The Pandemic Has Spurred a Return to Low-Cost Fitness Activities
Like many others in the U.S., Ron Gumucio and his wife stopped going to the gym in 2020 as a precaution against COVID-19. To fill the void, Gumucio’s wife eventually purchased a stationary bike, joining the club of people who have splurged on pricey at-home exercise equipment. But Gumucio, 44, has gone in a different direction. Until he feels safe returning to the gym, he’s sticking to distinctly low-tech forms of fitness. He takes a daily walk around his New Jersey neighborhood. He jogs. He bought cheap resistance bands to sneak in a little strength training. Occasionally he uses the jungle gym in his local pa...
Source: TIME: Health - March 5, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Magazine Source Type: news

Europe Is Considering COVID-19 Vaccine Passports. Should the Rest of the World Catch Up?
In a move welcomed by many of Europe’s traumatized travel destinations, the European Union’s leadership is considering a digital health pass that would allow E.U. citizens who have received a COVID-19 vaccine to travel for work or tourism. Ursula von der Leyen, president of the European Commission, tweeted that the goal of such a “Digital Green Pass” is to provide “proof that a person has been vaccinated; results of tests for those who couldn’t get a vaccine yet; [and] info on COVID-19 recovery” enabling residents to move safely within the E.U. and abroad. Israel, which has succe...
Source: TIME: Health - March 4, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Aryn Baker Tags: Uncategorized COVID Questions COVID-19 Explainer Londontime Source Type: news

Insurance Claim Data Show How Much Teen Mental Health Has Suffered During the U.S. COVID-19 Pandemic
As early as last spring, psychologists were warning that even as children and teens were spared most of the physical impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, the shuttering of schools, the lack of contact with friends and the loss of milestones like birthday parties, graduations and more would exact a heavy emotional and developmental price. Now, a year on, the numbers are in—and they’re in some ways worse than the experts feared. In a new study by the nonprofit FAIR Health, investigators combed through a database of 32 billion U.S. health insurance claims—focusing on the two billion or so from 2019 to 2020&mdash...
Source: TIME: Health - March 4, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

‘We Will Handle It.’ An Army of Women Is Taking on the Hunger Crisis in Local Communities
Just before 3 p.m. on a warm Wednesday in February, 30-year-old Jammella Anderson—­donning heart-shaped glasses, a Black Lives Matter tee and 2-in. platform boots—strolls up to a small bicycle-­repair shop just north of Albany, N.Y. She’s here to persuade Troy Bike Rescue to let her use an electrical outlet so she can plug in a new refrigerator just outside the shop’s front door. “It’s just two prongs,” she explains to one of the employees. “All I need is an outlet.” Anderson, who works as a part-time doula and yoga instructor, is here on behalf of the one-woman...
Source: TIME: Health - March 3, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Abby Vesoulis and Mariah Espada Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature food insecurity Magazine Women in Crisis Source Type: news

Pregnant Asylum-Seekers Needed Help at the Border. Inside the Program That Provided Care —and Community
Xiomara was already having labor pains when she presented herself to U.S. Border Patrol officials to make a claim for asylum. She had fled gang violence in El Salvador six months earlier, working under the table in Mexico to afford bus tickets for her and her three young children to make it to the border. When she finally arrived, nine months pregnant and feeling contractions, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) offered to take her to a hospital. But she had heard about family separations and was worried about losing her kids if she were hospitalized, so instead she was sent back to the streets of Ciudad Juárez...
Source: TIME: Health - March 3, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jasmine Aguilera Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Immigration Magazine Women in Crisis Source Type: news

