A Mother ’s Exposure to Pesticides During Pregnancy May Raise Children’s Autism Risk
In one of the largest studies looking at the potential effects of pesticide exposure on still-developing fetuses and newborns, scientists found that exposure to the most commonly used pesticides was linked to higher risk of autism spectrum disorder. Led by Ondine von Ehrenstein, associate professor in the Fielding School of Public Health at the University of California, Los Angeles, the researchers analyzed autism registry data in California along with data on pesticide spraying in the state. They published their findings in the BMJ. Overall, the study included nearly 38,000 people, with 2,961 cases of autism. The scientis...
Source: TIME: Health - March 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news

Temple University Mumps Outbreak Swells to 74 Cases
(PHILADELPHIA) — Philadelphia health officials say they now believe 74 people have contracted mumps at Temple University. City Department of Health spokesman James Garrow said Wednesday there are 15 confirmed cases and 59 probable cases, all but three of them in Philadelphia. Probable diagnoses indicate a person showing mumps-like symptoms. The city says the numbers reported this year are high compared with those in past years; 54 cases were reported in 2010. Students who may be infected should limit contact with others and seek medical care. Mumps is a viral infection that involves swollen glands. The Centers for Di...
Source: TIME: Health - March 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized Education Infectious Disease onetime Pennsylvania Source Type: news

The USDA Forced Kittens to Become Cannibals for Research, Watchdog Report Says
A shocking watchdog report alleges that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) spent $22.5 million conducting “unnecessary and unjustifiable” research that involved killing cats and forcing “kitten cannibalism,” among other unsavory practices. The report — from the non-profit White Coat Waste Project, which opposes animal testing by the government, and former USDA scientist Jim Keen — says a large chunk of this research relates to toxoplasmosis, an illness spread by exposure to the Toxoplasma gondii parasite. As recently as 2015, the report says, the USDA purchased and killed cats and...
Source: TIME: Health - March 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized onetime Research Source Type: news

You Asked: Should I Try ‘Mindful Eating?’
Grab a raisin—just one raisin—and put it on a plate. Now, sit down and examine the raisin. Smell it. Roll it between your fingers. When you feel you’ve fully appreciated its raisin-ness, pop it into your mouth, and consider its taste and texture as you slowly chew and swallow it. You’ve just dabbled in the trendy practice of mindful eating: a kind of meditation in motion that’s increasingly being scientifically studied for its potential health benefits. Like other mindfulness methods, it emphasizes a judgment-free awareness of your thoughts, emotions and sensory experiences, and it helps you p...
Source: TIME: Health - March 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news

Kale Is One of the Most Contaminated Vegetables You Can Buy. Here ’s Why
Each year, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) publishes its Dirty Dozen list, which ranks the 12 pieces of produce that contain the highest amounts of pesticide residues. This year, one of the dirtiest fruits and vegetables turns out to be kale, occupying the third spot on the EWG’s list of most contaminated. Strawberries top the list, followed by spinach. (The full 2019 Dirty Dozen list, ranked from most contaminated to least, include strawberries, spinach, kale, nectarines, apples, grapes, peaches, cherries, pears, tomatoes, celery and potatoes.) The list is compiled from the results of regular testing done by t...
Source: TIME: Health - March 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news

Just 10 Minutes of Exercise a Week May Be Enough to Extend Your Life, Study Says
Exercising for just 10 minutes a week is linked to a longer life, according to a new study published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. Several recent studies have found that even low-intensity exercise, done for a short amount of time, can have a meaningful impact on health. Still, the idea that exercising for 10 minutes a week — less time than it takes to watch a TV show, do a load of laundry or make a pot of pasta — may be enough to increase your lifespan is novel. It’s also somewhat controversial, since the federal physical activity guidelines recommend getting at least 75 minutes of vigorous ...
Source: TIME: Health - March 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Exercise/Fitness Source Type: news

