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The Twisted Psychology of Parents Who Torture Their Children
Don’t try to fathom what was going on in the minds of the California parents who starved and imprisoned their 13 children for years before one of the victims escaped and informed the police last weekend. Really, there is no unraveling it—not fully, at least. Basic empathy and the care of offspring are among the most fundamental lines of code in the human operating system. When that gets corrupted—when the protectors become tormentors, when the nurturers become jailers—it’s nearly impossible to grasp, much less explain. That doesn’t mean that forensic psychologists and others aren’t...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - January 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger and Belinda Luscombe Tags: Uncategorized onetime psychology Source Type: news

The Great Crack-Up
It’s hard to wreck a continent you can barely get your hands on. Human beings typically do our worst environmental damage in the places we live and work–clear-cutting forests, strip-mining mountains. Antarctica, however, was more or less out of reach. No more. Climate change has become our species’ great destructive equalizer, leaving no part of the planet safe from the harm we do. In March 2017, the sea ice around both poles reached a record low for that time of year. In July, a 1 trillion–ton iceberg, roughly the size of Delaware, calved off of the Larsen C ice shelf in western Antarctica. The dam...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - January 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

An Asteroid Bigger Than the World ’s Tallest Building Will Fly by Earth Next Month
A massive “potentially hazardous” asteroid spanning more than the length of the world’s tallest building will fly by our planet on Feb. 4. The roughly .7-mile long asteroid is considered longer than the Burj Khalifa, which at .5 miles high currently stands as the world’s tallest building, and will fly at a speed of 67,000 miles per hour just 2.6 million miles from Earth. “This is a fairly routine close approach of an object that we have known about for many years,” said Paul Chodas who manages the Center for Near Earth Object Studies at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Asteroid 2...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - January 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Talia Avakian Tags: Uncategorized asteroid onetime Source Type: news

Aerial Photos of Antarctica Reveal the Devastating Toll of Climate Change
A crevasse measuring a few thousand feet from an altitude of 1,500 ft., during a November flyover. The Great Crack-Up By JEFFREY KLUGER Photographs by PAOLO PELLEGRIN—MAGNUM PHOTOS FOR TIME It’s hard to wreck a continent you can barely get your hands on. Human beings typically do our worst environmental damage in the places we live and work—clear-cutting forests, strip-mining mountains. Antarctica, however, was more or less out of reach. No more. Climate change has become our species’ great destructive equalizer, leaving no part of the planet safe from the harm we do. In March 2017, the sea ice arou...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - January 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Time Tags: 2017 climate change climate change 2017 global warming 2017 iceberg antarctica 2017 larsen c ice shelf larsen ice shelf massive crack antarctica massive crack in antarctica massive iceberg breaks off antarctica Source Type: news

Archaeologists in Mexico Claim to Have Discovered the World ’s Longest Underwater Cave
(MEXICO CITY) — Archaeologists and divers on Mexico’s Yucatan peninsula announced Wednesday that they found a passage connecting two underwater caves, creating what they say is the world’s longest continuous flooded cave. Divers from the Great Maya Aquifer Project said the discovery has revealed a combined cave about 216 miles (347 kilometers) long. Mammoth Cave in Kentucky remains the world’s longest cave of any kind, with more than 400 miles (650 kilometers) of passages explored. The Sac Actun and Dos Ojos caves were both previously known and are near the Caribbean coast town of Tulum. The combine...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - January 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized Mexico onetime overnight Source Type: news

Temperatures Plunged to -88.6 °F in Parts of Russia. Here’s What That’s Like
(MOSCOW) — People living in some of the coldest places on earth are hunkering down as temperatures fall to near-record lows that are even defeating thermometers. Temperatures in the remote, diamond-rich Russian region of Yakutia on Tuesday plunged to minus 67 degrees Celsius (minus 88.6 degrees Fahrenheit) in some areas. In Yakutia — about 3,300 miles east of Moscow — where students routinely go to school in minus 40 degrees, school was canceled throughout the region. Local police also ordered parents to keep their children at home. Over the weekend, two men froze to death when they tried to walk to a nea...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - January 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized APW onetime russia weather Source Type: news

