America ’s Drinking Habits Are Killing More Young People, Study Suggests
Liver disease deaths are growing more common in the U.S. and disproportionately affecting younger Americans, according to a recent study. The paper, published in The BMJ just a day after a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report on rising liver cancer death rates, paints a troubling picture of how Americans’ drinking habits may be affecting their health. While the new study couldn’t prove causation, the researchers say drinking is likely to blame for the growing number of adults aged 24 to 35 who are dying from cirrhosis, or scarring of the liver. The researchers used deaths logged in the CDC&r...
Source: TIME: Health - July 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime Research Source Type: news

Bayer to Stop Selling Controversial Birth Control Device That Sparked Thousands of Lawsuits
Bayer announced Friday that it will no longer sell a controversial, permanent form of birth control that thousands of women say led to serious complications. Essure, a non-surgical sterilization device that is inserted into the fallopian tubes and prevents pregnancy by producing scar tissue that blocks sperm from fertilizing eggs, will no longer be available in the U.S. after December 31, 2018, Bayer announced in a statement. “This decision is based on a decline in U.S. sales of Essure in recent years and the conclusion that the Essure business is no longer sustainable,” the statement reads. While Bayer mainta...
Source: TIME: Health - July 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime medicine onetime Source Type: news

Bayer Pulls Controversial Birth Control Device That Sparked Thousands of Lawsuits
Bayer announced Friday that it will no longer sell a controversial, permanent form of birth control that thousands of women say led to serious complications. Essure, a non-surgical sterilization device that is inserted into the fallopian tubes and prevents pregnancy by producing scar tissue that blocks sperm from fertilizing eggs, will no longer be available in the U.S. after December 31, 2018, Bayer announced in a statement. “This decision is based on a decline in U.S. sales of Essure in recent years and the conclusion that the Essure business is no longer sustainable,” the statement reads. While Bayer mainta...
Source: TIME: Health - July 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime medicine onetime Source Type: news

Turning Vacant Lots Into Green Spaces Can Improve Mental Health. Here ’s How
Researchers have long touted the mood-boosting effects of green space and spending time outdoors — and a new study emphasizes just how much of an impact your environment can have on your mental health. The paper, published Friday in JAMA Network Open, found an association between urban restoration efforts in Philadelphia and the mental health of city residents. “Cleaning and greening” urban lots in Philadelphia was linked to a drop in neighborhood residents feeling depressed or worthless, and a slight uptick in overall resident mental health, the study says. “Vacant lot greening is a very simple str...
Source: TIME: Health - July 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology onetime Source Type: news

Raw Turkey Is Connected to Salmonella Outbreak Affecting People in 26 States
A salmonella outbreak connected to raw turkey has affected 90 people in 26 states, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Thursday. At least 40 people have been hospitalized due to the Salmonella outbreak, according to the CDC. There are currently no deaths associated with this outbreak, which began last November. It is unclear where the Salmonella outbreak is coming from, and the CDC said it is still looking into which supplier or type of raw turkey product is linked to the outbreak. The agency is monitoring the outbreak in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety Inspectio...
Source: TIME: Health - July 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Gina Martinez Tags: Uncategorized Disease onetime Source Type: news

How Beef Jerky Might Affect the Risk of Mania
Scientists are learning that certain foods — either because of their natural ingredients or because of added chemicals — can have significant effects on health. One way in which food can exert this influence health is through inflammation, which is triggered by the immune system and may have an impact on the risk of developing a number of chronic conditions. Plenty of foods contribute to inflammation, from sugar to saturated fat. But in a new study, cured meats are under scrutiny. They usually contain nitrates, a group of chemicals used as a preservative to cure meats like jerky, meat sticks and hot dogs, and...
Source: TIME: Health - July 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime Source Type: news

