Here ’s Why You Get More Acne in the Winter — And How to Fix It
Nothing much blooms in winter, but pimples may be an exception. A 2015 study of New England acne patients found the percentage of them who enjoyed a clear complexion was greatest during summer and fall. Winter, on the other hand, tended to be a rough season; rates of moderate-to-severe acne leaped 11% among the study participants in winter compared to summer. One reason your skin tends to act up in cold weather may have to do with sebum, a type of oil that the small glands of the skin secrete. Sebum helps keep your skin properly moist and supple, but too much can cause the cells in your skin to stick together. This can lea...
Source: TIME: Health - November 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news

Are Smoothies Healthy? Here ’s What the Experts Say
Smoothies have a health glow about them. They’re often an integral part of cleanses, and they’re ubiquitous at health food stores and health-centric restaurants. And the smoothie trend is still going strong. Workout studios serve them up post-class, dietitians preach their powers and fit celebrities tout their nutritional prowess. But are smoothies healthy? Here’s what you should know about the drink, whether you’re picking one up or making your own. How to make healthy smoothies You can put nearly anything into a smoothie. But most consist of liquid (like water, non-dairy milk or kefir), fruits, ve...
Source: TIME: Health - November 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Cassie Shortsleeve  Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news

More U.S. Kids Have Recently Been Diagnosed with a Mysterious Paralyzing Illness
(NEW YORK) — More children have been diagnosed with a mysterious paralyzing illness in recent weeks, and U.S. health officials said Tuesday that they still aren’t sure what’s causing it. This year’s count could surpass the tallies seen in similar outbreaks in 2014 and 2016, officials said. Fortunately, the disease remains rare: This year, there have been 90 cases spread among 27 states, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. It’s not clear what’s causing some children to lose the ability to move their face, neck, back, arms or legs. The symptoms tend to occur about a week a...
Source: TIME: Health - November 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: MIKE STOBBE / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime public health Source Type: news

Juul Suspends Sales of Most Flavored Products, Stops Social Media to Address Underage Vaping
(Bloomberg) — Juul Labs Inc., the maker of the e-cigarette that is wildly popular with American teens, said it stopped selling its fruit-flavored nicotine pods to stores and shut down its U.S.-based Facebook and Instagram accounts. The move, which was announced Tuesday by Juul Chief Executive Officer Kevin Burns, follows a campaign from the Food and Drug Administration to curtail underage use of e-cigarettes. On Thursday, an FDA senior official said the agency would restrict sales of many fruity flavored nicotine cartridges used in vaping devices. The curb is expected to cut Juul’s in-store retail sales by 45...
Source: TIME: Health - November 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Olivia Zaleski / Bloomberg Tags: Uncategorized onetime public health Source Type: news

New Physical Activity Guidelines Offer Simple Advice: Move More, Sit Less
Americans should sit less and move more, even if that activity comes in tiny chunks, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS) latest physical activity guidelines. The core recommendations in the 2018 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, which were published Monday in the Journal of the American Medical Association, aren’t all that different from the previous iteration, which was released in 2008. The tone, however, has shifted to include more manageable forms of activity and to promote benefits of exercise that go beyond physical health, such as improved cognitive function, me...
Source: TIME: Health - November 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Exercise/Fitness onetime overnight Source Type: news

New Studies Give Mixed Results About Taking Fish Oil and Vitamin D
(CHICAGO) — Taking fish oil or vitamin D? Big studies give long-awaited answers on who does and does not benefit from these popular nutrients. Fish oil taken by healthy people, at a dose found in many supplements, showed no clear ability to lower heart or cancer risks. Same for vitamin D. But higher amounts of a purified, prescription fish oil slashed heart problems and heart-related deaths among people with high triglycerides, a type of fat in the blood, and other risks for heart disease. Doctors cheered the results and said they could suggest a new treatment option for hundreds of thousands of patients like these. ...
Source: TIME: Health - November 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: MARILYNN MARCHIONE / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime Supplements Source Type: news

