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CTE Was Confirmed in a Living Person for the First Time. And It ’s a Veteran NFL Player
A former NFL player is reportedly the first living person ever accurately diagnosed with CTE, or chronic traumatic encephalopathy, the disease found in the brains of dozens of ex football players. This breakthrough, which was made in 2012, but only published this week in the journal Neurosurgery, could help doctors identify and treat patients while they are still alive. CTE was previously only identifiable through a brain examination after death. The subject of the diagnosis was not named in the study, but was reported by CNN to be Fred McNeill, who died in 2015 at age 63. McNeill played 12 seasons as a linebacker for the ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - November 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Billy Perrigo Tags: Uncategorized CTE NFL onetime Source Type: news

Scientists Have Discovered a New Planet Close to Earth. Here ’s Why It’s So Exciting
If life is lurking somewhere in space, it’s done an awfully good job of hiding itself so far. But the jig may be up now that we have a better idea of where to look. That’s clearer than ever with the announcement in the journal Astronomy and Astrophysics of a newly discovered exoplanet orbiting an otherwise unremarkable star named Ross 128. Not only is the planet precisely the kind of place that could support biology, it’s located right down the street by cosmic standards — just 11 light-years from Earth. The new world, prosaically named Ross 128 b, was discovered by a European telescope in the Chile...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - November 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized exobiology exoplanet extraterrestrials Life onetime planets Proxima Centauri b Ross 128 b space Source Type: news

A Newly Discovered Planet Could Harbor Life – and It’s (Relatively) Close to Us
A newly discovered exoplanet could harbor life, scientists say. And it’s even (relatively) close to Earth – only 11 light-years away. Ross 128 b has some similar characteristics to Earth, astronomers said in a new study published in the journal Astronomy and Astrophysics. It’s roughly the same size and may have a comparable surface temperature, an environment that could allow life to flourish. “The special properties of this system means that we are contributing our bit on the search of an Earth 2.0.” Nicola Astudillo-Defru, one of the study’s co-authors at the University of Geneva&rsquo...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - November 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Aric Jenkins Tags: Uncategorized astronomy onetime space Source Type: news

Scientists Have Made Their First Attempt at Gene Editing Inside a Human Patient
(OAKLAND, Calif.) — Scientists for the first time have tried editing a gene inside the body in a bold attempt to permanently change a person’s DNA to try to cure a disease. The experiment was done Monday in California on 44-year-old Brian Madeux. Through an IV, he received billions of copies of a corrective gene and a genetic tool to cut his DNA in a precise spot. “It’s kind of humbling” to be the first to test this, said Madeux, who has a metabolic disease called Hunter syndrome. “I’m willing to take that risk. Hopefully it will help me and other people.” Signs of whether i...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - November 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Marilynn Marchione / AP Tags: Uncategorized gene editing Genetics health Innovation onetime overnight Research Source Type: news

Why Smart People Still Believe Conspiracy Theories
Millions of Americans believe in conspiracy theories — including plenty of people who you might expect would be smart enough to know better. Despite mountains of scientific evidence to the contrary, at least 20% of Americans still believe in a link between vaccines and autism, and at least 37% think global warming is a hoax, according to a 2015 analysis. Even more of us accept the existence of the paranormal: 42% believe in ghosts and 41% in extrasensory perception. And those numbers are stable. A 2014 study by conspiracy experts Joseph Uscinski of the University of Miami and Joseph Parent of Note Dame University sur...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - November 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized 9/11 behavior Conspiracy Theories healthytime human behavior moon landings politics psychology Science vaccines Source Type: news

The Leonid Meteor Shower Is This Weekend. Here Are the Best Places to See It
The annual Leonid meteor shower will be crystal-clear to astronomy fans in many parts of the U.S. this weekend. The Leonid shower happens each November, when Earth crosses the orbital path of the Tempel-Tuttle comet, according to EarthSky. This year, the celestial show is slated to begin Nov. 17, with peak viewing hours starting early the next morning, AccuWeather reports. According to AccuWeather, that’s good news for stargazers in the coastal Southeast, the northern Plains, the Four Corners area and California, where clear skies will make for great viewing conditions. Viewers in the Northeast, Great Lakes region an...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - November 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized astronomy leonid meteor shower onetime Science Source Type: news

