...
Source: TIME: Health - April 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized Japan onetime Source Type: news

6 ‘Healthy’ Snacks a Nutritionist Will Immediately Cut From Your Diet
This article originally appeared on Health.com (Source: TIME: Health)
Source: TIME: Health - April 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Cynthia Sass / Health.com Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news

A Man Got ‘Thunderclap Headaches’ After Eating the World’s Hottest Pepper
This article originally appeared on Health.com (Source: TIME: Health)
Source: TIME: Health - April 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda Macmillan / Health.com Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Should You Diagnose Yourself Online? Here ’s What Doctors Think
Online symptom checkers are the digital version of the DIY doctor. Plug in what’s ailing you — headache, stomach pains, weird skin rash — and you get a list of what’s (likely) causing the problem. The key word is ‘likely.’ Depending on which version you use, that list could be spot on, or it could lead you astray — luring you into a false sense of reassurance that nothing is wrong, or sending you into a spiral of anxiety about a serious, and possibly even fatal, condition. None of that is new for web-based data searches. But because health information could literally mean the diffe...
Source: TIME: Health - April 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized healthytime medicine onetime Source Type: news

Strawberries Top the “Dirty Dozen” List of Fruits and Vegetables With the Most Pesticides
In the latest report about pesticide residues, the Environmental Working Group says that 70% of conventionally grown fruits and vegetables contain up to 230 different pesticides or their breakdown products. The analysis, based on produce samples tested by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, found that strawberries and spinach contained the highest amounts of pesticide residues. One sample of strawberries, for example, tested positive for 20 different pesticides, and spinach contained nearly twice the pesticide residue by weight than any other fruit or vegetable. The two types of produce topped the EWG ranking of the 12 fr...
Source: TIME: Health - April 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime Source Type: news

Taking Antidepressants During Pregnancy May Lead to Fetal Brain Changes
There’s a growing and confusing group of studies looking at the effect of anti-depressants during pregnancy. Some research suggests that the drugs are linked to an increased risk of miscarriage, while other studies focus on the implications for the developing baby (including possible birth defects and an increased risk of autism), while other studies questioned such associations. So it’s not surprising that doctors and expectant moms struggle with weighing the benefits of treating the mother’s depression with an incomplete understanding of the risks involved. In the latest study to address the subject, re...
Source: TIME: Health - April 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Antidepressants Brain Reproductive Health ssris Source Type: news

Exercise Could Lower Your Chances of Getting Heart Disease Even if You ’re Genetically at Risk
About one in four deaths in the United States are due to heart disease. But a new study suggests that even if you have a genetic risk for heart disease, there’s a simple way to combat it: Exercise. In the study, researchers looked at data from nearly 500,000 people from England, Scotland and Wales who were participating in a trial called the U.K. Biobank Study. At the start of the trial, the men and women allowed researchers to assess their genetic predispositions for heart disease. They also self-reported their exercise, wore accelerometers to subjectively measure their daily physical activity, wore hand dynamometer...
Source: TIME: Health - April 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized Exercise family history of heart disease genetic risk for heart disease onetime Source Type: news

The Surgeon General Says More People Should Carry Naloxone, the Opioid Antidote. Here ’s Where to Get It and How Much It Costs
The U.S. Surgeon General, Dr. Jerome Adams, issued a public health advisory on Thursday urging more Americans to carry and learn to use the opioid overdose-reversing drug naloxone. Naloxone, which is often referred to by the brand name Narcan, can be lifesaving for people overdosing on opioids. As the nation’s opioid crisis has increased in recent years, first responders, emergency medical technicians and police officers have used naloxone to help revive people who are suspected of overdosing. Adams said Thursday that community members, family and friends of people using opioids, and individuals using the drugs thems...
Source: TIME: Health - April 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Abigail Abrams Tags: Uncategorized Naloxone Narcan onetime Opioid opioids Source Type: news

The Surgeon General Says More People Should Carry Naloxone, the Opioid Antidote. Here ’s How Where to Get It and How Much It Costs
The U.S. Surgeon General, Dr. Jerome Adams, issued a public health advisory on Thursday urging more Americans to carry and learn to use the opioid overdose-reversing drug naloxone. Naloxone, which is often referred to by the brand name Narcan, can be lifesaving for people overdosing on opioids. As the nation’s opioid crisis has increased in recent years, first responders, emergency medical technicians and police officers have used naloxone to help revive people who are suspected of overdosing. Adams said Thursday that community members, family and friends of people using opioids, and individuals using the drugs thems...
Source: TIME: Health - April 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Abigail Abrams Tags: Uncategorized Naloxone Narcan onetime Opioid opioids Source Type: news

Weekend Recipe: A Stress-Busting Smoothie
I designed this smoothie for myself due to my busy work schedule, and hectic work environment. My immune system was low and my cortisol levels were high, so I needed to pay more attention to my heatlth and get my own wellbeing back on track. This smoothie is my ultimate healthy breakfast. It provides sustained energy, supports my immune system, my digestive system and is rich in protein and antioxidants. It takes just one minute to make and any leftovers can be taken to work and enjoyed as a snack or light meal the same day. Adding protein in my smoothies helps to keep me full all morning and it also aids my concentration ...
Source: TIME: Health - April 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Teresa Cutter — The Healthy Chef Tags: Uncategorized Cooking diet Food healthytime Recipes weekend recipe Source Type: news

This Study Could Explain Why Our Brains Perform Worse As We Age
For a long time researchers thought the brain did not make new cells. That meant that as the existing cells died with age, nerve connections were lost and everything from memory to reasoning and language skills started to decline. Then scientists learned that the brain actually did make new nerve cells, specifically in areas associated with memory. But why do cognitive functions still decline over time? That’s what researchers led by Maura Boldrini, a research scientist in the department of psychiatry at Columbia University, and her colleagues wanted to find out. In a study published in Cell Stem Cell, Boldrini and h...
Source: TIME: Health - April 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Brain onetime Source Type: news

Easy Ways to Actually Improve Your Posture
You’ve probably heard about “tech neck”—the head-drooped, shoulders-forward pose many of us strike while crouched at a computer or peering into our phones. The more time a person spends in this position, the more the body’s muscles and ligaments embrace it as normal. The result is poor posture, which may have repercussions far beyond appearances. “We live in a world now where slouching is highly promoted because we’re sitting in chairs and our body is in a collapsed position,” says Erik Peper, a professor in the department of health education at San Francisco State University...
Source: TIME: Health - April 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Exercise/Fitness healthytime Source Type: news

FDA Orders Mandatory Recall of Kratom-Based Herbal Supplements Over Salmonella Outbreak
(WASHINGTON) — A Las Vegas company was ordered to pull its herbal supplements off the market because some of its products tested positive for salmonella, part of a nationwide outbreak linked to the ingredient kratom. The Food and Drug Administration said Tuesday that it took the rare step of ordering the recall because Triangle Pharmanaturals refused to cooperate with U.S. regulators. Companies typically comply with government requests and voluntarily recall tainted products. Calls and an email to the company were not immediately returned Tuesday morning. “This action is based on the imminent health risk posed ...
Source: TIME: Health - April 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Matthew Perrone / AP Tags: Uncategorized APH FDA healthytime onetime Source Type: news