Fossil Fuels, Climate Change and India ’s COVID-19 Crisis
A version of this story first appeared in the Climate is Everything newsletter. If you’d like sign up to receive this free once-a-week email, click here. The surge of COVID-19 cases and the humanitarian crisis now unfolding in India has shocked the world and led to a search for an explanation of how the situation got so bad so fast. Scientists are investigating several factors including new variants and public health officials have pointed to underinvestment in the country’s health system. Undoubtedly, the causes are varied, and as I watched the numbers surge, I began to wonder whether it’s worth conside...
Source: TIME: Health - May 6, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized climate change COVID-19 Source Type: news

Moderna Reports That Booster Doses of Its COVID-19 Vaccine Appear to Be Effective Against Virus Variants
In a press release on May 5, Moderna reported the first results of any vaccine maker from studies on booster doses of COVID-19 vaccines, which some experts believe might be necessary in a year or so to keep COVID-19 under control. Based on current research, people vaccinated with the existing, authorized shot from Moderna appear to have a diminished response to the variant viruses—although it’s still sufficient to protect against serious COVID-19 illness. Still, public health experts are concerned that the variant viruses could break through that vaccine protection and start causing more infections. The company...
Source: TIME: Health - May 5, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

From Free Beer to $100 Payments, States Are Incentivizing COVID-19 Vaccination. Will It Work?
The internet had a field day when Krispy Kreme in March offered free donuts to anyone who could prove they’d been vaccinated against COVID-19. But only a few weeks later, as vaccine supply begins to outpace demand in many places and daily vaccination rates tumble across the U.S., states, cities and counties are following the donut chain’s lead. West Virginia is offering $100 savings bonds to 16- to 35-year-olds who get vaccinated. Maryland will pay fully vaccinated state employees $100. Breweries participating in New Jersey’s “Shot and a Beer” program are giving out free drinks to legal adults...
Source: TIME: Health - May 5, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

The U.S. Birth Rate Dropped Last Year, But Don ’t Blame It All on the Pandemic
About 142,000 fewer babies were born in the U.S. in 2020 than in 2019, according to provisional figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released May 5. But unlike most health news pertaining to last year, the pandemic was not the primary cause for the decline. In total, there were 3.6 million births in 2020, a 4% drop from 2019. The tally is on par with the number of births in 1980. Additionally, the general fertility rate, which is a better metric to show national birth trends over time, also dropped 4% last year to 55.8 births per 1,000 women ages 15 to 44. That rate set a record low for the country,...
Source: TIME: Health - May 5, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Emily Barone Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

The Most Important Thing Rich Countries Can Do to Help India Fight COVID-19
The Biden Administration is debating whether COVID-19 vaccine patents should be temporarily waived, given the devastating humanitarian crisis unfolding in India from the virus. There are two key factors that should drive the Biden team to agree to do so: first, there is strong precedent on waiving patents in the context of public health emergencies; second, the real-world effectiveness of most COVID-19 vaccines against symptomatic disease and transmission can temper the disaster. The Biden Administration will be making its decision on lifting some patent restrictions as early as May 5. India faces a catastrophe, with ove...
Source: TIME: Health - May 5, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dr. Monica Gandhi Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 India Source Type: news

Why Men Are Falling Behind in COVID-19 Vaccination
In the United States, COVID-19 has been more likely to kill men than women: about 13 men have died of the disease for every 10 women, according to data collected by The Sex, Gender and Covid-19 Project at University College London. Fortunately, there’s one clear way to reduce the disparity: the three vaccines authorized for use in the U.S. have all been shown to reduce patients’ risk of dying of or being hospitalized with COVID-19 to nearly zero. However, many men in the U.S. aren’t racing to get vaccinated. As of May 3, about 38.5% of the male population has been vaccinated, compared to 43.3% of the fema...
Source: TIME: Health - May 4, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