Launch of Super Advanced Weather Satellite Delayed Over Technical Glitch
A U.S. government satellite that was scheduled to launch into orbit early Tuesday morning was delayed after a technical hitch. The Joint Polar Satellite System-1 satellite, or JPSS-1, was scheduled to launch into a polar orbit from California’s Vandenberg Air Force Base. But a bad reading during the first stage of its launch, combined with boats nearby, forced scientists to postpone. The mission is being led by the NOAA, the agency responsible for the oceans and atmosphere, and overseen by NASA. The satellite will have to wait for at least 24 hours before launching again, as the delay meant it missed the short 66 sec...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - November 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Billy Perrigo Tags: Uncategorized NASA NOAA onetime satellite Source Type: news

How China Could Shape the Future of Energy
Changes to China’s energy mix amid President Xi Jinping’s push for an “energy revolution” have the potential to accelerate the global transition away from fossil fuels to clean energy sources, according to a new report from the International Energy Agency. The country has sought to move away from coal and other fossil fuels to address a pollution problem that leads to millions of premature deaths and foster economic development outside of heavy industry. China has also sought to position itself as the global leader in the fight against climate change. To that end, China will install a third of the n...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - November 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized energy Source Type: news

Carbon Pollution Levels Rose for the First Time in Four Years
(WASHINGTON) — Global carbon pollution rose this year after three straight years when levels of the heat-trapping gas didn’t go up at all, scientists reported Monday. Preliminary figures project that worldwide carbon dioxide emissions are up about 2 percent this year, according to an international team of scientists. Most of the increase came from China. The report by the Global Carbon Project team dashed hopes that emissions from the burning of coal, oil and gas had peaked. “We hoped that we had turned the corner… We haven’t,” said study co-author Rob Jackson, an Earth scientist at Sta...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - November 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Seth Borenstein / AP Tags: Uncategorized climate change onetime Source Type: news

How to See the Venus-Jupiter Conjunction on Monday
Despite being hundreds of millions of miles apart, Venus and Jupiter will appear close together on the horizon just before sunrise on Monday — an astronomical event known as a conjunction. “You’ll have to be looking very low on the east-southeast horizon about 45 minutes before sunrise,” Jane Houston Jones of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory said in a video, recommending that viewers protect their eyes and avoid aiming binoculars or telescopes directly at the sun. The planets will appear to move past each other about seven degrees above the horizon, “forming what looks like a brilliant d...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - November 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katie Reilly Tags: Uncategorized NASA onetime space space 2017 Source Type: news

A Radioactive Cloud from Russia Swept Over Europe — and No One Knows Why
A mysterious radioactive cloud that swept through much of Europe this fall has officials baffled. The cloud was harmless and has dissipated, France’s Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety wrote in a statement Thursday, but between Sept. 27 and Oct. 13, the radioactive nuclide Ruthenium 106 was detected in “the majority of European countries.” Experts aren’t totally sure where the substance came from, though testing suggests it was first released during the last week of September in Russia or Kazakhstan, likely somewhere between Russia’s Volga River and Ural Mountains. &ldquo...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - November 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized europe France Nuclear onetime radiaoctive Science Source Type: news

NASA Wants Your Help Naming a Tiny World at the End of the Solar System
(CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.) — Heads up, armchair travelers. NASA is seeking a nickname for a tiny, icy world on the edge of the solar system that’s the next destination for New Horizons, the spacecraft that surveyed Pluto. New Horizons whipped past Pluto two years ago. Now it’s headed for 2014 MU69 — gobbledygook to even the most die-hard scientists. To lighten the mood as New Horizons aims for a 2019 flyby, the research team is holding a naming contest . The deadline is Dec. 1. MU69 is 4 billion miles (6.5 billion kilometers) away and may actually be two objects, either stuck together or orbiting one an...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - November 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Marcia Dunn / AP Tags: Uncategorized NASA onetime space Source Type: news