Prescription Doses of Fish Oil May Lower Heart Attack and Stroke Risk
Omega-3 fatty acids, abundant in fish oil, are known to be good for the heart. Studies have shown that people who eat more fish rich in these fats have lower rates of heart problems and less risk of dying from heart disease compared to those who eat less. Those data have fueled a booming business in over-the-counter fish oil supplements. In a new study published in the New England Journal of Medicine, and presented at the American Heart Association annual meeting, researchers report that a highly purified version of omega-3 fats, called icosapent ethyl, can lower the risk of a number of heart-related events, including hear...
Source: TIME: Health - November 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Heart Disease omega-3 Source Type: news

Fish Oil and Vitamin D Supplements May Not Help Prevent Heart Attacks and Cancer, Study Says
There’s good evidence that fish oil supplements may lower the risk of second heart events — like a heart attack or stroke — in people with heart disease, but few rigorous studies have investigated whether the supplement can help people to lower their risk of having a heart event in the first place. And while some data suggests that people with lower levels of vitamin D tend to have higher rates of heart disease and cancer, the evidence isn’t solid. Now, a new study published in the New England Journal of Medicine and presented at the annual meeting of the American Heart Association offers more findi...
Source: TIME: Health - November 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Drugs Source Type: news

Some Researchers Thought This Drug Could Treat the Polio-Like Illness Sickening Children. A New Study Says It Probably Doesn ’t
Health officials are scrambling for answers — and cures — as a rare, polio-like illness called acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) spreads across the country. Some researchers thought the antidepressant fluoxetine, which is often sold under the brand name Prozac and has some antiviral properties, could work against AFM, a mysterious illness that strikes some children and can cause muscle weakness, breathing issues, paralysis and even death. A new study published Friday in Neurology, however, provides disappointing results: In a small, non-randomized retrospective study, fluoxetine did not seem to restore patients&rsqu...
Source: TIME: Health - November 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Drugs healthytime onetime Source Type: news

CDC Confirms First Death Related to Salmonella Outbreak Linked to Raw Turkey
(NEW YORK) — Federal health officials on Thursday reported the first death in an ongoing salmonella outbreak linked to raw turkey. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said the death was in California but didn’t have any immediate details. Since last November, the agency said 164 people have fallen ill in 35 states, with the most recent case being reported on Oct. 20. No products have been recalled, and the agency hasn’t recommended that people avoid turkey. But it said it believes the outbreak is widespread and ongoing, and it reminded people to properly cook and handle turkey with Thanksgiving...
Source: TIME: Health - November 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized California Death health onetime Source Type: news

Here ’s When Your Body Burns the Most Calories, According to a New Study
Everything from your workouts to your sleep schedule can influence how many calories you burn throughout the day. And according to a small new study, there may be a time of day during which your body naturally burns the most calories. That’s likely thanks to circadian rhythms, which control the body’s internal clock and sleep and wake cycles. These rhythms can also influence calorie burning, according to the research, which was published Thursday in Current Biology. At rest, humans burn about 10% more calories in the late afternoon than they do late at night, laboratory experiments found. That equals about 130...
Source: TIME: Health - November 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Research Source Type: news

Should You Take Aspirin Every Day? Here ’s What the Science Says
Aspirin is best known as an over-the-counter painkiller. But acetylsalicylic acid, as it’s called chemically, has many other health benefits, as well as side effects, in the body that have only become clear in recent years. Here’s what the latest science says about the health benefits and side effects of aspirin, as well as which conditions it may treat and those it doesn’t appear to improve. (If you are taking aspirin for any reason other than for periodic pain relief, it’s best to consult with your doctor to confirm whether the benefits outweigh the risks in your particular case.) How aspirin affe...
Source: TIME: Health - November 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Drugs healthytime Source Type: news

