How Cancer Shaped Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg ’s Life and Work
The name Ruth Bader Ginsburg became almost synonymous with strength and stamina as she rose to prominence in judicial and feminist circles throughout her long career. Famously nicknamed the Notorious RBG and known for her grueling fitness regimen, the late Supreme Court justice also struggled with cancer and other health issues for the better part of her time on the bench — culminating with her death on Sept. 18 at the age of 87 of complications from metastatic pancreatic cancer. Ginsburg’s health issues became public in 1999, six years after her appointment to the Supreme Court, when she had surgery for early-...
Source: TIME: Health - September 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Cancer healthytime remembrance Source Type: news

We Need a COVID-19 Vaccine. We Also Need Transparency About Its Development
The authorization of an effective vaccine will mark perhaps the biggest turning point in the battle against coronavirus, but only if enough people are willing to get vaccinated. There have been substantial declines in public willingness to get vaccinated against COVID-19, despite immense, unprecedented public investments in vaccine development. In one survey, barely half of Americans said they would get the vaccine as soon as it was available, numbers that will undermine the benefits of even a highly effective vaccine. It is no mystery why trust in a potential vaccine has plummeted. Operation Warp Speed, the Trump Administ...
Source: TIME: Health - September 18, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dr. Ashish K. Jha Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

There ’s Only Weak Evidence For Vitamin-D As a COVID-19 Preventative—But Scientists Are Trying to Learn More
To protect himself from COVID-19, Dr. Anthony Fauci has long said he’s skipping hugs and handshakes, wearing a mask, and staying off of planes. Last week, he acknowledged adding another step to protect his health: taking supplements of vitamin-D. “If you are deficient in Vitamin-D, that does have an impact on your susceptibility to infection,” Fauci, head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said in an interview posted on Instagram last week. “So I would not mind recommending—and I do it myself—taking vitamin-D supplements.” However, while spurious claims t...
Source: TIME: Health - September 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Donald Trump Is Losing On An Issue Voters Care A Lot About. Here ’s How He’s Trying to Change That
With nearly 200,000 Americans dead from COVID-19 and millions more who lost their health insurance when they lost their jobs this year, President Donald Trump tried this week—as he has done throughout his presidency—to change the conversation. On Sunday, the President issued a new executive order aimed at lowering prescription drug prices, an issue dear to many voters, and boasted on Twitter that “prices are coming down FAST.” The reality is more complicated. Trump’s new executive order, which revokes and replaces a different executive order on drug prices that he signed in July, directs the...
Source: TIME: Health - September 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Abigail Abrams Tags: Uncategorized 2020 Election COVID-19 Explainer News Source Type: news

College Professors Made Models Showing How Bad COVID-19 Would Be on Campus. Some Administrators Ignored Them
Who thought it would be a good idea to move thousands of teenagers and young adults across the country to college campuses, where, unencumbered by parental supervision, many college kids did what college kids do? Actually, Nigel Goldenfeld and Sergei Maslov, two University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign physics researchers, thought they had it figured out. They created a predictive model for the campus, which showed that with a robust, twice-a-week testing program for students, faculty and staff who are regularly on campus, a mask mandate and an app for contact tracing, COVID-19 cases could be kept below 500 people for th...
Source: TIME: Health - September 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Victoria Knight / Kaiser Health News Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

The COVID-19 Pandemic Has Erased Decades of Progress on Childhood Vaccination
While the world waits for a COVID-19 vaccine, children across the globe are going without shots already known to be life-saving. With the world in disarray due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the number of children vaccinated this year against infections like diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, measles and pneumococcal disease has fallen to levels not seen since the 1990s, according to a new report from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. “In other words,” the report reads, “we’ve been set back about 25 years in about 25 weeks.” That stark figure comes from the Gates Foundation’s annual Goalkee...
Source: TIME: Health - September 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Central Europe Largely Avoided the First Coronavirus Wave. Why Are Cases Spiking Now?
Central Europe in the past week has seen a spike in daily confirmed coronavirus cases, a major setback for a region that largely avoided the first wave of the virus in the spring. The Czech Republic, an E.U. member state of 10.7 million, registered a country record of 1,382 new infections on Sep. 11, bringing the country’s total cases to over 32,400. In the last week, nearby countries Hungary, Slovakia and Slovenia have also recorded their highest daily caseloads since the pandemic began. Infections in the Czech Republic previously peaked at around 3 cases per capita (per 100,000 residents) in late March but reached ...
Source: TIME: Health - September 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Madeline Roache Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 europe Explainer Londontime Source Type: news