Meet the Heroic Animals That Went Into Space Before Humans
The First Space Pioneers Bettmann Archive Animals were every bit as heroic as the first human astronauts By Jeffrey Kluger Animals have long been the science community’s shock troops—the first to hit the beaches when a new frontier of knowledge is being claimed. Those soldiers hardly volunteered for the misison: The thousands of monkeys and mice that were used as test subjects for Jonas Salk’s first polio vaccine were conscripted for the job, whether they wanted to do it or not. That doesn’t diminish their profound contribution to scientific knowledge—indeed, it enlarges it. The same is tru...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - November 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Time Tags: animals belka ham Laika NASA space strelka Source Type: news

Donald Trump Used to Say Climate Change Is a Hoax. The Government Just Confirmed It Isn ’t
A sweeping federal report released Friday stressed that climate change poses a grave threat to the U.S. — from the dangers of rapidly increasing temperatures to rising sea levels — challenging the Trump Administration’s unwillingness to address global warming. The climate change report, known as the National Climate Assessment, predicts that sea levels could rise by as much as eight feet by the end of the century, average annual temperatures will continue to rise and forest fires will continue to grow in severity. Humans are “extremely likely” to be responsible for global warming and that &ldq...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - November 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized climate change onetime Source Type: news

Scientists Just Found a Hidden Chamber in the Great Pyramid of Giza
(CAIRO) — Scientists have found a hidden chamber in Egypt’s Great Pyramid of Giza, the first such discovery in the structure since the 19th century and one likely to spark a new surge of interest in the pharaohs. In an article published in the journal Nature on Thursday, an international team said the 30-meter (yard) void deep within the pyramid is situated above the structure’s Grand Gallery, and has a similar cross-section. The purpose of the chamber is unclear, and it’s not yet known whether it was built with a function in mind. The scientists made the discovery using cosmic-ray imaging, recordin...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - November 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Brian Rohan / AP Tags: Uncategorized Archaeology Egypt onetime Source Type: news

Smithsonian Announced Its 2017 Ingenuity Award Winners
From a groundbreaking director and screenwriter to a 12-year-old who is changing what children read, this year’s recipients of Smithsonian Magazine’s annual American Ingenuity Awards boast a wide-ranging set of accomplishments. Smithsonian Magazine last week announced its winners for the annual awards, which honor innovators in a variety of fields, including technology, history, performing arts, physical sciences and more. Ava DuVernay, who became the first female African-American director to have a film nominated for Best Picture at the Academy Awards with 2014’s Selma, will be honored for her achievemen...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jennifer Calfas Tags: Uncategorized onetime Source Type: news

This Dinosaur Had a ‘Bandit Mask’ Like a Raccoon
Scientists said this week that a “diminutive” dinosaur from China is the first to sport a so-called “bandit mask” pattern around its eyes, an evolutionary feature common in modern-day mammals and birds, including raccoons. The revelation came in a study released Thursday by researchers in England. “This is the first time it’s been seen in a dinosaur and, to my knowledge, any extinct animal that shows color bands,” a co-author of the study, Fiann Smithwick, told the BBC. The roughly turkey-sized dinosaur, called Sinosauropteryx, was incidentally one of the first fossils to show evid...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Billy Perrigo Tags: Uncategorized dinosaurs onetime Source Type: news

Bill Nye Thinks Science Will Survive the Trump Administration
Bill Nye is perhaps best known for the zany persona he cultivated for years as a science educator — always filled with cheer for the subject matter at hand. But that fun zaniness disappears in the new documentary Bill Nye: Science Guy in a moment bound to send a chill up the spine of anyone who believes that American students should learn basic science. In the film, Nye confronts famed creationist Ken Ham as he undercuts evolution in a conversation with an elementary school-age child at Kentucky’s Creation Museum. “Young woman, I would say to you that there’s a process that humans have developed ove...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized climate change onetime Science Source Type: news

Spectacular Images Show How Our View of the Universe Has Evolved
Unveiling The Universe NASA/ESA/The Hubble Heritage Team The human species is ever-changing and with it our view of the universe. By Jeffrey Kluger It’s easy to laugh at the ancient humans who thought of the nighttime sky as a sort of cosmic colander, but the idea made an intuitive kind of sense. In the evening, a gigantic bowl with thousands of pinprick holes is inverted over the Earth—or so the thinking went. The sun, suspended above it all, streams through in a brilliant scattering of starry points. Over the centuries, we slowly came to a clearer understanding of the structure and workings of the universe,...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Time Tags: Eclipse jeff kluger NASA space universe Source Type: news