How Complementary Cancer Therapies Can Increase Risk of Early Death
People diagnosed with cancer have a multitude of treatment options, many of which are standard therapies that have been well-studied to improve their chances of surviving their disease or avoiding recurrence. But people are increasingly also folding in complementary medicine approaches — which include nutrients, herbal remedies and other so-called natural supplements — with their cancer treatment regimes. While these are not nearly as well-studied as conventional therapies like surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, many people rely on them because they believe they can improve their chances of surviving their ca...
Source: TIME: Health - July 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Cancer healthytime Source Type: news

More Women Are Having Heart Attacks During Pregnancy and Birth
The number of women who have a heart attack during pregnancy, labor or in the weeks following birth appears to be rising. In a new study, published Wednesday in the journal Mayo Clinical Proceedings, researchers looked at more than 49 million births.Among the women who gave birth, 1,061 had a heart attack during their labor and delivery; 922 had heart attacks during their pregnancy, and 2,390 women had heart attacks after they gave birth. Overall, the risk of having a heart attack was relatively low. But the risk increased 25% from 2002 to 2014, the researchers found, which they call a concerning rise. Among women who had...
Source: TIME: Health - July 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Heart Disease Pregnancy Source Type: news

Is Shellfish Healthy? Here ’s What the Experts Say
With all the talk about the disease-fighting, life-extending superpowers of the Mediterranean diet, a lot of people are trying to cram more seafood into their meals. But while there are endless articles extolling the healthful glories of fatty, omega-3-rich fish like salmon and mackerel, there’s not much talk about shellfish—or whether these sea creatures deserve space on your shopping list. As it turns out, they do. “Shellfish are high-quality protein sources—just like land animals—meaning they have all the essential amino acids,” says Faye Dong, professor emerita of food science and hu...
Source: TIME: Health - July 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news

Teens Who Are Constantly On Their Phones May Be At Risk of ADHD, Study Says
New research says there may be consequences for teenagers growing up in the social media generation. Though it could not prove causation, a new study, published Tuesday in JAMA, found an association between lots of screen use in teenagers and symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The disorder is characterized by difficulty paying attention, paired with hyperactivity and impulsive behavior, according to the Mayo Clinic. In 2014, a group of researchers surveyed more than 3,000 California 10th graders about their digital media use and their self-reported frequency of symptoms that could indicate ADHD, ...
Source: TIME: Health - July 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime Research Source Type: news

‘For Me, It’s Personal.’ CDC Chief Reveals Fentanyl Almost Killed His Son
(NEW YORK) — The head of the nation’s top public health agency says the opioid epidemic will be one of his priorities, and he revealed a personal reason for it: His son almost died from taking cocaine contaminated with the powerful painkiller fentanyl. “For me, it’s personal. I almost lost one of my children from it,” Dr. Robert Redfield Jr. told the annual conference of the National Association of County and City Health Officials. The AP viewed a video of his speech, which he delivered Thursday in New Orleans. Redfield declined to speak about it Monday, except to say in a statement: “It...
Source: TIME: Health - July 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mike Stobbe / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime Opioid Source Type: news

More Americans Are Dying From Liver Cancer, Study Says
Liver cancer deaths have increased in the U.S., according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). Between 2000 and 2016, liver cancer death rates increased by 43% for men and 40% for women, according to the NCHS. In that time period, liver cancer rose from the ninth to the sixth leading cause of cancer death; it’s expected to kill about 30,200 people this year, according to the American Cancer Society (ACS). Liver cancer is much more prevalent in men than it is in women. Taking into account the recent increases, liver cancer kills rough...
Source: TIME: Health - July 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Cancer healthytime onetime Source Type: news

It ’s Nearly Impossible to Diagnose Alzheimer’s Disease in Living People. Bill Gates Wants to Change That
Name practically any disease or condition that afflicts the human body and there’s probably a good test for detecting it — preferably early, when there’s a chance that promising treatments can slow it down or even cure it. Cancer, inherited forms of heart disease, diabetes, hypertension, and even certain mental illnesses can be picked up by tracking hormones, genes or other things circulating in the body. But that hasn’t been the case with Alzheimer’s disease, the neurodegenerative condition that was first described in 1906, and more than a century later, still doesn’t have a blood test ...
Source: TIME: Health - July 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Disease healthytime onetime Source Type: news