Cape Town Is 90 Days Away From Running Out of Water
After three years of unprecedented drought, the South African city of Cape Town has less than 90 days worth of water in its reservoirs, putting it on track to be the first major city in the world to run out of water. Unless residents drastically cut down on daily use, warns Cape Town Mayor Patricia De Lille, taps in the seaside metropolis of four million will soon run dry. On April 22, to be exact. Here’s what to know: The date is just a scare tactic, surely? Nope. Day Zero, as it is called, is real, and is calculated every week based on current reservoir capacity and daily consumption. On Jan. 8 Mayor De Lille revi...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - January 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Aryn Baker / Cape Town Tags: Uncategorized Environment South Africa Source Type: news

Scientists Observe Rare Supermassive Black Hole ‘Double Belch’
Scientists studying a supermassive black hole around 800 million light-years from Earth say they caught it ‘belching’ — blasting out jets of bright light — after ingesting hot gas. The team, led by University of Colorado Boulder researchers, was fortunate to catch the black hole in the act, as the action has rarely been seen before as a result of gas feeding. They also saw a remnant of a previous black hole belch, which occurred around 100,000 years before the second. The Hubble Space Telescope and the Chandra X-ray Observatory, along with observatories in Hawaii and New Mexico, were used to make th...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - January 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kate Samuelson Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

Scientists Have Discovered Massive Ice Sheets on Mars
Massive ice sheets have been discovered on Mars that could potentially be a resource for astronauts to harness for exploration of the planet. According to a report published on Friday in the journal Science, scientists examined eight areas on Mars where erosion has occurred. Researchers discovered massive ice sheets in the planet’s mid-latitudes that are believed to extend up to 100 meters deep and contain distinguishable layers that, “could preserve a record of Mars’ past climate,” the report says. “They might even be a useful source of water for future human exploration of the red planet.&rd...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - January 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Casey Quackenbush Tags: Uncategorized Cosmology Discovery Mars Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter onetime overnight planets Science space Space Exploration space travel Source Type: news

A Rare Blue Moon Lunar Eclipse That Hasn ’t Been Seen in 35 Years Is Coming Soon. Here’s What You Need to Know
The moon will appear larger, brighter and reddish-orange for some skygazers later this month when a total lunar eclipse occurs during a blue moon and a so-called supermoon, in what scientists say is a rare occurrence. Much of America could witness the Jan. 31 celestial spectacle, which is a “collision of multiple lunar events,” according to Dr. Noah Petro, a planetary geologist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. Many have begun calling the combination a “super blue blood moon eclipse.” On that night, there will be a total lunar eclipse, which happens when the Earth passes between the sun a...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - January 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Melissa Chan Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

Here ’s Why You’re Seeing ‘Wild Swings’ From Freezing to Really Warm Weather This Week
After shivering through bitterly cold temperatures thanks to Winter Storm Grayson, large portions of the country will experience a serious January thaw late this week. In Boston, New York City, Philadelphia and Baltimore, for example, temperatures on Friday are projected to top 50 degrees — and in Washington, D.C., and Richmond, Va., they’re expected to surpass a balmy 60 degrees. “It’s a big change,” admits Paul Walker, a senior meteorologist for AccuWeather. “We’ve had some wild swings with these temperatures.” Be that as it may, Walker says the dueling forecasts aren&rsquo...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - January 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized onetime weather Source Type: news

‘Their Brain Just Fries.’ Australian Weather Is so Hot That Bats Are Boiling to Death
Australia has been roiled by a vicious heat wave this past week, with thermostats in Sydney reaching 117 degrees on Sunday, making it the city’s hottest day since 1939. Across the country, as firefighters beat back brushfires near Melbourne and a section of highway asphalt turned into ooze, everyone is struggling with the heat — including animals. In southern Queensland, bats are falling out of trees due to the heat, with as many as 100,000 flying fox bats from 25 separate colonies estimated to have died over the weekend, the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals told Australia’s ABC News...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - January 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Eli Meixler Tags: Uncategorized animals Australia climate change onetime overnight Source Type: news

