Why Doing Nothing Is One of the Most Important Things You Can Do
From the age of Enlightenment onward, philosophers, political leaders and moral authorities of many kinds have tried to convince us that work is one of the most important opportunities for freedom. Through work, we can become a somebody, relish the esteem we gain, structure our lives and, while we are at it, contribute nobly to the common good. This is a strange brew of ideas, but one that has seeped deeper into our psyche than we may realize. We develop a craving for recognition that is rarely satisfied. We need to be seen and admired, pushed along by a narcissism that doesn’t really believe in itself, but doesn&rsq...
Source: TIME: Health - June 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Brian O’Connor Tags: Uncategorized onetime society Source Type: news

A Boy Contracted the First Case of Bubonic Plague Idaho Has Seen in 26 Years
A boy in Idaho has contracted the first case of bubonic plague the state has seen for 26 years, according to health officials. The child, who remains unidentified, was treated with antibiotics in the hospital and is now recovering at home in a stable condition. The Central District Health Department, which announced the news of the bubonic plague’s return, said it was unclear whether the boy had contracted the disease in Idaho or on a recent trip to Oregon. Health officials said ground squirrels near the child’s home in Elmore County, Idaho, had tested positive for carrying the disease in 2015 and 2016, though ...
Source: TIME: Health - June 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Billy Perrigo Tags: Uncategorized idaho onetime Source Type: news

A Better Flu Shot May Be On the Horizon. Here ’s Why
Each year, influenza viruses bring aches, pains, fever and overall misery to millions of people. The flu also leads to hundreds of thousands of hospitalizations and thousands of deaths. In a new paper published in Genome Medicine, researchers say a blood test may be able to identify which people are more likely to fight off the flu and which may have a harder time. And information from that same test could lead to new treatments — including more effective vaccines — that might make more people more flu-resistant. For four years, Purvesh Khatri, an associate professor of medicine and biomedical data science at S...
Source: TIME: Health - June 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized healthytime public health Source Type: news

Drowning Is the No. 2 Cause of Death for Young Children. Here ’s How to Keep Your Kids Safe Around Pools
The tragic death of Olympic skier Bode Miller’s 19-month-old daughter on Sunday has cast new light on the dangers of drowning – which is the no. 2 cause of death among young children in the United States. Emeline Miller drowned in a swimming pool during a pool party in Orange County, California, Miller said in a statement. “Our baby girl, Emmy, passed away yesterday. Never in a million years did we think we would experience a pain like this,” he posted to Instagram. “Her love, her light, her spirit will never be forgotten. Our little girl loved life and lived it to it’s fullest everyday....
Source: TIME: Health - June 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Gina Martinez Tags: Uncategorized onetime safety Source Type: news

Body Hair Is Natural. Society Thinking Otherwise Is Dangerous
Visible body hair is rarely seen. It is so rare that underarm hair on a celebrity becomes a news story. For the rest of us, showing it in public — even at the beach, when wearing very little — is almost a political statement in itself. Increasingly, women remove all visible body hair. Including pubic hair. Men too have been getting in on the act, hence the long-rising popularity of the “back, sack and crack” waxing technique. The hairy chests and Playboy bushes of the 1970s are gone. Quite simply, body hair is no longer a feature of the ideal body. But it is not just the ideal body that is hairless...
Source: TIME: Health - June 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Heather Widdows Tags: Uncategorized beauty onetime Source Type: news

How Often Should I Clean My Phone?
The world is a giant petri dish. You and everything you come into contact with are carpeted with bacteria—so there’s no escaping microorganisms. The good news is that the vast majority of them are either benign or beneficial. That’s true even of those infamous “fecal bacteria.” While a sick person’s excrement harbors illness-causing germs, a healthy person’s poop—though gross—usually isn’t dangerous. (If you’ve read anything about fecal transplants, you know that the bacteria in feces may in some cases confer health benefits.) So even if your smartphone is e...
Source: TIME: Health - June 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized healthytime public health Source Type: news