How Trees Mother Their Seedlings and What We Can Learn About Connection From Forests
Well hello! I’m so glad you’re here. A version of this article also appeared in the It’s Not Just You newsletter. Sign up here to receive a new edition every Sunday. Forest ecologist Suzanne Simard studies what she calls “mother trees.” They are tall old-growth trees with vast root systems connected to hundreds of other trees via a network of fungi that allows them to share resources and information. Mother trees are the source of a forest’s resilience and renewal in the face of modern stressors, like climate change. This breakthrough research revealed stunningly complex communication...
Source: TIME: Health - May 2, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Susanna Schrobsdorff Tags: Uncategorized Evergreen It's Not Just You Source Type: news

America ’s Single, Fully-Vaccinated Seniors Are Looking for Love Again
A few Saturdays ago, a charming teacher asked Katherine Palmer, 64, on a date at a local tavern. After a year of staying six feet apart from others, meeting up outside and wearing face masks, spending time with someone in person made her nervous at first. However, as she she started to relax into the date, she began to realize something else: they were hitting it off. Now that she’s fully vaccinated, she says, she’s ready to put her worries aside and put herself out there. Palmer says the pandemic made her recognize that, when it comes to finding love again, there’s no time to waste. “When your husb...
Source: TIME: Health - April 30, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Pfizer-BioNTech Will Start to Ship Smaller Packs of Its COVID-19 Vaccine, In An Effort to Reach More People
Now that every American adult is eligible to get vaccinated, vaccine makers are shifting their priorities to meet the changing needs of people will need to be vaccinated in coming months. On April 29, Pfizer-BioNTech announced that it will begin shipping smaller packages of its COVID-19 by the end of May. Currently, the companies’ vaccine comes in packs of 195 vials, each of which contains about six doses of vaccine, for a total of around 1,100 doses. That size is useful for the mass vaccination centers that have been the focus of the U.S. vaccination program so far, with their goal of immunizing hundreds or even tho...
Source: TIME: Health - April 30, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Moderna Is Testing a New Version of Its COVID-19 Vaccine That Wouldn ’t Require Ultra-Cold Storage
As safety concerns over COVID-19 vaccines from AstraZeneca and Johnson&Johnson–Janssen have led to disruptions in the inoculation efforts of numerous countries relying on those shots, companies like Moderna are attempting to fill the resulting gaps. The Massachusetts-based biotech company announced on April 29 that it is investing billions to boost manufacturing facilities in Switzerland, Spain and the U.S., building enough capacity to produce up to 3 billion doses of its mRNA-based vaccine through 2022. The company’s vaccine technology differs from that of AstraZeneca and J&J, which both use an adenovi...
Source: TIME: Health - April 29, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

How the Closure of In-School Learning Damaged U.S. Children ’s Mental Health During the Pandemic
Nobody ever believed the pandemic would go easy on children. The virus might target them less directly than it targets older people, but other challenges—the loss of school, the loss of play, the loss of time with friends—would exact their own emotional toll. A study published April 29 in JAMA Network Open sheds light on how serious that harm has been. The work, led by psychologist Tali Raviv at Northwestern University, involved a survey of more than 32,000 caregivers looking after children from kindergarten to grade 12 in the Chicago public school system. The definition of “caregiver” was broad, in...
Source: TIME: Health - April 29, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

How the FDA ’s Menthol Cigarette Ban Fits Into a New Era of U.S. Tobacco Regulation
It’s easy to forget that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) only gained the ability to regulate tobacco products in 2009, given how much it has done in the following decade-plus. In recent years, the FDA has enacted a series of regulations that have significantly shaped the ways in which Americans buy and consume nicotine. In the last two years alone, the FDA has banned the sale of many flavored e-cigarette products and, following legislation issued by the Trump Administration in late 2019, began enforcing a new federal minimum age for tobacco sales, up to 21 from 18. A policy originally proposed in 2017 by ...
Source: TIME: Health - April 29, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized News Source Type: news

