Polio Is Now in NYC ’ s Sewage, Suggesting That the Virus Is Circulating
NEW YORK — The polio virus has been found in New York City’s wastewater in another sign that the disease, which hadn’t been seen in the U.S. in a decade, is quietly spreading among unvaccinated people, health officials said Friday. The presence of the poliovirus in the city’s wastewater suggests likely local circulation of the virus, the city and New York state health departments said. State Health Commissioner Dr. Mary T. Bassett said the detection of poliovirus in wastewater samples in New York City is alarming but not surprising. “The risk to New Yorkers is real but the defense is so simple...
Source: TIME: Health - August 12, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Karen Matthews and Mike Stobbe/AP Tags: Uncategorized Disease healthscienceclimate New York wire Source Type: news

What to Know About Long COVID in Kids
There are lots of outstanding questions about Long COVID. How many people have it? Why do some develop it and not others? Do effective treatments exist? When it comes to kids and Long COVID, there are even more questions and fewer answers. It wasn’t until earlier this year that experts even reached a consensus definition for pediatric Long COVID to use in research: one or more symptoms that last at least 12 weeks after a case of COVID-19, affect daily life, and can’t be explained by an alternate diagnosis. “There are a whole host of things that we’re just trying to figure out,” says Dr. Kathry...
Source: TIME: Health - August 12, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

What to Know About Peripheral Artery Disease —and Its Connection to Diabetes
When we think of clogged arteries, most of us think about the heart. “But buildup of fatty plaques can happen in any artery, including those that carry blood away from the heart,” says Dr. Samuel Kim, a preventive cardiologist and lipidologist at Weill Cornell Medicine in New York. The arteries that branch out and feed into our arms and legs make up the bulk of what we call peripheral arteries. And the narrowing in these vessels is referred to as peripheral artery disease (PAD), a common condition in which the legs or arms don’t receive sufficient blood flow. “Interestingly, arteries in our legs and...
Source: TIME: Health - August 11, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lala Tanmoy Das Tags: Uncategorized Disease freelance healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

How to Exercise When It ’ s Really Hot Outside
For people in many parts of the U.S.—as well as large portions of the world—the phrase “record heat” has been a regular part of the recent forecast. While that doesn’t mean you have to move your favorite outdoor workout into the gym, you may need to do it a little differently. Here’s what experts recommend for staying safe and active outdoors. How hot is too hot to exercise outside? There’s no precise temperature at which it becomes unsafe to exercise. It comes down to individual factors, according to Melissa Kendter, a personal trainer, running coach, and functional training speci...
Source: TIME: Health - August 11, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Elizabeth Millard Tags: Uncategorized climate change Exercise & Fitness freelance healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

CDC Drops Quarantine and Testing Recommendations for COVID-19
NEW YORK — The nation’s top public health agency on Thursday relaxed its COVID-19 guidelines, dropping the recommendation that Americans quarantine themselves if they come into close contact with an infected person. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also said people no longer need to stay at least 6 feet away from others. The changes are driven by a recognition that — more than 2 1/2 years since the start of the pandemic — an estimated 95% of Americans 16 and older have acquired some level of immunity, either from being vaccinated or infected, agency officials said. [time-brightcove not...
Source: TIME: Health - August 11, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mike Stobbe and Collin Binkley/AP Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 healthscienceclimate wire Source Type: news

To Avoid Paxlovid Rebound, Some Experts Call for Longer Courses of Treatment
Prescriptions for the antiviral drug Paxlovid have soared since the medication was granted emergency use authorization last December. High-profile people who recently tested positive—including President Joe Biden, White House medical advisor Dr. Anthony Fauci, and late night host Stephen Colbert—have also taken the drug. But some people—including those three famous patients—have reported rebound infections after taking the pills. Paxlovid rebound occurs when a person takes the drug for a few days, tests negative, and then tests positive again several days later. The growing number of cases is prompt...
Source: TIME: Health - August 11, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

Thinking Too Hard Really Can Make You Tired, Scientists Say
If you’re feeling drained at the end of a demanding day at the office, it could be you’ve been thinking too much. Scientists analyzed the chemical composition of the brains of two groups of people over the course of an approximate work day. One group was given easy tasks, while the other was told to carry out more demanding versions of the same cognitive assignments. Signs of fatigue, such as reduced pupil dilation, were recorded only in the group performing the more complex tasks. Read More: Forget Physique. Mental Health Is the Newest, Hottest Fitness Goal Using magnetic resonance spectroscopy, researchers fr...
Source: TIME: Health - August 11, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alex Millson/Bloomberg Tags: Uncategorized healthscienceclimate Mental Health wire Source Type: news