See Jupiter Looking Downright Gorgeous in These New NASA Photos
NASA has shared brand new photos of Jupiter taken by the Juno spacecraft, showing the gas giant’s blue-tinged skies. The Juno spacecraft takes batches of photos about every 53 days as it orbits Jupiter. NASA researchers uploaded the raw images online last month, prompting several people to process the photos into colorful views of Jupiter, including self-described citizen scientists Gerald Eichstädt and Seán Doran. Eichstädt and Doran’s enhanced images from Juno’s JunoCam show a beautiful planet of luminous colors, ranging from deep blues and purples to browns and reds — though peop...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - January 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mahita Gajanan Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

See the Moment a Whale Seemed to Protect a Marine Biologist From a Tiger Shark
(BRUNSWICK, Maine) — A marine biologist believes a humpback whale shielded her from a 15-foot tiger shark in the South Pacific. Nan Hauser said she didn’t understand the actions of the 25-ton whale that she met face-to-face in the Cook Islands. Then she saw the shark. She’s heard on a video telling the massive mammal, “I love you!” The encounter took place in October, but Hauser didn’t upload the video until Monday. It quickly spread via social media. Hauser, president of the Center for Cetacean Research and Conservation, tells the Portland Press Herald that whales are “altrui...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - January 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized Maine onetime Whales Source Type: news

Google Celebrates Nobel-Prize Winning Biochemist Har Gobind Khorana
Indian-American biochemist Har Gobind Khorana, known for his construction of the first synthetic gene and renowned research in nucleic acids and proteins, is being honored with a Google Doodle Tuesday, on what would have been Khorana’s 96th birthday. Khorana’s work uncovered how a DNA’s genetic code determines protein synthesis — which dictates how a cell functions. That discovery earned khorana, along with two colleagues, the 1968 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine “for their interpretation of the genetic code and its function in protein synthesis.” Several years later, Khorana creat...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - January 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jennifer Calfas Tags: Uncategorized Google Google Doodle onetime Source Type: news

Who Is Har Gobind Khorana? Why Google Is Celebrating the Nobel Prize-Winner
Known for his construction of the first synthetic gene and renowned research in nucleic acids and proteins, Indian American biochemist Har Gobind Khorana is being honored with a Google Doodle Tuesday. Khorana’s work uncovered how a DNA’s genetic code determines protein synthesis — which dictates how a cell functions. That discovery earned him, along with two colleagues, the 1968 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine “for their interpretation of the genetic code and its function in protein synthesis.” Several years later, Khorana created the first synthetic gene — a step that led to comme...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - January 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jennifer Calfas Tags: Uncategorized Google Google Doodle onetime Source Type: news

SpaceX Has Launched the U.S. Government ’s Secretive ‘Zuma’ Spacecraft Into Orbit
SpaceX successfully completed its first launch of 2018 Sunday night, sending a highly secretive U.S. government spacecraft into orbit before carrying out an upright landing of the rocket’s first stage. The classified payload, named Zuma, took off at around 8 p.m. from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on a Falcon 9 rocket and was sent into low-earth orbit. Little is known about the mission’s objectives. SpaceX cut its live web feed shortly after separation of the payload from the rocket, citing the classified nature of its cargo. After delivery, the live video feed resumed to show the upright landing ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - January 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Laignee Barron Tags: Uncategorized Innovation onetime overnight rocket Space Exploration SpaceX Source Type: news

Legendary Astronaut John Young Dies at 87
Legendary astronaut John Young has died, according to a statement from NASA. He was 87. “We’re saddened by the loss of astronaut John Young, who was 87,” NASA wrote on Twitter. “Young flew twice to the Moon, walked on its surface & flew the first Space Shuttle mission.” We're saddened by the loss of astronaut John Young, who was 87. Young flew twice to the Moon, walked on its surface & flew the first Space Shuttle mission. He went to space six times in the Gemini, Apollo & Space Shuttle programs. pic.twitter.com/l4nSwUCMIq — NASA (@NASA) January 6, 2018 Young was the...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - January 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized NASA onetime Source Type: news

Legendary Astronaut John Young Dead at 87
Legendary astronaut John Young has died, according to a statement from NASA. He was 87. “We’re saddened by the loss of astronaut John Young, who was 87,” NASA wrote on Twitter. “Young flew twice to the Moon, walked on its surface & flew the first Space Shuttle mission.” We're saddened by the loss of astronaut John Young, who was 87. Young flew twice to the Moon, walked on its surface & flew the first Space Shuttle mission. He went to space six times in the Gemini, Apollo & Space Shuttle programs. pic.twitter.com/l4nSwUCMIq — NASA (@NASA) January 6, 2018 Young was the...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - January 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized NASA onetime Source Type: news