We Need More Data in the Fight Against Cancer. Here ’s a Plan to Help Us Get There
For the first time in over a year, we are starting to see a light at the end of the tunnel from the devastation caused by COVID-19. While much work remains to end and avoid a resurgence of the pandemic, public and private investments in scientific research will get us to a new normal. The speed to develop, test and manufacture COVID-19 vaccines has shown how science and technology, supported by leadership from governments and the private sector, have the ability to save lives. For example, the CDC’s V-safe program, which recorded side effects, led to the collection of data from tens of millions of people after vaccin...
Source: TIME: Health - April 29, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dr. David B. Agus, Dr. Elizabeth M. Jaffee, and Dr. Chi Van Dang Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

India ’s COVID-19 Crisis Is Spiraling Out of Control. It Didn’t Have to Be This Way
Dusk is falling in the Indian capital, and the acrid smell of burning bodies fills the air. It’s the evening of April 26, and at a tiny crematorium in a Delhi suburb, seven funeral pyres are still burning. “I have lived here all my life and pass through this area twice a day,” says local resident Gaurav Singh. “I have never seen so many bodies burning together.” Scenes of mass death are now unavoidable in what’s often called the world’s largest democracy. Social media is filled with images of body bags and urgent requests for medical aid. Indians gasping for breath are being turned...
Source: TIME: Health - April 29, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Naina Bajekal Tags: Uncategorized Cover Story COVID-19 feature India Londontime Magazine Source Type: news

Why the COVID-19 Variants Spreading in India Are a Global Concern
As the numbers of COVID-19 cases and deaths in India continue to mount, public health officials are carefully watching yet another looming threat: the appearance of mutations that could be making the virus circulating there more infectious or more capable of causing severe disease. Scientists believe that the variants of SARS-CoV-2 responsible for this second wave of cases in India already include at least two mutations that make them more dangerous. These mutations are already familiar to COVID-19 experts. One is found in a variant first identified in South Africa, while the other is part of a variant believed to have eme...
Source: TIME: Health - April 28, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

CDC Says Vaccinated Americans (Mostly) Don ’t Need to Wear Masks Outside
(NEW YORK) — The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention eased its guidelines Tuesday on the wearing of masks outdoors, saying fully vaccinated Americans don’t need to cover their faces anymore unless they are in a big crowd of strangers. And those who are unvaccinated can go outside without masks in some situations, too. The new guidance represents another carefully calibrated step on the road back to normal from the coronavirus outbreak that has killed over 570,000 people in U.S. For most of the past year, the CDC had been advising Americans to wear masks outdoors if they are within 6 feet of one another. ...
Source: TIME: Health - April 28, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mike Stobbe / AP Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 overnight wire Source Type: news

When and How You Can Test Yourself for COVID-19 At Home
When history looks back on the COVID-19 pandemic, 2020 will likely emerge as the year of testing, while 2021 (and likely 2022) will be the year of vaccinations. But that doesn’t mean testing no longer matters. In fact, testing will become more critical than ever as schools, gyms, workplaces, restaurants and shops reopen, and sports events and concerts rev up again. Given that reality, the recent availability of at-home, DIY tests is welcome news. As of last week, Abbott’s BinaxNOW COVID-19 test—which doctors and hospitals have already been using to screen people—started to become available at retail...
Source: TIME: Health - April 27, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

U.S. to Share 60 Million Doses of AstraZeneca Vaccines Amid Global COVID-19 Surge
The U.S. announced Monday it would share its entire supply of AstraZeneca’s Covid-19 vaccine with other countries and readied an aid package for India, as President Joe Biden pivots to ramp up U.S. pandemic assistance to the rest of the world. The decision would make as many as 60 million vaccine doses available for export in coming months, if they clear a federal safety review. The plan represents a shift for Biden, who has hesitated to give vaccine doses and materials to other countries while focusing on ensuring Americans are vaccinated first. “Given the strong portfolio of vaccines that the United States ha...
Source: TIME: Health - April 27, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jordan Fabian and Josh Wingrove / Bloomberg Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 overnight wire Source Type: news