COVID-19 is Still Devastating Nursing Homes. The Trump Administration Isn ’t Doing Much To Stop It
At least 75,000 Americans in nursing homes and other long-term care facilities have already died from COVID-19—and the devastation is far from over. After a decrease earlier this summer, the death toll is now rising once again, and as the country heads into the fall and then flu season, millions of Americans who require institutional long-term care remain at the greatest risk. But, so far, the Trump Administration has talked a big talk—and mostly failed to deliver. The White House trumpeted its efforts to send personal protective equipment (PPE) and testing materials to long-term care facilities, but the suppli...
Source: TIME: Health - September 11, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Abigail Abrams Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

More Than Half of Americans Worry That White House Pressure Will Lead to a Rushed Coronavirus Vaccine
For weeks now, U.S. President Donald Trump has repeatedly made predictions, sometimes verging on promises, that a COVID-19 vaccine is imminent. “We remain on track to deliver a vaccine before the end of the year and maybe even before November 1st,” he said at a Sept. 4 news conference. “We think we can probably have it some time during the month of October.” As the Washington Post reported last week, administration officials say the President has become “fixated” on speeding up a vaccine development process that is already underway at an unprecedented rate and scope, to the point where n...
Source: TIME: Health - September 11, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

The Great Vaccine Race: Inside the Unprecedented Scramble to Immunize the World Against COVID-19
The cleverest of enemies thrive on surprise attacks. Viruses—and coronaviruses in particular—know this well. Remaining hidden in animal hosts for decades, they mutate steadily, sometimes serendipitously morphing into more effective and efficient infectious agents. When a strain with just the right combination of genetic codes that spell trouble for people makes the leap from animal to human, the ambush begins. Such was the case with SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus behind COVID-19, and the attack was mostly silent and insidious at first. Many people infected with SARS-CoV-2 remained oblivious as they served as the v...
Source: TIME: Health - September 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Magazine Source Type: news

COVID-19 Has Killed Nearly 200,000 Americans. How Many More Lives Will Be Lost Before the U.S. Gets It Right?
Forty-five days before the announcement of the first suspected case of what would become known as COVID-19, the Global Health Security Index was published. The project—led by the Nuclear Threat Initiative and the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security—assessed 195 countries on their perceived ability to handle a major disease outbreak. The U.S. ranked first. It’s clear the report was wildly overconfident in the U.S., failing to account for social ills that had accumulated in the country over the past few years, rendering it unprepared for what was about to hit. At some point in mid-September—perha...
Source: TIME: Health - September 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alex Fitzpatrick and Elijah Wolfson Tags: Uncategorized Cover Story COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news

Almost 2 Million Fewer U.S. Teenagers Are Vaping Now Compared to Last Year, CDC Data Show
Almost 2 million fewer U.S. teenagers report using e-cigarettes in 2020 compared to 2019, according to new data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). “Youth e-cigarette use remains an epidemic,” CDC Director Dr. Robert Redfield said in a statement released Wednesday, but the decline in underage vaping is dramatic. About 20% of U.S. high school students and 5% of middle schoolers who responded to the 2020 National Youth Tobacco Survey said they’d used an e-cigarette in the last 30 days, compared to 27.5% and 10.5% in 2019. That means about 3.6 million teenagers are now considered ...
Source: TIME: Health - September 9, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized News Vaping Source Type: news