3 Companies Recall Blood Pressure Medications Over Cancer Fears
Some drugs used to control high blood pressure and prevent heart failure were voluntarily recalled this past week due to an impurity that could possibly lead to cancer, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said. These products — with the active ingredient valsartan, a generic drug used to treat high blood pressure — may contain N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), a possible human carcinogen. The FDA asked three companies, Major Pharmaceuticals, Solco Healthcare and Teva Pharmaceuticals Industries Ltd., to recall their valsartan products. Solco and Teva were also asked to recall their drugs containing valsartan/hydr...
Source: TIME: Health - July 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jennifer Calfas Tags: Uncategorized medicine onetime Source Type: news

This Simple Trick Will Make You Happier and Better at Your Job
Tech startups are famous for installing nap pods and break rooms to attract Millennial workers. But most people work in offices where slipping off for a snooze or a foosball match would put a big dent in their promotion prospects. Even for self-employed or remote workers who don’t have a boss peering over their shoulder, taking anything more than a lunch break during work hours is anathema. But this “all work and no play” ethos may be harming employee health and productivity. The latest evidence suggests that taking short breaks during the work day makes employees happier and better at their jobs. A rece...
Source: TIME: Health - July 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology Source Type: news

‘That Laugh Is a Drug.’ HBO’s New Documentary Explores Robin Williams’ Relationship to Comedy and Addiction
Substance use loomed large over Robin Williams’ life. But a lesser-known addiction of the late entertainer may have been comedy itself, suggests HBO’s new documentary Robin Williams: Come Inside My Mind. Come Inside My Mind, directed by Marina Zenovich, offers a two-hour glimpse into Williams’ psyche through audio clips, archival footage and interviews with his friends and family. In doing so, it paints a vivid picture of the extent to which Williams, who died by suicide in August 2014, devoted his 63 years of life to making others laugh. Williams describes the passion he felt for comedy almost as a compu...
Source: TIME: Health - July 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized documentaries onetime Source Type: news

McDonald ’s Salads May Be Behind a Parasitic Illness Outbreak in Illinois and Iowa
McDonald’s salads may be to blame for a parasitic illness outbreak that has sickened more than 100 people in Illinois and Iowa, according to public health officials. Since mid-May, Illinois alone has seen more than 100 cases of cyclosporiasis, an intestinal illness caused by the parasite cyclospora, according to an announcement from the Illinois Department of Public Health. Iowa is experiencing a similar outbreak, according to a statement from the Iowa Department of Public Health. McDonald’s salads may be the culprit in both states, according to the announcements. Twenty-nine people in Illinois and at least 15 ...
Source: TIME: Health - July 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

The FDA Approved an Anti-Bioterrorism Drug Meant to Treat Smallpox
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on Friday approved the first drug specifically designed to treat smallpox — despite the fact that the disease was officially eradicated in 1980. While the daily threat of smallpox, which is caused by the variola virus, is virtually non-existent, FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb said in a statement that the drug, called TPOXX, or tecovirimat, could be a safeguard against bioterrorism. “To address the risk of bioterrorism, Congress has taken steps to enable the development and approval of countermeasures to thwart pathogens that could be employed as weapons,” Gottlieb s...
Source: TIME: Health - July 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime medicine onetime Source Type: news

McDonald ’s Salads May Be Causing Parasite Outbreak in Some States
(SPRINGFIELD, Ill.) — Health officials in Illinois and Iowa are investigating an increase in people becoming sick from a parasite that causes intestinal illness. The Illinois Department of Public Health said in a news release Thursday that it has received confirmation of about 90 cases of cyclosporiasis, which is caused by the Cyclospora parasite. The Iowa Department of Public Health, in its own release, said it has identified 15 cases linked to the same illness and parasite. Both departments say there appears to be a link to consumption of McDonald’s salads. The departments say McDonald’s is also investi...
Source: TIME: Health - July 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Time Tags: Uncategorized onetime public health Source Type: news