How Countries Around the World Are Helping India Fight COVID-19 —and How You Can Too
India is in the midst of a humanitarian crisis. The country recorded 352,991 new cases of COVID-19 on Monday, breaking the record once again for the most cases recorded in a single day anywhere in the world since the beginning of the pandemic. Hospital ICUs are overcrowded. There are shortages of oxygen for some patients with the most severe illness, of personal protective equipment (PPE) for those treating them, and of tests to detect the true extent of the epidemic. Read More: ‘This Is Hell.’ Prime Minister Modi’s Failure to Lead Is Deepening India’s COVID-19 Crisis Journalists stationed at crema...
Source: TIME: Health - April 27, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Billy Perrigo Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Explainer India Londontime Source Type: news

As the U.S. Moves Toward Post-Pandemic Life, COVID-19 Is Still Devastating the World —Especially India
The pandemic won’t end for anyone until it ends for everyone. That sentiment has been repeated so many times, by so many people, it’s easy to forget it’s not just a cliche—particularly if you live in one of the wealthy countries, like the U.S. and Israel, that has made significant moves toward what feels like an end to the COVID-19 era. Israel, for example, has fully vaccinated more than half of its population and about 90% of its adults 50 and older are now immune to the virus—enough that the country is “busting loose” and “partying like it’s 2019,” as the Washin...
Source: TIME: Health - April 26, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Watch: Justine Bateman on the Reaction to Her Book and Why Fear of Aging Is Worse Than Looking Older
Well hello! A version of this article also appeared in the It’s Not Just You newsletter. Sign up here to receive a new edition every Sunday for free. Check out my video interview with Justine Bateman above, or read excerpts below. Two weeks ago, I wrote about actor and director Justine Bateman’s new book, FACE: One Square Foot of Skin, in which she asks why women still spend so much time in a frustrating quest to ‘fix’ their faces in response to a culture steeped in anti-aging messaging. The response was overwhelming. Hundreds of thousands of you read the piece on TIME.com, and many commented on T...
Source: TIME: Health - April 25, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Susanna Schrobsdorff Tags: Uncategorized It's Not Just You Source Type: news

Use of the J & J Vaccine for COVID-19 Can Resume, Says CDC Review Panel
In a 10 to 4 vote, a committee of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) on April 23 decided to lift the temporary hold on using the COVID-19 vaccine made by Johnson & Johnson/Janssen. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and CDC had temporarily halted vaccination with the J&J shot on April 13 after six reports of unusual blood clots in the brain occurred among nearly 7 million people vaccinated with the shot in the U.S. The panel of 15 independent experts was under some pressure to make a decision about the safety of the vaccine, which is the only single-shot vaccine for COVID-19 currently authorized in...
Source: TIME: Health - April 23, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

People Are Reporting Unexpected Side Effects After COVID-19 Vaccination —But That’s Actually Normal
Abigail, a 29-year-old from New York City who asked to use a pseudonym to preserve her privacy, knew to expect some side effects after she got her second Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine in February. The fever, body aches and fatigue she felt were nothing surprising. But when she began experiencing heavy, “stupidly painful, debilitating” menstrual periods, she felt blindsided. “I had not heard a single person talking about it,” she says. While scientists have not confirmed that COVID-19 vaccines can cause menstrual changes like Abigail’s, she feels confident the shot was her trigger, since she...
Source: TIME: Health - April 22, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Survey: ‘Faith-Based Approaches’ Could Help Convince Millions of Americans to Get COVID-19 Vaccines
A new survey released by the Public Religion Research Institute (PRRI) and the Interfaith Youth Core found that COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy remains prevalent in some American communities—but a faith-based approach could prove crucial in the fight to combat it. The survey sampled over 5,600 adults across the U.S. between March 8 and 30. It found that among Americans who attend some type of religious service at least a few times a year, 44% of people “hesitant” about COVID-19 vaccines said that a faith-based approach—or approaches—could impact their eventual decision to get vaccinated, and 14% of...
Source: TIME: Health - April 22, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Madeleine Carlisle Tags: Uncategorized Brief COVID-19 News Source Type: news