This CEO Is Pushing a Pill For Female Sex Drive. But Does the Science Hold Up?
There are two schools of thought about pink. One is that it is the color of bubble gum and Barbie. Cindy Eckert’s view is that it is the color of business. It is a dominant presence at the offices of her Raleigh, N.C., venture-capital firm, the Pink Ceiling, a fund that advertises its main goal as “to make women really f-cking rich.” It’s an even more dominant presence on Eckert, who defies people to observe the taboo on assessing anyone–especially a woman–by their clothes. She wears some hue of pink every working day, accessorized with hot pink nails, lipstick and shoes. Even her hair s...
Source: TIME: Health - November 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Belinda Luscombe Tags: Uncategorized Sex society Source Type: news

Here ’s How Popular Yoga and Meditation Really Are
Yoga and meditation aren’t so alternative anymore. About 14% of adults and a growing number of kids now practice yoga and meditation, according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics. Between 2012 and 2017, the percentage of kids and adults who said they had done yoga or meditated in the last year rose significantly. About 14% of adults reported practicing both yoga and meditation in 2017, up from about 9.5% and 4%, respectively, in 2012. Meanwhile, the percentage of kids ages 4 to 17 who had done yoga in the last year increased from about 3% to 8...
Source: TIME: Health - November 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Research Source Type: news

Does Echinacea Really Work Against Colds? Here ’s What the Science Says
During cold season, people often search for natural cold remedies and immunity boosters. Echinacea has long been rumored to both prevent and knock out colds. But the evidence in favor of the herbal supplement is mixed, and its varied preparations make it hard to study. The name “echinacea” refers to almost 10 species of flowering herb, and echinacea supplements use one or several of these species. They can be made using either the plant’s above-ground parts or its below-ground roots (or both). All this variance has led to disagreement among experts when it comes to echinacea’s benefits. “Our s...
Source: TIME: Health - November 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news

Does Echinacea Work? Here ’s What the Science Says
During cold season, people often search for natural cold remedies and immunity boosters. Echinacea has long been rumored to both prevent and knock out colds. But the evidence in favor of the herbal supplement is mixed, and its varied preparations make it hard to study. The name “echinacea” refers to almost 10 species of flowering herb, and echinacea supplements use one or several of these species. They can be made using either the plant’s above-ground parts or its below-ground roots (or both). All this variance has led to disagreement among experts when it comes to echinacea’s benefits. “Our s...
Source: TIME: Health - November 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news

Spanking Harms Children, According to the American Academy of Pediatrics
Parents should not spank their children, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) said Monday, in an updated policy statement on the effects of corporal punishment. Spanking as a form of discipline in young children leads to increased aggression and does not go very far in teaching responsibility and self-control, the AAP says, also noting the harmful effects of verbal abuse. The policy statement, which will be presented at the AAP’s 2018 National Conference & Exhibition, details that the use of corporal punishment can have a negative effect on the relationship between a parent and a child. “Experiencing co...
Source: TIME: Health - November 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mahita Gajanan Tags: Uncategorized health onetime Parenting Source Type: news

More Women Are Using Marijuana During Pregnancy, Report Says
Fewer women are smoking cigarettes and drinking alcohol during pregnancy, but more are using marijuana, according to new federal data. Between 2002 and 2016, the percentage of pregnant women who reported smoking cigarettes while expecting fell significantly: from 17.5% to about 10%, according to a research letter published Monday in JAMA Pediatrics. Alcohol use also fell modestly during this time period, from nearly 10% to about 8.5%. But cannabis use among pregnant women — while still relatively rare — is on the rise, increasing from almost 3% of pregnant women to almost 5%. Those figures were based on respons...
Source: TIME: Health - November 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Research Source Type: news

Freddie Mercury Didn ’t Want to Be a ‘Poster Boy’ for AIDS — But He and Other Celebrities Played a Key Role in Its History
In the new biopic about Freddie Mercury — Bohemian Rhapsody, in theaters Friday — the Queen lead singer (played by Rami Malek) has one request when he tells his bandmates about his HIV diagnosis: that they keep the news private, because he doesn’t want to be a “poster boy” for AIDS or a “cautionary tale.” While Mercury is remembered more for his music than for anything, his health status did in fact become public just days before he died of complications of AIDS-related pneumonia on Nov. 24, 1991, at the age of 45. And in fact, even if the timeline of his diagnosis in real life doe...
Source: TIME: Health - November 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Olivia B. Waxman Tags: Uncategorized health movies Music Source Type: news