Dog Heart Disease May Be Linked to Potato-Based Pet Food, FDA Says
Potato-based pet foods may be causing heart disease in dogs, the U.S. Food & Drug Administration warned this week. The government agency is investigating a potential link between pet foods with peas, lentils, potatoes and other legume seeds and instances of canine dilated cardiomyopathy in dogs not typically vulnerable to the disease. “Highly unusual” reports of these dogs contracting the disease prompted the FDA to investigate their food sources, which, the agency notes, largely contained those certain ingredients. .@FDAanimalhealth is investigating the potential association between reports of canine di...
Source: TIME: Health - July 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jennifer Calfas Tags: Uncategorized onetime Pets Source Type: news

‘Do Not Eat this Cereal.’ CDC Says Kellogg’s Honey Smacks Linked to Salmonella Outbreak
(ATLANTA) — The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says a popular Kellogg’s cereal has been linked to a salmonella outbreak that has infected 100 people in 33 states. The CDC announced Thursday that customers should avoid Honey Smacks, tweeting, “Do not eat this cereal.” The agency says it found salmonella in samples of Honey Smacks, which has been subject to a voluntary recall by Kellogg since mid-June. It says that regardless of expiration date, the cereal should be thrown away or returned to a retailer for a refund. OUTBREAK Update: 100 Salmonella infections in 33 states linked to Kell...
Source: TIME: Health - July 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized onetime overnight public health Source Type: news

There ’s More Good News About Immune Therapies for Cancer
There has been welcome excitement in the cancer field lately about immune-based treatments, which co-opt the body’s own immune system to fight tumors. The so-called immunotherapies have transformed everything from solid cancers like melanoma and lung, to blood cancers like lymphoma and leukemia. In the latest study involving one of the first immunotherapies approved by the Food and Drug Administration, researchers report that an immune-based approach can even help people with advanced melanoma, which has spread to the brain, to live longer. The study, published in Cancer Immunology Research, included more than 2,700 ...
Source: TIME: Health - July 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Cancer healthytime Innovation Health Source Type: news

Do You Really Need Less Sleep As You Age?
There’s no doubt that kids need more sleep than adults. Their growing bodies and brains burn through a lot of energy, and adequate rest and recovery are essential for proper development. That’s why the National Sleep Foundation recommends that teens get eight to ten hours of sleep a night, while younger kids require more. But what about adults? It’s common for people to sleep fewer hours in middle age than during their 20s or 30s—and to report feeling fine. But does a person’s sleep requirements diminish with age? “No,” says Dr. Leila Kheirandish-Gozal, director of clinical sleep r...
Source: TIME: Health - July 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized healthytime sleep Source Type: news

When It Comes to Breastfeeding, This Is Why Women Never Feel Like They ’re Right
There may be nobody as vulnerable to manipulation as a mother worried about her child’s health. The question of whether we’re doing right by our kids cuts straight to the maternal heart. The problem is that in this age of marketing vs. activism, we’re overwhelmed and paralyzed by the debates about what’s best. It’s not surprising, then, that there was an uproar when the New York Times reported on July 8 that the Trump Administration had tried to dilute a resolution at the World Health Assembly this spring that called on all nations to “protect, promote and support breastfeeding.” T...
Source: TIME: Health - July 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Susanna Schrobsdorff Tags: Uncategorized breast milk breastfeeding Trump Administration WHO Source Type: news

About Half of Americans Say They ’re Trying to Lose Weight
If you’re trying to lose weight, new data says that you’re far from alone. 49% of American adults surveyed between 2013 and 2016 reported trying to lose weight at some point during the prior 12 months, according to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). Women were more likely than men to report trying to lose weight, finds the data, which is based on responses to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. That finding held true overall — 56.4% of women said they had tried to slim down, versus 41.7% of men — and in...
Source: TIME: Health - July 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news