A Congressional Watchdog Is Warning Washington to Prepare for Costly Climate Change
The U.S. federal government should adopt a strategy to manage climate change risks, as their cost to the government may rise as much as $35 billion per year by mid-century, a congressional watchdog office report released on Monday said. The report from the non-partisan Government Accountability Office comes as Congress weighs aid packages for U.S. victims of deadly hurricanes and wildfires that struck in 2017, with losses already estimated at more than $300 billion. President Donald Trump, a climate change doubter, rolled back Obama administration directives requiring federal agencies to prepare plans to address climate ri...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Valerie Volcovici / Reuters Tags: Uncategorized climate change Disaster Environment onetime overnight Source Type: news

Stephen Hawking ’s Thesis Is So Popular It Crashed Cambridge’s Website
Stephen Hawking wrote his Ph.D. thesis all the way back in 1966. But it’s still generating buzz more than half-a-century later. The physicist’s thesis about expanding universes, which he wrote at Cambridge University as a 24-year-old postgraduate student, was made freely available online for the first time ever Monday morning, and immediately incited a frenzy. More than 60,000 people — enough to periodically crash the university’s website — have already read it, the university said. The work was previously available through Cambridge’s library, but readers had to visit the facility in pe...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized onetime Physics Science Stephen Hawking Source Type: news

The EPA Has Pulled Its Scientists from a Climate Change Conference
The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has pulled three of its scientists from a major conference on Monday, where they were set to speak about the impacts of climate change on New England’s largest estuary, the New York Times reports. The last-minute cancellation is raising alarms about attempts to stifle discussion on climate change at the federal regulating body, the Times says. The EPA did not provide a rationale for the change of plans. EPA administrator Scott Pruitt, nominated to the position by President Donald Trump, has been a vocal denier of the scientific consensus that human-made greenhouse gases are a...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Laignee Barron Tags: Uncategorized climate change Environment onetime overnight Source Type: news

The Orionid Meteor Shower Peaks This Weekend. Here ’s What Time You Can Watch
Turn off Netflix this weekend and head outdoors to watch the peak of the Orionid Meteor Shower instead. The starry spectacle is set to take place between Oct. 20 and Oct. 22, offering a dazzling display that should delight veteran and novice stargazers alike. This year’s Orionid meteor shower should be especially good because there will be little moonlight that could otherwise drown out the meteors. Just make sure you have clear skies in your local forecast before heading out. “The Orionids peak on October 20 — a dark, moonless night,” wrote NASA’s Jane Houston Jones in a recent statement. &ld...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kate Samuelson Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

There ’s a Cave on the Moon Large Enough For a Future Lunar Colony
Japanese scientists have discovered a crater beneath the Moon’s surface that scientists think could one day house a lunar colony. The 50km (31 miles) long and 100m (328 feet) wide fissure was found by Japan’s Selenological and Engineering Explorer (SELENE) probe using a radar system, Japan’s Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) confirmed on October 18. Japanese scientists said that the crevasse, which is located beneath a region of volcanic domes known as the Marius Hills, may be a subterranean lava tube created by volcanic activity some 3.5 billion years ago. “We’ve known about these l...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Eli Meixler Tags: Uncategorized Japan moon onetime overnight Space Exploration Source Type: news

How to View Uranus Without a Telescope as It Nears Earth Tonight
From about 1.7 billion miles away, Sky-gazers will have a good chance of seeing the icy planet Uranus Thursday night — without the help of a telescope. Uranus is making its closest approach to our planet, NASA says, and because it will be sandwiched between Earth and the sun, it could be visible to the naked eye. A waning moon, and the resulting darker sky, should help. “It’s visible all night long and its blue-green color is unmistakeable. It may be bright enough to see with your naked eye — and for sure in binoculars,” according to NASA. Uranus is 4 times wider than Earth. For perspective, N...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lisa Marie Segarra Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