Are E-Cigarettes Safe? Here ’s What the Science Says
In 1965, when Herbert Gilbert was granted the first patent on a smoke- and tobacco-­free cigarette, he wrote that the product would “provide a safe and harmless means for and method of smoking.” More than 60 years later, however, modern iterations of Gilbert’s invention have sparked debate in the public-health community. E-cigarettes, which have grown increasingly popular in the past five years, were designed as a tool to help people quit ­smoking—and by doing so they should drastically reduce rates of lung cancer and other diseases. But the question is, does that potential outweigh their po...
Source: TIME: Health - November 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized public health Source Type: news

23andMe Can Now Tell You How You May Respond to Some Drugs. But Experts Are Wary
Consumer genetics company 23andMe on Wednesday became the first to secure Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for a report that provides information about how a person’s genetics may impact the efficacy of certain drugs. The approval, which comes with certain caveats and safety controls, expands the company’s ability to offer medical insights to customers — but some experts say that information should be approached with caution. This is the latest consumer advance in pharmacogenetics, or the study of how a person’s genes may alter the effects of certain drugs, including blood thinners and an...
Source: TIME: Health - November 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Genetics healthytime Source Type: news

Babies Born to Older Dads May Have a Higher Risk of Health Problems, Study Says
Women are constantly reminded of their ticking biological clocks and the risks that come with having children later in life — both in terms of maternal and infant health, and the ability to conceive a baby in the first place. But for the most part, men don’t get the same warnings. A new study published Wednesday in the BMJ suggests that men, too, may have biological clocks worth heeding. Babies born to older fathers, the paper says, may be more susceptible to health problems including preterm birth, low birth weight and breathing problems. And women who have children with older men may have increased health ris...
Source: TIME: Health - October 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Research Source Type: news

Minimally Invasive Surgery Is Standard for Cervical Cancer. But A New Study Shows It ’s Not Effective
In a demonstration that newer isn’t always better, two studies published in the New England Journal of Medicine show that minimally invasive surgery techniques, including robotic surgery, lead to higher death rates from any cause than traditional, open surgery done through an incision in the abdomen. Minimally invasive surgery — or keyhole surgery, in which doctors perform operations through small incisions rather than by opening up patients and exposing them to complications — and robotic surgery have shortened recovery times and cut back on infections and bleeding. So in many cases, surgeons prefer usin...
Source: TIME: Health - October 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Cancer healthytime Source Type: news

Here ’s the Healthiest Way to Gain Weight
For most Americans with weight issues, the problem is carrying around too much , not too little. While obesity rates have surged in North America since the 1970s, the proportion of underweight people has remained low—less than 5% of the population, according to a study in The Lancet. These bodyweight trends mean that most health experts are focused on helping people lose weight to avoid disease. But there are also some potentially serious health consequences associated with being clinically underweight, which is usually defined as having a body mass index (BMI) of 18.5 or below. “There are many epidemiologic st...
Source: TIME: Health - October 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news

Cases of Mysterious Polio-Like Illness Continue to Rise. And Experts Are Frustrated Over a Lack of Answers
A rare, polio-like illness continues to spread across the United States, puzzling and concerning health officials who are investigating the mysterious condition. So far this year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has reported a total of 72 confirmed cases of acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) in 24 states, including clusters in Minnesota, Pennsylvania and Colorado. Ninety percent of confirmed diagnoses were in children younger than 18, according to the CDC. The agency is investigating another 119 patients in connection with the disease, which causes symptoms including sudden arm and leg weakness, loss of musc...
Source: TIME: Health - October 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Infectious Disease onetime Source Type: news

