The Global Mental Health Crisis Requires a Worldwide Investment, Advocates Say On TIME Davos Panel
Mental health issues affect billions of people across every corner of the globe, touching every community and every family, and mounting evidence shows the issue is worsening. To combat the issue, we need to urgently grow our investment in programs that expand access to care, mental health advocates said at a TIME lunch on Wednesday in Davos, Switzerland. “Invest in the system, invest in our rights,” said Elisha London, founder and CEO of United for Global Mental Health. She called for $1 billion in spending on mental health programs worldwide: “It has to happen now.” The event, held during the annu...
Source: TIME: Health - January 22, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Justin Worland / Davos, Switzerland Tags: Uncategorized DavosMentalHealth mental health Source Type: news

Scientists Confirm That Stress Can Indeed Turn Hair Grey
When Ya-Chieh Hsu, professor of stem cell and regenerative biology at Harvard University and the Harvard Stem Cell Institute, wanted to figure out exactly what makes hair turn grey, she started with an obvious, albeit anecdotal, culprit: stress. There are well-known historical examples of the connection between stress and hair greying—Marie Antoinette’s coif reportedly blanched after she was captured during the French Revolution—and studies have even linked stress in animals to greying hair. But for the first time, Hsu and her colleagues figured out the biological reason why stress saps the pigment out of...
Source: TIME: Health - January 22, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized grey hair Stress Source Type: news

The Wuhan Coronavirus Is Spreading Fast. Will Doctors Be Able to Find a Treatment Before the Outbreak Ends?
Cases of a novel pneumonia-like illness that originated in Wuhan, China in December have now been confirmed in South Korea, Thailand, Japan, Taiwan, Macau—and, as of Jan. 21, the U.S. The virus’ geographic reach, as well as its newly discovered ability to spread via person-to-person contact, has health officials worried about the prospect of globals spread. As health officials scramble to learn more about the virus and is origins, researchers are simultaneously turning to the question of how to develop a vaccine or therapy that could help contain transmission worldwide—a feat that experts say is technical...
Source: TIME: Health - January 22, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Infectious Disease Source Type: news

Social Media Helped Juul Dominate the Vaping Market. Now, Teens Are Using It to Help Each Other Quit
Juul Labs, the e-cigarette company so popular its name became a verb, wouldn’t be where it is without social media. In the company’s early years, a steady stream of posts from users and influencers helped turn Juul from a smoking alternative to a cultural phenomenon. So many Juul users—many of them teenagers—voluntarily posted about vaping that it hardly made a difference when the company in 2018 silenced its own accounts to help stem its popularity among underage users. Now, in the wake of a vaping-related lung disease outbreak that has sickened almost 2,700 and killed 60, teenagers and young adult...
Source: TIME: Health - January 21, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized public health vaping Source Type: news

Human-to-Human Transmission Confirmed in China Coronavirus
BEIJING — The head of a Chinese government expert team said Monday that human-to-human transmission has been confirmed in an outbreak of a new coronavirus. Team leader Zhong Nanshan, a respiratory expert, said two people in Guangdong province in southern China caught the disease from family members, state media said. The National Health Commission task force also found that some medical workers have tested positive for the virus, the English-language China Daily newspaper said. Human-to-human transmission could make the virus spread more quickly and widely. The outbreak is believed to have started from people who pic...
Source: TIME: Health - January 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized China onetime Source Type: news

17 More People Diagnosed With Deadly Viral Pneumonia in China
(BEIJING) — Seventeen more people in central China have been diagnosed with a new form of viral pneumonia that has killed two patients and placed other countries on alert as millions of Chinese travel for Lunar New Year holidays. In total, 62 cases of the novel coronavirus have been identified in the city of Wuhan, where the virus appears to have originated. The Wuhan Municipal Health Commission reported the new cases in a statement Sunday. Nineteen of those individuals have been discharged from the hospital, while two men in their 60s — one with severe preexisting conditions — have died from the illness....
Source: TIME: Health - January 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: YANAN WANG / AP Tags: Uncategorized China onetime Source Type: news