AstraZeneca Resumed Its COVID-19 Vaccine Trial After Pausing for Safety Review
This story has been updated to reflect AstraZeneca’s vaccine trial resuming. AstraZeneca, the U.K.-based pharmaceutical company behind one of the world’s most promising COVID-19 vaccine candidates, has resumed its U.K. trial after pausing it due to “a single event of an unexplained illness,” the company announced Sept. 12. While AstraZeneca did not initially specify the nature of the study participant’s “unexplained illness,” an anonymous source told the New York Times that a trial participant in the U.K. was recently diagnosed with an inflammatory condition that affects the spinal...
Source: TIME: Health - September 9, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

AstraZeneca Paused Its COVID-19 Vaccine Trial to Perform a Safety Review. That ’s Not Bad News
AstraZeneca, the U.K.-based pharmaceutical company behind one of the world’s most promising COVID-19 vaccine candidates, has paused its trials due to “a single event of an unexplained illness that occurred in the UK Phase III trial,” the company announced Sept. 9. The news is disappointing, but it shows the development process is happening as it should. It is not uncommon for drug or vaccine trials to hit snags, even at advanced stages. Indeed, part of the reason vaccines go through multiple phases of testing, with increasingly large numbers of patients, is to catch rare but potentially serious side effec...
Source: TIME: Health - September 9, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Depression Has Skyrocketed During the COVID-19 Pandemic, Study Says
Almost as soon as coronavirus lockdowns went into effect in March, discussion turned to mental health. It’s well-documented that natural disasters, wars and other mass traumas can lead to significant increases in population-wide psychological distress. Weeks or months of anxiety, fear, sadness and social isolation can take their toll, leading many experts to fear the U.S. would face a mental health epidemic at the same time it fought a viral pandemic. Now, a study published in JAMA Network Open offers one of the first nationally representative estimates of how severe that epidemic may be: Three times as many American...
Source: TIME: Health - September 4, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Affordable Steroids Could Reduce Some COVID-19 Deaths by One-Third, Says World Health Organization
:rockYou’d think a robust immune system would be an awfully good thing to have if you’re battling COVID-19—and much of the time it is. But in the most extreme cases—the ones the World Health Organization (WHO) labels as “severe and critical,” denoting the most extremely ill, typically hospitalized patients, with the highest risk of death—the system meant to protect the body from disease can make things worse, leading to inflammation and other damage to the lungs, which in turn can result in an often fatal case of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In June, a single large s...
Source: TIME: Health - September 2, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Children Across Europe Are Going Back to School. Here ’s How 3 Countries Are Managing It
Around the world, students are returning to school as countries experiment with new educational models and social distancing protocols to prevent the spread of COVID-19. While preliminary research suggests children are less vulnerable to COVID-19 than adults, there remain concerns that schools will become breeding grounds for infection. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has cautioned that “full sized, in-person classes, activities and events” will likely lead to the spread of COVID-19 in schools. Opening schools in some countries has already proven to be hazardous. In Israel, for instance, s...
Source: TIME: Health - September 2, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mélissa Godin Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Explainer Londontime Source Type: news

Coronavirus Is Surging In the U.S. Midwest. Here ’s What’s Going on Across the Region
The epicenter of the U.S. coronavirus epidemic is a moving target. In the spring, it was New York City. Then Florida, Texas and California became hotspots. And now, with fall approaching, the outbreak has a new locus: the Midwest. Daily coronavirus cases and deaths are trending downward nationally after a spike this summer. There were about 34,000 new cases of coronavirus and about 600 deaths on Aug. 31—decreases of about 12% and 30%, respectively, compared to two weeks ago. But the Midwest is an exception to the trend. It is the country’s only region where daily case counts are rising in nearly every state&mda...
Source: TIME: Health - September 1, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

How the COVID-19 Pandemic Has Changed Cancer Care, In 4 Charts
Before the pandemic, about 1,000 new patients came to Boston’s Dana-Farber Cancer Institute for treatment consultations each week. When COVID-19 hit Massachusetts this spring, the number of new consultations fell by half and the hospital moved as many appointments as possible online. Now, with daily case counts relatively low in the area, the hospital is back to scheduling about 800 consultations per week, using a mixture of telemedicine and in-person appointments, says associate chief medical officer Dr. Andrew Wagner—but that still means about 200 cancer patients per week are not getting the treatment consult...
Source: TIME: Health - August 28, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme and Emily Barone Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