The Scientific Reason Why You Can ’t Stop Eating Halloween Candy
A bowl of Halloween candy is enough to frighten any healthy eater. After just one piece, it can feel impossible to stop—until you get a stomachache. You might assume that sugar is the sole reason that Halloween candy is so hard to resist. After all, it can activate reward circuits in the brain that also light up in response to drugs like cocaine, and it is possible to build up a tolerance to and dependence on sugar. But Halloween candy’s hold on you goes beyond sugar alone. “You can just keep unwrapping and popping those little suckers,” says Rachele Pojednic, an assistant professor of nutrition at ...
Source: TIME: Health - October 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition halloween 2018 healthytime Source Type: news

More Than 90% of Generation Z Is Stressed Out. And Gun Violence Is Partly To Blame
Gun violence, political turmoil and personal problems are causing significant stress among America’s teenagers and youngest adults, according to a new report. Members of Gen Z — people ages 15 to 21 — reported the worst mental health of any generation included in the American Psychological Association’s annual Stress in America report, which was based on almost 3,500 interviews with people ages 18 and older, plus 300 interviews with teenagers ages 15 to 17. Just 45% of those in Gen Z reported “excellent” or “very good” mental health, compared to 56% of Millennials, 51% of Gen...
Source: TIME: Health - October 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology Source Type: news

There ’s Worrying New Research About Kids’ Screen Time and Their Mental Health
This study goes beyond prior work in terms of giving a more fine-grained picture, which suggests that one hour of daily screen time may be an important threshold. It also provides relatively consistent patterns around multiple different concerning outcomes, such as depression, anxiety, problems completing tasks, and increased arguing.” Primack says that no single study can provide “a complete picture” on the effects of screens on young people’s mental health, and that more research is needed. But when it comes to some screen-based activities—especially those related to social media and smartph...
Source: TIME: Health - October 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Mental Health/Psychology Source Type: news

Gun-Related Injuries Send More Than 8,000 Kids a Year to the Emergency Room: Study
Gun injuries, including many from assaults, sent 75,000 U.S. children and teens to emergency rooms over nine years at a cost of almost $3 billion, a first-of-its-kind study found. Researchers called it the first nationally representative study on ER visits for gun injuries among U.S. kids. They found that more than one-third of the wounded children were hospitalized and 6 percent died. Injuries declined during most of the 2006-14 study, but there was an upswing in the final year. The researchers found that 11 of every 100,000 children and teens treated in U.S. emergency rooms have gun-related injuries. That amounts to abou...
Source: TIME: Health - October 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: LINDSEY TANNER / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime Studies Source Type: news

Is Granola Healthy? Here ’s What Experts Say
Granola, beloved by hikers and outdoorsy types, certainly seems healthy. You can buy it in health food stores and organic supermarkets, with words like “pure” and “natural” stamped right on the label. Is granola healthy? It absolutely can be. But products vary greatly, and knowing whether or not the nutty snack lives up to its nutritional claims can take a little bit of digging. Here’s what dietitians say you should know about granola before crunching down. What is granola made of? “There is no one standard formula for granola, so whether it’s healthy really depends on the ingredie...
Source: TIME: Health - October 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Cassie Shortsleeve  Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news

You Love Haunted Houses Because They ’re Playing a Trick On Your Brain
Scary movies, haunted houses and other spooky activities send some people running, while others can’t get enough. But what’s actually going on in the brains of fear-loving folks? Less than you might think, according to a study recently published in the journal Emotion. After having a voluntary scary experience, the researchers found, people were in better moods and had decreased brain activity overall. “We think it’s very similar, at least at a physiological and neurological level, to the runner’s high experience, where you’re really pushing yourself and your sympathetic nervous system i...
Source: TIME: Health - October 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized halloween 2018 healthytime Mental Health/Psychology Source Type: news

Why Are We All Having So Little Sex?
Matt, a 34-year-old data analyst from Texas, and his wife dated for seven years before getting married in 2013. When they didn’t live together, they had sex every time they saw each other. After they moved in, however, he says things changed. Their sex life became inconsistent. They’d have a really active week and then a month with nothing, or just one at-bat. It began to hurt their relationship. At one point early in their marriage, Matt’s wife got pregnant, but they weren’t sure the marriage was going to make it, so they terminated the pregnancy. Part of the problem for Matt, who spoke to TIME abo...
Source: TIME: Health - October 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Belinda Luscombe Tags: Uncategorized Sexual Health Source Type: news