The FDA Just Approved the First Drug for Postpartum Depression
The Food and Drug Administration approved the first drug specifically for the treatment of postpartum depression Tuesday. The drug, which is administered via an intravenous drip, reportedly works within 48 hours, providing near immediate relief to women experiencing symptoms, according to the New York Times. Postpartum depression has historically been treated with counseling or general antidepressants, which can take weeks to kick in or may not work at all. The newly-approved drug, brexanolone, will be marketed as Zulresso. The treatment will be offered only as an in-patient option at certified medical centers because it c...
Source: TIME: Health - March 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amy Gunia Tags: Uncategorized Health Care onetime overnight Source Type: news

The F.D.A. Just Approved the First Drug for Postpartum Depression
The Food and Drug Administration approved the first drug specifically for the treatment of postpartum depression Tuesday. The drug, which is administered via an intravenous drip, reportedly works within 48 hours, providing near immediate relief to women experiencing symptoms, according to the New York Times. Postpartum depression has historically been treated with counseling or general antidepressants, which can take weeks to kick in or may not work at all. The newly-approved drug, brexanolone, will be marketed as Zulresso. The treatment will be offered only as an in-patient option at certified medical centers because it c...
Source: TIME: Health - March 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amy Gunia Tags: Uncategorized Health Care onetime overnight Source Type: news

Giving Your Baby Peanuts Early On May Help Prevent Allergies, New Guidelines Say
Introducing peanuts early may help some babies avoid allergies, according to new guidance from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). The guidelines, published in the journal Pediatrics, update and replace the AAP’s 2008 report on preventing atopic diseases — such as asthma, skin conditions and food allergies — in children. While the science in this area is still developing, the AAP’s new report says that there is more evidence than ever to suggest that purposefully introducing some foods to children early in life may help prevent them from developing food allergies, which affect about 8% of Amer...
Source: TIME: Health - March 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news

8 Science-Backed Ways to Prevent Heart Attacks, According to New Guidelines
Experts have issued a new set of guidelines on the best ways to prevent first heart attacks, strokes and heart failure — and for the first time, they focus squarely on the patient. The new guidelines recognize how doctors can support people to not only address their medical risk factors, but also to change their behaviors and lifestyles in order to reduce their risk. The latest revisions to the guidelines, issued by the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA), were announced at the annual meeting of the ACC. They are intended to help doctors figure out a patient’s risk of h...
Source: TIME: Health - March 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Heart Disease Source Type: news

Eggs May Be Bad for the Heart, a New Study Says —But There’s More to the Story
Conclusions about eggs based on available scientific evidence vary widely — in part because nutrition research is notoriously hard to conduct accurately. Despite the entrenched belief that eggs raise cholesterol, some studies have suggested that dietary cholesterol intake doesn’t necessarily translate to higher blood cholesterol. One study from last year found that people who ate an egg per day had lower rates of heart disease and bleeding stroke than people who did not eat them, and research from 2016 found that eggs didn’t have a strong effect on risk of coronary artery disease. Some researchers have su...
Source: TIME: Health - March 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news

Every Little Move You Make Can Help Your Health, Study Says
Lovers of vigorous exercise aren’t the only ones who get health benefits from physical activity. Lower-key workouts — even activities you’d never think of as exercise — can also improve your well-being, studies find. Now, new research published in JAMA Network Open shows just how impactful any type of movement can be. Compared to women who get less exercise, those who get lots of light physical activity may have up to a 42% lower risk of dying from coronary problems, such as heart attacks, and a 22% lower risk of developing cardiovascular disease, the study says. Light activity includes “most...
Source: TIME: Health - March 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Exercise/Fitness Longevity Source Type: news

Depression and Suicide Rates Are Rising Sharply in Young Americans, New Report Says. This May Be One Reason Why
Since the late 2000s, the mental health of teens and young adults in the U.S. has declined dramatically. That’s the broad conclusion of a new study published in the Journal of Abnormal Psychology. Between 2009 and 2017, rates of depression among kids ages 14 to 17 increased by more than 60%, the study found. The increases were nearly as steep among those ages 12 to 13 (47%) and 18 to 21 (46%), and rates roughly doubled among those ages 20 to 21. In 2017—the latest year for which federal data are available—more than one in eight Americans ages 12 to 25 experienced a major depressive episode, the study fou...
Source: TIME: Health - March 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Mental Health/Psychology Source Type: news