Shedding New Light On the Silent Crisis
From our partner Kaiser Permanente. There is a silent epidemic. Globally, in increasing numbers, young people are facing mental-health issues. Depression is a leading cause of illness among young people. Anxiety is on the rise. Suicide ranks third as a cause of death for 15- to 19-year-olds and is increasingly becoming a health equity issue: African-American girls in grades nine to 12 were 70% more likely to attempt suicide in 2017, as compared with non-Hispanic white girls of the same age. Unless we act, we will face the repercussions of this epidemic for years. Lives will be shortened, and generations will struggle. Our...
Source: TIME: Health - January 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Greg Adams Tags: Uncategorized Davos 2020 mental health Source Type: news

Fewer Americans Are Binge Drinking, But Those Who Are, Are Drinking More
American adults who binge drink are consuming an increasing number of alcoholic beverages per year when they binge, a new study from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says. The study, an analysis of data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System from 2011 to 2017, found that while overall rates of binge drinking decreased slightly, going from 18.9% to 18.0%, the average number of binge drinks consumed by adults who report binge drinking rose from 472 to 529, a 12% increase. The CDC defines “binge drinking” as consuming five or more drinks in two hours or less for men, and four ...
Source: TIME: Health - January 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mahita Gajanan Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news

How Ageism Negatively Affects Older People ’s Health
Bias against age is prevalent in many societies, embedded into societal institutions and expressed in individual perceptions and behaviors, and studies have shown that ageism can negatively affect older people’s health. As the aging population around the world continues to grow, these biases could add to already skyrocketing health care costs, say experts. To determine how much ageism can influence older people’s health, researchers at Yale University analyzed 422 studies involving ageism in 45 countries from 1970 to 2017. The studies included data from seven million older people and specifically addressed age ...
Source: TIME: Health - January 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Aging health Source Type: news

Rep. Ayanna Pressley Reveals Her Hair Loss as She Shares Her ‘Very Personal’ Alopecia Diagnosis
In a moving interview with The Root, Massachusetts Rep. Ayanna Pressley opened up about living with alopecia and revealed that she has gone completely bald. Pressley, 45, said she decided to go public about her hair loss because she felt she owed an explanation to all the women of color who have reached out to her about what had become known as her signature hairstyle: Senegalese twists. She added that she decided to open up about going bald “to be freed from the secret, and the shame that that secret carries with it.” “I’m not here just to occupy space,” she also said. “I’m here t...
Source: TIME: Health - January 16, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Madeleine Carlisle Tags: Uncategorized democrats onetime Source Type: news

This Year ’s Flu Season Got Off to a Strange Start. What Does That Mean for the Months Ahead?
Flu season is always unpredictable. Different viral strains circulate each year, which makes forecasting the disease’s spread—and formulating the annual flu vaccine—an educated guessing game. Even so, the 2019-2020 flu season has been particularly unusual. Influenza B, the viral strain that usually circulates toward the end of flu season, instead emerged first this year, shifting usual transmission patterns. A vaccine mismatch and reduced immunity to influenza B may have contributed to the early and severe start of this flu season. What does that mean for the months ahead? TIME asked Lynnette Brammer, an ...
Source: TIME: Health - January 16, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Infectious Disease Source Type: news

Health Officials Say Romaine Lettuce is Safe to Eat Again as Nationwide E. Coli Outbreak has Ended
The US Centers for Disease Control and the US Food and Drug Administration have declared that the recent nationwide E. Coli outbreak, which contaminated romaine lettuce, ended as of Wednesday. Authorities traced the outbreak back to the Salinas Valley growing region in California. The FDA has lifted a consumer advisory to avoid romaine lettuce from Salinas “as the growing season for this region is over and there is no longer a need for consumers to avoid it.” Health officials had previously advised consumers, retailers and restaurants to throw out any romaine lettuce grown in the Salinas, Calif. region. People...
Source: TIME: Health - January 16, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sanya Mansoor Tags: Uncategorized onetime public health Source Type: news

When It Comes to Some Medical Treatment, Researchers Find Less Is More
Beyond its effects on the body, medical care can be a balm for the mind. Extensive treatment can feel like a promise that doctors have done everything possible. But that perceived security can come at a high price. As health costs soar, patients are emptying their pockets for care that may not make them healthier, research suggests. Last year, a 5,000-person trial showed that for patients with chronic but stable heart disease, surgical procedures such as stenting and bypass did not reduce the risk of heart attack or death more than lifestyle interventions and medication. Even patients with extensive damage did not, on aver...
Source: TIME: Health - January 16, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Surgery Source Type: news