The Hidden Reasons Why Alzheimer ’s Caregivers Are So Stressed
When Nancy Daly was helping to care for her late mother, who had Alzheimer’s disease, the stress was so great that she would often shut herself in a bathroom and cry into a towel. For more than two years, Daly regularly flew from her home in California to her mother’s in Maryland, eventually to no recognition. “It was as if my entire childhood was erased, when she did not know me,” says Daly, 59. “But I had to grit my teeth and bear it. It was my job to be there.” Daly’s situation is likely familiar to many of the 16 million Americans who serve as unpaid caregivers to someone with ...
Source: TIME: Health - October 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Aging Baby Boomer Health Source Type: news

‘Weed the People’ Explores Medical Marijuana for Kids With Cancer
Marijuana, both medicinal and recreational, is growing more mainstream. Medical marijuana is now legalized in a majority of states, and 62% of Americans support legalizing it outright — but in the political realm, the plant has long been controversial. Now, a new documentary called Weed the People, which opens in some theaters in October, explores the potential of medical marijuana for childhood cancers and the regulatory hurdles facing people who want to use cannabis. The film, which was executive produced by former talk-show host Ricki Lake, follows five families using cannabis oils to treat pediatric cancers. Some...
Source: TIME: Health - October 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Drugs healthytime Source Type: news

Stressed-Out People May Have Smaller Brains, Study Says
You already know that stress is bad for your health, but according to a new study published in Neurology, it may also be bad for your brain. The new study found that middle-aged adults with the highest levels of cortisol had lower brain volume and cognitive functioning than people with lower levels of the hormone, suggesting that stress may be to blame. The hormone cortisol is involved in a range of normal bodily processes, including metabolism, immunity and memory formation. But extra cortisol is also released in response to stress, leading to higher levels overall. Though the study did not follow people to see if anyone...
Source: TIME: Health - October 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Research Source Type: news

Every U.S. Public Library and YMCA Will Soon Get Narcan for Free
Every public library and YMCA in the U.S. may soon be equipped with Narcan, in an effort to combat drug-related deaths by expanding access to the opioid-overdose-reversing naloxone nasal spray. Emergent BioSolutions, which this month completed its acquisition of Narcan maker Adapt Pharma, will provide a free kit including two doses of the nasal spray, as well as educational materials, to each of the 16,568 public libraries and 2,700 YMCAs in the U.S., according to an announcement released Wednesday. The initiative builds on the Narcan in Schools program, through which the company offers four free doses of Narcan to each U....
Source: TIME: Health - October 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime opioids Source Type: news

The FDA Approved a New Flu Treatment, Just In Time for Flu Season
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a new antiviral influenza treatment. The agency on Wednesday approved Genentech’s drug Xofluza, which can be taken via a single oral dose to help patients recover more quickly from the flu. It’s the “first new antiviral flu treatment with a novel mechanism of action approved by the FDA in nearly 20 years,” FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb said in a statement. The main factor differentiating Xofluza from other antiviral flu treatments on the market, such as Tamiflu and Relenza, is the way it’s taken. Xofluza is the only antiviral that can b...
Source: TIME: Health - October 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Drugs healthytime onetime Source Type: news

These Are the States with the Highest and Lowest Youth Obesity Rates
More than a quarter of Mississippi children ages 10 to 17 are obese, giving the state the nation’s highest rate of youth obesity, according to new data. Nationwide, nearly 16% of kids ages 10 to 17 have obesity, according to a report released Wednesday by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and based on data from the 2016-2017 National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH). But rates varied significantly from state to state, ranging from Mississippi’s 26.1% to Utah’s 8.7%. The NSCH was redesigned in 2016, so it’s difficult to compare the current data with past iterations of the survey. The 2016-20...
Source: TIME: Health - October 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Obesity onetime Source Type: news