California Jury Awards $29 Million to Woman Who Says She Got Cancer from Johnson & Johnson Baby Powder
A woman who claims asbestos in Johnson & Johnson products caused her deadly cancer was awarded $29.4 million by a California jury on Wednesday, Reuters reports. A jury in a California Superior Court in Oakland determined that defective Baby Powder was a “substantial contributing factor” to Terry Leavitt’s mesothelioma, an aggressive cancer that affects the tissue that coats internal organs, the Associated Press reports. Leavitt said she often used two talcum-powder-based Johnson & Johnson products — Baby Powder and Shower to Shower powder — in the 1960s and 1970s, and claims they contr...
Source: TIME: Health - March 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Cancer onetime Source Type: news

Cardiologist Eric Topol on How AI Can Bring Humanity Back to Medicine
In his new book, Deep Medicine, the cardiologist argues that artificial intelligence can bring humanity back to medicine. You tweet several times a day about the latest medical studies. Do you really read all of those articles? Every one of the 18,000 tweets come from me. People think I have an army of people to help me–no. I’m an information junkie. Ever since I was a kid I’ve been an incessant reader. I apportion time every day–a couple of hours in the morning and the evening. What is the biggest problem you see in medicine today? What’s happened is an erosion of the relationship, due to the...
Source: TIME: Health - March 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Artificial Intelligence Life Reinvented medicine Source Type: news

New York Judge Rules Unvaccinated Students Can ’t Go Back to Class
A federal judge in New York denied a request that would have allowed 44 unvaccinated children to return to school on Wednesday. Citing an “unprecedented measles outbreak,” District Court Judge Vincent Briccetti said the parents had failed to demonstrate “that public interest weighs in favor of granting an injunction,” according to the Rockland/Westchester Journal News. Last December, amid a measles outbreak, public health officials in Rockland County took the bold step of banning unvaccinated kids from the classroom at schools with less than 95% vaccination rates. The parents from the Green Meadow W...
Source: TIME: Health - March 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amy Gunia Tags: Uncategorized onetime overnight public health Source Type: news

Doctors Are Writing Half as Many New Opioid Prescriptions as They Used To, Study Says
Deaths from opioid overdoses have increased dramatically over the last decade. In 2017, the latest year for which the U.S. government has statistics on the trend, more than 47,000 Americans died of opioid overdoses. One major factor contributing to the rising number of people who get addicted to opioids and die from overdoses is the increasing number of prescriptions written by doctors to treat pain. Overdose deaths related to such prescriptions increased five times from 1999 to 2017. But according to the latest study looking at opioid prescribing patterns, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, recent efforts t...
Source: TIME: Health - March 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Drugs Source Type: news

Experts Are Calling for a Ban on Gene Editing of Human Embryos. Here ’s Why They’re Worried
In November 2018, Chinese biophysicist Jiankui He stunned the world when he announced that he had used a controversial gene-editing technology, called CRISPR, to genetically alter the genes in embryos and give them immunity to HIV. The embryos were transferred to the woman who provided the eggs to create them, and twin girls were born. The move, considered highly experimental and unethical by most scientists around the world, prompted intense debate in the scientific community about not just the implications for the twins, but for society as well. When applied to human eggs, sperm and embryos, gene-editing technologies, of...
Source: TIME: Health - March 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Genetics Source Type: news

The FDA Revealed How It ’s Planning to Restrict E-Cigarette Sales to Teens
In one of his last acts as head of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), outgoing Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb released new plans for restricting the sale of certain flavored e-cigarettes, in an effort to combat teen vaping. The draft guidance, which will remain open for public comment for 30 days before being finalized, crystallizes some of the agency’s prior plans for regulating flavored e-cigarettes, which have become so popular among teenagers that many doctors fear they could contribute to widespread nicotine addiction among young people. Vaping among high school students rose by 78% (from almost 12% to alm...
Source: TIME: Health - March 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized public health Source Type: news