Puerto Rico ’s Water System Is Slowly Returning To Normal. But Many Are Being Left Behind
(UTUADO, Puerto Rico) — Carmen Rodríguez Santiago counts herself lucky to have any water service at home. But eight months after Hurricane Maria, the 52-year-old security guard said the faucets in her cream-and-pink-colored house still run dry every two to three days, and the water, when it returns, is flecked with sediment. Puerto Rican officials claim that water service on the U.S. island has been restored to more than 96% of customers as of June 6, but the report of progress masks underlying problems. Outside of cities, service has been slower to be reconnect. Flow is often intermittent and the water qualit...
Source: TIME: Health - June 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Carmen Heredia Rodriguez / Kaiser Health News Tags: Uncategorized healthytime public health Source Type: news

Here ’s How Many Young People Are Seeing Unwanted Sexual Content Online
More young people have access to the Internet than ever before, and researchers are trying to understand what risks are involved. A new study published Tuesday in the Journal of Adolescent Health, reports that one in five youths are seeing unwanted sexual material online—and one in nine are getting unwanted requests for sexual material from their peers or adults. Study author Sheri Madigan, a child and adolescent psychologist, says that many young clients have described their risky online behaviors to her. “Some teens I worked with set up meetings offline with strangers they had met online,” she says. &ld...
Source: TIME: Health - June 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Research Source Type: news

Here ’s Why You Get Hangry, According to Science
There’s a difference between being hungry—a feeling we all get between meals—and being “hangry“. If you get hangry, you probably already know it: your hunger pangs put you in a very bad mood that you (and your family and friends) have a hard time ignoring. But is being hangry a real thing, or just an excuse? “It’s generally accepted that hunger can impact our moods and even behaviors like aggression and impulsivity,” says Jennifer MacCormack, a doctoral student in the department of psychology and neuroscience at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), and lead ...
Source: TIME: Health - June 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology Source Type: news

Men With Erectile Dysfunction Are Twice As Likely to Have Heart Disease, Study Says
By now, most people are familiar with the factors that can increase the risk of having a heart attack: gaining too much weight, having high blood pressure or high cholesterol levels, smoking and not exercising enough. In a study published Monday in the journal Circulation, researchers say they have documented another risk factor that could help identify men at greatest risk of heart problems: Among a group of 1,900 men aged 60 to 78, those with erectile dysfunction were twice as likely as men without the condition to have a heart attack, stroke, or die of a heart problem. Around 20% of men over age 20 experience erectile ...
Source: TIME: Health - June 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Erectile Dysfunction healthytime heart onetime Source Type: news

How Community Health Workers Could Save 30 Million Lives By 2030
When Dr. Raj Panjabi talks about starting his nonprofit, Last Mile Health, he describes being motivated by both love and outrage. At nine years old, Panjabi had to flee his home in Liberia to escape civil war; he and his family relocated to the U.S. When Panjabi returned to his home country as a medical student, he discovered there were only 51 doctors left to serve the country’s four million people. As a result, many residents were dying from treatable conditions, especially in rural areas, simply because they lived too far away from doctors and hospitals. “We’ve kind of written these communities off as ...
Source: TIME: Health - June 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: TIME Staff Tags: Uncategorized community health workers Dr. Raj Panjabi ebola Health Care Last Mile Health medicine TIME 100 TIME 100 x WeWork Speaker Series Zika Source Type: news

How to Support Loved Ones Who May Be At Risk of Suicide, According to Psychologists
Two high-profile deaths by suicide — those of fashion designer Kate Spade and chef Anthony Bourdain — were met with an outpouring of grief from fans this week. But mental health professionals say they should also serve as an important reminder to support other people who may be struggling, given rising suicide rates across nearly every segment of the U.S. population. “We often don’t take time to reach out to those we care about and love, even when we notice there’s a concern,” says Nadine Kaslow, a past president of the American Psychological Association and a professor at Emory Universi...
Source: TIME: Health - June 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology onetime Source Type: news

Trump ’s Immigration Policies Are Making It Harder for Foreign Doctors to Work in the U.S. — And That Could Hurt Patients
For the past four years, Daniel, an Israeli-born doctor completing a medical residency in the U.S., has secured an H-1B visa for temporary specialized workers without a hitch. But this May, without warning, the government put his status in the U.S. in danger. Daniel, who withheld his last name for fear of retaliation, is one of many foreign-born medical residents across the country who have received visa rejections or delays since mid-April — similar to rejections thousands of H-1B applicants in other high-paying industries have recently received — prompting a flurry of legal activity from medical groups, hospi...
Source: TIME: Health - June 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime medicine onetime Source Type: news