I Avoided Facing My Mental Illness for Decades. The Pandemic Changed That
“I didn’t leave my apartment for days, weeks. Time became meaningless.”“I was struggling with almost every aspect of my life.”ide class="right-rail__container right-rail__container--ad"> Several years ago, when I was in my mid-20s, after suffering from major depressive disorder and anxiety for most of my life, I found myself at the emergency room during an episode of substance-induced psychosis. My father and stepmother found me, at the very beginning of the episode, having paranoid delusions. Someone had tried to poison me and now they were coming, I told them. “Do not ans...
Source: TIME: Health - March 3, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jaquira Díaz Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature health Magazine Women in Crisis Source Type: news

Another Round of Stimulus Checks Is Coming, But Some Families May Fall Through the Cracks
With fewer than two weeks remaining before Congress’ expanded federal unemployment benefits expire, lawmakers are racing to finish their latest COVID-19 relief package, which passed the House of Representatives on Feb. 27 before heading to the Senate. The legislation, known as the American Rescue Plan, extends that unemployment program, and also includes a new child care tax credit and rent payment assistance. For many Americans, though, the most anticipated provision is another round of $1,400 direct checks. But who will get those checks—and how much money they’ll actually get—has been a sticking p...
Source: TIME: Health - March 3, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Emily Barone Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

‘Tip Of the Iceberg’: Interpol Says Fake COVID-19 Vaccines Were Smuggled Across Continents
By the time police discovered the shipment of fake COVID-19 vaccines, the vials had travelled over 6,000 miles from China to South Africa, the work of a smuggling ring that has produced thousands of counterfeit doses, according to Interpol, the global police agency that helped break up the operation. The trafficking case, involving a shipment of at least 2,400 doses, is the first confirmed instance of fake vaccines being smuggled across continents, an Interpol spokesperson told TIME—though there are likely more that have occurred, and more still that may be uncovered in the future. “This is only the tip of the ...
Source: TIME: Health - March 3, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Simon Shuster Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

U.S. Will Have Enough COVID-19 Vaccines for All Adults by End of May, Biden Says
(WASHINGTON) — President Joe Biden said Tuesday that the U.S. expects to take delivery of enough coronavirus vaccines for all adult Americans by the end of May, two months earlier than anticipated, as his administration announced that drugmaker Merck & Co. will help produce rival Johnson & Johnson’s newly approved shot. With the bolstered supply, Biden also announced he would be using the powers of the federal government to direct all states to prioritize vaccinating teachers, and said the federal government would provide the doses directly through its pharmacy program. He challenged states to administe...
Source: TIME: Health - March 2, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: ZEKE MILLER, LINDA A. JOHNSON and JONATHAN LEMIRE/AP Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 wire Source Type: news

How to Raise Resilient Kids
When the COVID-19 pandemic first forced schools and workplaces to close across the United States in March 2020, Charlotte Klopp, a mother of three in North Carolina, thought, like many, that the shut-downs would be short lived. “We thought that it would just be a few weeks or maybe a month and that life would resume as normal pretty quickly,” she says. As the pandemic stretched on for many months, she began to realize that she would need to be intentional about helping her kids weather the challenges that such a long period of stress and disruption can bring. “Sometimes they get frustrated that they can&r...
Source: TIME: Health - March 2, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Julia Pelly Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

When a Texas County Tried to Ensure Racial Equity in COVID-19 Vaccinations, It Didn ’t Go as Planned
It takes about eight minutes to try and save a life. Or at least that’s how long it takes a volunteer with a tablet, standing in the parking lot at the T.R. Hoover Community Development center in South Dallas on a bitterly cold February morning. During the pandemic, the small nonprofit situated in the neighborhood that developers in the 1920s dubbed “the Ideal community” has taken on an ever evolving list of roles. It’s a job-search center. It’s a drive-through food pantry. And, of late, T.R. Hoover is an in-person coronavirus vaccine registration site aimed at helping Ideal’s mainly Bla...
Source: TIME: Health - March 2, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Janell Ross/Dallas Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Source Type: news

