Merck Will Allow Other Drug Manufacturers to Produce Its COVID-19 Pill
(LONDON) —Pharmaceutical company Merck agreed to allow other drug makers to produce its COVID-19 pill, in a move aimed at helping millions of people in poorer countries get access to the potentially life-saving drug, a United Nations-backed public health organization said on Wednesday. The Medicines Patent Pool said in a statement that it had signed a voluntary licensing agreement for molnupiravir with Merck and its partner Ridgeback Biotherapeutics. The agreement will allow the Medicines Patent Pool to grant further licenses to qualified companies who are approved to make the drug. Neither drug maker will receive ro...
Source: TIME: Health - October 27, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 healthscienceclimate wire Source Type: news

FDA Committee Recommends COVID-19 Vaccine for Children 5-11 Years Old
COVID-19 vaccines are already authorized for children ages 12 and older, and the shots now have the support of a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) expert panel for younger children ages 5 to 11. In a 17 to 0 vote, with one abstention, the committee recommended the COVID-19 vaccine made by Pfizer-BioNTech for the youngest group yet to potentially get immunized against the disease in the US. The committee recommended a two-dose regimen at one-third the dosage approved for adults. The FDA now takes the committee’s advice into consideration before making a final recommendation. If the agency decides to recommend th...
Source: TIME: Health - October 26, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

COVID-19 Boosters Are Now More Popular Than First Shots
When Americans divide themselves into camps, they stick to them fiercely: Democrats versus Republicans, pro-life versus pro-choice, gun rights versus gun control. Add to that, as has become apparent over the course of the past year, those who are pro- versus anti-coronavirus vaccines. As with so many other polarizing issues, your position on getting or not getting inoculated against COVID-19 has become more than a medical question. It’s morphed into a form of cultural identifier, a sign of your membership in one tribe or another. More than ever, that’s becoming clear as booster shots are rolled out around the n...
Source: TIME: Health - October 26, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Making Breast Cancer Care More Inclusive
Most guidelines and data on breast cancer have come from studies of white women of European descent. “I don’t experience the screening recommendations in the same way that white women do,” says Yvette Gullatt, chief diversity officer for the University of California system. “I experience breast cancer in Black women as highly aggressive and lethal. I’ve had white colleagues who were diagnosed with breast cancer and go to radiation in the morning, and are back at work by 10 a.m.; they never miss a day.” Gullatt joined the WISDOM study, which stands for Women Informed to Screen Depending ...
Source: TIME: Health - October 26, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Moderna Reports COVID-19 Vaccine Safe and Efficacious for Kids
Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccine is safe and efficacious for children ages 6 to 11 years old who recieve two half doses, the company said today. That’s based on the results of its KidCOVE study, which involved more than 4,700 kids in that age group. The children participating in Moderna’s trial were randomly assigned to receive two half doses of the vaccine or two shots of a placebo. Those who got the vaccine generated adequate virus-fighting antibodies that met the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) requirements for efficacy, and the vaccine produced an immune response in nearly all the children. ...
Source: TIME: Health - October 25, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

China to Start Vaccinating Children Over 3 Years Old as COVID-19 Cases Spread
(TAIPEI, Taiwan) — Children as young as 3 will start receiving COVID-19 vaccines in China, where 76% of the population has been fully vaccinated and authorities are maintaining a zero-tolerance policy toward outbreaks. Local city and provincial level governments in at least five provinces issued notices in recent days announcing that children ages 3-11 will be required to get their vaccinations. The expansion of the vaccination campaign comes as parts of China take new clampdown measures to try to stamp out small outbreaks. Gansu, a northwestern province heavily dependent on tourism, closed all tourist sites Monday a...
Source: TIME: Health - October 25, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Huizhong Wu / AP Tags: Uncategorized China COVID-19 healthscienceclimate wire Source Type: news