Getting Rid of Cellulite Is Tough. But Here ’s What Works Best
It was of course the French—the keenest observers and arbiters of aesthetics—who first studied, named and attempted to develop treatments for cellulite. The term “cellulite” initially appeared in a French medical dictionary back in the 1870s, and the condition was described as an inflammation of cellular tissue. Fast forward 150 years, and dermatologists today know better—though they still don’t know everything. For example, they know that cellulite is not a sign of inflammation or any other type of medical concern. It’s a completely harmless and purely cosmetic condition that affe...
Source: TIME: Health - October 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Exercise/Fitness Source Type: news

If the Government Redefines Gender to Exclude Trans People, It Could Worsen an Urgent Public Health Crisis
The New York Times reports that the Trump Administration, via the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), is circulating a memo that seeks to define gender “on a basis that is clear, grounded in science, objective and administrable.” This definition, to potentially apply throughout several federal government agencies, states: “The sex listed on a person’s birth certificate, as originally issued, shall constitute definitive proof of a person’s sex unless rebutted by reliable genetic evidence.” Whatever else one might believe about this definition and its goals, it is not grounded i...
Source: TIME: Health - October 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tia Powell, Jules Chyten Brennan, Viraj Patel, Vafa Tabatabaie Tags: Uncategorized medicine Source Type: news

A Virus Outbreak Has Killed 7 Children at a New Jersey Health Center. Here ’s What to Know
A viral illness outbreak has killed seven children and infected 11 others at a medical facility in New Jersey, state health officials announced Wednesday. The New Jersey Department of Health initially announced that 18 cases of adenovirus, six of them fatal, had been confirmed among pediatric residents at the Wanaque Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation in Haskell. On Wednesday, officials announced that a seventh child, who was among the 18 original confirmed cases, died on Tuesday. An investigation is ongoing, but the center has agreed not to admit new patients until the outbreak is deemed over. New Jersey Governor Phil...
Source: TIME: Health - October 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime New Jersey onetime Source Type: news

A Virus Outbreak Has Killed 6 Children at a New Jersey Health Center. Here ’s What to Know
A viral illness outbreak has killed six children and infected 12 others at a medical facility in New Jersey, state health officials confirmed Tuesday. Eighteen cases of adenovirus, six of them fatal, have been confirmed among pediatric residents at the Wanaque Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation in Haskell, according to a statement from the New Jersey Department of Health. An investigation is ongoing, but the center has agreed not to admit new patients until the outbreak is deemed over. New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy said in a statement Tuesday that state and local health officials are working to contain the outbreak. ...
Source: TIME: Health - October 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime New Jersey onetime Source Type: news

Drug Overdose Deaths Have Fallen Over the Last Year, Data Shows
The estimated number of deaths from drug overdoses has fallen for each of the last seven months on record, giving reason for cautious optimism about the state of the nation’s substance abuse epidemic. Fatal overdose rates have risen sharply over the past several decades — more than tripling between 1999 and 2016 — in large part because of the opioid epidemic. But preliminary data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) points to a promising, if modest, recent downturn. The NCHS measures drug overdose deaths in 12-month periods ending in a gi...
Source: TIME: Health - October 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime opioids Source Type: news

U.S. Health Chief Says Overdose Deaths Are Starting to ‘Plateau’ But ‘We Are So Far From the End’
(WASHINGTON) — The number of U.S. drug overdose deaths has begun to level off after years of relentless increases driven by the opioid epidemic, health secretary Alex Azar said Tuesday, cautioning it’s too soon to declare victory. “We are so far from the end of the epidemic, but we are perhaps, at the end of the beginning,” Azar said in prepared remarks for a health care event sponsored by the Milken Institute think tank. Confronting the opioid epidemic has been the rare issue uniting Republicans and Democrats in a politically divided nation. A bill providing major funding for treatment was passed u...
Source: TIME: Health - October 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR and CARLA K. JOHNSON / AP Tags: Uncategorized Addiction health onetime U.S. Source Type: news