Do Gummy Vitamins Work? Here ’s What Experts Say
Gummy vitamins are increasingly popular—and not just for kids. By some estimates, adults now comprise up to 80% of the gummy vitamin market. “Pill fatigue” is one factor driving grownups toward gummies. If you have to take multiple supplements every day—and especially if you have problems swallowing capsules or tablets—gummies can make that chore easier (and tastier), finds a 2017 report from the AARP. But do gummy vitamins work the same as ordinary supplements? “It’s a lot harder to make a good gummy than it is to make a tablet or capsule,” says Dr. Tod Cooperman, president ...
Source: TIME: Health - March 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news

CBD Oil Is Everywhere, But Is It Really Safe and Healthy?
You might have seen it in your neighborhood health store, your local spa or your corner coffee shop. CBD, aka cannabidiol, is getting mixed into cocktails, lotions and drinks. But what is CBD, exactly? Does it have real health benefits? Is it even safe? To get a better understanding of the compound, TIME spoke to two scientists on the cutting edge of CBD research: Dr. Esther Blessing, an associate professor of psychiatry at New York University, and Margaret Haney, professor of neurobiology at Columbia University Medical Center and director of the university’s Marijuana Research Laboratory. Blessing and Haney agree th...
Source: TIME: Health - March 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized onetime Research Source Type: news

A Measles Diagnosis Is Confirmed in New Hampshire. Now, At Least 12 States Have Cases of the Disease
A new measles diagnosis has been reported in New Hampshire, bringing the number of states with confirmed cases of the disease to at least a dozen. As of Mar. 7, 228 measles cases in 12 states have been confirmed so far this year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)’s latest numbers. Outbreaks have been particularly severe in Washington and New York states. The sick person in New Hampshire reportedly contracted measles while traveling abroad, as the CDC says is often the case. The international traveler also took a bus from Boston to Manchester, N.H. in late February, WCAX reports. No mea...
Source: TIME: Health - March 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Infectious Disease Source Type: news

A Measles Diagnosis Is Confirmed in New Hampshire. Now, 12 States Have Cases of the Disease
A new measles diagnosis has been reported in New Hampshire, bringing the number of states with confirmed cases of the disease to a dozen. As of Mar. 7, 228 measles cases in 12 states have been confirmed so far this year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)’s latest numbers. Outbreaks have been particularly severe in Washington and New York states. The sick person in New Hampshire reportedly contracted measles while traveling abroad, as the CDC says is often the case. The international traveler also took a bus from Boston to Manchester, N.H. in late February, WCAX reports. No measles case...
Source: TIME: Health - March 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Infectious Disease Source Type: news

Trump ’s Budget Asks for Nearly $300 Million to End the U.S. HIV Epidemic Within 10 Years
President Donald Trump’s proposed 2020 budget includes nearly $300 million meant to “defeat the HIV/AIDS epidemic” in the U.S. — even as it calls for a 12% reduction in total funding to the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). During his February State of the Union address, Trump announced an ambitious plan to “eliminate the HIV epidemic in the United States within 10 years.” During a subsequent call with reporters, health officials said the initiative would focus on 48 at-risk counties across the country and would involve promoting early HIV treatment and diagnosis, expanding ...
Source: TIME: Health - March 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized HIV/AIDS Source Type: news

23andMe Has a New Type 2 Diabetes Risk Report. Here ’s What to Know
Consumer genetics company 23andMe is broadening its health portfolio with a new report on consumers’ genetic risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. More than 30 million Americans have diagnosed or undiagnosed diabetes, according to the most recent federal data. The vast majority of these people — up to 95% — have Type 2 diabetes, meaning their bodies do not use insulin properly. Both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes are related to family history and genetics, but Type 2 is also strongly associated with obesity, as well as lifestyle factors such as diet and exercise. The new 23andMe report estimates a customer&rsq...
Source: TIME: Health - March 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news