‘Einstein of the Ocean’ Who Helped Surfers Catch the Perfect Waves Turns 100
This article originally appeared on TheConversation.com (Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories)
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Paul Spence and Shane Keating / The Conversation Tags: Uncategorized birthdays History Oceans onetime Science Surfing World War II Source Type: news

4 Surprising Facts About the Universe We Just Discovered in a Cosmic Breakthrough
News from space always arrives late — and in a discovery announced Monday, that meant 130 million years late. It was that long ago that two neutron stars in Galaxy NGC 4993, in the Hydra constellation, spiraled in toward one another and collided in a titanic eruption, sending out waves of energy that literally shook our world. The shaking happened on Aug. 17 at 8:41 a.m. E.T., as gravitational waves released by the event — ripples in spacetime that Albert Einstein first predicted in 1915 but weren’t confirmed until a full century later — at last reached and passed through the Earth. While the first...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Black Holes Cosmology Einstein gamma rays gravitational waves NASA neutron stars onetime Science space telescopes Source Type: news

Electric Vehicles Are Here. Now We Need to Figure Out How to Charge Them
In the century since the dawn of the mass-market car, more than 100,000 gas stations have popped up along the country’s 4 million miles of roads and highways–and a stop to refuel became a crucial part of the quintessential U.S. road trip. But the heyday of the gas station as a place to refuel is probably drawing to a close. Analysts project that sales of electric vehicles will outnumber sales of gas-powered cars by midcentury. That means a wholesale rethinking of the infrastructure that consumers use to charge their batteries Powering that electric-car fleet will require a dramatic increase in public charging s...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized driving electric vehicles Source Type: news

A Groundbreaking Astronomy Discovery Gave Scientists Their Best Look Ever at How Gold Was Created
(WASHINGTON) — It was a faint signal, but it told of one of the most violent acts in the universe, and it would soon reveal secrets of the cosmos, including how gold was created. Astronomers around the world reacted to the signal quickly, focusing telescopes located on every continent and even in orbit to a distant spot in the sky. What they witnessed in mid-August and revealed Monday was the long-ago collision of two neutron stars — a phenomenon California Institute of Technology’s David H. Reitze called “the most spectacular fireworks in the universe.” “When these things collide, all h...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Seth Borenstein / AP Tags: Uncategorized astronomy onetime Source Type: news

Why So Many People Believe Conspiracy Theories
William of Occam would have hated conspiracy theories. A 14th-century philosopher and Franciscan friar, William is celebrated for developing the “law of parsimony,” better known today as “Occam’s razor.” According to the razor principle, the simplest explanation for an event is almost always the best; shave away any extraneous assumptions, and what you’ve got left is usually the truth. That’s not exactly the way conspiracy theorists think. Either Barack Obama was actually born in Hawaii, or an international plot unfolded over multiple decades to conceal his Kenyan birthplace and in...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized behavior beliefs climate change Conspiracy Theories healthytime JFK moon landings Science the brain vaccines Source Type: news

No, Yellowstone ’s Supervolcano Isn’t Going to Wipe Out Life on Earth Anytime Soon
If you’re worried a supervolcano lying beneath Yellowstone National Park could erupt and plunge the planet into a volcanic winter, you shouldn’t be. While a future eruption — a prospect widely reported this week after new research — is possible, geologists say it’s incredibly unlikely. The odds that Yellowstone’s sleeping supervolcano will erupt within a century and cause massive devastation are one in 10,000, which is about as likely as a very large asteroid hitting Earth, according to Jacob Lowenstern, a research geologist at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). “It’s not imp...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Melissa Chan Tags: Uncategorized onetime Yellowstone National Park Source Type: news

This Surprising Sea Creature Is Causing Climate Change
Clams and worms at the bottom of the ocean may be releasing “ridiculous amounts of greenhouse gases” that contribute to climate change, according to a new study. Researchers behind the study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, found that 10% of the methane emissions from the Baltic Sea come from clams and worms. That’s roughly equivalent to 20,000 cows. Methane is one of the most potent greenhouse gases, roughly 30 times more effective at trapping heat in the atmosphere than carbon dioxide. The study evaluated the Baltic Sea specifically, but if that effect also occurs the globe the impact of oc...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized animals climate change onetime Source Type: news