The World ’s Leading Medical Journals Don’t Write About Racism. That’s a Problem
Over the past year, rising deaths from COVID-19, police brutality, anti-Asian hate crimes, and the inequitable damage of climate breakdown, have made the manifold harms of racism easier for everyone to see. Harms that were once shielded from public consumption by segregation or shrouded from public scrutiny by stories depicting the U.S. as a nation of fairness and freedoms, are now the center of an ongoing national confrontation with racism and its impacts on health, safety, and justice. Yet amid growing calls for anti-racism and health equity, troubling reports have emerged highlighting the ways the U.S. health care indus...
Source: TIME: Health - April 21, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rhea Boyd, Nancy Krieger, Fernando De Maio, and Aletha Maybank Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

What Will Office Life Be Like After the Pandemic? This Australian Fintech Company May Have the Answer
Katherine McConnell wanted to make sure that she and her employees didn’t fall back into their old habits when they returned to the office in Sydney, Australia—where the coronavirus situation has stabilized—after several months of working from home. So McConnell, the founder and CEO of financial technology company Brighte, implemented a flexible working policy, allowing employees to continue to work from home even after the office reopened. Still, she found herself rushing between meetings and spending increasingly long hours in the office—and missing things like eating lunch with her family. So she...
Source: TIME: Health - April 21, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amy Gunia Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Will Trust in the Johnson & Johnson Vaccine Recover? Europe ’s AstraZeneca Experience Suggests Not
When the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended stopping use of the Johnson & Johnson/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine on April 13, they declared the action a “pause”—a brief intermission as the government investigates a possible link between the vaccine and blood clots in a small number of recipients. The agencies may lift that recommendation as soon as this week, and vaccination with the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna shots has continued. However temporary it might be, a recent YouGov/Economist survey suggests that the J&J pause has already hurt U.S. pu...
Source: TIME: Health - April 20, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Exclusive: Inside the Facilities Making the World ’s Most Prevalent COVID-19 Vaccine
If you’ve been vaccinated for COVID-19, chances are pretty high that you’re benefiting from a product made by BioNTech. The German biotech company, co-founded by a husband-and-wife team of scientists, developed the vaccine that became not only the first to earn authorization in the U.S. for COVID-19 in December but also the first ever based on a new technology involving the genetic material mRNA. In interviews in December and March, co-founders Ugur Sahin and Ozlem Tureci spoke about their whirlwind year and their partnership with U.S. pharmaceutical company Pfizer to test and manufacture the vaccine. Over thre...
Source: TIME: Health - April 19, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park and Aryn Baker/Marburg, Germany Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Exclusive feature longform Magazine photography Source Type: news

I ’m Awash In Pandemic-Fueled Gratitude and Taking a Solitary Cross-Country Road Trip
Well hello! A version of this article also appeared in the It’s Not Just You newsletter. Sign up here to receive a new edition every Sunday for free. And write to me at Susanna@Time.com A Solitary Road Trip and Some Hope For Grace Next week I’m going to pack up my little snoring dog and drive from Brooklyn to Los Angeles all by my vaccinated self. It’s somewhat insane, especially if you know how slowly I drive. But like lots of things we’ve been waiting months to do, the idea of seeing any vista beyond my neighborhood is ridiculously thrilling. I’m awash in pandemic-fueled gratitude. There ar...
Source: TIME: Health - April 18, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Susanna Schrobsdorff Tags: Uncategorized It's Not Just You Source Type: news

Will You Need a Booster Shot of the COVID-19 Vaccine?
When the first COVID-19 vaccines from Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna were authorized by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in December 2020, most people breathed a sigh of relief since both shots were shown to be between 94% and 95% effective in protecting from COVID-19 symptoms. But public health experts warned that nobody really knew how long the protection would last, since the longest clinical trials in people only went to a few months. Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and the chief medical advisor to President Joe Biden, suggested that additional booster ...
Source: TIME: Health - April 16, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