The ‘Safe Supply’ Movement Aims to Curb Drug Deaths Linked to the Opioid Crisis
On a morning Zoom call, a group of Canadian mothers give their full attention to a young man from the Drug User Liberation Front. At 26, Jeremy Kalicum is the age some of their kids would be if they had not died of accidental overdoses. “We’re just sick of it. We’re sick of our friends dying.”Kalicum’s tone is urgent as he walks the moms through a PowerPoint presentation explaining why the Liberation Front, known as DULF, wants to protest on International Overdose Awareness Day and hand out illicit drugs. These wouldn’t be the kind that killed their sons and daughters, he assures them; t...
Source: TIME: Health - October 25, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Paul Moakley Tags: Uncategorized feature nationpod photography Source Type: news

FDA Says Pfizer COVID-19 Vaccine Looks Effective for Young Kids
Federal health regulators said late Friday that kid-size doses of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine appear highly effective at preventing symptomatic infections in elementary school children and caused no unexpected safety issues, as the U.S. weighs beginning vaccinations in youngsters. The Food and Drug Administration posted its analysis of Pfizer’s data ahead of a public meeting next week to debate whether the shots are ready for the nation’s roughly 28 million children ages 5 to 11. The agency will ask a panel of outside vaccine experts to vote on that question. In their analysis, FDA scientists concluded that...
Source: TIME: Health - October 23, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: LAURAN NEERGAARD and MATTHEW PERRONE / AP Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 wire Source Type: news

Bringing WISDOM to Breast Cancer Care
Dr. Laura Esserman answers the door of her bright yellow Victorian home in San Francisco’s Ashbury neighborhood with a phone at her ear. She’s wrapping up one of several meetings that day with her research team at University of California, San Francisco, where she heads the Carol Franc Buck Breast Care Center. She motions me in and reseats herself at a makeshift home office desk in her living room, sandwiched between a grand piano and set of enormous windows overlooking her front yard’s flower garden. It’s her remote base of operations when she’s not seeing patients or operating at the hospita...
Source: TIME: Health - October 22, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Pfizer Says Its COVID-19 Vaccine Appears More Than 90% Effective in Kids
Kid-size doses of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine appear safe and nearly 91% effective at preventing symptomatic infections in 5- to 11-year-olds, according to study details released Friday as the U.S. considers opening vaccinations to that age group. The shots could begin in early November — with the first children in line fully protected by Christmas — if regulators give the go-ahead. Details of Pfizer’s study were posted online. The Food and Drug Administration was expected to post its independent review of the company’s safety and effectiveness data later in the day. Advisers to the FDA will pub...
Source: TIME: Health - October 22, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lauran Neergaard and Matthew Perrone / AP Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 wire Source Type: news

U.S. Conservatives Want to Save Australia From ‘COVID Tyranny.’ Australians Aren’t Interested
Australian lawmakers took to Twitter to school American critics of the country’s COVID-19 public health measures, pointing to how well they have worked to prevent deaths in comparison to policies in the U.S., where the death toll has been one of the worst in the world. Since the pandemic began, Australia has enforced strict measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19, including some of the world’s longest lockdowns. State and territory-wide restrictions can only be lifted once more than 80% of the local population aged 16 and older is fully inoculated against the virus. In the U.S., by comparison, many states l...
Source: TIME: Health - October 22, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Chad de Guzman Tags: Uncategorized Australia COVID-19 overnight Second click uspoliticspolicy Source Type: news

CDC Authorizes Boosters of Moderna and Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 Vaccines
Dr. Rochelle Walensky, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), authorized booster doses of COVID-19 vaccines for certain groups. Walensky followed the advice of a CDC expert panel, which recommended the boosters in in two unanimous votes earlier in the day. The 15-member Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) advised that anyone who was initially vaccinated with the Moderna shot get a booster at least six months later, and that J&J-Janssen recipients receive a booster at least two months after their initial vaccination. The endorsement follows a similar decision from the Food and ...
Source: TIME: Health - October 21, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