10 Hurricanes in a Row Hit the Atlantic This Year. That Hasn ’t Happened Since 1893
Tropical storm Ophelia became the 10th Atlantic storm in a row to strengthen into a hurricane Wednesday — the first time that such a long string of storms have all reached hurricane strength since 1893, meteorologists said. Many of those 10 hurricanes have not hit the U.S. mainland — and Ophelia isn’t expected to reach America either. But a few others, including Harvey, Irma and Maria, have left dozens in the U.S. dead and caused billions of dollars in damage. Hurricane season continues through the end October, leaving the potential for even more destruction. This year’s unusually strong storm seaso...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized climate onetime weather Source Type: news

Why It ’s So Hard to Predict Exactly Where Wildfires Will Strike
After at least 17 people were killed and more than 2,000 structures were destroyed by fast-moving wildfires raging across northern California this week, some are wondering: Is there a way to better predict wildfires and warn residents before they start? Unfortunately, experts say the nature of wildfires makes it almost impossible to create an accurate early-warning system like those that exist for other natural disasters, including hurricanes and tornadoes. “With wildfires, there is nothing typically natural that would give an indication ahead of time that a fire is going to spark,” Daniel Berlant, assistant de...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alana Abramson Tags: Uncategorized California onetime weather Source Type: news

The 2017 MacArthur Fellows Were Just Announced. Here ’s How 6 ‘Genius’ Grant Winners Spent Their Life-Changing Prize Money
Jacob Soll has told this story so many times, he almost sounds removed from it. Not bored, or jaded really. But detached — like it happened to a friend of a friend. Or he read about it in a book, and is a little incredulous. “It was like Oliver Twist or something,” he says. “I was the lowest paid professor at my university. My roof was falling in, pipes were exploding. When I got the call, I was literally walking to the library in the rain, thinking about how ruined I was.” It was fall 2011, and the MacArthur Foundation had just named the historian to its fellowship program, an honor that came...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kristen Bahler Tags: Careers grants Source Type: news

NASA: The Moon Once Had an Atmosphere That Faded Away
The moon likely had an ancient, temporary atmosphere — similar to the pocket of gases that surround Earth — around 3 to 4 billion years ago, according to a new study. Scientists at NASA‘s Marshall Space Flight Center and the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI) in Houston found that the atmosphere was caused by ancient volcanos spewing gases into the lunar sky faster than they could escape to space. The atmosphere, which was about 2% the density of Earth’s but twice that of Mars, lasted for around 70 million years before sputtering away into space. “This work dramatically changes our view of th...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara John Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

There Could Be Pesticides in Your Honey
About three-fourths of honey from around the world contains some pesticides, according to a study published in Science Friday. The study found that 75% of honey samples collected from nearly 200 sites across the globe contained at least one of five kinds of pesticides called neonicotinoids. Researchers tested 198 samples of honey from every continent, excluding Antarctica, and found that 45% of the samples contained two or more of the compounds that make up the pesticide and that 10% had at least four or five compounds. “Our results confirm the exposure of bees to neonicotinoids in their food throughout the world,&rd...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mahita Gajanan Tags: Uncategorized Food health onetime Source Type: news

Jane Goodall: ‘We Don’t Have Unlimited Time’ to Save the Planet
Jane Goodall has been at the forefront of the conservation movement for decades, helping to illuminate human understanding of wildlife and the need to protect it. But never has the challenge been as urgent as now, she told TIME. “When I began there wasn’t any particular need for conservation the way there is now,” Goodall said. “If we carry on with business as usual, it will be too late.” Goodall listed a wide range of concerns, including poaching and deforestation, as key issues affecting wildlife, but highlighted climate change as the threat with the potential to do the most damage in the lo...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized animals climate change Environment onetime Source Type: news