10 Epidemiologists and Infectious Disease Experts On Whether They Are Sending Their Kids Back to School
There are no easy answers to the questions about bringing kids back into classrooms this fall. Parents, school administrators and educators must instead weigh two bad options: isolate children at home or risk them getting and spreading COVID-19 through in-person contact. That decision is daunting even for infectious disease experts and epidemiologists. Over the last few months, they have been forced to think about the pandemic not only as scientists and scholars, but as parents, and despite their wealth of knowledge, like any parents, these experts are grappling with uncertainty. There are ways to limit the spread of the C...
Source: TIME: Health - August 28, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

For $5 and in 15 Minutes You Can Learn If You Have COVID-19
On Aug. 26, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) gave an emergency use authorization (EUA) for a rapid COVID-19 test that can produce results in just 15 minutes, which could not only increase the number of people tested in the U.S., but also identify those who are positive sooner, so they can self-isolate and limit spread of the disease. The testing device, made by Abbott Laboratories and called BinaxNOW Ag Card, is about the size of a credit card and can be easily used anywhere people need to be tested. It analyzes samples from a nasal swab and comes with an app that people can download to receive their results&mda...
Source: TIME: Health - August 27, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Online Therapy, Booming During the Coronavirus Pandemic, May Be Here to Stay
Mental health flows from the ceramic jug psychotherapist Lori Gottlieb keeps on her desk. There’s nothing special about the jug—a minor accessory in an office designed with the sort of tidy impersonality common to her field. And there’s no special elixir in it—just water. But all the same, the jug provides a certain kind of healing. When patients are struggling, crying, overcome in some way, Gottlieb, a Los Angeles based practitioner and author of the book Maybe You Should Talk to someone, will offer up a cup of water, pour it for them and hand it across. In that small gesture is a whole constellati...
Source: TIME: Health - August 27, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

How Growing Food Can Change Your Life, According to Gardener Ron Finley
Gardening has blossomed during the COVID-19 pandemic. Just as Americans planted “victory” gardens during wars and depressions before, now many are planting seeds to grow their own food. Doing so comes with real benefits, like stress relief, exercise and risk reductions for many diseases as a result of eating more vegetables. In a recent episode of TIME for Health Talks, Ron Finley, a Los Angeles–based urban gardener known as the “Gangsta Gardener,” and Questlove, a musician and food entrepreneur, talked about how gardening and the healthy foods it yields can also build community. A decade ago,...
Source: TIME: Health - August 26, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mandy Oaklander Tags: Uncategorized TIME for Health Talks TIME for Health Talks - E5 Source Type: news

How Data Visualization During Public Health Crises Has Saved Lives for Centuries
When publicized far and wide enough, infographics, some experts argue, can save lives. The communicative value in visualizing data towards improving public health outcomes is long-established, going back over two centuries. And while the earliest examples were intended to inform discussion and debate among an elite social sphere, they also sought to address real-world problems. From 1820 to 1830, an enthusiasm for statistics began to emerge across the western world, leading to an era of statistics concerned with reform. It was led by individuals who sought to disrupt what they saw as the chaos of politics and replace it wi...
Source: TIME: Health - August 26, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Murray Dick / The MIT Press Reader Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 health Public Health syndication Source Type: news

Artificial Intelligence Is Here To Calm Your Road Rage
I am behind the wheel of a Nissan Leaf, circling a parking lot, trying not to let the day’s nagging worries and checklists distract me to the point of imperiling pedestrians. Like all drivers, I am unwittingly communicating my stress to this vehicle in countless subtle ways: the strength of my grip on the steering wheel, the slight expansion of my back against the seat as I breathe, the things I mutter to myself as I pilot around cars and distracted pedestrians checking their phones in the parking lot. “Hello, Corinne,” a calm voice says from the audio system. “What’s stressing you out right n...
Source: TIME: Health - August 26, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