Bill Gates Thinks These 6 Innovations Could Change the World
When Johann Gutenberg invented the printing press, he changed the course of history. You could say the same about Thomas Edison’s light bulb, Jonas Salk’s polio vaccine, and Grace Hopper’s compiler. What will the next great invention to transform history? Here are a few innovations that I think are worth watching. Better Vaccine Storage Vaccines have saved millions of lives around the world, but they spoil if they aren’t stored at the right temperature. A group of inventors from Global Good in Seattle have created an innovative new refrigerator called the MetaFridge. It stays cold enough to keep vac...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - January 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Bill Gates Tags: Uncategorized Innovation Optimist Source Type: news

The 11,500-Year-Old Remains of a Baby Could Reveal How Humans First Came to the Americas
Ancient DNA extracted from the skull of a six-week-old baby girl whose 11,500-year-old remains were unearthed in a burial pit in central Alaska is helping scientists resolve long-standing controversies about how humans first populated the Americas. Scientists said on Wednesday a study of her genome indicated there was just a single wave of migration into the Americas across a land bridge, now submerged, that spanned the Bering Strait and connected Siberia to Alaska during the Ice Age. The infant — named “sunrise girl-child” (Xach‘itee‘aanenh T‘eede Gaay) using the local indigenous langua...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - January 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Will Dunham / Reuters Tags: Uncategorized archeology onetime Science Source Type: news

The First Supermoon of 2018 Arrives on New Year ’s Day
The new year will be off to a celestial start with the appearance of a bigger and brighter supermoon — this time nicknamed the “wolf moon.” The supermoon is a nickname of its own, referring to a full moon that appears larger and more luminous due to its increased proximity to the Earth. The wolf moon, however, refers to the first full moon of the new year, which so happens to fall on New Year’s Day this time around, according to NASA. The second of a “supermoon trilogy” that began with a supermoon at this beginning of this month, the New Year’s supermoon should look about 14% bigge...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Aric Jenkins Tags: Uncategorized onetime supermoon Source Type: news

‘A Once in a Lifetime Thing.’ People Dazzled By a Surprise Meteor That Soared Across New England
A meteor sailed across the Northeast skies Tuesday, dazzling dozens of spectators in more than a half-dozen states, experts said. The American Meteor Society, a nonprofit scientific group made up of astronomers, confirmed a meteor was spotted over parts of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, New York, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut and Pennsylvania about 6 p.m. EST. The organization received more than 180 reports from witnesses about the fireball sighting. The celestial event is fairly common, but because of its brevity, it’s rare to catch it as it’s happening, according to Mike Hankey, an operations manag...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Melissa Chan Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

People in L.A. Definitely Thought Last Night ’s SpaceX Rocket Launch Was Aliens
SpaceX launched its final rocket of the year on Friday, which put on a spectacular show as it streaked across the night sky in Southern California. But not everyone in L.A. got the memo about the rocket launch. Some thought it was aliens. Or worse. Social media users posted pictures of the rockets and speculated about what the lights in the sky could be – with opinions ranging from aliens to fairy godparents to Santa. Aliens are real and it's over for mankind pic.twitter.com/FnmKbnynCF — blake (@Yungasshat) December 23, 2017 In the sky tonight. Santa? Aliens? Meteor? Fairy Godparents? pic.twitter.co...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lisa Marie Segarra Tags: Uncategorized onetime SpaceX tech Source Type: news

Bruce McCandless, First Astronaut to Fly Freely in Space, Dies at 80
(HOUSTON) — NASA astronaut Bruce McCandless, the first person to fly freely and untethered in space, has died. He was 80. McCandless died Thursday in California, NASA’s Johnson Space Center announced Friday. No cause of death was given. He was famously photographed in 1984 flying with a hefty spacewalker’s jetpack, alone in the cosmic blackness above a blue Earth. He traveled more than 300 feet away from the space shuttle Challenger during the spacewalk. McCandless said he wasn’t nervous about the historic spacewalk. “I was grossly over-trained. I was just anxious to get out there and fly. I f...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized onetime remembrance Source Type: news