Inside a Changing First-Grade Classroom in the 1970s
When first-grade teacher Bill L’Orange invited LIFE into his classroom 45 years ago, he offered the magazine’s readers a glimpse into a world that few would have otherwise had access to — the world of the child, so foreign to many adults, as well as the world of a male elementary-school teacher. At the time, a male elementary-school teacher (like a female college professor, as one education expert put it) was rare enough to be considered newsworthy. L’Orange, whose profession is feted each Oct. 5 on UNESCO’s World Teachers’ Day, taught a group of 28 students in a Chicago suburb. When he ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lily Rothman and Liz Ronk Tags: Uncategorized 1972 Education Elementary School Leonard McCombe LIFE Magazine photography Source Type: news

Harvest Moon 2017: How to Get the Best View of the Rare October Moon
The 2017 celestial marking of fall comes Thursday night when the Harvest Moon, the autumn full moon, will be in full view. Moonrise begins at 6:52 p.m. E.T. Thursday night and the moon sets at 7:41 a.m. E.T. the next day on the East Coast. The Washington Post notes that the Harvest Moon can also be seen for a couple of days afterwards right around sunset. Sunset is at 6:29 p.m. E.T. and 6:28 p.m. E.T. on Friday and Saturday. The Harvest Moon, which is also know as the “Blood Moon,” marks the closest full moon to the fall equinox, and it might look a bit more orange than a regular full moon. According to the Pos...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lisa Marie Segarra Tags: Uncategorized onetime weather Source Type: news

When Bullets Rained Down in Las Vegas, One Man ’s Hotel Room Became a Sanctuary for Strangers
Sunday was just not Aaron Banner-Goodspeed’s day. The TSA confiscated his shaving cream; he thought he might be able to sneak it through airport security, but he got busted. So when the 43-year old data analyst for a Boston hospital landed in Las Vegas after a five-hour flight, he had to schlep out to buy more. Then he ate some dinner and went back to his room and tried to find an episode of Curb Your Enthusiasm on TV. But the Tropicana hotel had no HBO. Just his luck. He was hanging out in his underwear, flipping through basic cable channels, when he heard a commotion outside his room on the first floor. “I th...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlotte Alter Tags: Uncategorized Crime Las Vegas las vegas shooting onetime Source Type: news

Tropical Storm Nate Could Threaten U.S. Gulf Coast as a Hurricane
Tropical Storm Nate, which has been forming across the southern Caribbean, could strengthen into a low-grade hurricane and is on track to hit the U.S. Gulf Coast, and possibly Florida, by this weekend. The storm, which currently has maximum sustained winds of 40 mph, is expected to move through northeastern Nicaragua and eastern Honduras on Thursday, according to a Oct. 5 public advisory by the National Hurricane Center. It might reach sustained Category 1 winds of 85 mph in three days as it approaches the Gulf Coast on Saturday. “Strengthening is likely over the northwestern Caribbean Sea Thursday night and Friday,&...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara John Tags: Uncategorized onetime weather Source Type: news

‘FAKE!’ Trump Wants Senate Intelligence Committee to Probe ‘Fake News Networks’
U.S. President Donald Trump called on the Senate Intelligence Committee, currently investigating Russia’s possible collusion with Trump during the 2016 election, to launch a probe into the news media. “Why Isn’t the Senate Intel Committee looking into the Fake News Networks in OUR country to see why so much of our news is just made up-FAKE!” Trump tweeted on Thursday morning. Why Isn't the Senate Intel Committee looking into the Fake News Networks in OUR country to see why so much of our news is just made up-FAKE! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) October 5, 2017 Rex Tillerson n...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara John Tags: Uncategorized Donald Trump Source Type: news

Las Vegas Shooter ’s Gambling Draws New Attention to High-Stakes Video Poker
(LAS VEGAS) — Authorities trying to piece together the final days before Stephen Paddock unleashed his arsenal of powerful firearms on country music fans on the Las Vegas Strip have at least one potential trove of information: his gambling habits. Nevada gambling regulators say they’re sorting through documents for clues about him and his girlfriend, Marilou Danley. Those can include suspicious transaction or currency reports, as well as information from a player’s rewards card, which the casinos use to track their gambling and offer perks. Paddock’s brother has described the gunman as a high-stakes...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Gene Johnson, Ken Ritter, Regina Garcia Cano / AP Tags: Uncategorized Las Vegas onetime Source Type: news