CDC Authorizes Boosters of Moderna and Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 Vaccines
Dr. Rochelle Walensky, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), authorized booster doses of COVID-19 vaccines for certain groups. Walensky followed the advice of a CDC expert panel, which recommended the boosters in in two unanimous votes earlier in the day. The 15-member Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) advised that anyone who was initially vaccinated with the Moderna shot get a booster at least six months later, and that J&J-Janssen recipients receive a booster at least two months after their initial vaccination. The endorsement follows a similar decision from the Food and ...
Source: TIME: Health - October 21, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Migrants and Refugees Face an Invisible Trauma We Can ’t Ignore
In the wake of multiple legal challenges, the Biden Administration late last month aimed to fortify the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program with a new rule that would shield more than 600,000 undocumented people brought to the U.S. by their parents. While proponents of the program welcomed the move and heralded it an “effort to bulletproof the DACA program,” our response in this moment overlooks a fundamental problem: each challenge on immigration—whether the Muslim Ban, family separation, or challenging DACA—takes a toll on refugee and migrants through vicarious trauma and weather...
Source: TIME: Health - October 21, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Gunisha Kaur Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

FDA Authorizes Moderna and J & J Booster Shots
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) today followed the advice of its advisory committee and recommended booster shots of COVID-19 vaccines from Moderna and Johnson&Johnson-Janssen. The agency also authorized mixing or matching booster doses, meaning that people can either get another dose of the same vaccine they originally received, or get a booster with a different vaccine. More than 150 million doses of the Moderna vaccine and 15 million of the J&J-Janssen vaccine have been administered in the U.S. In a briefing discussing the agency’s decision, acting FDA director Dr. Janet Woodcock said the primary re...
Source: TIME: Health - October 20, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Climate Chaos Helped Spark the French Revolution —and Holds a Dire Warning for Today
Historians have long observed the links between the natural environment and the fate of civilization. Natural emergencies like droughts, floods and crop failure regularly plunge people into chaos. Long term changes in the earth’s climatic conditions lead flourishing societies like the Roman Empire to wither and fade. But perhaps there is no greater example of the explosive intersection of climate disruption and political upheaval than the period surrounding the French Revolution of 1789. Starting in the mid-13th century, the northern hemisphere entered a period of prolonged cooling known as the Little Ice Age. This ...
Source: TIME: Health - October 20, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mike Duncan Tags: Uncategorized climate change Sustainability TIME 2030 world affairs Source Type: news

Schools and Pediatricians Will Be Key to Biden ’s Childhood Vaccine Rollout
The White House outlined its COVID-19 plan to vaccinate younger children which would focus on smaller doses administered with smaller needles if the shots are authorized by regulators. “We will be ready to get shots in arms,” President Joe Biden’s COVID-19 response coordinator, Jeff Zients, said Wednesday during a White House briefing on the plan, which includes supporting vaccination by primary care doctors and in pharmacies and schools. The U.S. has ordered enough supply to vaccinate all kids 5 to 11, the White House said in a statement Wednesday. The vaccination campaign for kids would differ from the ...
Source: TIME: Health - October 20, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Josh Wingrove / Bloomberg Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 healthscienceclimate wire Source Type: news

Scientists Successfully Attached a Pig Kidney to Human For the First Time
Scientists temporarily attached a pig’s kidney to a human body and watched it begin to work, a small step in the decades-long quest to one day use animal organs for life-saving transplants. Pigs have been the most recent research focus to address the organ shortage, but among the hurdles: A sugar in pig cells, foreign to the human body, causes immediate organ rejection. The kidney for this experiment came from a gene-edited animal, engineered to eliminate that sugar and avoid an immune system attack. Surgeons attached the pig kidney to a pair of large blood vessels outside the body of a deceased recipient so they cou...
Source: TIME: Health - October 20, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Carla K. Johnson / AP Tags: Uncategorized Research wire Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson Hike 2021 Profit Forecast as COVID-19 Vaccine Sales Grow
Sales of the cancer treatment Darzalex helped Johnson & Johnson deliver better-than-expected third-quarter earnings, while COVID-19 fueled vaccine revenue and had more customers reaching for Tylenol. The world’s biggest maker of health care products hiked its 2021 earnings forecast after saying Tuesday that net income climbed 3% to $3.67 billion in the recently completed quarter. Sales of the company’s single-shot COVID-19 vaccine started to pick up in the quarter and nearly doubled what it brought in during the first half of 2021. J&J also said that sales of over-the-counter drugs, which do not need pr...
Source: TIME: Health - October 19, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: TOM MURPHY/AP Tags: Uncategorized biztech2030 Vaccines wire Source Type: news