This Surprising Factor May Raise Your Risk of Alzheimer ’s
Outside of your genetic makeup, few things are definitively linked to Alzheimer’s disease and other degenerative brain conditions. Unlike heart disease, which is affected by behaviors like diet, exercise and smoking, science hasn’t documented many risk factors that make the brain more vulnerable to dementia—although there are hints that things like physical activity and brain games might help to protect against cognitive decline. But in a study published in the journal Neurology, researchers led by Dr. Zoe Arvanitakis, medical director of the Rush Memory Clinic at Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center, fi...
Source: TIME: Health - July 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Alzheimer's Blood Pressure Brain healthytime Heart Disease Source Type: news

Is Hummus Actually Healthy? Here ’s What the Experts Say
Hummus, the chickpea-based dip that’s a staple in many Middle Eastern cuisines, is on the rise in the U.S. Multiple factors are fueling its growing popularity, according to the USDA: Hummus is naturally gluten-free, and Americans now have bigger appetites for healthier snacks. But how healthy is hummus? Here’s what the experts say. What is hummus made of? Traditional hummus is made from a blend of chickpeas, olive oil, tahini (sesame paste), lemon juice and spices, and this mix makes for a nutrient-dense food, says Elizabeth G. Matteo, a registered dietitian at Boston University’s Sargent Choice Nutritio...
Source: TIME: Health - July 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sophia Gottfried Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime Source Type: news

Should You Stay Friends With an Ex? Here ’s What Experts Say
Few relationship questions are as polarizing as whether or not you should stay friends with an ex. For every person who tries to salvage the good and forget the bad, there’s another who’d rather move on and never look back. Anecdotal evidence feeds arguments on both sides — but what do the experts say? Rachel Sussman, a New York City-based psychotherapist and author of The Breakup Bible, advises caution when it comes to staying friends, but says there are couples for whom it works; ultimately, she says, it’s “an individual determination.” Nonetheless, Sussman says there are some guidelin...
Source: TIME: Health - July 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime Sex/Relationships Source Type: news

How Scientists Are Testing Cancer Drugs to Slow Down Aging
Aging is a perfectly natural process, but that doesn’t mean that humans won’t try everything in their power to slow it down. In recent years, researchers who study aging have become intrigued by the idea of slowing the march of time by ridding the body of its population of older cells. In a new study published in Nature Medicine, scientists led by Dr. James Kirkland, director of the Robert and Arlene Kogod Center on Aging at Mayo Clinic, show that the proportion of older, aging cells in mice is indeed related to aging-related symptoms, from frailty to lower endurance and slower walking speeds. Kirkland and his ...
Source: TIME: Health - July 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Aging healthytime Innovation Health Source Type: news

Is Working Remotely Bad for Your Health?
Imagine rolling out of bed in the morning and, rather than racing to get out the door and into morning traffic, you could go for a run or make yourself breakfast. It’s the kind of daydream every chained-to-his-desk office worker has now and then. And for many, that daydream has become a reality. Following the Great Recession and the rise of the app-driven gig economy, more and more American workers have found themselves jettisoned from traditional office spaces and thrust into jobs that require them to work remotely, at least some of the time. A 2016 study from Harvard and Princeton found that the percentage of the ...
Source: TIME: Health - July 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Research Source Type: news

How to Have the Most Fun in Your Free Time, According to Science
The calendar is an indispensable tool in our over-committed and over-stimulated culture, and one no longer reserved solely for work commitments and appointments. Many busy people, faced with ever-dwindling free time, resort to scheduling everything from time with friends and family to sex with a partner. But is scheduling your free time a good idea? Researchers from Ohio State University’s Fisher College of Business and Rutgers Business School evaluated existing research (much of it their own) on time management tactics and how they affect the uptake, outcome and enjoyment of various activities. Many of their assessm...
Source: TIME: Health - July 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Innovation Health Mental Health/Psychology onetime Source Type: news