The Skull-Shaped ‘Halloween Asteroid’ is Coming Back in 2018
Back in 2015, Halloween was also celebrated in the skies, as a skull-shaped asteroid flew by earth on Oct. 31. The asteroid is coming back next year, but it’ll be a little late for the Halloween parties. Halloween asteroid 2015 TB145 will make its return in mid-November 2018, according to a release from the Institute of Astrophysics of Andalusia in Spain. It makes a lap around Earth ever 3.04 years, according to Space.com. It also reflects about five or six percent of the sunlight that hits it, making it just slightly more reflective than charcoal for comparison. Astronomers also think it could be a dead comet. 2015 ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lisa Marie Segarra Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

How Climate Change Could Make the Migrant Crisis Worse
Scientists have for years cited extreme weather events connected to climate change as a contributing factor in the ongoing European migrant crisis. Drought and crop failure have destroyed livelihoods and driven sectarian conflict, leading to mass migration from the Middle East and Northern Africa to Europe. The problem is about to get much worse, according to a new study in the journal Science. Researchers behind the study evaluated asylum applications submitted to the European Union from migrants in more than 100 countries between 2000 and 2014, and found a link between dramatic temperature fluctuations and migration. As...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized climate change Refugee crisis Source Type: news

3 Astronauts Take Off For International Space Station
(BAIKONUR, Kazakhstan) — A capsule carrying three astronauts from Russia, Japan and the United States has blasted off for a two-day trip to the International Space Station. The Soyuz capsule with Anton Shkaplerov, Norishige Kanai and Scott Tingle launched at 1:23 p.m. (0723 GMT; 2:23 a.m. EST) Sunday from Russia’s manned space-launch complex in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. It entered orbit nine minutes later. It is the first space flight for Tingle and Kanai; Shkaplerov is on his third mission to the ISS. The capsule is to dock on Tuesday with the orbiting space laboratory. The three will join Russia’s Alexander...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

A 3-Mile-Wide ‘Potentially Hazardous’ Asteroid Will Fly by Earth on Saturday. Here’s How to Watch
If you caught the Geminid meteor shower earlier this week, stay tuned for another celestial phenomena on Saturday night: 3200 Phaethon. On Dec. 16, a three-mile-wide asteroid called 3200 Phaethon will make its closest pass of Earth in at least 45 years, coming with 6.4 million miles of our planet, according to NASA estimates. The asteroid orbits Earth every 523 days, according to Space.com, coming within varying distances of the planet each time. While 3200 Phaethon does skim past Earth closely enough to earn a Potentially Hazardous Asteroid label from NASA — which the agency says “does not mean a PHA will impa...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

Climate Change Is Already Wreaking Havoc on Our Weather, Scientists Find
The Arctic is melting with no turning back. Climate change increased rainfall during Hurricane Harvey by at least 15%. And several extreme weather events that occurred in 2016 would not have been possible without man-made global warming. These are among the findings being discussed this week at this fall’s meeting of the American Geophysical Union in New Orleans, the largest gathering of Earth scientists in the world. Taken together, the findings show the deepening urgency of the fight against climate change. “Climate change is hurting us without a doubt,” said James Byrne, a professor at the University o...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized climate change onetime Source Type: news

4 Winter Solstice Rituals From Around the World
Thousands of people around the globe will herald the winter solstice, the shortest day of the year in the Northern Hemisphere, with centuries-old rituals like soaking in fruit-filled baths and dressing up as a devilish folklore legend that punishes naughty children around Christmas. The solstice, which falls on Dec. 21 this year, marks the first day of winter. It starts the moment the Northern Hemisphere is pointed at its farthest distance from the sun. The winter solstice is considered a turning point in the year in many cultures. The sacred day is also called Yule to pagans celebrating the birth of the new solar year, ac...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Melissa Chan Tags: Uncategorized onetime winter solstice Source Type: news

Fracking Linked to Negative Health Effects in Infants, Study Says
Babies born to mothers who lived near fracking wells during pregnancy are more likely to experience negative health effects than babies born elsewhere, according to new research. Researchers behind the study, published in the journal Science Advances, found that living within 1 km (0.6 miles) of a fracking well during pregnancy increased odds of low birth weight by 25%. Low birth rates are associated with a slew of different health effects later in life, including various illnesses and developmental problems. The effect was lower but still significant in babies whose mother lived between 1 and 3 km (1.9 miles) from a well ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized Babies energy fracking fracking ban health infant health Source Type: news