Injuries and Deaths Could Rise with Climate Change in the U.S., a New Study Finds
An estimated 2,135 additional people could die every year in the United States as a result of climate change-related injuries like assaults, drownings and falls, if temperatures rise 2°C over current long-term averages, according to findings published in Nature Medicine earlier this week. While researchers have studied the intersection of health and climate change before, the focus has been on chronic and infectious diseases; in the latter category, malaria is considered an especially serious threat. Little research, however, has been done on the impact climate change can have on injuries which is the cause of 10% of d...
Source: TIME: Health - January 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mélissa Godin Tags: Uncategorized climate change Source Type: news

4-Year-Old Iowa Girl Blinded After Contracting the Flu
Jade DeLucia, a 4-year-old from Iowa, is back home with her family after being struck with a case of the flu that, after a lengthy hospital stay, has left her blind. Amanda Phillips, the girl’s mother, told reporters that Jade came down with a fever in mid-December, which she initially controlled with medication. “There wasn’t any sign that would’ve told me that something was seriously wrong with her,” Phillips told CNN. Phillips did not immediately respond to TIME’s request for comment. Jade had been vaccinated earlier in 2019, according to a post Phillips wrote on Facebook. But, she ad...
Source: TIME: Health - January 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jasmine Aguilera Tags: Uncategorized Iowa onetime public health Source Type: news

‘Normal’ Human Body Temperature Has Changed in the Last Century
Whether you have a stomachache, a wrist sprain or a chronic disease, one of the first things doctors and nurses will do at an appointment is take your temperature. A normal temperature means your body is humming along the way it should. A higher temperature means you have a fever, and shows your body could be fighting an infection. And since 1871, “normal” has meant 98.6°F (37°C). That number was determined by a German physician, based on millions of readings from 25,000 German patients, taken by sticking thermometers under their arms. When doctors in the U.S. and Europe repeated the experiment in local...
Source: TIME: Health - January 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized fever health inflammation Research Source Type: news

Sept. 11 Responders May Be at Heightened Risk of Developing Leukemia
After the Twin Towers fell on Sept. 11, 2001, the thousands of people involved in rescue-and-cleanup efforts were exposed to carcinogens and other toxins as they breathed in contaminated air and dug through industrial rubble. Studies completed since then have shown elevated rates of conditions including multiple myeloma, prostate cancer and thyroid cancer among 9/11 responders and those who worked near the site. A new study published Jan. 14 in the journal JNCI Cancer Spectrum adds another to that list: leukemia. “After about 12 years of follow-up, there was an increase in the rate of all cancers combined, and separa...
Source: TIME: Health - January 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Cancer Research Source Type: news

Thailand Confirms Traveler from China Hospitalized With New Form of Coronavirus, According to U.N. Officials
(BANGKOK) — A Chinese visitor to Thailand has been confirmed to be infected with a new strain of coronavirus that has been linked to a pneumonia outbreak in central China, health officials said Monday. The U.N.’s World Health Organization said Thai officials have reported that a traveler from the Chinese city of Wuhan has been hospitalized in Thailand with the virus. The outbreak of the virus has been traced to Wuhan, where it affected several dozen people who had been to a major meat and seafood market. Thai Public Health Minister Anutin Charnvirakul said it appears to be the first confirmed case of the virus ...
Source: TIME: Health - January 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized China onetime Thailand Source Type: news

3D Printing and the Murky Ethics of Replicating Human Bones
This article was originally published on Undark. Read the original article. (Source: TIME: Health)
Source: TIME: Health - January 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sarah Wild / Undark Tags: Uncategorized onetime Research syndication Source Type: news