Researchers Have Found Microplastics in Human Waste for the First Time
A new study found microplastic particles in human waste for the first time, a worrying sign of the prevalence of plastic in the food chain, the Guardian reports. In the small study of participants from Europe, Russia and Japan — presented at United European Gastroenterology’s meeting in Vienna — all eight were found to have microplastic particles in their stool samples. Out of 10 varieties tested for, nine different plastics were identified in the human waste, with polypropylene and polyethylene terephthalate the most common. Based on their findings, the study researchers expect that tiny bits of plastics...
Source: TIME: Health - October 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Casey Quackenbush Tags: Uncategorized Environment onetime overnight Source Type: news

Not Exercising May Be Worse for Your Health Than Smoking, Study Says
It’s common knowledge that there are many benefits to being fit, but one large new study found that skipping out on the gym is practically the worst thing you can do for your health. In fact, the study claims not exercising might be more harmful to your health than smoking. New findings, published Friday in the journal JAMA Network Open, detail how researchers at the Cleveland Clinic studied 122,007 patients from 1991 to 2014, putting them under treadmill testing and later recording mortality rates. Researchers found a clear connection between a longer, healthier life and high levels of exercise. The report calls for...
Source: TIME: Health - October 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Gina Martinez Tags: Uncategorized health onetime Research Source Type: news

Expansive New Study Says Not Exercising Is Worse for Your Health Than Smoking
It’s common knowledge that there are many benefits to being fit, but one large new study found that skipping out on the gym is practically the worse thing you can do for your health. In fact, the study claims not exercising might be more harmful to your health than smoking. New findings, published Friday in the journal JAMA Network Open, detail how researchers at the Cleveland Clinic studied 122,007 patients from 1991 to 2014, putting them under treadmill testing and later recording mortality rates. Researchers found a clear connection between a longer, healthier life and high levels of exercise. The report calls for...
Source: TIME: Health - October 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Gina Martinez Tags: Uncategorized health onetime Research Source Type: news

A New Type of Treatment Shows Promise Against Aggressive Breast Cancer
This study is proof of principle that we should keep going,” Litton says. She is investigating whether there is a way for people who have already started chemotherapy to learn whether they will respond to the standard cycle of chemotherapy drugs, or should be switched to immunotherapy combinations for better results. Adams is also hopeful that other immunotherapy drugs may be developed that are more effective in activating the immune system against breast cancer cells specifically. “I expect these results will really invigorate the field and bring new research to help patients,” she says. (Source: TIME: Health)
Source: TIME: Health - October 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized breast cancer news healthytime Source Type: news

Hackers Breach HealthCare.Gov System, Threatening the Data of 75,000 People
(WASHINGTON) — A government computer system that interacts with HealthCare.gov was hacked earlier this month, compromising the sensitive personal data of some 75,000 people, officials said Friday. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services made the announcement late in the afternoon ahead of a weekend, a time slot agencies often use to release unfavorable developments. Officials said the hacked system was shut down and technicians are working to restore it before sign-up season starts Nov. 1 for health care coverage under the Affordable Care Act. About 10 million people currently have private coverage under forme...
Source: TIME: Health - October 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR / AP Tags: Uncategorized Healthcare onetime technology U.S. Source Type: news

This 13-Year-Old ’s Tool Could Change Pancreatic Cancer Treatment
An Oregon teenager’s innovation could change the way doctors treat pancreatic cancer, a deadly form of the disease that has just a 7% five-year survival rate. Rishab Jain, a 13-year-old from Stoller Middle School in Portland, on Tuesday won the Discovery Education 3M Young Scientist Challenge with an algorithm that uses machine learning to help doctors zero in on the pancreas during cancer treatment. Doing so can be difficult, since the pancreas is often obscured by other organs, and since breathing and other bodily processes can cause it to move around the abdominal area. As a result, doctors sometimes need to deplo...
Source: TIME: Health - October 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Cancer healthytime onetime Source Type: news