As J & J ’s COVID-19 Vaccine Remains Shelved, Who Will Be Most Affected?
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommended on April 14 that states shelve doses of the Johnson & Johnson/Janssen vaccine for at least a week while regulators investigate the cases of six recipients who developed blood clots within two weeks of their inoculations. Even though the pause will be longer than some expected, the pace of the U.S. rollout is unlikely to slow significantly—so long as a wide percentage of the population remains willing to participate. In the five weeks since the Department of Health and Human Services first began allocating doses of the one-shot J&J vaccine a...
Source: TIME: Health - April 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Chris Wilson Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Scientists Report Creating the First Embryo With Human and Non-Human Primate Cells
In a ground-breaking experiment, researchers have successfully created the first human-monkey chimera. The work, published in the journal Cell, describes the the first embryo containing both human and monkey cells that was cultured for 20 days. Led by Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte, the study represents the culmination of decades of work in understanding early embryo development in non-human species, which Belmonte hopes will now apply to humans. But it is bound to raise serious ethical questions about the implications of combining human cells with those from a different species (even if it is a closely related one), and the...
Source: TIME: Health - April 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Pause on J & J Vaccination in U.S. Continues as CDC Committee Asks for More Data
After federal health agencies in the U.S. recommended a temporary halt on using the Johnson & Johnson-Janssen COVID-19 vaccine, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on April 14 convened a 13-member Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) to review the six reports of unusual blood clots occurring in people vaccinated with the shot. The ACIP sets policies for how any approved or, in the case of COVID-19, authorized, vaccines are to be used—when and how the shots should be given and to which age groups. After the meeting, the CDC said it would continue to recommend the pause. The committ...
Source: TIME: Health - April 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

My Family Wants to Visit This Summer. Is Travel Safe Yet?
Welcome to COVID Questions, TIME’s advice column. We’re trying to make living through the pandemic a little easier, with expert-backed answers to your toughest coronavirus-related dilemmas. While we can’t and don’t offer medical advice—those questions should go to your doctor—we hope this column will help you sort through this stressful and confusing time. Got a question? Write to us at covidquestions@time.com. Today, anonymous asks: My family from Florida wants to visit us this summer but have not been vaccinated. My husband and I are fully vaccinated. What should we tell them about vis...
Source: TIME: Health - April 14, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID Questions COVID-19 Source Type: news

FDA and CDC Recommend Pausing COVID-19 Vaccination With J & J-Janssen Shot While They Investigate Blood Clot Risks
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are recommending that vaccinations with the Johnson & Johnson/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine be temporarily halted while the agencies review reports of blood clots among vaccinated people. On April 13, the two government agencies issued a joint statement announcing a recommended pause as federal regulators review six cases of blood clots reported six to 13 days after the people received the single-dose vaccine. “Until that [review] process is complete, we are recommending a pause in the use of this vaccine out of an abundance of cautio...
Source: TIME: Health - April 13, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Two New Studies Show That the U.K. COVID-19 Virus Variant Is Not Linked to Severe Disease —But Questions Remain
In two studies published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases and in The Lancet Public Health, respectively, scientists provide comforting news about a new strain of the COVID-19 virus that emerged from the U.K. last December. It has since become the dominant virus in the region, accounting for nearly all of the new COVID-19 cases there—and has recently been implicated in spikes in parts of the U.S., as well as other parts of the world. The researchers report that the so-called B.1.1.7 variant of the virus is not linked to more severe disease or death, and that the virus isn’t causing different (or higher numbers ...
Source: TIME: Health - April 12, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Black Women Are Fighting to Be Recognized as Long COVID Patients
It took five years of chronic pain, nausea, fuzzy thoughts and a cruel mixture of fatigue and insomnia for Wilhelmina Jenkins to be diagnosed with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). But even after she received that diagnosis, in 1988, she faced her fair share of doubters—not because her symptoms didn’t meet the bar for diagnosis, but because she is Black. At that time, researchers mistakenly thought ME/CFS, a syndrome that sometimes follows a viral illness and leads to long-term pain, fatigue and other symptoms that can last decades, primarily affected upper-class white women. It was p...
Source: TIME: Health - April 12, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Two New Studies Point to How AstraZeneca ’s COVID-19 Vaccine Is Linked to Blood Clots
In two papers published in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), researchers in Europe provide the most detailed explanation yet for what is behind the clotting side effects reported among people getting vaccinated with the AstraZeneca COVID-19 shot. In both papers, researchers found that people getting the vaccine had higher levels of antibodies directed against a cluster of immune-related cells that the body might form in response to the vaccine. These clusters include platelets, which help blood to clot when you get cut or injured, and the antibodies stick to the platelet-complex and form dangerous clots that can ...
Source: TIME: Health - April 9, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