15-Year-Old Texas Teen ’s Death Is Nation’s Youngest Vaping-Related Fatality in Current Outbreak
The death of a 15-year-old in Texas marks what the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is calling the youngest vaping-related fatality in the U.S. since the current outbreak began last year. Dallas County Health and Human Services officials reported the death of a teen “with a chronic underlying medical condition” who lived in Dallas County in a press release issued on New Year’s Eve and confirmed the teen’s age to TIME. The incident is Dallas County’s first death related to e-cigarette, or vaping, product-use associated lung injury, local officials said. “Reporting a ...
Source: TIME: Health - January 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sanya Mansoor Tags: Uncategorized onetime public health Texas Source Type: news

U.S. Drinking Deaths Double in 2 Decades With Faster Rate for Women: Study
Deaths from boozing and bingeing more than doubled in the past two decades, as alcohol consumption per person rose 8%, with sharp increases in the rate for women and the middle-aged. Men were three-quarters of the total but fatalities for women rose at a faster rate: 85% versus 39% for males, according to 1999-2017 research by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Total U.S. alcohol deaths reached 72,558 in 2017 — up from 35,914 in 1999 — with almost a third tied to liver disease, according to the study. Over 18 years, the total was almost 1 million. “The report is a wakeup call to the ...
Source: TIME: Health - January 11, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Steve Geimann / Bloomberg Tags: Uncategorized onetime public health Source Type: news

Forget What You Think You Know About Blue Light and Sleep
It’s become a virtually unchallenged piece of conventional wisdom that exposure to blue light—the type emitted by electronic device screens—is bad for sleep. That thinking has spurred a mini-industry of innovations meant to stop those effects, like warm-toned “night mode” settings on gadgets and glasses that claim to block blue light. But in December, a group of researchers at the University of Manchester in the U.K. published a paper in Current Biology challenging that notion. After exposing mice to lights that were different in hue but equal brightness and assessing their subsequent activity...
Source: TIME: Health - January 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized sleep Wellness Source Type: news

‘I’ve Been Battling and Overcoming.’ Justin Bieber Confirms Lyme Disease Diagnosis
(NEW YORK) — Justin Bieber says that he has been battling Lyme disease. In an Instagram post on Wednesday, the pop star wrote that “it’s been a rough couple years but (I’m) getting the right treatment that will help treat this so far incurable disease and I will be back and better than ever.” Lyme disease is transmitted by Ixodes ticks, also known as deer ticks. Lyme can cause flu-like conditions, neurological problems, joint paint and other symptoms. “While a lot of people kept saying justin Bieber looks like (expletive), on meth etc. they failed to realize I’ve been recently diag...
Source: TIME: Health - January 9, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized celebrity health Lyme disease onetime Source Type: news

Scientists Calculated How Much Longer You Can Live With a Healthy Lifestyle
Study after study reminds us that as challenging as it can be, sticking with healthy habits—eating right, exercising regularly, not smoking, maintaining a healthy weight, and controlling how much alcohol you drink—can help us to live longer. But tacking on extra years isn’t so appealing if some or most of them are riddled with heart disease, diabetes or cancer. In a 2018 study, an international group of researchers led by scientists at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health found that adopting five healthy habits could extend life expectancy by 14 years for women and by 12 years for men: eating a die...
Source: TIME: Health - January 9, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Cancer diet Exercise Heart Disease Source Type: news

Trying to Get in Shape in 2020? Here ’s the History Behind the Common New Year’s Resolution
It’s that time of year again, when many Americans head to the gym in an attempt to keep a New Year’s resolution to exercise more. About 11% of gym memberships are purchased in January, more than any other month in the year, according to a recent survey by The International Health, Racquet and Sportsclub Association, and a recent YouGov poll found that, of the nearly 30% of respondents who said they are making New Year’s resolutions, 50% said their top resolution was to exercise. While New Year’s resolutions in general are thought to date back to the ancient Babylonians, the New Year’s resoluti...
Source: TIME: Health - January 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Olivia B. Waxman Tags: Uncategorized health Source Type: news

Here Are 50 of the Best Workout Songs to Get You Motivated
With the thrill of New Year’s resolutions behind us and a long winter ahead, it can be hard to keep going with workout goals. But sometimes, all you need is the right song to give you the push you need to keep at it — whether running, biking or weight lifting. TIME is here to help with an essential workout playlist: a mix of songs that are tried-and-tested crowd favorites and some deeper cuts worth your attention from recent years and beyond. Normani’s “Motivation,” Lizzo’s “Good As Hell” and Travis Scott’s “Sicko Mode” are just the beginning; from hip-hop t...
Source: TIME: Health - January 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Raisa Bruner Tags: Uncategorized clickmonsters Music Source Type: news