The World Health Organization Declares Africa Polio-Free
Nobody will ever know the identity of the thousands of African children who were not killed or paralyzed by polio this year. They would have been hard to keep track of no matter what because in ordinary times, they would have followed thousands last year and thousands the year before and on back in a generations-long trail of suffering and death. Instead, no African children were claimed by polio this year or last year or the year before. It was in 2016 that the last case of wild, circulating polio was reported in Nigeria—the final country on the 54-nation African continent where the disease was endemic. And with a r...
Source: TIME: Health - August 25, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

COVID-19 Is Transmitted Through Aerosols. We Have Enough Evidence, Now It Is Time to Act
Many months into the COVID-19 pandemic, the coronavirus is still spreading uncontrolled through the U.S. Public health authorities including the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO) tell us to remain six feet apart, wash our hands, disinfect frequently touched surfaces, and wear masks. But compliance with these measures—especially masks—is mixed, and daily we hear of cases where people do not know how they were infected. We hear about superspreading events, where one person infects many, happening in crowded bars and family gatherings, but not at outdoor ...
Source: TIME: Health - August 25, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jose-Luis Jimenez Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Exclusive: The Chinese Scientist Who Sequenced the First COVID-19 Genome Speaks Out About the Controversies Surrounding His Work
Over the past few years, Professor Zhang Yongzhen has made it his business to sequence thousands of previously unknown viruses. But he knew straight away that this one was particularly nasty. It was about 1:30 p.m. on Jan. 3 that a metal box arrived at the drab, beige buildings that house the Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center. Inside was a test tube packed in dry ice that contained swabs from a patient suffering from a peculiar pneumonia sweeping China’s central city of Wuhan. But little did Zhang know that that box would also unleash a vicious squall of blame and geopolitical acrimony worthy of Pandora herself....
Source: TIME: Health - August 25, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlie Campbell / Shanghai Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 overnight Source Type: news

Exclusive: The Scientist Who Sequenced the First COVID-19 Genome Speaks Out About the Controversies Surrounding His Work
Over the past few years, Professor Zhang Yongzhen has made it his business to sequence thousands of previously unknown viruses. But he knew straight away that this one was particularly nasty. It was about 1:30 p.m. on Jan. 3 that a metal box arrived at the drab, beige buildings that house the Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center. Inside was a test tube packed in dry ice that contained swabs from a patient suffering from a peculiar pneumonia sweeping China’s central city of Wuhan. But little did Zhang know that that box would also unleash a vicious squall of blame and geopolitical acrimony worthy of Pandora herself....
Source: TIME: Health - August 25, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlie Campbell / Shanghai Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 overnight Source Type: news

How Convalescent Plasma Could Help Fight COVID-19
The last time most of us gave any thought to antibodies was probably in high school biology, but we’re getting a crash refresher course thanks to COVID-19. They are, after all, the key to our best defenses against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that’s caused the global pandemic. People who have been infected likely rely on antibodies to recover, and antibodies are what vaccines are designed to produce. Or at least that’s what infectious-disease and public-health experts assume for now. Because SARS-CoV-2 is such a new virus, even the world’s best authorities aren’t yet sure what it will take to build p...
Source: TIME: Health - August 24, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

A New Study Suggests COVID-19 Reinfection Is Possible. Here ’s What to Know
Preliminary research released Monday suggests it’s possible to get COVID-19 twice—but experts say the news is not as concerning as that headline may seem. The new research, which was accepted for publication in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases, details the case of a 33-year-old man living in Hong Kong. He first tested positive for COVID-19 in late March and developed symptoms including cough, sore throat, fever and headache. He made a full recovery, but again tested positive for COVID-19 while traveling home from Europe in mid-August. This time, he did not have any symptoms. The Hong Kong-based research...
Source: TIME: Health - August 24, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

How to Make Homemade Face Masks More Effective —and How to Wear Them Right
Five months after coronavirus took root in the U.S., face masks remain one of the most controversial and confusing parts of the pandemic. Changing public-health messaging hasn’t helped. In March, when personal protective equipment (PPE) was running short, top U.S. public-health officials told Americans that the general public did not need masks because they don’t fully block respiratory particles that spread COVID-19, such as those in a sick person’s cough or sneeze. Most masks are best at preventing particles from getting into the air where others might inhale them, so, at first, the U.S. Centers for Dis...
Source: TIME: Health - August 24, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