A Record-Breaking Number of Kids Died During This Year ’s Flu Season
This year’s flu season has killed more children than in any non-pandemic year on record, according to new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) data. A total of 172 pediatric deaths have now been reported in connection with the 2017-2018 flu season, including two that occurred as recently as mid- to late-May, according to the CDC. That number edges out the 171 deaths seen in 2012-2013, and surpasses the number of deaths recorded in all but pandemic years, which involve a global outbreak of a new influenza virus, to which most people are not immune. “We saw just an overwhelming amount of flu in gener...
Source: TIME: Health - June 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

Weekend Recipe: A Flourless Orange Cake
I adore baking with whole fruits. Citrus fruits in particular, such as oranges, impart rich aromatics that are very refreshing on the palate. This flourless orange cake is simple to make and scented with whole sweet oranges, vanilla, almonds and honey to create a truly irresistible gluten-free treat that’s perfect for any occasion. It’s also extremely moist, so it’ll keep in the fridge for at least a week, and in my opinion, become even more delicious as the flavors deepen over time I love to serve this cake with a dollop of thick natural yogurt or crème fraîche, but it’s also just as d...
Source: TIME: Health - June 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Teresa Cutter — The Healthy Chef Tags: Uncategorized Food Source Type: news

There May Soon Be a Blood Test for Predicting Premature Births
Each year in the U.S., one in 10 babies is born prematurely. Around the world, that number is slightly higher, affecting 15 million infants annually. In a new study published in Science, researchers led by a group at Stanford University report the first steps toward a blood test that can predict which pregnancies are most likely to result in early births. Stephen Quake, professor of bioengineering and applied physics at Stanford, and his team analyzed the roughly 20,000 genes in the human genome in a group of 38 women who were at higher risk for premature delivery. Of those women, 23 ended up delivering when their babies w...
Source: TIME: Health - June 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Reproductive Health Source Type: news

More Women With Breast Cancer May Soon Be Skipping Chemo. Here ’s Why
Phyllis Lacetti found her own breast cancer when she felt an abnormal lump in her right breast in 2007. A nurse at Montefiore Medical Center, she had a lumpectomy to remove it, but an MRI afterward revealed remaining cancer cells, so she opted to get a mastectomy. Her cancer doctor recommended she get chemotherapy to ensure that her cancer wouldn’t recur, since Lacetti’s family history put her at high risk. Her sister and father had died of leukemia, and her brother passed away from thyroid cancer. Chemotherapy, he said, was her best option for preventing the cancer from returning. But Lacetti was reticent abo...
Source: TIME: Health - June 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Cancer healthytime Source Type: news

Suicide Rates Are Rising In Nearly Every State, CDC Says
Suicide rates are climbing in nearly every demographic, age group and geographic area, according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Deaths by suicide have increased by around 30% since 1999, claiming nearly 45,000 lives in 2016, according to the report. Those trends apply to nearly every segment of the U.S. population: Suicide rates have increased in 44 states, among all racial and ethnic groups and in every age range except adults older than 75. In half of all states, suicide rates increased by 30% or more. “This is essentially a problem everywhere—a problem that’s get...
Source: TIME: Health - June 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

A Disturbing Trend on the Rise
The apparent suicide of designer Kate Spade on June 5 did more than shock and sadden her fans across the country. It also reignited a conversation about the many faces–and causes–of suicide. The circumstances around Spade’s death remain unclear, but the tragedy underscores a disturbing reality in the U.S. Suicide is a growing public-health problem that doesn’t discriminate on the basis of demographics. “This is not a condition that is related to success or failure,” says Dr. Anne Schuchat, principal deputy director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). “No o...
Source: TIME: Health - June 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized kate spade mental health Suicide Source Type: news

These 5 Tips From Dietitians Will Make It Easier to Eat Healthy
This article originally appeared on Health.com (Source: TIME: Health)
Source: TIME: Health - June 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jessica Migala / Health Tags: Uncategorized Healthy Eating Nutrition onetime Source Type: news

Is It Possible To Eat Too Much Fruit?
Apple co-founder Steve Jobs was, briefly and famously, an ardent fruitarian—meaning he ate a diet composed primarily of fruit, which he believed would cleanse his body of harmful fluids. Just as famously, the actor Ashton Kutcher tried adopting Jobs’s fruit-centric diet, until he ended up in the hospital with an out-of-whack pancreas. So is it bad for your health to eat a lot of fruit? Though a famous study from 1980 argued that based on the evolution of human jaws and teeth, our ancient ancestors used to eat a diet dominated by fruit, there’s not a lot of good evidence for or against fruit-heavy diets fo...
Source: TIME: Health - June 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime Source Type: news