Why Some People Have a Crippling Fear of Flying — and How They Can Overcome It
At one point or another, as many as 12.5% of Americans will struggle with a phobia — “an intense, irrational fear of something that poses little or no actual danger” — according to the National Institute of Mental Health. Of these, a fear of flying, or aviophobia, is one of the most common, with estimated prevalence ranging from 2.5% to 6.5% of the population. Far more people have a fear of flying that doesn’t reach phobia levels, despite the fact that people are flying more than ever before and plenty of data shows it’s a reliably safe way to travel. So what is it about flying that stir...
Source: TIME: Health - July 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology onetime onetimetravel Source Type: news

A Woman Fractured Her Eye Socket By Blowing Her Nose
About a year ago, a 36-year-old woman entered London’s North Middlesex University Hospital experiencing all of the telltale signs of a fist-fight. She was bleeding from the nose, complaining of vision loss and experiencing swelling and extreme pain on the left side of her face, according to a recent case report published in The BMJ. Her symptoms all pointed to an eye socket fracture—what’s called an orbital blowout fracture, an injury typically sustained from punches or other facial trauma. But all this woman had done was blow her nose. “It’s very bizarre. We see eye socket fractures from peop...
Source: TIME: Health - July 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime medicine onetime Source Type: news

Working Long Hours Can Raise the Risk of This Disease
Working long hours can have detrimental effects on health — from increased stress to higher rates of certain chronic diseases. Now, in the latest study exploring the effect of extended work hours, researchers say that type 2 diabetes may be one of them. Mahee Gilbert-Ouimet, an epidemiologist and postdoctoral fellow at the Institute for Work and Health in Toronto, and her colleagues analyzed data from a database of more than 7,000 workers in Canada who were followed for more than 12 years to better understand whether work hours can affect the risk of diabetes. In the study, published in BMJ Diabetes Research & Ca...
Source: TIME: Health - July 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized diabetes healthytime Source Type: news

How a Drug For Pets May Help Prevent Zika and Malaria
Diseases spread by pests like mosquitoes and fleas remain global health problems. To prevent transmission, public health strategy has largely focused on using insecticides or bed nets. Vaccines are also under development for diseases like Zika, but few are approved for use. Now, a new study suggests that medicines already used for pets to protect against fleas and ticks could offer similar protection for humans. In the report, published Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers at the nonprofit drug discovery institute Calibr and TropIQ Health Sciences report that drugs called isoxa...
Source: TIME: Health - July 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Innovation Health public health Source Type: news

Drinking Coffee May Help You Live Longer, Study Says
A new study provides more good news for coffee lovers. Drinking coffee is associated with a lower risk of early death — virtually regardless of how much you drink and whether or not it’s caffeinated, concludes a paper published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine. “We observed an inverse association for coffee drinking with mortality, including among participants who reported drinking at least one cup per day, up to eight or more cups per day, as well as those drinking filtered, instant and decaffeinated coffee,” said Dr. Erikka Loftfield, the study’s lead investigator and a research fellow at th...
Source: TIME: Health - July 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Why You Should Enroll Your Kids in Piano Lessons, According to Science
With 88 keys and hundreds of internal strings, a standard piano produces a slew of unique sounds and tones. And mastering that complex system doesn’t only result in beautiful music — a new study says it can also help kids build up their language skills. “There’s evidence that early exposure to piano practice enhances the processing of sounds that extend not only from music, but also into language,” says John Gabrieli, a cognitive neuroscientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s McGovern Institute for Brain Research, and the co-author of the paper published in Proceedings of ...
Source: TIME: Health - July 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Innovation Health onetime Research Source Type: news