Need a Checkup? Controversial Fitness Company CrossFit Wants to Be Your Doctor
CrossFit CEO Eric Roza would like to know if I have a primary care doctor. When I sheepishly tell him that I do not, he grins. I’ve just helped prove his point that the traditional primary care system, the one rooted in doctor’s offices and hospitals, isn’t working as it should. My lack of a doctor is “indicative of the problem,” he says. Traditional primary care “takes time, it takes money. You’re not seeing the value, right?” That problem is what CrossFit—a fitness company famous for high-intensity workouts that combine weight lifting and cardio, and infamous for a st...
Source: TIME: Health - October 19, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Health Care healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

It May Be Too Late to Find the Origin of COVID-19. The WHO Is Trying Anyway
Almost two years into the COVID-19 pandemic, it’s still not clear exactly how, where or when the SARS-CoV-2 virus began infecting people. Many experts believe the virus jumped from animal hosts to humans, but researchers continue to investigate the possibility that it escaped from a laboratory. It’s not clear which, if either, of those theories is correct, and as time passes, the chances of finding a concrete answer grow slimmer. But on Oct. 13, the World Health Organization (WHO) unveiled a new effort to capitalize on whatever limited time remains: the Scientific Advisory Group for the Origins of Novel Pathoge...
Source: TIME: Health - October 19, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

What Colin Powell ’s COVID-19 Death Says About the Current State of the Pandemic
The death of Colin Powell, an 84-year-old former four-star general who served as Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff under U.S. President George H.W. Bush and Secretary of State under President George W. Bush and is perhaps best known for his role in bringing the U.S. into its second war in Iraq, is a high-profile reminder of a grim reality: COVID-19 is not just a pandemic of the unvaccinated, as current president Joe Biden likes to say, but a pandemic of the elderly, too. From early on in the pandemic, we’ve known the virus disproportionately kills older people, and the overall data make that pretty clear: About 5...
Source: TIME: Health - October 18, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alex Fitzpatrick Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

Japan ’s Plummeting COVID-19 Cases Create Mysterious Success Story
(TOKYO) — Almost overnight, Japan has become a stunning, and somewhat mysterious, coronavirus success story. Daily new COVID-19 cases have plummeted from a mid-August peak of nearly 6,000 in Tokyo, with caseloads in the densely populated capital now routinely below 100, an 11-month low. The bars are packed, the trains are crowded, and the mood is celebratory, despite a general bafflement over what, exactly, is behind the sharp drop. Japan, unlike other places in Europe and Asia, has never had anything close to a lockdown, just a series of relatively toothless states of emergency. Some possible factors in Japan’...
Source: TIME: Health - October 18, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mari Yamagichi/AP Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Japan wire Source Type: news

The FDA ’s Vaccine Expert Panel Recommends Approval of a J & J Booster for Anyone Who Had an Initial Shot
The Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) expert vaccine panel on Friday, Oct. 15, recommended a booster dose of the Johnson&Johnson-Janssen COVID-19 vaccine. In a unanimous vote, the 19-member panel recommended the booster for anyone who was previously immunized with the vaccine, at least two months after the that first dose. With the advice, the panel has now backed boosters for all three vaccines currently available in the US. J&J’s vaccine is the only one authorized in the U.S. (and globally) that requires only a single dose. If the FDA accepts the committee’s decision, which it is expected to ...
Source: TIME: Health - October 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

A New Study Makes the Case for Mixing and Matching the Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna and J & J Vaccine Doses
As soon as health officials made it clear that the world would need a booster dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, they needed to know if people could mix doses of vaccines made by different manufacturers. In the first study to provide results on such cross-dosing, researchers say that it’s safe for people who received one of the three vaccines available in the U.S. to get a booster dose of another—and that they found early evidence that certain combinations might generate stronger immune responses than others. The study was published on a preprint server and not yet peer-reviewed, and came on the same day that the Fo...
Source: TIME: Health - October 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