COVID-19 Patient Receives Lung Transplant From Living Donors
TOKYO — Doctors in Japan announced Thursday they have successfully performed the world’s first transplant of lung tissue from living donors to a patient with severe lung damage from COVID-19. The recipient, identified only as a woman from Japan’s western region of Kansai, is recovering after the nearly 11-hour operation on Wednesday, Kyoto University Hospital said in a statement. It said her husband and son, who donated parts of their lungs, are also in stable condition. The university said it was the world’s first transplant of lung tissue from living donors to a person with COVID-19 lung damage. T...
Source: TIME: Health - April 9, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: MARI YAMAGUCHI / AP Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 overnight wire Source Type: news

Exclusive: CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky Unveils Agency Initiative to Address Racism in Health
If the COVID-19 pandemic has taught us anything, it is that health is a commodity bestowed readily on some and denied to so many others. Within months of the COVID-19 virus reaching U.S. shores, it became clear that the disease hit certain groups harder, contributing to more severe illness and higher hospitalization and death rates among Black, Latinx and American Indian/Alaska Native communities, and those of lower socioeconomic status. The reason for that skewed impact doesn’t have so much to do with biology or genetics as it does a myriad of other factors, such as where people live, how clean the air they breathe ...
Source: TIME: Health - April 8, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Is the U.S. COVID-19 Vaccine Rollout Working? We ’re Not Sure Yet
After four months and 171 million doses of COVID-19 vaccines administered across the U.S., more than a few of us are eager to know: are the shots working? Thus far, available evidence can half-answer that question: The vaccines are working well for those who can get them. As soon as the rollout kicked off, a variety of researchers began conducting what might be considered an unofficial phase 4 clinical trial, monitoring early vaccine recipients among the general public. Several of their studies have found a significant reduction in both the rates of infection and severity of symptoms among vaccinated populations compared t...
Source: TIME: Health - April 8, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Chris Wilson Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

I Missed My Second COVID-19 Vaccine Appointment. What Happens Now?
Welcome to COVID Questions, TIME’s advice column. We’re trying to make living through the pandemic a little easier, with expert-backed answers to your toughest coronavirus-related dilemmas. While we can’t and don’t offer medical advice—those questions should go to your doctor—we hope this column will help you sort through this stressful and confusing time. Got a question? Write to us at covidquestions@time.com. Today, W.S. in Florida asks: I got my first Pfizer vaccine in January. Is it too late to get the second injection now, more than two months later? What should I do? The second dos...
Source: TIME: Health - April 7, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID Questions COVID-19 Source Type: news

At Least 43,000 Kids in the U.S. Have Lost a Parent to COVID-19, Study Finds
There’s been a collective quality to the dying the world has witnessed since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. The nearly 3 million global deaths that have been recorded so far have not been discrete events; rather, each one has radiated outward, leaving holes in families, neighborhoods, entire communities. There is perhaps no hole more gaping than the one left in the life of a child when a parent is taken too young—a loss that leads to traumatic grief, depression and, as research has shown, academic problems and even a higher risk of unintentional death or suicide. Now, a study published April 5 in JAMA ...
Source: TIME: Health - April 7, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