E-Scooter Injuries Are the Latest ‘Urban Health Scare,’ a New Report Suggests
If you’ve set foot in an American city in the past few years, you’ve almost certainly seen sidewalks littered with electronic scooters. Souped up versions of what were once seen as children’s toys have been pitched as the future of urban commuting: a greener, cleaner and more compact alternative to cars, and one with arguably an even lower barrier to entry than bicycles. While there’s debate as to whether scooters will fully deliver on that promise, they’re undeniably popular; the National Association of City Transportation Officials reports that in 2018, people took 38.5 million trips on shar...
Source: TIME: Health - January 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized data visualization embargoed study Injuries Source Type: news

As Bushfires Rage, Australia Faces Another Challenge: Protecting National Mental Health
As wildfires continue blazing a deadly path through Australia, leaving destroyed homes and landscapes in their wake, people and countries around the world are coming together to offer financial and firefighting assistance. But with months of burning likely still to go, and 18 million acres of destruction already recorded, along with 24 lives lost, it’s clear that reconstruction will be a long process—both in terms of physical rebuilding, and psychological recovery. “Their national psyche will change,” says California-based psychotherapist Diane Ross-Glazer, who has counseled disaster survivors and l...
Source: TIME: Health - January 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Mental Health/Psychology Source Type: news

About 750 Seattle Students Will Be Excluded From School Because of Incomplete Vaccination Records
About 750 Seattle students won’t be allowed to attend school on Wednesday because they haven’t updated their vaccination records. The policy is a result of a new Washington state law that limited exemptions for the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine, requiring that students be fully vaccinated or be in the process of completing immunizations in order to attend school. The law, which followed a measles outbreak in the state, prohibits families from using personal or philosophical reasons to avoid the MMR vaccine. It still allows for exemptions for medical or religious reasons. Wednesday marks the deadline...
Source: TIME: Health - January 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katie Reilly Tags: Uncategorized vaccines washington Source Type: news

U.S. Cancer Death Rates Continue to Drop, But Progress Is Stalling for Some Cancers
Over the last few decades, the death rate from cancer dropped by 29% in the U.S., according to the latest data from the American Cancer Society (ACS). That, the ACS’s new study estimates, saved 2.9 million lives from 1991 to 2017, largely owing to declines in mortality from the four leading cancer types: lung, breast, prostate and colon. From 2016 to 2017—the latest year for which data are available—the overall cancer death rate declined by 2.2%, the largest single-year reduction ever recorded. These new figures were reported in a study published in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians. The declines are a...
Source: TIME: Health - January 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Cancer Source Type: news

Want to Calm Your Anxious Pet With CBD? Some Products Are All Bark and No Bite: Study
Companies have unleashed hundreds of CBD pet health products accompanied by glowing customer testimonials claiming the cannabis derivative produced calmer, quieter and pain-free dogs and cats. But some of these products are all bark and no bite. “You’d be astounded by the analysis we’ve seen of products on the shelf with virtually no CBD in them,” said Cornell University veterinary researcher Joseph Wakshlag, who studies therapeutic uses for the compound. “Or products with 2 milligrams per milliliter, when an effective concentration would be between 25 and 75 milligrams per milliliter. There a...
Source: TIME: Health - January 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mary Esch / AP Tags: Uncategorized animals onetime Source Type: news

The U.S. Spends $2,500 Per Person on Health Care Administrative Costs. Canada Spends $550. Here ’s Why.
Whether it’s interpreting medical bills, struggling to get hospital records, or fighting with an insurance provider, Americans are accustomed to battling bureaucracy to access their health care. But patients’ time and effort are not the only price of this complexity. Administrative costs now make up about 34% of total health care expenditures in the United States—twice the percentage Canada spends, according to a new study published Monday in Annals of Internal Medicine. These costs have increased over the last two decades, mostly due to the growth of private insurers’ overhead. The researchers exa...
Source: TIME: Health - January 6, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Abigail Abrams Tags: Uncategorized Health Care Source Type: news