FDA Panel Votes to Recommend Moderna COVID-19 Booster Shot
The COVID-19 vaccine made by Moderna is the second to get the greenlight from a panel of experts assigned to advise the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). On Thursday afternoon, a 19-member committee voted unanimously in favor of advising the FDA to recommend booster shots for people who have previously been vaccinated with Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccine. It’s now up to the FDA to make a final decision, which the Centers for Disease Control’s (CDC) Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices will then consider shortly in coming up with the final recommendation for who should get the Moderna booster. Moderna...
Source: TIME: Health - October 14, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

With Help From a Beer Maker, There ’s a New Front Opening in the Battle Over School Masks
Shannon Jensen was diligent about making sure her sons wore masks to school when classes resumed in September. Other parents in Waukesha, Wis., weren’t. And three weeks after school opened, Jensen’s eldest son, who was seated next to an unmasked classmate who had COVID-19 symptoms, fell ill with the virus. Soon, another of her boys had tested positive, according to a lawsuit that marks a new twist in the ongoing battle over what schools should be doing to protect children from the coronavirus. While parents across the country have filed lawsuits against states and school districts to protest mask mandates, Jens...
Source: TIME: Health - October 14, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katie Reilly Tags: Uncategorized Education nationpod News Source Type: news

The ‘Great Resignation’ Is Finally Getting Companies to Take Burnout Seriously. Is It Enough?
Toward the end of last year, Anthony Klotz, a professor of business administration at Texas A&M University who studies workplace resignations, realized that a lot of people were about to quit their jobs. A record 42.1 million Americans quit a job in 2019, according to U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data, but that rate dropped off during the pandemic-addled year of 2020. As 2021 approached, bringing with it the promise of effective vaccines and a return to semi-normal life, Klotz guessed that two things would happen. First, many of the people who wanted to quit in 2020 but held off due to fear or uncertainty would fina...
Source: TIME: Health - October 14, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

The Delta Variant Is Forcing New Zealand To Find a Safe Way Out of Its ‘Zero-COVID’ Strategy
For much of the pandemic, Aotearoa New Zealand’s COVID-19 response has ranked as one of the best in the world. We have been living in a parallel world, one of a small handful of countries to follow an elimination strategy. That strategy has meant that we have had very few COVID-19 cases and deaths. And when I say very few, I mean it. Until August this year, there had been just over 2,800 confirmed cases and 26 deaths. We have lived much of the pandemic with daily life almost unrestricted. As someone who follows the global situation closely it has been surreal. I’ve spent much of this pandemic worried that New Z...
Source: TIME: Health - October 14, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Siouxsie Wiles Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

How COVID-19 Opened the Door to a New Era in Psychedelic Medicine
From Wall Street to Hollywood, psychedelics are having a cultural moment. For those of us who grew up in the “this is your brain on drugs” era, it’s hard to let go of stigma—and the mental image of an egg sizzling on a hot pan. But as a growing number of states and cities move to decriminalize drugs, and investors flock to an emerging market for psychedelic health care, substances like psilocybin, ketamine and LSD are edging into mainstream culture—and setting the stage for a paradigm shift in modern medicine. Within the next few years, we could see psychedelic therapies prescribed for refract...
Source: TIME: Health - October 13, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dr. Shoshana Ungerleider Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Why a One-Size-Fits-All Approach to Breast Cancer Prevention Can Leave Women Vulnerable
When Heather Mann learned she had breast cancer, it was a complete surprise. “I had never thought that I was at high risk for breast cancer,” the 49-year-old says. “I don’t have any family lineage or history of breast cancer. My grandmother on my father’s side had breast cancer, but apparently that’s not usually a significant factor. So I was very surprised when I found out that I had a malignant tumor.” Shelia Bauer ‘s breast cancer journey took a very different route. After her twin sisters died of the disease in their 50s, Bauer, now 73, assumed that she likely carried som...
Source: TIME: Health - October 13, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Time Tags: Uncategorized Cancer healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

He Was Shot by a Stranger but Treated Like a Criminal When He Reached the ER
When Greg Jackson Jr. thinks about the night he was shot, the most painful part of the memory isn’t that he almost died. It’s not the six surgeries he underwent, the half-year bedridden, or the image of his younger cousin using a shirt as a tourniquet to save his life. It’s not even the thought of the gunman. What brings on a flood of resentment is his reception at the hospital. After he was rolled off the ambulance on a stretcher, still clad in his bloody clothes, police officers—not doctors or nurses—greeted him and began peppering him with questions. Where was he when the shots rang out? W...
Source: TIME: Health - October 13, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Melissa Chan Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Guns Health Care healthscienceclimate nationpod Source Type: news