How Coronavirus Has Spread Across the United States: Track the ‘Eye of the Epidemic’
For months now, many have been baffled by how the United States, among the richest and most technologically capable countries on Earth, could lead the world in both confirmed cases of COVID-19 and resulting deaths. Fingers have been pointed in many directions, from listless political leadership to intractable cultural attitudes. But there is another factor that arguably made the U.S. a sitting duck for viral catastrophe: the country’s 328 million residents are scattered across its many states, districts and territories, each with their own approach to viral containment. We aren’t battling one epidemic—we&...
Source: TIME: Health - August 24, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Chris Wilson Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

FDA Authorizes Use of Plasma From Recovered Patients to Treat COVID-19
(WASHINGTON) — President Donald Trump on Sunday announced emergency authorization to treat COVID-19 patients with convalescent plasma — a move he called “a breakthrough,” one of his top health officials called “promising” and other health experts said needs more study before it’s celebrated. The announcement came after White House officials complained there were politically motivated delays by the Food and Drug Administration in approving a vaccine and therapeutics for the disease that has upended Trump’s reelection chances. On the eve of the Republican National Convention, T...
Source: TIME: Health - August 24, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jonathan Lemire an Mike Stobbe / AP Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 overnight wire Source Type: news

What to Know About COVID-19 Tests, from PCR to Antigen to Antibody
People often talk about COVID-19 testing like it means only one thing. But in reality, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has so far granted emergency-use authorization to more than 200 different tests meant to detect a current or past infection from SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Most recently, the agency made headlines for approving the first such test that uses saliva samples, the aptly named SalivaDirect test out of the Yale School of Public Health. These COVID-19 tests fall into three main categories: PCR, antigen and antibody. Dr. Aneesh Mehta, chief of infectious diseases services at Emory Univ...
Source: TIME: Health - August 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Dr. Otis Brawley In Conversation With Douglas Brooks: ‘We Don’t Need to Reform Health Care—We Need to Transform Health Care’
Douglas Brooks served as the head of the White House Office of National AIDS Policy during the Obama Administration as the first openly gay, HIV-positive African American to hold the job. He focused on addressing the health needs of those at higher risk of HIV infection, and is now executive director of community engagement at the biopharmaceutical company Gilead Sciences. Dr. Otis Brawley was chief medical and scientific officer of the American Cancer Society before becoming a professor of oncology at Johns Hopkins, where he oversees a research effort exploring disparities in cancer rates and outcomes. Over a Zoom call, t...
Source: TIME: Health - August 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Douglas Brooks and Otis Brawley Tags: Uncategorized feature Magazine Source Type: news

You Might Not Catch Coronavirus On an Airplane. But Air Travel Is Still Probably Spreading COVID-19
It’s a very good time to be a domestic jet-setter on a budget. JetBlue’s fall sale, which took place in early August, featured tickets as low as $20 for trips between New York City and Detroit or Los Angeles to Las Vegas. Alaska Airlines recently offered a buy-one-get-one sale, a deal more familiar to Payless shoe shoppers than air travelers. United Airlines passengers could recently book themselves a round-trip from Newark, N,J. to Ft. Myers, Fla.—a major viral hotspot—for as little as $6, before taxes and fees hiked the price to a staggering—wait for it—$27. All of this, of course, ass...
Source: TIME: Health - August 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alex Fitzpatrick Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