The FDA Approved a Topical Treatment for Excessive Underarm Sweating
The Food and Drug Administration has approved a topical wipe that can help curtail excessive underarm sweating, the company behind the product announced Friday. Qbrexza is a cloth that can be applied to the skin daily to reduce perspiration by blocking sweat gland activation, according to an announcement from manufacturer Dermira. The product offers a subtle solution to the millions of people who suffer from primary focal axillary hyperhidrosis, or excessive underarm sweating, which is currently often treated with Botox and other more invasive options. In two clinical trials, Qbrexza was shown to reduce patients’ swe...
Source: TIME: Health - June 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime medicine onetime Source Type: news

You ’re Probably Not Washing Your Hands Right, Study Says
People fail to properly wash their hands while cooking 97% of the time, potentially opening them up to food-borne illnesses such as salmonella, norovirus and E. coli, according to a study from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS). FSIS, in partnership with researchers from RTI International and North Carolina State University, sorted 383 people into one of two groups. About half the sample watched a three-minute video about safe food preparation and using food thermometers, while the other did not get any guidance. All of the individuals were then sent into test kitchens outf...
Source: TIME: Health - June 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime Research Source Type: news

A Heat Wave Is Hitting Much of the U.S. This Week. Here ’s How to Stay Safe
Large swaths of the country are gearing up for — or already weathering — a major heat wave this week, with temperatures threatening to top 100 degrees in some places. If you live in an area experiencing these extreme temperatures, it’s important to know how to keep yourself cool and healthy. Here’s what you need to know in a heat wave, according to Dr. Laura Burke, an emergency medicine physician at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. Prevention is the best medicine Burke recommends limiting strenuous outdoor activity and taking frequent breaks if it can’t be avoided, staying indoo...
Source: TIME: Health - June 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

Psychologists Explain Why You Procrastinate — And How to Stop
From time to time, everybody leaves a task lingering on their to-do list for a few hours — or days, or weeks — too long. Procrastination is a normal, near-universal phenomenon — which makes it all the more important to understand why it strikes and what to do about it. “Procrastination is not just avoiding or delaying a task,” says David Ballard, head of the American Psychological Association’s Center for Organizational Excellence. “It also has to include an aspect that’s counterproductive, irrational or unnecessary.” Those triggers typically fall into one of four camps...
Source: TIME: Health - June 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology onetime Source Type: news

E. Coli Outbreak in Romaine Lettuce That Sickened 200 and Killed 5 Linked to Tainted Irrigation
NEW YORK — Tainted irrigation water appears to be the source of a national food poisoning outbreak linked to romaine lettuce, health officials said Thursday. About 200 people were sickened in the E. coli outbreak and five people died. The outbreak, which started in the spring, is now over, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. The illnesses in 36 states were previously traced to romaine lettuce grown in Yuma, Arizona, which provides most of the romaine sold in the U.S. during the winter. On Thursday, officials said the outbreak strain of E. coli bacteria was found in an irrigation canal in the Yuma...
Source: TIME: Health - June 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mike Stobbe / AP Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

Why July Is the Most Dangerous Month To Go Swimming
Just in time for swimming season, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a new report on disease outbreaks associated with swimming in rivers, lakes and oceans. Between 2000 and 2014, public health officials in 35 states, plus Guam, reported a total of 140 disease outbreaks associated with swimming in untreated recreational waters — mainly at beaches and bodies of water in public parks, the report says. These outbreaks led to 4,958 illnesses and two deaths. The vast majority of outbreaks with a confirmed cause were linked to gastrointestinal pathogens such as norovirus, Shigella and E. coli. ...
Source: TIME: Health - June 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

Only 23% of Americans Get Enough Exercise, a New Report Says
Less than a quarter of Americans are meeting all national physical activity guidelines, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). Federal physical activity guidelines recommend that adults get at least 150 minutes of moderate or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise each week, in addition to muscle-strengthening activities at least twice a week. But according to the new NCHS report, which drew on five years of data from the National Health Interview Survey, only about 23% of adults ages 18 to 64 are hitting both of those marks. Another 32% ...
Source: TIME: Health - June 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Exercise/Fitness healthytime onetime Source Type: news