Giant Penguins the Size of Humans Once Lived in New Zealand, Scientists Discover
(NEW YORK) — Fossils from New Zealand have revealed a giant penguin that was as big as a grown man, roughly the size of the captain of the Pittsburgh Penguins. The creature was slightly shorter in length and about 20 pounds (9 kilograms) heavier than the official stats for hockey star Sidney Crosby. It measured nearly 5 feet, 10 inches (1.77 meters) long when swimming and weighed in at 223 pounds (101 kilograms). If the penguin and the Penguin faced off on the ice, however, things would look different. When standing, the ancient bird was maybe only 5-foot-3 (1.6 meters). The newly found bird is about 7 inches (18 ce...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized animals onetime Source Type: news

Scientists Discover Human-Sized Penguin Fossil
(NEW YORK ) — Fossils from New Zealand have revealed a giant penguin that was as big as a grown man, roughly the size of the captain of the Pittsburgh Penguins. The creature was slightly shorter in length and about 20 pounds (9 kilograms) heavier than the official stats for hockey star Sidney Crosby. It measured nearly 5 feet, 10 inches (1.77 meters) long when swimming and weighed in at 223 pounds (101 kilograms). Fossils from New Zealand have revealed a giant penguin that was as big as a grown man, roughly the size of the captain of the Pittsburgh Penguins.https://t.co/phlLq2Y8wh pic.twitter.com/1YJCfWHBAx &mdash...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Malcolm Ritter / AP Tags: Uncategorized fossils onetime Source Type: news

The Geminid Meteor Shower Is One of the Best of the Year. Here ’s When to Watch
Every year in December, stargazers are treated to the spectacle of the Geminid meteor shower, one of the best meteor showers of the gear. The Geminid meteor shower may also be related to the asteroid 3200 Phaethon, which could have been left behind by the same comet whose debris causes the shower. This year, the Geminid meteor shower will be visible on the night of Dec. 13 into the morning of Dec. 14. The Geminids can be seen in their full glory anywhere in the northern hemisphere, and will also be visible in the southern hemisphere — though they will not rise far above the horizon. To see the Geminid meteor shower,...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Billy Perrigo Tags: Uncategorized geminid meteors onetime space Source Type: news

Here ’s the Best Time to Watch the Geminid Meteor Shower
Every year in December, stargazers are treated to the spectacle of the Geminid meteor shower. This year, the Geminids will be visible on the night of Dec. 13 into the morning of Dec. 14. They can be seen in their full glory anywhere in the northern hemisphere, and will also be visible in the southern hemisphere — though they will not rise far above the horizon. To see the Geminid meteor shower, it’s best to find a spot as far away from any light sources as possible, wrap up warm, and lie on a blanket facing the sky. Astronomers say the shower will be at its most intense around 2 a.m., when the sky is at its dar...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Billy Perrigo Tags: Uncategorized geminid meteors onetime space Source Type: news

Thanks, Mr President! Bloomberg Says Trump Pulling Out of Paris Agreement Has Been a ‘Rallying Cry’ for Green Lobby
More than six months after President Donald Trump announced he would pull the U.S. out of the global climate deal known as the Paris Agreement, about 50 world leaders, as well as major U.S. business executives and U.N. officials gathered in the French capital for a daylong climate summit, insisting that Trump’s decision had no impact—and indeed, might well have mobilized the rest of the world to unite on a key issue. “The fact that President Trump has a different view has been a rallying cry for the pro-environmentalists groups. And that has been very helpful,” former New York Mayor Michael Bloomber...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Vivienne Walt / Paris Tags: Uncategorized Environment France Source Type: news

Trump Wants to Send Astronauts Back to the Moon. Will That Really Happen?
The easiest part about going to the moon is, well, going to the moon. Once you’ve got your funding in place, your crew trained and your rocket and spacecraft on the launch pad, it’s just a matter of gassing it all up and going. We’ve done it before — nine times in fact; we can surely do it again. The trick is all that other stuff that has to come first — especially the money, the rocket and the spacecraft. Details like that are worth keeping in mind in the wake of President Donald Trump’s just-signed Space Policy Directive, setting NASA on a path to return Americans to the moon and to us...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Apollo program Mars moon NASA onetime space Space Policy Directive trump Source Type: news