Alex Trebek to Rep. John Lewis: Let ’s Beat Pancreatic Cancer Together
(LOS ANGELES) — Alex Trebek has a message of support for Congressman John Lewis as both fight pancreatic cancer. “We’re starting a new year, and let’s see if we can’t both complete the year as pancreatic cancer survivors,” Trebek said when asked what he would tell Lewis. He noted they’re the same age, 79. The Georgia Democrat and veteran civil rights leader announced his diagnosis of advanced cancer in late December. In making his announcement, Lewis made clear that he has no plans to step aside and said, “I have a fighting chance.” Trebek made his illness public last ...
Source: TIME: Health - January 6, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: LYNN ELBER / AP Tags: Uncategorized Cancer onetime Television Source Type: news

Gen X Women Get Less Sleep Than Any Other Generation. What ’s Keeping Them Up?
In the middle of the night, I wake up feeling warm. I open the window and pull my hair back into a ponytail and drink some water. Then I glance at my phone, delete a few things, and see some spam. I hit unsubscribe and go back to bed. Then I lie there thinking, What if by opening that spam email I got myself hacked? What if I just sent everyone in my contact list a Burger King ad at two in the morning? Now wide awake, I move on to other concerns: my parents’ health, my stepson’s college tuition, pending deadlines. Hours roll by. I tackle real-life math problems: how many weeks I have before getting my next free...
Source: TIME: Health - January 6, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ada Calhoun Tags: Uncategorized Gen X healthy sleep insomnia Source Type: news

A Mysterious Virus in Central China Has Infected Dozens, Raising Fears of a New Epidemic. Here ’s What to Know
An unidentified form of pneumonia has broken out in the central Chinese city of Wuhan, prompting authorities to quarantine those infected and raise hospital alerts. Wuhan’s health bureau announced Sunday that close to 60 patients have been diagnosed with the virus, and neighboring Hong Kong has announced suspected cases. (A suspected case in Singapore turned out to be a false alarm.) The mysterious strain has been linked to a seafood market which has been closed for sanitation since Jan. 1. Medical experts are attempting to identify the illness. While they say it is unlikely that this new strain of pneumonia could ca...
Source: TIME: Health - January 6, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Hillary Leung / Hong Kong Tags: Uncategorized China onetime overnight Source Type: news

2019-2020 Flu Season on Track to Be Especially Severe, New CDC Data Suggests
The current flu season is on track be one of the worst in years, Director of the National Institute of Allergies and Infectious Diseases Dr. Anthony Fauci told CNN. CNN reports that Fauci says the 2019-2020 flu season is on track to be as severe as the 2018-2017 season, which was the deadliest in at least a decade. New data from the CDC released on Friday estimates that so far this season, at least 6.4 million people have caught the flu, 55,000 people have been hospitalized and 2,900 people have died — 800 more people then were estimated the week before. According to the latest CDC in-season flu burden estimates, ...
Source: TIME: Health - January 4, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Madeleine Carlisle Tags: Uncategorized Health Care onetime Source Type: news

Trump Administration Announces Stripped-Down Regulations on Flavored Vaping Products
The Trump Administration on Jan. 2 announced that it will remove some—but not all—flavored e-cigarette products from the U.S. market, in a compromise that has sparked criticism from both vaping advocates and adversaries. The new plan applies to the cartridge-based e-cigarette products made by companies like Juul Labs, which are particularly popular among teenagers. Under the policy, companies will be prohibited from selling e-liquids in fruit, dessert and mint flavors, leaving only menthol and tobacco products on the market. Larger, tank-style e-cigarettes—which users can manually fill with e-liquids of t...
Source: TIME: Health - January 2, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized E-Cigarettes public health Source Type: news

Countless People Are Struggling With an Eating Disorder Doctors Can ’t Diagnose
At first, Melanie Murphy was just following doctor’s orders. Murphy, then 19, had gained weight during a period of depression, and her doctor told her she should lose some. She went from 180 to 125 pounds in 18 months—and even when she knew it was time to stop slimming down, she couldn’t shake the need to chase a goal. Without weight loss, she needed a new target. That became finding the “perfect” diet, one that was clean and pure and would keep her healthy for years to come. At least, that was how she thought about it then. These days, she uses a different descriptor: “orthorexia,&rdquo...
Source: TIME: Health - January 2, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Eating Disorder Source Type: news