How To Tell If You ’re In a Toxic Relationship — And What To Do About It
It’s a common refrain: relationships are hard work. Fights are normal and rough patches are par for the course. True as that may be, however, these platitudes can distract from legitimate causes for concern in one’s social and romantic life — including signs that a relationship may have become, or always was, toxic. Here’s what you need to know about toxic relationships, and how to tell if you’re in one. What is a toxic relationship? Dr. Lillian Glass, a California-based communication and psychology expert who says she coined the term in her 1995 book Toxic People, defines a toxic relationship...
Source: TIME: Health - June 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime Sex/Relationships Source Type: news

Seasonal Depression Doesn ’t Just Happen in the Winter. Here’s What to Know About Summertime Sadness
As a kid, Krista Golden loved to play outside in her family’s yard when the weather turned nice. But by her mid-twenties, something changed. “As I’ve gotten older, I’d rather be by myself and stay in the house during the summer,” says Golden, who is 43 and lives in Ohio. “I just accepted it as, ‘This is me.'” Last winter, Golden learned that there was a reason for her summertime sadness: Her therapist told her she likely had seasonal affective disorder (SAD). But unlike most people with SAD, who experience dips in mood and energy during the cold, dark months of winter, Golden...
Source: TIME: Health - June 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology onetime Source Type: news

9 Kinds of Bug Bites You Might Get This Summer — and What to Do About Them
This article originally appeared on Health.com (Source: TIME: Health)
Source: TIME: Health - June 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda Gardner / Health Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

Most Women With Breast Cancer Can Skip Chemo, According to New Study
(CHICAGO) — Most women with the most common form of early-stage breast cancer can safely skip chemotherapy without hurting their chances of beating the disease, doctors are reporting from a landmark study that used genetic testing to gauge each patient’s risk. The study is the largest ever done of breast cancer treatment, and the results are expected to spare up to 70,000 patients a year in the United States and many more elsewhere the ordeal and expense of these drugs. “The impact is tremendous,” said the study leader, Dr. Joseph Sparano of Montefiore Medical Center in New York. Most women in this ...
Source: TIME: Health - June 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Marilynn Marchione / AP Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime Women's Health Source Type: news

Opioids Are Now Responsible for 1 in 5 Deaths Among Young Adults
In 2016, one in 65 deaths in the United States involved opioids — and among younger adults, that number skyrocketed to one in five, according to a new study. Data has shown for years that deaths involving both prescribed and illicit opioids are rising sharply. They’ve nearly doubled since 2009, and have infiltrated all genders, demographics and geographic areas, according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) data. The new study, published Friday in the journal JAMA Network Open, puts some of those numbers into new perspective. The paper used data from the CDC’s WONDER database, which tracks...
Source: TIME: Health - June 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

Why You Should Pick Up the Pace When You Walk
This study could not definitively say if fast walking causes better health, or vice versa. It may simply be that fit, healthy people tend to walk faster than those who are ailing. But the researchers write in the paper that walking speed appears to affect mortality risk independent of total physical activity, perhaps thanks to “the increased relative exercise intensity” of walking fast. In other words, speedy stepping may strengthen the heart better than leisurely strolling, in keeping with long-standing associations between exercise and cardiovascular health. While Stamatakis acknowledges that how fast you wal...
Source: TIME: Health - June 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Exercise/Fitness healthytime onetime Source Type: news

4 More People Have Died From the Romaine Lettuce E. Coli Outbreak
Tainted lettuce may be off store shelves, but the ramifications of the nationwide romaine E. coli outbreak aren’t over yet. Four more deaths have been reported in connection with the outbreak, according to a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) update released Friday. Two people from Minnesota, one person from Arkansas and one person from New York have died, according to the update. The first death associated with the outbreak, a person in California, was reported in early May. Twenty-five more illnesses have also been reported since the CDC’s last update, bringing the total to 197 people sickened ...
Source: TIME: Health - June 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