The Doctor Who Discovered Lead in Flint ’s Water on What Went Wrong and How to Fix It
What led you to suspect that there was lead in the water of Flint, Mich.? I was clued in by a high school girlfriend–a drinking-water expert–over a glass of wine at a barbecue at my house. She told me that the water [which was being piped from the local river to save money] wasn’t being treated properly. And once you proved that to be true, the city swung into action? No. I was attacked, the science was attacked and my credibility was attacked. Everybody talking about this was attacked: moms, activists, pastors, journalists. In your new book, What the Eyes Don’t See, you say the crisis in Flint was ...
Source: TIME: Health - June 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Belinda Luscombe Tags: Uncategorized 10 Questions Flint Michigan Water Source Type: news

Researchers May Have Underestimated the Number of Opioid Overdose Deaths
The statistics around opioid overdose deaths are staggering. More than 42,000 people died of an opioid overdose in 2016 alone, according to recent federal estimates, and fatal overdose rates continue to rise across nearly every segment of the population. Among young adults, these drugs accounted for about 20% of all deaths in 2016, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates. But a new study says that even those figures don’t capture the full extent of the opioid crisis. In a paper published Wednesday in Public Health Reports, researchers find that as many as 70,000 opioid overdose deaths were unreported...
Source: TIME: Health - June 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime Research Source Type: news

Being Fit in Middle Age May Protect Against Depression
About 16 million adults in the U.S., and 350 million people around the world, have depression, a major source of physical and mental disability. It affects people’s employment and their ability to socialize and maintain relationships. Now, in a large study published in JAMA Psychiatry, researchers say there may be a relatively inexpensive, non-invasive way to combat depression, beginning in middle-age. The scientists, led by Dr. Madhukar Trivedi, director of the center for depression research and clinical care at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, report that being physically fit can lower the...
Source: TIME: Health - June 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology Source Type: news

You Asked: What ’s the Best Way to Treat Plantar Fasciitis?
Often described as a throbbing pain that strikes the meat of the heel and radiates outward, plantar fasciitis is one of the most common foot conditions in the U.S. Roughly 2 million Americans suffer from it, and it can last anywhere from a few weeks to several months at a stretch. In some cases, it can even be a chronic ailment. The plantar fascia is a fan-shaped band of connective tissue that runs along the underside of the foot, spanning the arch and attaching at the heel and between the bones of the toes. Plantar fasciitis results when that connective tissue is somehow injured or inflamed—a common occurrence among...
Source: TIME: Health - June 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Exercise/Fitness healthytime Source Type: news

My 10-Year-Old Daughter Takes the First FDA-Approved Marijuana Drug. It ’s Changed Our Lives
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) made history on Monday when it approved Epidiolex, an oral medication that uses cannabidiol (CBD) — a chemical compound that is found in marijuana, but does not cause a high — for the treatment of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and Dravet syndrome, two rare forms of epilepsy. (In addition to being the first FDA-approved drug derived from marijuana, Epidiolex is also the first drug approved specifically for Dravet syndrome.) In three clinical trials comprising more than 500 people, the pharmaceutical was shown to reduce the frequency of seizures associated with these conditions. A...
Source: TIME: Health - June 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Adam Adache Tags: Uncategorized healthytime medicine onetime Source Type: news

The Science Behind Happy Relationships
When it comes to relationships, most of us are winging it. We’re exhilarated by the early stages of love, but as we move onto the general grind of everyday life, personal baggage starts to creep in and we can find ourselves floundering in the face of hurt feelings, emotional withdrawal, escalating conflict, insufficient coping techniques and just plain boredom. There’s no denying it: making and keeping happy and healthy relationships is hard. But a growing field of research into relationships is increasingly providing science-based guidance into the habits of the healthiest, happiest couples — and how to ...
Source: TIME: Health - June 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sarah Treleaven Tags: Uncategorized Love & Relationships Source Type: news