European Regulators Find Possible Link Between AstraZeneca COVID-19 Vaccine and Rare Clotting Disorder
(LONDON) — The European Union’s drug agency said Wednesday that it found a “possible link” between the AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine and a rare clotting disorder but recommended that vaccinations continue in adults, saying the benefits of the shot still outweigh risks. The European Medicines Agency described the clots as “very rare” side effects. It said most of the cases reported have occurred in women under 60 within two weeks of vaccination — but based on the currently available evidence, it was not able to identify specific risk factors. Experts reviewed several dozen cases t...
Source: TIME: Health - April 7, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: MARIA CHENG/AP Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Ageist Attacks Against President Biden Reinforce Outdated Stereotypes —and Hurt Younger People, Too
When President Joe Biden tripped on the stairs up to Air Force One on March 19, the incident immediately touched off a flurry of mockery. Fox News host Sean Hannity declared the President to be “frail.” “He didn’t know where the hell he was,” former President Donald Trump said in an interview with Lara Trump. Saturday Night Live, no stranger to easy jokes about aging Presidents, poked fun both at the fall and at a March 25 press conference when a reporter asked Biden if he planned to run for a second term—a question, quipped SNL’s Michael Che, which was “probably the nicest w...
Source: TIME: Health - April 7, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Inside Ibogaine, One of the Most Promising and Perilous Psychedelics for Addiction
Amber Capone had become afraid of her husband. The “laid-back, bigger than life and cooler than cool” man she’d married had become isolated, disconnected and despondent during his 13 years as a U.S. Navy SEAL. Typically, he was gone 300 days of the year, but when he was home, Amber and their two children walked on eggshells around him. “Everyone was just playing nice until he left again,” Amber says. In 2013, Marcus retired from the military. But life as a civilian only made his depression, anger, headaches, anxiety, alcoholism, impulsivity and violent dreams worse. Sometimes he’d get up...
Source: TIME: Health - April 5, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mandy Oaklander Tags: Uncategorized Drugs feature Magazine Mental Health Source Type: news

Before You Have That Bonfire of the Stretchy Pants, Consider Some Pandemic Wardrobe Habits You Should Keep
A version of this article also appeared in the It’s Not Just You newsletter. Sign up here to receive a new edition every Sunday. Well hello! I’m so glad you’re here. As always, you can send comments to me at: Susanna@Time.com. I walked out of my apartment last Sunday afternoon like a Pandemic Eve, leaving her quarantine garden, still blissfully unselfconscious about how I looked, which was ridiculous. There were the mud boots I’ve been wearing daily since November because they’re so easy, the frayed yoga pants, and a workout shirt that is the color of a traffic cone. But what really tied it a...
Source: TIME: Health - April 4, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Susanna Schrobsdorff Tags: Uncategorized Evergreen It's Not Just You Source Type: news

What I ’ll Cherish About That Embarrassing Work-From-Home Wardrobe
A version of this article also appeared in the It’s Not Just You newsletter. Sign up here to receive a new edition every Sunday. Well hello! I’m so glad you’re here. As always, you can send comments to me at: Susanna@Time.com. I walked out of my apartment last Sunday afternoon like a Pandemic Eve, leaving her quarantine garden, still blissfully unselfconscious about how I looked, which was ridiculous. There were the mud boots I’ve been wearing daily since November because they’re so easy, the frayed yoga pants, and a workout shirt that is the color of a traffic cone. But what really tied it a...
Source: TIME: Health - April 4, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Susanna Schrobsdorff Tags: Uncategorized Evergreen It's Not Just You Source Type: news

Fully Vaccinated People Can Travel With Low Risk of COVID-19, CDC Says
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) today announced the news many people have been waiting for: People fully vaccinated against COVID-19 can safely return to their vacations, family visits and business trips. Up until today, the CDC took a more cautious stance on travel, recommending that even fully vaccinated people—those who received their last vaccine dose at least two weeks prior—avoid non-essential trips. The agency loosened that policy today, saying fully vaccinated people can travel domestically without tests or post-travel quarantine periods, as long as they continue taking precaut...
Source: TIME: Health - April 2, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Should We Keep Wearing Masks Even After the Pandemic Ends?
Riding the New York City subway during cold and flu season used to test your stomach. The woman next to you was coughing. The guy behind her was sneezing. Somebody was always fishing for a tissue. That’s a distant memory now. The subway is far emptier, for one thing—and with the riders onboard almost universally wearing masks, the chorus of sniffles and coughs has been silenced. During the pandemic, the need for that policy is clear. But should the masks stay even after COVID-19 is gone? Before vaccines began rolling out to the general public, masks were among the only tools available for containing SARS-CoV-2,...
Source: TIME: Health - April 2, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news