France Awards Climate Scientists With ‘Make Our Planet Great Again’ Grants
(PARIS) — Eighteen climate scientists from the U.S. and elsewhere hit the jackpot Monday as French President Emmanuel Macron awarded them millions of euros in grants to relocate to France for the rest of Donald Trump’s presidential term. The “Make Our Planet Great Again” grants — a nod to Trump’s “Make America Great Again” campaign slogan — are part of Macron’s efforts to counter Trump on the climate change front. Macron announced a contest for the projects in June, hours after Trump declared he would withdraw the U.S. from the Paris climate accord. More than 5,00...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sylvie Corbet / AP Tags: Uncategorized climate change Donald Trump Emmanuel Macron France onetime president trump Source Type: news

What Does an Anxiety Disorder Feel Like? Here Are 4 Signs You May Have a Problem
If 2.6 billion people were suffering from an illness, you’d think we’d all be more familiar with it. That figure represents 33.7% of the population of the world, after all. It also represents the share of that population that will at some point experience an anxiety disorder, according to the National Institutes of Health. For those billions, the experience of clinical anxiety can range from a persistent fretfulness, distractedness and a sort of whole-body clenching, to the paralytic crisis of a full-blown panic attack. All of it feels lousy; all of it is a state you race to escape — which typically only ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized anxiety disorder behavior health OCD psychology PTSD Source Type: news

This Nobel Laureate Is Worried U.S. Politics Could Endanger Scientific Research
(STOCKHOLM) — An American researcher who shared this year’s Nobel Prize for medicine bluntly criticized political developments at home in his address at the awards’ gala banquet Sunday night. Michael Rosbash, who was honored for his work on circadian rhythms — commonly called the body clock — expressed concern that U.S. government support such as that received by him and colleagues Jeffrey Hall and Michael Young is endangered. “We benefited from an enlightened period in the postwar United States. Our National Institutes of Health have enthusiastically and generously supported basic resea...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: David Keyton and Jim Heintz / AP Tags: Uncategorized Budget Donald Trump Federal Budget Immigration micharl rosbash nobel prize onetime overnight politics Science United States Source Type: news

Nobel Laureate: As Long as Atomic Bombs Exist, Disaster Is Inevitable
(OSLO) — As long as atomic bombs exist, a disaster is inevitable, the head of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons, the winner of this year’s Nobel Peace Prize, said Saturday. “We are facing a clear choice right now: The end of nuclear weapons or the end of us,” Beatrice Fihn told a news conference at the Norwegian Nobel Committee. “An impulsive tantrum, a calculated military escalation, a terrorist or cyberattack or a complete accident — we will see the use of nuclear weapons unless they are eliminated,” she warned. “These weapons do not make us safe, they a...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: David Keyton / AP Tags: Uncategorized Nobel Peace Prize norway Nuclear Weapons onetime Source Type: news

Nikki Haley Questions U.S. Participation in the Winter Olympics Amid Tensions With North Korea
Nikki Haley, the U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, has called American attendance at South Korean winter games into question, citing escalating tension with North Korea. Haley told Fox News on Wednesday night that American athletes’ participation in the games is an “open question,” according to a transcript from CNN. The games — scheduled for Feb. 9-25 in Pyeonchang, South Korea — come amid increasing hostility between Washington and South Korea’s northern neighbor. While acknowledging that she has not “heard anything about” whether the athletes will be participating, Ha...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Laignee Barron Tags: Uncategorized North Korea olympics onetime overnight South Korea Source Type: news

Newly Discovered Dinosaur Species Looks Like Something Dr. Seuss Dreamed Up
(WASHINGTON) — With a bill like a duck but teeth like a croc’s, a swanlike neck and killer claws, a new dinosaur species uncovered by scientists looks like something Dr. Seuss could have dreamed up. It also had flippers like a penguin, and while it walked like an ostrich it could also swim. That’s the first time swimming ability has been shown for a two-legged, meat-eating dinosaur. The tiny creature, only about 18 inches (45 centimeters) tall, roamed 75 million years ago in what is now Mongolia. Its full curled-up skeleton was found in a sandstone rock. “It’s such a peculiar animal,” sa...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Seth Borenstein / AP Tags: Uncategorized dinosaurs onetime Source Type: news