A Corruption Probe Into College Hoops Exposes More Than Shady Deals
The criminal complaint unveiled in late September contained all sorts of unsavory details about college basketball’s underground economy: five-figure bribes to coaches, six-figure payouts to high school players and their families, and the alleged complicity of employees at some of the nation’s most prominent universities. The 10 defendants “allegedly exploited the hoop dreams of student-athletes around the country,” said Joon H. Kim, the acting U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York. The FBI opened a tip line, and officials suggested more bombshells to come. It was a public service but ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sean Gregory Tags: Uncategorized NCAA Source Type: news

Batteries Are the Next Target in China ’s Clean-Energy Conquest
Clean-energy promoters hailed Tesla’s announcement of plans for a Nevada “gigafactory”–a reference to the unit for measuring energy storage–back in 2014 as the dawn of a new American industry. The $5 billion facility would eventually produce millions of lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles as well as energy storage on the grid. But behind the headlines, leading battery researchers and entrepreneurs say the gigafactory represents an exception to the rule in the fast-growing global industry for lithium-ion batteries. No matter what Tesla has planned, the U.S. is set to lag China in the ba...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized Batteries Source Type: news

The Fight Over Gun Control Isn ’t Really About Guns
Over the roar of the guitar, the gunfire erupted. At first the country-music fans at the Route 91 Harvest Festival in Las Vegas thought the loudspeakers were malfunctioning or that the pyrotechnics had gone awry. But as the bodies crumpled, the crowd began to grasp the horror that was unfolding. The rapid pop pop pop exploded around Doris Huser, 29. She and her 8-year-old daughter had been in the bathroom, but when the shooting began, they pushed back into the crowd, toward the sound of the bullets, in search of Huser’s 5-year-old son and her developmentally disabled sister. They could feel the bullets pinging off th...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Philip Elliott / Las Vegas, Haley Sweetland Edwards / Las Vegas and Charlotte Alter / Las Vegas Tags: Uncategorized gun crime Guns Las Vegas Las Vegas Massacre las vegas shooting NRA Source Type: news

Rep. Jeff Duncan: Why I Created Suppressor Legislation
What happened that fateful Sunday evening in Las Vegas is beyond words. In the days immediately following the shooting, I intentionally avoided saying much, not because I didn’t have opinions, but because I feel that we as a society are often too quick to politicize a situation. The days after the shooting should have been spent grieving, coming together and looking for answers. Unfortunately that’s not what happened, and now I feel compelled to correct the record on some of the over-the-top rhetoric. As the Washington Post’s Fact Checker unit confirmed in 2015, practically none of the then existing legis...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeff Duncan Tags: Uncategorized Guns Las Vegas Massacre las vegas shooting Source Type: news

Review: A Heroine for Our Times in Jennifer Egan ’s Manhattan Beach
Jennifer Egan joined the who’s who of American letters in 2011 when she won a Pulitzer for A Visit From the Goon Squad, an interlinked-story-collection-as-novel that bucked more than a few conventions. Her new novel Manhattan Beach is more conventional in that it’s a linear, historical narrative set circa World War II. It’s a less inventive book, but many readers will find it more satisfying. Manhattan Beach, named for the neighborhood in Brooklyn, begins when Anna Kerrigan is almost 12 years old, tagging along with her father to a mysterious man’s seaside home. Already there is a plucky danger abou...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sarah Begley Tags: Uncategorized Books Source Type: news

The Tragedies of 2017 Will Test the Bonds That Connect Us, Now and for Years to Come
If you could see grief on a map, there would be rings of anguish radiating from whole regions of the U.S. right now. From Texas to Florida to Puerto Rico and Las Vegas, the hurt would expand with each person affected to the people they’re connected with in all parts of the country. No state would remain untouched by the events of 2017. The magnitude of the suffering over the past few months is unfathomable to those who haven’t spent time in a war zone or in countries where nature’s most brutal assaults are even more frequent. Houston and Florida are still reeling from sequential hurricanes. Puerto Rico ha...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Susanna Schrobsdorff Tags: Uncategorized Las Vegas Source Type: news