Why Big Businesses in Texas Are Ignoring Gov. Abbott ’s Vaccine Mandate Ban
Mandates have proven to be an effective but controversial method for compelling vaccine-shy Americans to receive their shots. But as the Biden Administration has doubled down on requiring COVID-19 vaccination—including proposing a rule that businesses with more than 100 employees mandate vaccination—for some Republicans, opposition to mandates is proving to be an essential credential for showcasing leaders’ conservative bonafides. On Oct. 11, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott—who has opposed masking but came under fire from a Republican political rival recently for allegedly failing to push back hard enough o...
Source: TIME: Health - October 12, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized biztech2030 Source Type: news

U.S. Task Force Reconsiders Daily Low-Dose Aspirin Use for Preventing Heart Attacks in Adults Over 60
Older adults without heart disease shouldn’t take daily low-dose aspirin to prevent a first heart attack or stroke, an influential health guidelines group said in preliminary updated advice released Tuesday. Bleeding risks for adults in their 60s and up who haven’t had a heart attack or stroke outweigh any potential benefits from aspirin, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force said in its draft guidance. For the first time, the panel said there may be a small benefit for adults in their 40s who have no bleeding risks. For those in their 50s, the panel softened advice and said evidence of benefit is less clear....
Source: TIME: Health - October 12, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lindsey Taylor/AP Tags: Uncategorized healthscienceclimate Research wire Source Type: news

Reluctant Towns, Cities and States Are Being Dragged Into Court to Fix Sidewalks for People With Disabilities
From her Baltimore dining room, Susan Goodlaxson can see her neighbor gardening across the street. But while other neighbors stop to chat, Goodlaxson just watches from the window. She uses a wheelchair, and there isn’t a single curb ramp on her block. If the 66-year-old wanted to join, she’d have to jump her wheelchair down the 7.5-inch curb and risk a fall. Ditto if she wanted to wheel over to the library, a trip that would require riding in the street to avoid rampless curbs and broken sidewalks. “I don’t feel like it’s asking too much to be able to move your wheelchair around the city,&rdqu...
Source: TIME: Health - October 12, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Maureen O’Hagan / Kaiser Health News Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

An Innovative Washington Law Aims to Get Foreign-Trained Doctors Back in Hospitals
Growing up in Somalia’s capital of Mogadishu, where people sometimes die of preventable or treatable illnesses like diarrhea, typhoid and malaria, taught Abdifitah Mohamed a painful lesson: adequate health care is indispensable. In 1996, Mohamed’s mother died of septicemia after spending nine months hospitalized for a gunshot wound. Her death, Mohamed says, inspired him to go to medical school, and for about four years he worked to treat the sick and injured in Somalia, Sudan and Kenya. But Mohamed hasn’t been able to work as a doctor since 2015, when he left for the United States, where his wife emigrate...
Source: TIME: Health - October 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

On Loving Someone Who Battles Inner Demons
Well hello! I’m so glad you’re here. Write to me here, or via Instagram: @SusannaSchrobs. Subscribe to get a new edition of “It’s Not Just You” every Saturday. Many of those who battle the most serious mental health issues have a small tribe of loved ones who travel that road with them (as much as anyone can). This week’s essay is for those of you who might know a bit about that journey. This somewhat abbreviated newsletter is also also a call to action for this year’s World Mental Health Day in the wake of a pandemic that has had disastrous effects on the most vulnerable. Yours, S...
Source: TIME: Health - October 10, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Susanna Schrobsdorff Tags: Uncategorized It's Not Just You Source Type: news