A Young Boy Spent 47 Days In an ICU and Racked Up $800,000 in Medical Costs Because He Wasn ’t Vaccinated Against Tetanus
A young boy in Oregon spent 47 days in an intensive care unit (ICU), resulting in more than $800,000 in medical costs, because he was not vaccinated against tetanus, according to a case study published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Case study co-author Dr. Carl Eriksson, an assistant professor of pediatric critical care at Oregon Health & Science University, who was involved in the boy’s treatment, wrote in an email to TIME that severe tetanus cases are very rare in the U.S., where vaccination effectively prevents such conditions. The boy’s illness was Oregon’s first pediat...
Source: TIME: Health - March 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Infectious Disease onetime Source Type: news

Better Late Than Never: Exercising Helps You Live Longer No Matter When You Start, Study Says
By now, it’s undeniable: regular exercise comes with a range of health benefits for people who stick with it over time. But is it ever too late to start? Most research hasn’t been designed to answer this question, since exercise studies typically record people’s physical activity levels at one point in time: in youth, middle-age or beyond. But Pedro Saint-Maurice, a postdoctoral fellow at the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and his colleagues wanted to find out whether exercise’s benefits changed if people remained active for most of their lives, or if, like mos...
Source: TIME: Health - March 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Exercise/Fitness Longevity Source Type: news

Some Anti-Vaxxers Aren ’t Getting Their Pets Vaccinated. Here’s Why That’s So Dangerous
Dogs can’t get autism, and even if they could, vaccines couldn’t cause it. Period. But some anti-vaxxers are increasingly making the same unfounded claims about pets and vaccines they’ve been repeating about children and vaccines for the past 20 years: that vaccines are unnecessary, dangerous and that they can cause a form of (canine) autism, along with other diseases. Just as with kids, that may be driving down pet vaccination rates. And the movement, while niche, shows no sign of stopping; in some states in the U.S., anti-vax activists have recently agitated to make state laws about mandatory pet vaccin...
Source: TIME: Health - March 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized onetime Pets Source Type: news

Monthly Shots of HIV Drugs Are as Effective as Daily Pills, 2 Big Studies Show
SEATTLE (AP) — Monthly shots of HIV drugs worked as well as daily pills to control the virus that causes AIDS in two large international tests, researchers reported Thursday. If approved by regulators in the United States and Europe, the shots would be a new option for people with HIV and could help some stay on treatment. Instead of having to remember to take pills, patients instead could get injections from a doctor or nurse each month. “Some people will be thrilled” at the convenience, said Mitchell Warren, executive director of AVAC, an AIDS advocacy group. Condoms remain the most widely available and...
Source: TIME: Health - March 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CARLA K. JOHNSON / AP Tags: Uncategorized AIDS/HIV anti hiv drugs onetime Source Type: news

The New Depression Treatment Esketamine Helped Me Get My Life Back. But I Don ’t Know If I Can Take It Forever
On Tuesday, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the U.S.’ first new major depression treatment in years: a fast-acting esketamine nasal spray related to the club drug ketamine, which is itself a promising treatment for depression. The esketamine spray, manufactured by Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen Pharmaceuticals and sold under the brand name Spravato, is intended for adults with treatment-resistant depression. When taken in conjunction with oral antidepressants under medical supervision, Spravato has been shown to ease depression systems in as little as hours, though the psychedelic-derived drug ...
Source: TIME: Health - March 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amelia D. Tags: Uncategorized Drugs healthytime onetime Source Type: news

The New Depression Treatment Esketamine Helped Me Get My Life Back. But I Don ’t Know If I Can Keep Taking It
On Tuesday, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the U.S.’ first new major depression treatment in years: a fast-acting esketamine nasal spray related to the club drug ketamine, which is itself a promising treatment for depression. The esketamine spray, manufactured by Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen Pharmaceuticals and sold under the brand name Spravato, is intended for adults with treatment-resistant depression. When taken in conjunction with oral antidepressants under medical supervision, Spravato has been shown to ease depression systems in as little as hours, though the psychedelic-derived drug ...
Source: TIME: Health - March 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amelia D. Tags: Uncategorized Drugs healthytime onetime Source Type: news