COVID-19 Could Threaten Firefighters as Wildfire Season Ramps Up
Jon Paul was leery entering his first wildfire camp of the year late last month to fight three lightning-caused fires scorching parts of a Northern California forest that hadn’t burned in 40 years. The 54-year-old engine captain from southern Oregon knew from experience that these crowded, grimy camps can be breeding grounds for norovirus and a respiratory illness that firefighters call the “camp crud” in a normal year. He wondered what COVID-19 would do in the tent cities where hundreds of men and women eat, sleep, wash and spend their downtime between shifts. Paul thought about his immunocompromised wif...
Source: TIME: Health - August 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Matt Volz / Kaiser Health News Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Some Coronavirus Patients Are Reporting Symptoms That Last Months. Nobody Knows Exactly How to Treat Them
Kayla Brim laughed when she learned it could take 10 days to get her COVID-19 test results back. “I thought, ‘Okay, well, within 10 days I should be fine,’” she remembers. That was on July 2. More than a month later, Brim is still far from fine. Prior to the pandemic, the 28-year-old from Caldwell, Idaho, juggled homeschooling her two kids with her work as a makeup artist—she was supposed to open her own salon in July. Now, she suffers daily from shortness of breath, exhaustion, excruciating headaches, brain fog, neuropathy, high blood pressure and loss of taste and smell. She feels like &ldqu...
Source: TIME: Health - August 18, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Watch: A New York City Doctor Warns of COVID-19 ’s Long-Term Effects
Most people who are infected with COVID-19 ultimately survive. But for many patients, that may mean living with life-altering symptoms that linger—or become permanent. In a conversation with Katie Couric for TIME, Dr. Rony Shimony, a cardiologist at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York, said he and his colleagues have noticed that patients as young as their 30s who survived COVID-19 are reporting lasting symptoms. Doctors have discovered issues including kidney damage, reduction in heart function, and cognitive impairment in patients who had been infected with COVID-19, Shimony said, adding that the sicker the patients h...
Source: TIME: Health - August 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 katie couric Source Type: news

First Mediterranean Cruise Sets Sail From Italy After Months-long Coronavirus Hiatus
(ROME) — Cruise ship passengers had their temperatures checked and took COVID-19 tests Sunday so they could set sail on what is being billed as the first Mediterranean cruise after Italy’s pandemic lockdown. The cruise ship company MSC has made the procedures, for crew as well as passengers, part of its new health and safety protocols. The MSC Grandiosa, which was christened last year, set sail from the northern Italian port of Genoa on Sunday evening for a seven-night cruise in the western Mediterranean. Anyone testing positive, or with a fever, or having other COVID-19 symptoms was denied boarding, the compan...
Source: TIME: Health - August 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: FRANCES D'EMILIO / AP Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Travel wire Source Type: news

After 102 Days COVID-Free, New Zealand ’s Resurgence Highlights the Difficulties of Returning to Normal Life
For the past three months, New Zealanders have enjoyed a ‘COVID-free’ country, with citizens hugging one another, children returning to classrooms and sport fans filling stadiums. But this changed on Tuesday, when a family of four from Auckland, the country’s biggest city, tested positive for the virus, breaking a 102 day streak without any new COVID-19 cases. As of today, 29 people have tested positive for the virus, all of which remain linked to the original four cases. Although the government says the latest outbreak appears to currently be limited to one cluster, it is taking tough actions to prohibi...
Source: TIME: Health - August 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mélissa Godin Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Struggling to Focus? How to Improve Your Attention Span When ‘the World Is Sick’
If your mind wanders off before you finish reading this sentence, you’re not alone. Months into the COVID-19 pandemic, many of us are still learning to live with an ambient thrum of stress, anxiety, fear, grief and anger. For many people—especially those recovering from the virus or juggling work and child care—brain fog and inattention have been collateral damage. In a recent survey of 300 American workers, about 40% said they feel less productive than usual during the pandemic. Todd Braver, a professor of psychological and brain sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, says that’s completel...
Source: TIME: Health - August 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 UnitedWeRise20Disaster Source Type: news

Why the U.S. Is Losing the War On COVID-19
It is a frightening time to live in the United States. COVID-19, a novel disease as ruthless as it is seemingly random, is picking us off by the thousands; even many of those who “recover” may never truly be the same again. The pandemic has exposed the gulf between what this country promises for its citizens and what it actually delivers. And as the U.S. barrels toward Election Day, the outbreak is sure to complicate the voting process, with potentially disastrous results. For a short time in the spring, it appeared the U.S. was getting a grip on its outbreak. Hard-hit states like New York successfully flattene...
Source: TIME: Health - August 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alex Fitzpatrick Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 UnitedWeRise20Disaster Source Type: news