More than 120,000 American Kids Lost a Parent or Other Caregiver During the COVID-19 Pandemic
(NEW YORK) — The number of U.S. children orphaned during the COVID-19 pandemic may be larger than previously estimated, and the toll has been far greater among Black and Hispanic Americans, a new study suggests. More than half the children who lost a primary caregiver during the pandemic belonged to those two racial groups, which make up about 40% of the U.S. population, according to the study published Thursday by the medical journal Pediatrics. “These findings really highlight those children who have been left most vulnerable by the pandemic, and where additional resources should be directed,” one of th...
Source: TIME: Health - October 7, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mike Stobbe/AP Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 overnight wire Source Type: news

Pfizer Asks U.S. Regulators to Approve COVID-19 Shots for Kids 5 Through 11
Pfizer asked the U.S. government Thursday to allow use of its COVID-19 vaccine in children ages 5 to 11 — and if regulators agree, shots could begin within a matter of weeks. Many parents and pediatricians are clamoring for protection for children younger than 12, today’s age cutoff for the vaccine made by Pfizer and its German partner BioNTech. Not only can youngsters sometimes get seriously ill, but keeping them in school can be a challenge with the coronavirus still raging in poorly vaccinated communities. Pfizer announced in a tweet that it had formally filed its application with the Food and Drug Administr...
Source: TIME: Health - October 7, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: LAURAN NEERGAARD/Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

Why, When and How to Test At-Home for COVID-19
As we close in on two years of living with COVID-19, quick and accurate tests for COVID-19 remain an urgent priority. In fact, as schools reopen, businesses resume operations and people return to work, rapid testing could be the key to preventing Delta or any new variants of SARS-CoV-2 from flaring into even larger outbreaks. But that’s only if testing is used in the right way, at the right time and in the right places. With more opportunities for people to interact in public settings where the virus can spread, it’s never been more important to know who is infected and potentially seeding new COVID-19 infectio...
Source: TIME: Health - October 7, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

The World ’s First Malaria Vaccine—and What it Means for the Future of Pandemic Response
On Oct. 6, the World Health Organization recommended use of the first vaccine to fight malaria. The decision is momentous and highly anticipated for many reasons: among them is that this is the first vaccine to help reduce the risk of deadly severe malaria in young children in Sub-Saharan Africa, where the disease remains a leading killer. The vaccine offers hope that there can be a circle of learning from one pandemic to the next. Malaria, our oldest pandemic, may offer insights on how we can survive contemporary scourges like COVID-19. Malaria evolved at least 2.5 million years ago and first infected humans in rural part...
Source: TIME: Health - October 7, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Raj Panjabi Tags: Uncategorized health healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

The World Health Organization Just Endorsed The World ’s First Malaria Vaccine
LONDON (AP) — The World Health Organization (WHO) on Wednesday endorsed the world’s first malaria vaccine and said it should be given to children across Africa in the hope that it will spur stalled efforts to curb the spread of the parasitic disease. WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus called it “a historic moment” after a meeting in which two of the U.N. health agency’s expert advisory groups recommended the step. “Today’s recommendation offers a glimmer of hope for the continent, which shoulders the heaviest burden of the disease. And we expect many more African child...
Source: TIME: Health - October 6, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Maria Chang / AP Tags: Uncategorized Disease wire Source Type: news

As Teachers and School Boards Face a Spike in Violent Threats, the Justice Department Is Stepping In
The U.S. Justice Department is launching an effort to combat a spike in harassment and violent threats against school board members and teachers, calling it a “disturbing trend,” while Republican leaders are denouncing the move as an attempt to silence parents amid debates over mask mandates and social justice issues. “While spirited debate about policy matters is protected under our Constitution, that protection does not extend to threats of violence or efforts to intimidate individuals based on their views,” Attorney General Merrick Garland said in a memo on Monday, directing the FBI and U.S. Att...
Source: TIME: Health - October 6, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katie Reilly Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Education nationpod Source Type: news

The Justice Department Says It ’s Stepping in as Teachers and School Boards Face a Spike in Violent Threats
The U.S. Justice Department is launching an effort to combat a spike in harassment and violent threats against school board members and teachers, calling it a “disturbing trend,” while Republican leaders are denouncing the move as an attempt to silence parents amid debates over mask mandates and social justice issues. “While spirited debate about policy matters is protected under our Constitution, that protection does not extend to threats of violence or efforts to intimidate individuals based on their views,” Attorney General Merrick Garland said in a memo on Monday, directing the FBI and U.S. Att...
Source: TIME: Health - October 6, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katie Reilly Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Education nationpod Source Type: news