A Mumps Quarantine in Louisiana May Have Compromised Rights of Detained Immigrants
A mumps outbreak and quarantine at the Pine Prairie Immigration and Customs Enforcement Processing Center in Louisiana blocked immigrants from legal resources, including their lawyers and the law library, for about two weeks in January and February, according to the attorneys. The outbreak has also raised questions about how officials dealing with public health concerns can undermine detainees’ legal rights. Lawyers said the illness did not stop immigration court proceedings — meaning from at least Feb. 3 to Feb. 14 quarantined individuals were required to continue with removal hearings, conducted from their do...
Source: TIME: Health - March 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Shefali Luthra / Kaiser Health News and Julie Appleby / Kaiser Health News Tags: Uncategorized public health Source Type: news

Dogs Are Great for Your Health. But There ’s a Little-Known Risk of Owning One
The health benefits of having a pet — especially a dog — are well-established. Dog owners have been shown to live longer, healthier lives than people without pups, in part because caring for a dog encourages physical activity. And pets of all types have been shown to lower their owners’ stress levels and improve their mental health. But a new research letter published in JAMA offers a look at a potential downside of pet ownership. Among older adults, fractures linked to dog-walking are surprisingly common and growing more frequent, according to the research. Researchers examined data from the National El...
Source: TIME: Health - March 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news

This Ketamine-Like Drug Has Been Approved to Treat Depression
(WASHINGTON) — A mind-altering medication related to the club drug Special K won U.S. approval Tuesday for patients with hard-to-treat depression, the first in a series of long-overlooked substances being reconsidered for severe forms of mental illness. The nasal spray from Johnson & Johnson is a chemical cousin of ketamine, which has been used for decades as a powerful anesthetic to prepare patients for surgery. In the 1990s, the medication was adopted as a party drug by the underground rave culture due to its ability to produce psychedelic, out-of-body experiences. More recently, some doctors have given ketamin...
Source: TIME: Health - March 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: MATTHEW PERRONE / AP Tags: Uncategorized Drugs onetime overnight Source Type: news

A Man May Be Cleared of HIV for the Second Time in History. Here ’s What That Means
A man in London has become only the second person to achieve remission from HIV infection, researchers from the UK reported Tuesday. The therapy responsible has worked on only one other person who is considered to be “cured” of HIV: Timothy Ray Brown, who still does not show signs of the virus in his body after more than 10 years. Here’s what to know about the landmark case. How did it happen? In a letter published in the journal Nature, researchers led by Ravindra Gupta from the University of Cambridge London and Imperial College London and his colleagues say that they used a treatment similar to the one...
Source: TIME: Health - March 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized HIV/AIDS Source Type: news

These Researchers Are Using Artificial Intelligence to Make a Better Flu Vaccine
The influenza virus is a particularly nasty bug, thanks in no small part to how rapidly it mutates. Every time the flu virus changes, it becomes harder for humans to develop an immunity. Even our best external defense against influenza, the flu shot, is based on experts’ best guess as to which flu strain or strains are most likely to be prevalent during a given flu season. Sometimes they’re right — this season’s vaccine has turned out to be a relatively good match for the strains currently in circulation. But sometimes they get it wrong, potentially leading to a more severe flu season. And influenza...
Source: TIME: Health - March 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alejandro de la Garza Tags: Uncategorized Life Reinvented medicine onetime Source Type: news

‘Propagating These Lies Is Dangerous.’ Ohio Teen Vaccinated Against His Mother’s Wishes Calls for End to Misinformation
The Ohio teenager who made headlines for getting vaccinated against his mother’s wishes told the Senate on Tuesday that spreading vaccine misinformation is dangerous — but urged the public not to vilify those who do so. “Approaching this issue with the concern of education and addressing misinformation properly can cause change, as it did for me,” 18-year-old Ethan Lindenberger said while testifying before the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee on Tuesday. “Although the debate around vaccines is not necessarily centered around information, and concerns for health and sa...
Source: TIME: Health - March 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime vaccines Source Type: news

FDA Announces Crackdown on Walgreens, 14 Other National Retailers Selling E-Cigarettes to Kids
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on Monday announced a renewed effort to hold retailers accountable for selling e-cigarettes to kids and teenagers, as part of its ongoing campaign against youth vaping. E-cigarettes are not legally available to anyone younger than 18 in the U.S. Nonetheless, youth use is a prevalent issue in the U.S., with 37% of high school seniors saying they had vaped in 2018. FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb has called vaping among teenagers an “epidemic,” pointing to health risks such as nicotine addiction and later use of combustible cigarettes and other tobacco products, and has ...
Source: TIME: Health - March 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime public health Source Type: news