Four More People Have Died From the Romaine Lettuce E. Coli Outbreak
Tainted lettuce may be off store shelves, but the ramifications of the nationwide romaine E. coli outbreak aren’t over yet. Four more deaths have been reported in connection with the outbreak, according to a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) update released Friday. Two people from Minnesota, one person from Arkansas and one person from New York have died, according to the update. The first death associated with the outbreak, a person in California, was reported in early May. Twenty-five more illnesses have also been reported since the CDC’s last update, bringing the total to 197 people sickened ...
Source: TIME: Health - June 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

4 Ways to Make Grilling Healthier This Summer
Cookouts are a summer staple. And while they do provide some health perks—fresh air, home cooking and time with friends and family—they can also come with risks. Follow these guidelines to make your grilled meals better for you. 1. Grill like a pescatarian Cooking most meat at temperatures above 300°F can produce potentially cancer-causing chemicals called heterocyclic amines (HCAs), according to the National Cancer Institute. But fruits and vegetables like corn, peaches, peppers, eggplant, pineapple, squash and watermelon hold up well on the barbecue and don’t form HCAs when they’re cooked. And...
Source: TIME: Health - June 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Deaths By Suicide and Firearms Are Rising Sharply Among Kids
After years of progress, deaths by suicide, homicide and other means of injury are way up among kids, according to new data from the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics. The overall death rate for children between ages 10 and 19 fell by 33% between 1999 and 2013. But from 2013 to 2016, the report says, it crept back up by 12% — in large part because of a sizable increase in injury deaths, a category that includes deaths by suicide, homicide and unintentional injuries or accidents. A total of 9,716 kids died by injury in 2016, a 17% increase over 2013, the report says. Unintentional injuries, such as tho...
Source: TIME: Health - June 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

Working Out Is Hard. Streaming Just Might Make It Easier
Wendi Weiner likes to start her day with a workout. After waking up at 6:30 a.m., she has a quick breakfast with coffee and changes into a tank top and capris from Old Navy before taking a 45-minute cycling class. Weiner, a 40-year-old writer and attorney who lives in Florida, had a particularly memorable ride on a Friday morning this past January. The instructor blared Weiner’s favorite songs and offered strong motivational cues to the entire class. Weiner watched the calorie count on her stationary bike skyrocket and found her name rising on the leaderboard that tracks participants’ performances. As she stepp...
Source: TIME: Health - May 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lisa Eadicicco Tags: Uncategorized fitness gym Powered by Data streaming Source Type: news

Roseanne Barr Just Used the ‘Ambien Defense.’ So Have Accused Murderers and Drunk Drivers
Roseanne Barr had an explanation in the aftermath of sending a racist tweet that led to the cancellation of her sitcom, Roseanne: Ambien made me do it. “It was 2 in the morning and I was ambien tweeting,” Barr wrote in a now-deleted tweet, adding in a separate post that she was “Not giving excuses for what I did (tweeted) but I’ve done weird stuff while on ambien.” Roseanne is definitely not off Twitter despite her statement yesterday that she was leaving it. And her “Ambien tweeting” line has users describing every odd (non-racist) thing they’ve done while on the sleep d...
Source: TIME: Health - May 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Uncategorized Drugs healthytime onetime Source Type: news

These Are the Healthiest Shoes To Wear, According to Scientists
Recall a time when you took a long walk on a beach. Your feet probably felt pretty tired by the end of it. “Your feet are tired because every time you press down on sand, the sand moves away from you, so your foot muscles have to work harder than on stiff surfaces,” says Daniel Lieberman, chair of the Department of Human Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University. The difference between walking on shifty sand or hard cement is comparable to the difference between walking barefoot or in shoes. “When you walk in shoes, your feet are pressing against a stiff substitute for the ground that makes the muscles i...
Source: TIME: Health - May 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Research Source Type: news

Here ’s How Much Exercise You Need to Keep Your Brain Healthy
There’s no question that exercise is good for the body, and there is growing evidence that staying physically active can help slow the normal declines in brain function that come with age. Health groups recommend that adults try to get at least 150 minutes of moderate-to-intense activity a week to keep their hearts healthy — but is that the same amount that’s needed to keep the brain sharp? In a new study published in the journal Neurology, researchers led by Joyce Gomes-Osman, an assistant professor in physical therapy and neurology at University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, set out to find an exe...
Source: TIME: Health - May 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Exercise/Fitness healthytime Source Type: news