This County Tried to Ensure Racial Equity in COVID-19 Vaccinations. The State Said No
It takes about eight minutes to try and save a life. Or at least that’s how long it takes a volunteer with a tablet, standing in the parking lot at the T.R. Hoover Community Development center in South Dallas on a bitterly cold February morning. During the pandemic, the small nonprofit situated in the neighborhood that developers in the 1920s dubbed “the Ideal community” has taken on an ever evolving list of roles. It’s a job-search center. It’s a drive-through food pantry. And, of late, T.R. Hoover is an in-person coronavirus vaccine registration site aimed at helping Ideal’s mainly Bla...
Source: TIME: Health - March 2, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Source Type: news

The First COVID-19 Vaccines Shipped Through COVAX Were Administered in the Ivory Coast
Frontline workers and public officials from the Ivory Coast on March 1 became the first people in the world to receive COVID-19 vaccines shipped from the COVAX Facility, in a long-awaited step toward global health equity. COVAX, a joint initiative of the World Health Organization (WHO); Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance; and the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations, aims to ensure fair access to vaccines in countries around the world. Wealthier nations were able to purchase enough vaccines through the COVAX Facility to inoculate up to 50% of their populations, and 92 middle- and low-income nations will receive free vac...
Source: TIME: Health - March 1, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

How to Stay Social When You Never See Your Work Friends
One of the hardest parts of working remotely is losing the built-in social life an office environment provides. But just because you’re not in the same building as others doesn’t mean you’re doomed to be a hermit. Start building your out-of-office social life by reaching out to coworkers you like—and talking about things besides work. There are plenty of reasons why this might feel awkward at first, says Shasta Nelson, a friendship expert and author of The Business of Friendship: Making the Most of the Relationships Where We Spend Most of Our Time. Perhaps you’re not used to initiating contac...
Source: TIME: Health - March 1, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Anna Goldfarb Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

What We Learned About Ourselves In the First Year of the Pandemic
A version of this article appeared in this week’s It’s Not Just You newsletter. SUBSCRIBE HERE to have an It’s Not Just You essay delivered to your inbox every Sunday. March is the anteroom of months. It’s both the end of last year’s winter and the beginning of the new year’s spring. It’s half slush, half-quixotic hope. I had my first baby in March–a child that arrived nine days late, already a solid little being with startling almond eyes and the appetite of a toddler. I had no idea what I was doing; we two just hunkered down and tried to figure each other out. I sti...
Source: TIME: Health - February 28, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Time Tags: Uncategorized Evergreen It's Not Just You Source Type: news

What We Learned About Ourselves in the First Year of the Pandemic
A version of this article appeared in this week’s It’s Not Just You newsletter. SUBSCRIBE HERE to have an It’s Not Just You essay delivered to your inbox every Sunday. March is the anteroom of months. It’s both the end of last year’s winter and the beginning of the new year’s spring. It’s half slush, half-quixotic hope. I had my first baby in March–a child that arrived nine days late, already a solid little being with startling almond eyes and the appetite of a toddler. I had no idea what I was doing; we two just hunkered down and tried to figure each other out. I sti...
Source: TIME: Health - February 28, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Susanna Schrobsdorff Tags: Uncategorized Evergreen It's Not Just You Source Type: news

What We Learned About Ourselves in the First Year of the Pandemic
A version of this article appeared in this week’s It’s Not Just You newsletter. SUBSCRIBE HERE to have an It’s Not Just You essay delivered to your inbox every Sunday. March is the anteroom of months. It’s both the end of last year’s winter and the beginning of the new year’s spring. It’s half slush, half-quixotic hope. I had my first baby in March–a child that arrived nine days late, already a solid little being with startling almond eyes and the appetite of a toddler. I had no idea what I was doing; we two just hunkered down and tried to figure each other out. I sti...
Source: TIME: Health - February 28, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Susanna Schrobsdorff Tags: Uncategorized Evergreen It's Not Just You Source Type: news