More Seniors Should Be Getting Brain Health Screenings, Experts Say
Alzheimer’s disease is a growing issue among Americans, but just 16% of seniors reported being regularly screened for cognitive issues, according to the Alzheimer’s Association’s new 2019 report. “There’s under-utilization of cognitive assessment in the clinical setting, and a disconnect between patient and provider over who should be initiating it,” says Joanne Pike, chief program officer at the Alzheimer’s Association. “[In] an ideal world, 100% of physicians initiate it, and 100% of seniors bring it up.” The new report finds that while the majority of doctors and sen...
Source: TIME: Health - March 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Brain Source Type: news

‘London Patient’ Appears to Become the Second Person Ever Cured of HIV
Doctors say a British man who previously tested positive for HIV might be the second person ever to be cured of the virus that causes AIDS. Reuters reports that the man, whose identity has not been revealed, has tested negative for the virus almost three years after he received a bone marrow transplant from a donor with an HIV-resistant genetic mutation. The man stopped taking antiretroviral drugs 18 months ago. “There is no virus there that we can measure. We can’t detect anything,” Ravindra Gupta, the doctor who co-lead the man’s treatment team, told Reuters. The man, who has been dubbed the &ldqu...
Source: TIME: Health - March 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amy Gunia Tags: Uncategorized health HIV/AIDS onetime overnight Source Type: news

‘London Patient’ Appears to Become the Second Person Ever Cured of AIDS
Doctors say a British man who previously tested positive for HIV might be the second person ever to be cured of the AIDS virus. Reuters reports that the man, whose identity has not been revealed, has tested negative for the virus almost three years after he received a bone marrow transplant from a donor with an HIV-resistant genetic mutation. The man stopped taking antiretroviral drugs 18 months ago. “There is no virus there that we can measure. We can’t detect anything,” Ravindra Gupta, the doctor who co-lead the man’s treatment team, told Reuters. The man, who has been dubbed the “London pat...
Source: TIME: Health - March 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amy Gunia Tags: Uncategorized health HIV/AIDS onetime overnight Source Type: news

Yet Another Study Shows There ’s No Link Between the Measles Vaccine and Autism
In this study, the scientists addressed some potential criticisms of how previous studies were designed in order to provide additional evidence to inform concerned parents. “We see vaccine skepticism growing,” says the study’s lead author Anders Hviid, an investigator at the Statens Serum Institut, the national public health organization in Denmark. “So we thought it was a good idea to revisit the hypothesis and try to get scientific answers to the different criticisms from skeptics of the original study.” Hviid and his colleagues analyzed data involving more than 650,000 children born in Den...
Source: TIME: Health - March 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized public health Source Type: news

Can You Really Catch Up on Lost Sleep? Here ’s What the Science Says
Experts have long said that you can’t make up for lost sleep by snoozing more on your days off. But in 2018, a study published in the Journal of Sleep Research called that conclusion into question, suggesting that sleeping in on days off could cancel out at least some of the health risks associated with work-week sleep deprivation, including the threat of early death. But a study recently published in Current Biology echoes previous convictions. It says extra weekend rest is not enough to make up for sleep lost during the week, and concludes that the “benefits of weekend recovery sleep are transient.” C...
Source: TIME: Health - March 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized sleep Source Type: news

One in Three Seniors Is Lonely. Here ’s How It’s Hurting Their Health
Loneliness and social isolation are growing public-health concerns for people of all ages in the United States, from young adults to seniors. Studies have long connected loneliness to a range of health issues that could threaten longevity and well-being, including higher risks of heart attacks, strokes, depression, anxiety and early death. Now, the latest National Poll on Healthy Aging finds that about a third of seniors are lonely. “Research shows that chronic loneliness can impact older adults’ memory, physical well-being, mental health, and life expectancy,” write the authors of the new report. &ld...
Source: TIME: Health - March 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Longevity Mental Health/Psychology Source Type: news