Google ’s AI Bested Doctors in Detecting Breast Cancer in Mammograms
While there has been controversy over when and how often women should be screened for breast cancer using mammograms, studies consistently show that screening can lead to earlier detection of the disease, when it’s more treatable. So improving how effectively mammograms can detect abnormal growths that could be cancerous is a priority in the field. AI could play a role in accomplishing that—computer-based machine learning might help doctors to read mammograms more accurately. In a study published Jan. 1 in Nature, researchers from Google Health, and from universities in the U.S. and U.K., report on an AI model ...
Source: TIME: Health - January 1, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Artifical Intelligence Breast Cancer embargoed study MSFTAI2019 Source Type: news

Here ’s How Conservatives Are Using Civil Rights Law to Restrict Abortion
Six states passed laws in 2019 banning abortions once a “fetal heartbeat” is detected, which can be as early as six weeks into pregnancy. While most of these new laws were challenged in court and are temporarily blocked, the trend has continued: another 10 states introduced similar bills in 2019 and more are expected this year. The sudden success of these measures is not an accident. They are the result of a concerted new strategy by abortion opponents, researchers have found. Instead of focusing on religious or women’s health concerns, supporters of Georgia’s “heartbeat” bill advanced...
Source: TIME: Health - January 1, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Abigail Abrams Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Medical Student Arrested, Held Without Bail After Alleged Attempt to Smuggle Cancer Research to China
(BOSTON) — A medical student from China who U.S. authorities say tried to smuggle cancer research material taken from a Boston hospital out of the country has been held without bail by a judge who ruled he was a flight risk. Zaosong Zheng, 29, who last year earned a visa sponsored by Harvard University to study in the U.S., appeared Monday in U.S. District Court in Boston. He was arrested Dec. 10 at Boston’s Logan Airport on a charge of making false statements. Magistrate Judge David Hennessy ruled that evidence suggested Zheng had tried to smuggle vials of research specimens in a sock in his suitcase bound for...
Source: TIME: Health - December 31, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized China health medical research onetime Source Type: news

Pharmacies Don ’t Know How to Dispose of Leftover Opioids and Antibiotics
Today (Dec. 30), a team of researchers from the University of California, San Francisco and the Children’s National Hospital in Washington, D.C., published the results of an investigation into whether or not pharmacy workers could provide accurate information on the disposal of two classes of drugs: opioids and antibiotics. The results are frightening: The researchers enlisted volunteers to place calls to nearly 900 pharmacies in California, posing as parents with leftover antibiotics and opioids from a “child’s” recent surgery. They asked the pharmacy employees on the line—either pharmacists...
Source: TIME: Health - December 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Elijah Wolfson Tags: Uncategorized data visualization embargoed study Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Researcher Who Led Team That Genetically Edited Babies Sentenced to Prison in China
(BEIJING) — Three researchers involved in the births of genetically edited babies have been sentenced for practicing medicine illegally, Chinese state media said Monday. The report by Xinhua news agency said lead researcher He Jiankui was sentenced to three years and fined 3 million yuan ($430,000). Two other people received lesser sentences and fines. Zhang Renli was sentenced to two years in prison and fined 1 million yuan. Qin Jinzhou received an 18-month sentence, but with a two-year reprieve, and a 500,000 yuan fine. He, the lead researcher, said 13 months ago that he had helped make the world’s first gene...
Source: TIME: Health - December 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized China onetime overnight Source Type: news

Genetic Mutations In Father ’s Sperm Can Predict Children’s Autism Risk
There’s no question that autism can be traced to a combination of genetic and environmental factors. One genetic contributor in particular has in recent years intrigued scientists studying autism: DNA mutations originating in fathers’ sperm. Studies have linked autism risk to de novo mutations, or changes in DNA that arise spontaneously in sperm as the germline cell develops, or in the embryo after fertilization. Researchers estimate that such mutations might be involved in anywhere from 10% to 30% of autism cases, and that the older a father is at the time of conception, the higher the chance his sperm will re...
Source: TIME: Health - December 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Autism Brain Source Type: news