Reading Books and Playing Games May Help Prevent Dementia: Study
Playing board games and reading books may be casual pastimes, but new research suggests that activities like these can have a real impact on a person’s risk for developing dementia in old age. The new study, published in the journal JAMA Psychiatry, looked at more than 15,500 people ages 65 and older who were living in Hong Kong and were tracked for about five years. The men and women didn’t have dementia at the start of the study, though more than 1,300 people developed it by the end. At the beginning of the trial and again during follow-up interviews, the men and women were asked about any “intellectual...
Source: TIME: Health - May 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized Brain healthytime Source Type: news

President Trump Signs Bill to Allow Terminally-Ill Patients to Try Unproven Drugs
(WASHINGTON) — President Donald Trump has signed legislation that would help people with deadly diseases try experimental treatments. Trump signed the Right to Try bill on Wednesday. He called it a “fundamental freedom” that will provide hope and save lives. The bill cleared the House last week following an emotional debate in which Republicans said it would help thousands of people in search of hope. Many Democrats said the measure was dangerous and would give patients false hope. Trump embraced the plan during his State of the Union address, saying people who are terminally ill shouldn’t have to l...
Source: TIME: Health - May 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ken Thomas / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime White House Source Type: news

The American Cancer Society Just Changed Its Guidelines Around Colorectal Cancer Screenings
Millions of Americans may book an extra doctor’s appointment this year, thanks to updated guidelines from the American Cancer Society (ACS). The ACS is now recommending that adults at average risk of colorectal cancer begin regular screenings at age 45, rather than the previous standard of age 50. The change was informed by research from ACS scientists, who found last year that cancers of the colon and rectum are occurring at increasing rates among young and middle-aged adults. Studies have shown that roughly one in seven colon cancer patients is younger than 50. People with a strong family history of colorectal can...
Source: TIME: Health - May 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Cancer healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Here ’s What Scientists Do—And Don’t—Know About E-Cigarettes
A little more than 3% of American adults regularly use e-cigarettes, and 15% say they have tried them, according to 2016 data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). That means millions of Americans vape, either consistently or sporadically — and there’s evidence that the number is rising. As they become more prevalent, e-cigarettes — which are typically used as alternatives to traditional cigarettes, or as smoking cessation aids — are coming under increasing scrutiny from doctors and regulatory groups. Youth recreational use, in particular, has drawn the attention of lawmakers an...
Source: TIME: Health - May 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

Tennessee Is Just the Latest State to Report a Hepatitis A Outbreak. Here ’s What to Know
Tennessee has joined a growing number of states battling hepatitis A outbreaks, public health officials report. The Nashville Metro Public Health Department (MPHD) announced that 14 cases of hepatitis A have been confirmed in the city since December 2017 —significantly more than the two cases it sees in an average year. MPHD is working with state public health officials to contain the outbreak, according to a statement, but the infection has already popped up in a number of nearby states, as well as some on the West Coast. Here’s what to know hepatitis A and the outbreaks around the country. What is hepatitis ...
Source: TIME: Health - May 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Infectious Disease onetime Source Type: news

The Best Way To Get Over a Breakup, According to Science
The aftermath of a breakup can be devastating. Most people emerge from it intact, but research has shown that the end of a romantic relationship can lead to insomnia, intrusive thoughts and even reduced immune function. While in the throes of a breakup, even the most motivated people can have a difficult time determining how best to get on with their lives. Now, in a small new study published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, researchers tested a variety of cognitive strategies and found one that worked the best for helping people get over a breakup. The researchers gathered a group of 24 heartbroken peo...
Source: TIME: Health - May 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Andrew Gregory Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Sex/Relationships Source Type: news

Cancer Group Recommends Ditching Bacon and Booze to Stay Cancer-Free
The World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) has bad news for lovers of bacon and booze: Eliminating processed meats and alcohol from your diet may help reduce your risk of developing cancer. The third report from the WCRF’s Continuous Update Project, an ongoing effort to inform consumers about lifestyle habits that may be related to cancer, provides numerous recommendations for people looking to minimize their risk of getting cancer. But two, in particular, are likely to cause a stir for many Americans. First, the WCRF recommends significantly or totally cutting back on processed meats including bacon, salami, hot dogs and...
Source: TIME: Health - May 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Cancer healthytime onetime Source Type: news