The Women Who Revolutionized Nursing During the American Civil War
The 1850s and 1860s in America saw the rise of the “sentimental domestic idea.” Women were held up as examples of purity, piety, and submissiveness. In the American antebellum period, precise and strict rules were recommended for women’s socially acceptable and appropriate behavior. But the Civil War would change the social, economic, and political landscape for women from every walk of American life—perhaps nowhere more so than in the field of nursing. Women demonstrated remarkable adaptability in the savagely altered wartime world, responding to the great need of the nation while acquiring and ut...
Source: TIME: Health - August 11, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Carole Adrienne Tags: Uncategorized Excerpt health Health Care Source Type: news

Why Pelvic Floor Rehabilitation Is Key For Bladder Cancer Patients
Cancer treatment has improved significantly over the past several decades, meaning that more people are living longer after undergoing surgical and medical interventions. This has led to the emergence of an area of cancer care called survivorship, which takes a holistic view of the patient’s well-being and sometimes involves therapies that haven’t always been part of the oncology playbook. In the case of bladder cancer, survivorship and improving quality of life post-surgery sometimes means physical therapy that focuses on improving the function of the pelvic floor. The pelvic floor refers to “the muscles...
Source: TIME: Health - August 10, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Elaine K. Howley Tags: Uncategorized Disease freelance healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

A Hotter World Means More Disease Outbreaks in Our Future
As global temperatures have risen in recent decades, so have the number of outbreaks of infectious diseases. SARS, MERS, Zika, West Nile, COVID-19, and now clusters of monkeypox and polio have all recently threatened public health. That’s no coincidence. In a study published in August in Nature Climate Change, researchers tried to understand the relationship between major environmental changes related to higher greenhouse gas emissions—including global warming, rising sea levels, storms, floods, drought, and heat waves—and the outbreaks of 375 human infectious diseases caused by viruses, bacteria, and oth...
Source: TIME: Health - August 10, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized climate change COVID-19 healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

Dozens in China Infected With New ‘Langya’ Virus Carried by Shrews
Nearly three dozen people in China have been sickened by a newly identified virus from the same family as the deadly Nipah and Hendra viruses, though there’s no evidence the pathogen can be transmitted from person-to-person. The virus, named Langya henipavirus or LayV, was found thanks to an early detection system for feverish people with a recent history of exposure to animals in eastern China. The patients—mainly farmers—also reported fatigue, cough, loss of appetite and aches, with several developing blood-cell abnormalities and signs of liver and kidney damage. All survived. Among the 35 patients, 26 ...
Source: TIME: Health - August 10, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Michelle Fay Cortez/Bloomberg Tags: Uncategorized Disease healthscienceclimate wire Source Type: news

Extra Polio Shot Offered to London Children as Concern Grows
UK health authorities will offer children under 10 living in London an additional dose of polio vaccine amid rising concern about a comeback of the disease. While nobody has tested positive for infection with the type of polio virus that can cause paralysis, authorities have nonetheless found it in several London sewage samples recently. This suggests “there is some level of virus transmission” in parts of London that “has gone beyond a close network of a few individuals,” the UK Health Security Agency said in a statement. The UK’s vaccine expert advisory committee recommended offering the ext...
Source: TIME: Health - August 10, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tim Loh and Dong Lyu/Bloomberg Tags: Uncategorized healthscienceclimate Vaccines wire Source Type: news

FDA Recommends New Monkeypox Vaccine Strategy to Stretch Supply
On August 9, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued an emergency use authorization (EUA) for a new way of administering the Jynneos monkeypox vaccine. The move allows doctors to give patients smaller doses in order to get more shots out of each vial and protect more people quickly. It’s the latest step in the federal government’s response to the growing monkeypox outbreak, which it declared a public health emergency on August 4. While the government has shipped nearly 620,000 doses of vaccines around the country so far, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates about 1.5 million ...
Source: TIME: Health - August 10, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized healthscienceclimate monkeypox Source Type: news

Watch: These Scientists Are Trying to Stop Future Pandemic Threats
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Source: TIME: Health - August 9, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Andrew D. Johnson Tags: Uncategorized COVID Questions COVID-19 News Source Type: news

What to Know About the Monkeypox Drug TPOXX —And Why It ’ s So Hard to Get
Monkeypox, which federal officials declared a public health emergency on August 4, is not as contagious as the other ongoing public health emergency in the U.S.: COVID-19. Monkeypox primarily spreads through contact with infected skin lesions. Theoretically, containing monkeypox should therefore be more feasible, as long as testing, vaccines, and treatments are accessible. But in reality, the rollouts of all three approaches have faced major challenges. Getting the antiviral drug tecovirimat, also known as TPOXX, is particularly difficult. Here’s what to know about the antiviral drug treatment TPOXX. What is TPOXX? T...
Source: TIME: Health - August 9, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized healthscienceclimate monkeypox Source Type: news