Falling Coronavirus Testing Numbers Obscures the Reality of the U.S. Pandemic
July was devastating in the U.S. After the country had appeared to flatten the curve in late spring, daily new cases of COVID-19 skyrocketed as the season turned, peaking at 20.5 per 100,000 people on July 18, according to data gathered by Johns Hopkins University (JHU). After some hemming and hawing, many local officials of states seeing resurgences reinstated some of the restrictions, meant to limit the spread of the virus, which had previously been lifted. On the face of it, these decisions seemed to have paid off: Though the U.S. recently passed 5 million total confirmed cases, it took longer (17 days) to go from 4 mil...
Source: TIME: Health - August 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Elijah Wolfson Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

‘It’s The Hunger Games for Laboratories.’ Why Some People Are Waiting Weeks for Their COVID-19 Test Results
A graduate student in Florida waited 11 days. Positive. A 14-year-old in California waited 24 days. Negative. A writer in New York has waited for four days—and is still waiting. As the United States struggles to control the COVID-19 pandemic, people across the country are using Twitter to announce the arrival of their virus test results. The point of these tweets is not just to broadcast the result itself, but to point out the absurdity of receiving a result so stale that it’s almost completely useless from a public health standpoint. Social media posts from July and August make clear a frustrating reality: ...
Source: TIME: Health - August 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Emily Barone Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 UnitedWeRise20Disaster Source Type: news

We Need to Take Care of the Growing Number of Long-Term COVID-19 Patients
On July 7, 2020, the Boston Red Sox pitcher Eduardo Rodriguez tested positive for the new coronavirus. He was scheduled to start Opening Day for the Sox, but the virus had other plans—damaging Rodriguez’s heart and causing a condition called myocarditis (inflammation of the heart muscle). Now the previously fit 27-year old ace left-hander must sit out the 2020 season to recover. Rodriguez is not alone in having heart damage from SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. In a new study done in Germany, researchers studied the hearts of 100 patients who had recently recovered from COVID-19. The findings were al...
Source: TIME: Health - August 11, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Gavin Yamey and Sharon Taylor Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 UnitedWeRise20Disaster Source Type: news

‘Our Moment To Take Charge.’ Eva Longoria on the Importance of Supporting Latino Communities Amid Coronavirus
During a TIME100 Talks discussion on Tuesday, award-winning actress and producer Eva Longoria discussed her role in new coalition Momento Latino, which aims to support the Latino community during — and in the aftermath of — the COVID-19 pandemic. The pandemic has deepened long-standing inequalities apparent between white and Latino populations in the U.S., Longoria told TIME100 Talks correspondent Ashley C. Ford. “Whether it’s disparities in health care, or access to quality education or lack of economic mobility,” she said, coronavirus “has exacerbated the problems within our communiti...
Source: TIME: Health - August 11, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Madeleine Carlisle Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 TIME100 Talks Source Type: news

The World Records Its 20 Millionth Case of COVID-19
There are a lot of ways to try to capture grim milestone the world crossed Monday night when it recorded its 20 millionth case of COVID-19. It’s two Swedens, four Irelands, 10 Slovenias. It’s greater than the entire population of the state of New York. The outbreak that began in Wuhan, China in December 2019 has now spread to 188 countries and regions, touching every continent but Antarctica. The U.S. continues to lead the world in total cases, having crossed its own milestone—to 5 million—on August 9. Brazil comes next, with 3 million; followed by India at 2.2 million; Russia at 890,000; and South ...
Source: TIME: Health - August 11, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature overnight UnitedWeRise20Disaster Source Type: news

Trump ’s Executive Order About U.S.-Made Drugs May Not Enhance Public Safety the Way It Should
Pharmaceutical manufacturing has long been a dirty business. The antibiotic-laced wastewater, and other pollutants it leaves behind, is just one of many reasons that so many American drug-manufacturing plants closed up over the last few decades and moved to places like Hyderabad, India, and China’s Zhejiang province, with their low labor costs and minimal regulations. But drug manufacturing in those remote outposts has been dirty in another way, as I learned from a decade of reporting that culminated in my book Bottle of Lies: the Inside Story of the Generic Drug Boom. The FDA’s own inspection records, as analy...
Source: TIME: Health - August 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katherine Eban Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Source Type: news