This Is How Long It Takes a Hot Car to Reach Dangerous Temperatures
In the last decade, nearly 750 children have died after being left in a hot car, and a new study highlights just how quickly that can happen. On a hot day, a car parked in direct sunlight may reach temperatures that are dangerous to a child in approximately one hour, according to a paper published in the journal Temperature. Even a vehicle in a shady area could warm up to risky levels after around two hours, the study says. Children are particularly susceptible to heatstroke. Their core temperatures rise more quickly than those of adults, and their bodies are less adept at cooling. Kids may also be unable to control or lea...
Source: TIME: Health - May 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime Research Source Type: news

Weekend Recipe: A Matcha Breakfast Bowl With Kiwi
One of the reasons that I love matcha so much is that it’s both energizing and calming at the same time. This green powder has become an integral part of my daily morning ritual, but instead of drinking matcha all the time, I also like to mix it up and create fun breakfast bowls with it. These only take a few minutes to make, and have become my go-to meals in the AM, especially when I’m pressed for time. So if you’ve only used matcha in tea, smoothies or ice cream, I strongly suggest trying it in a bowl. Adding in some of your favorite fruits, such as kiwis, will only make it tastier and more nutritious. ...
Source: TIME: Health - May 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Teresa Cutter — The Healthy Chef Tags: Uncategorized Food Source Type: news

This Kind of Diet May Lower the Risk of Dying from Breast Cancer
We are what we eat, the old cliché goes, and there’s plenty of evidence to support it: eating healthy foods really can lead to a healthier life. But can food actually lower your risk of dying from a disease like cancer? In a new study published in JAMA Oncology, researchers find some intriguing evidence that diet may indeed lower the risk of dying from cancer. Dr. Rowan Chlebowski, research professor at the City of Hope National Medical Center, and his colleagues analyzed data from more than 48,000 women enrolled in the ongoing Women’s Health Initiative, a large national study at 40 centers across the U....
Source: TIME: Health - May 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Cancer Diet/Nutrition healthytime Source Type: news

Can You Catch Up on Lost Sleep On the Weekends? Here ’s What Experts Think
Sleep experts have long preached the importance of a sleep routine. Going to bed and rising at roughly the same time every day helps to regulate circadian rhythms and improve overall sleep quality and quantity. But a new study published in the Journal of Sleep Research, offers a surprising asterisk to that advice: If you don’t get enough sleep during the week, it says, sleeping in on the weekends may cancel out at least some of the associated health risks. The findings are based on survey responses from more than 38,000 Swedish adults who answered questions about their lifestyle habits, medical histories and average ...
Source: TIME: Health - May 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime sleep Source Type: news

FDA Warns That Benzocaine Teething Products Are Not Safe for Children
The Food and Drug Administration warned parents on Wednesday about the dangers of using teething products that contain the popular numbing agent benzocaine. The FDA said that benzocaine can have a rare, but serious side effect on children, and especially those under 2 years old. The local anesthetic can cause a condition called methemoglobinemia, which reduces the amount of oxygen in a person’s blood and can be life-threatening, according to the FDA. The agency also sent a letter asking manufacturers to stop selling products aimed at babies and toddlers, prompting at least one major company to discontinue its teethin...
Source: TIME: Health - May 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Abigail Abrams Tags: Uncategorized Babies FDA onetime Source Type: news

Good News: Sitting All Day Isn ’t As Bad For You If You’re Fit
There is growing evidence that time spent sitting — in cars, at offices and on the couch — is having some seriously negative effects on health. Sedentary behavior has been linked to obesity, heart disease, diabetes and other chronic conditions. But a new study provides encouragement that some physical activity, including relatively simple ways to improve muscle strength, may be enough to overcome some of the unhealthy effects of sitting too much. In a study published in BMC Medicine, researchers led by Carlos Celis-Morales from the University of Glasgow analyzed data from nearly 400,000 middle-aged people in th...
Source: TIME: Health - May 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Exercise/Fitness healthytime Source Type: news

A New Study Links Antidepressants to Weight Gain
A new study published in The BMJ has found that antidepressant use may be associated with weight gain over time. “Patients who were normal weight were more likely to transition to overweight, and overweight patients were more likely to transition to obesity if they were treated with antidepressants,” said study co-author Rafael Gafoor, a primary care and public health researcher at King’s College London, in an email to TIME. The researchers used data from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink, a large collection of electronic health records. Their analysis included almost 295,000 people of all differ...
Source: TIME: Health - May 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology onetime Source Type: news