Charlize Theron and Darren Walker on How to End Global Vaccine Inequity
This month, for the first time in two years, the G20 will meet in Rome to discuss a global, multilateral agenda. The stakes could not be higher. Certainly, member states are feeling the COVID-19 pandemic’s ongoing consequences. But, sadly, the 175 countries not at the table—most in the Global South—still face the gravest suffering and highest rates of death. Nowhere is the disparity more apparent than in vaccine access. In places like Los Angeles and New York City, where we respectively live and were vaccinated, large distribution sites like the L.A. Forum and the Javits Center have helped the two cities ...
Source: TIME: Health - October 6, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlize Theron and Darren Walker Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

China, Isolated From the World, Is Now the Last Major Country Still Pursuing a ‘Zero COVID’ Strategy
For much of the pandemic, a group of places in the Asia-Pacific brought infections to zero, becoming virus-free havens in a world ravaged by the pathogen. Now, with the rise of the delta variant and the proliferation of vaccines, only one is still holding fast to that goal of eliminating Covid-19: China. With New Zealand preparing to shift away from the zero-tolerance strategy, China’s isolation is complete, raising the stakes on how long it can stick to a playbook that requires closed borders, abrupt lockdowns, and repeated disruption of social and economic activity. One by one, Covid Zero places like Singapore and ...
Source: TIME: Health - October 6, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Michelle Fay Cortez and Ainsley Thomson/Bloomberg Tags: Uncategorized bloomberg wire China COVID-19 overnight Source Type: news

NIH Director Francis S. Collins to Step Down by End of Year
Dr. Francis S. Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health for 12 years, said Tuesday he is stepping down, capping a career in which he directed crucial research into the human genome and the fight against serious diseases like cancer, Alzheimer’s, diabetes and COVID-19. Collins said he was “grateful and proud of the NIH staff and the scientific community, whose extraordinary commitment to lifesaving research delivers hope to the American people and the world every day.” He said the decision to step down at year’s end was “a difficult one.” “I fundamentally believe, howe...
Source: TIME: Health - October 5, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DINO HAZELL/AP Tags: Uncategorized Public Health wire Source Type: news

How to Maintain Your Social Life When You Have IBD
About two years ago, as Samantha Plevney was dealing with a major Crohn’s disease flare-up, she decided to tell her gastroenterologist how it was affecting her emotional health. “I told him that I’m alive but I’m not living,” she recalls. “Not being able to see my friends because of the uncertainty of my health situation was making me feel worse. I think people with IBD, and their doctors, tend to focus on physical symptoms, and for good reason. But the mental-health effect that comes from social support is huge.” Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) encompasses two conditions—Cr...
Source: TIME: Health - October 5, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Elizabeth Millard Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Meet the Women Participating in the Study That Could Change Future of Breast Cancer
When it comes to breast cancer, the sobering truth is that despite all the advances in new treatments and more sophisticated ways of imaging breast tissue, doctors still aren’t very good selecting out the women at highest risk of the disease from those at lower risk. All women get screened for breast cancer based on the crudest risk factor available: age. That’s led to a disturbing paradox. While death rates from breast cancer in the U.S. have dropped 40% from 1989 to 2017, that success may have come at a price, resulting in a Goldilocks treatment scenario in which only some women are receiving just the right s...
Source: TIME: Health - October 4, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Cancer healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

New York ’s Vaccine Mandate Is Working, But Hospitals Are Struggling With the Fallout
By almost any measure, New York State’s requirement that health care workers get vaccinated against COVID-19, which was announced on Aug. 16 and went into effect Sept. 27, has been a success. Thousands of reticent health care workers across the Empire State have been vaccinated over the last month. Among hospital staff specifically, 87% were fully vaccinated as of Sept. 28, up from 77% as of Sept. 24. (A similar mandate governing education workers in New York City, which went into effect today, has also resulted in a surge in vaccinations.) However, even health care leaders who support vaccination and vaccine mandate...
Source: TIME: Health - October 4, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 healthscienceclimate Source Type: news