20 Ways the World Got Better in 2019, in Charts
The last 12 months have felt chaotic, destabilizing, and on occasion apocalyptic. Toxic nationalist movements have risen across the globe; politics in democratic nations have increasingly polarized; wealth gaps continue to expand; and the specter of climate change lurking at a remove has become an actual monster inside the house. It’s difficult, in the context of the daily onslaught of bad news and its demands on our attention, to remember that when you look at the long arc of human civilization, there are many, many things that continue to get better. As a sort of balm for the pains of a traumatic year, here are 20 ...
Source: TIME: Health - December 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Elijah Wolfson Tags: Uncategorized climate change data visualization health Source Type: news

Federal Legal Age to Buy Tobacco Products Officially Raised to 21
On Friday, President Donald Trump signed a $1.4 trillion spending package that, on top of many things, raises the federal legal age for purchasing tobacco from 18 to 21. Beginning in the summer of 2020, it will be a violation of federal law to sell tobacco to anyone under the age of 21. Since the 1990s, federal law mandated the legal age to purchase tobacco be at least 18. The law also encompasses e-cigarettes and vaping cartridge, not just traditional tobacco products like cigarettes and cigars, adding regulation to an industry that, as TIME’s Jamie Ducharme writes, “has proliferated largely unchecked.” ...
Source: TIME: Health - December 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Madeleine Carlisle Tags: Uncategorized Congress onetime public health Source Type: news

The Federal Legal Age to Buy Tobacco Products Has Been Raised to 21. Here ’s What That Could Do to the Vaping Industry
The federal legal age for purchasing tobacco products has been increased from 18 to 21 in a move the American Lung Association said will “reduce youth access to tobacco products and help save lives.” That provision, part of a $1.4 trillion spending bill which President Donald Trump signed into law on Friday, would apply not only to traditional tobacco products such as cigarettes and cigars, but also to e-cigarettes—products that have lately been caught in regulatory cross-hairs, sparked by rising rates of use among teenagers. According to the latest federal data, 27.5% of high school students reported usi...
Source: TIME: Health - December 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized public health Source Type: news

Congress Voted to Raise the Tobacco-Buying Age to 21. Here ’s What That Could Do to the Vaping Industry
Congress this week passed perhaps the most dramatic change to U.S. tobacco regulation in a decade, raising the federal legal age of purchase from 18 to 21. That provision, part of a spending bill that must still be signed into law by President Donald Trump, would apply not only to traditional tobacco products such as cigarettes and cigars, but also to e-cigarettes—products that have lately been caught in regulatory cross-hairs, sparked by rising rates of use among teenagers. According to the latest federal data, 27.5% of high school students reported using e-cigarettes during the past month. Raising the legal age of ...
Source: TIME: Health - December 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized public health Source Type: news

The Vaping-Related Lung Disease Outbreak May Be Coming to an End
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) announced Friday with new confidence that vitamin E acetate seems to be largely to blame for the vaping-related lung illness outbreak that swept the country—at the same time it announced the outbreak seems to be approaching its end. As of the CDC’s latest update, 2,506 people in the U.S. and its territories have been hospitalized for “e-cigarette, or vaping, product use-associated lung injury” (EVALI), and 54 people have died. Most of these cases seem to have occurred in people who used products containing the marijuana compound THC, the majority purchased ...
Source: TIME: Health - December 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized E-Cigarettes embargoed study public health Source Type: news

Half of the U.S. Population Will Be Obese by 2030
Obesity continues to be a serious health problem in the U.S., contributing to heart disease, diabetes, joint disorders and even certain types of cancer. And according to the latest data, more Americans will be obese by 2030 than ever before. In a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers led by Zachary Ward at the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health analyzed body mass index (BMI) data reported by more than 6.2 million adults who answered questions for the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey (BRFSS), a large phone-based survey conducted by the U.S. Centers of Disease Control an...
Source: TIME: Health - December 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized data visualization embargoed study Obesity Source Type: news