This Black Hole Just Let Scientists Look Back in Time to the Dawn of Creation
(CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.) — Astronomers have discovered a super-size black hole harkening back to almost the dawn of creation. It’s the farthest black hole ever found. A team led by the Carnegie Observatories‘ Eduardo Banados reported in the journal Nature on Wednesday that the black hole lies in a quasar dating to 690 million years of the Big Bang. That means the light from this quasar has been traveling our way for more than 13 billion years. Banados said the quasar provides a unique baby picture of the universe, when it was just 5 percent of its current age. It would be like seeing photos of a 50-year-ol...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

How Telling Stories Makes Us Human
Odds are, you’ve never heard the story of the wild pig and the seacow — but if you’d heard it, you’d be unlikely to forget it. The wild pig and seacow were best friends who enjoyed racing each other for sport. One day, however, the seacow hurt his legs and could run no more. So the wild pig carried him down to the sea, where they could race forever, side by side, one in the water, one on the land. You can learn a lot from a tale like that — about friendship, cooperation, empathy and an aversion to inequality. And if you were a child in the Agta community — a hunter-gatherer population in...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized behavior Evolution fables human behavior hunter-gatherers Storytelling Source Type: news

These 12 People Are Changing Science
On Sunday, some of the smartest minds in science and math will gather at the NASA Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley for the Breakthrough Prize, one of the biggest prizes in science. Several scientists will be recognized for their research, with 12 individuals receiving substantial funding for their work in advancing life sciences, physics and mathematics. Founded in 2012 by Sergey Brin, Mark Zuckerberg & Priscilla Chan, Yuri & Julia Milner, and Anne Wojcicki, this year the annual prize provided $22 million in awards. Here are some of the winners whose work may be changing your life soon: PHYSICS Wilkinson Mi...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park, Alexandra Sifferlin and Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized anne wojcicki Breakthrough Prize healthytime Mark Zuckerberg Math onetime Physics priscilla chan Science sergey brin Silicon Valley Yuri Milner Source Type: news

Neil deGrasse Tyson Goes on Epic Rant About Tonight ’s Supermoon, Calls It ‘an Embarrassment’
The supermoon may be hitting the eye like a big pizza pie tonight, but it’s not amore. At least not for astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson. The prominent scientist took to Twitter to shatter the hype over Sunday’s supermoon, calling it “an embarrassment to everything else we call super.” “FYI: The very concept of a Super Moon is an embarrassment to everything else we call super: Supernova, Supercollider, Superman, Super Mario Bros,” he said on Twitter. Then he used a comparison that any fan of Dean Martin’s 1953 hit “That’s Amore” can understand. “If last m...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katie Reilly Tags: Uncategorized neil degrasse tyson onetime Science space supermoon Source Type: news

How to See the 2017 Geminid Meteor Shower
Stargazers will be treated to an awesome sight later this month — if they’re willing to stay up late. The 2017 Geminid meteor shower will take place from the night of Dec. 13 into the morning of Dec. 14, peaking around 2 a.m. local time, according to Space.com. At its height, Geminid will send as many as 120 meteors per hour streaking across the early morning sky. Better still, you don’t need any fancy equipment to enjoy the show. Space.com recommends simply picking an area as far away from artificial light as possible, lying back and fixing your gaze slightly above and to the right of Orion’s belt....
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

How to Watch the 2017 Geminid Meteor Shower in December
Stargazers will be treated to an awesome sight later this month — if they’re willing to stay up late. The 2017 Geminid meteor shower will take place from the night of Dec. 13 into the morning of Dec. 14, peaking around 2 a.m. local time, according to Space.com. At its height, Geminid will send as many as 120 meteors per hour streaking across the early morning sky. Better still, you don’t need any fancy equipment to enjoy the show. Space.com recommends simply picking an area as far away from artificial light as possible, lying back and fixing your gaze slightly above and to the right of Orion’s belt....
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news