Federal Investigators Find Critical Failings at Health Center Where 11 Children Died in Virus Outbreak
A viral outbreak killed 11 children at a New Jersey health center last year due to a lack of administrative oversight, slow responses from medical staff and a flawed infection-control plan, according to a federal investigation. Wanaque Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation in Haskell, N.J. is strongly contesting investigators’ findings. The 114-page report, which was compiled by the New York regional office of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and reviewed by TIME, says the pediatric medical director at the Wanaque Center “didn’t understand what medical director meant” when he ass...
Source: TIME: Health - March 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Infectious Disease New Jersey onetime Source Type: news

Study: Fast Food Calorie Content Has Steadily Increased Over the Past 30 Years
The calorie content at the most popular U.S. fast food restaurants has shot up over the past three decades, according to a new study. The study, published this week in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, compared food at 10 fast food restaurants: Arby’s, Burger King, Carl’s Jr, Dairy Queen, Hardee’s, Jack in the Box, KFC, Long John Silver’s, McDonald’s and Wendy’s. The study looked at the restaurants’ food in 1986, 1991 and 2016. Researchers found that, on average, the calorie content of entrees went up by 30 calories a decade, while the calorie content of desser...
Source: TIME: Health - March 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized diet Fast Food onetime restaurants Source Type: news

Arizona Lawmaker Says Mandatory Vaccine Laws are ‘Communist’ Amid a Nationwide Measles Outbreak
Despite a spike in measles cases across the country, some lawmakers are doubling down on their anti-vaccination beliefs. On Wednesday, the Republican Governor of Arizona Doug Ducey told reporters that he was “pro-vaccination” and “anti measles” and stated that he would not sign three bills passed by the Arizona state legislature designed to complicate and weaken state vaccine protocol. One of the bills would allow individuals to refuse a mandatory vaccine on religious grounds. In response, Arizona state representative Kelly Townsend released a statement on Facebook, claiming that mandatory vaccine l...
Source: TIME: Health - March 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Wilder Davies Tags: Uncategorized onetime public health Source Type: news

A Brooklyn Yeshiva Is Responsible for 21 Measles Infections In Growing Outbreak, Health Officials Say
A measles outbreak is spreading within New York City’s Orthodox Jewish community, with 21 cases coming from a single yeshiva in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, according to city health officials. The New York City Department of Health announced Thursday that 121 people have contracted measles since the outbreak began in October, and 31 cases have been newly identified. The vast majority of cases have affected children, particularly in the Borough Park and Williamsburg neighborhoods of Brooklyn. The outbreak’s initial case was acquired when a person visited Israel, where a measles outbreak is in progress, according to h...
Source: TIME: Health - March 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

Spending Just 20 Minutes in a Park Makes You Happier. Here ’s What Else Being Outside Can Do for Your Health
Spending time outdoors, especially in green spaces, is one of the fastest ways to improve your health and happiness. It’s been shown to lower stress, blood pressure and heart rate, while encouraging physical activity and buoying mood and mental health. Some research even suggests that green space is associated with a lower risk of developing psychiatric disorders — all findings that doctors are increasingly taking seriously and relaying to their patients. Now, a new study published in the International Journal of Environmental Health Research adds to the evidence and shows just how little time it takes to get...
Source: TIME: Health - February 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology Source Type: news

A Simple Blood Test Is as Effective as a Biopsy in Detecting Lung Cancer Mutations
This study shows that liquid biopsy is accurate and detects [markers] at the same rate as standard-of-care tissue testing of tumor tissue,” says Dr. Vassiliki Papadimitrakopoulou, professor of medicine at MD Anderson Cancer Center and lead author of the study. “This study gives us confidence that what is found in liquid biopsies really is what is found in the tumor.” (Papadimitrakopoulou serves on a number of advisory boards for pharmaceutical companies and received nominal fees as a consultant to Guardant in designing and running this trial.) Guardant360 picks up fragments of DNA that tumors shed into th...
Source: TIME: Health - February 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized blood test for cancer Source Type: news