FDA Panel Greenlights First Single-Shot COVID-19 Vaccine, from Johnson & Johnson
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) vaccine advisory committee earlier today (Feb. 26) voted unanimously to recommend Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine for emergency use authorization. While the FDA isn’t obligated to follow the committee’s advice, it generally does. At the end of a full day of review and discussion of the company’s shot, all 22 voting members of the committee agreed that the vaccine was safe and effective enough to be used by the public. It’s the third vaccine that the group of independent experts has recommended, following Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna. ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 27, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

We ’re in the Third Quarter of the Pandemic. Antarctic Researchers, Mars Simulation Scientists and Navy Submarine Officers Have Advice For How to Get Through It
McMurdo Station, an Antarctic research base 2,415 miles south of Christchurch, New Zealand, is a strange place to ride out the COVID-19 pandemic. But it’s been a home of sorts for Pedro Salom since he took a dishwashing job there in 2001, when he was 24. Now an assistant area manager with more than a dozen Antarctic deployments behind him, Salom has grown accustomed to the ebb and flow of life on the ice. There’s the surge of excitement when new arrivals join the camp, the feeling of isolation from the rest of the world when earth and sea disappear in the endless night from April to August; and the joy when the...
Source: TIME: Health - February 26, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

FDA: Pfizer-BioNTech Vaccine Doesn ’t Need Ultra-Cold Freezer Storage
When Pfizer-BioNTech’s vaccine became the first authorized for use in the U.S., the good news came with a catch: the vaccine, the first of its kind using a new mRNA-based technology, needs to be stored at ultra-cold temperatures (-80°C to -60°C) until thawing just before being injected into people’s arms. State health centers, hospitals and other potential vaccination sites scrambled to acquire special freezers that could reach these deep-freeze temperatures, and Pfizer developed a special shipping container that could keep doses appropriately chilled for up to a month as long as the container was conti...
Source: TIME: Health - February 26, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

My Family Is Still Being Careful About COVID-19. Why Does It Feel Like We ’re the Only Ones?
Welcome to COVID Questions, TIME’s advice column. We’re trying to make living through the pandemic a little easier, with expert-backed answers to your toughest coronavirus-related dilemmas. While we can’t and don’t offer medical advice—those questions should go to your doctor—we hope this column will help you sort through this stressful and confusing time. Got a question? Write to us at covidquestions@time.com. Today, K.K. in California asks: My son is almost two, and he was born prematurely at 33 weeks. We don’t ever want to see him in the hospital again, and especially not becaus...
Source: TIME: Health - February 25, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID Questions COVID-19 Source Type: news

We ’ll Probably Never Eliminate COVID-19 from the U.S. It’s Still Worth Trying
2021 got off to a grim pandemic start in the U.S. A huge surge in COVID-19 cases followed the holiday season, peaking at around 300,000 new cases on Jan. 8, 2020. More than 20,000 Americans lost their lives to the virus in a single week in January alone and over 146,00 in total have died since the start of the year. But six weeks later, the picture looks more promising. New daily cases have fallen sharply, daily deaths have fallen to levels not seen since Thanksgiving, and the pace of vaccine roll-out is speeding up. These positive trends mean that we can now begin to ask what the endgame might look like. Would we be happy...
Source: TIME: Health - February 25, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: William Hanage and Gavin Yamey Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Pfizer-BioNTech Announces They Will Test a Third Dose of Their COVID-19 Vaccine
Pfizer-BioNTech has begun testing a third dose of its COVID-19 vaccine in a small group of people. The vaccine is currently authorized in several countries in a two-dose regimen, given 21 days apart, and has proven in studies to be about 95% effective in protecting against COVID-19 disease. But as new (and more infectious) genetic variants of the COVID-19 virus start circulating—so far, scientists have identified three major strains, first found in the U.K., South Africa, and Brazil, respectively—questions about how well authorized vaccines can still thwart the virus have become more urgent. Pfizer-BioNTech hav...
Source: TIME: Health - February 25, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

COVID-19 Vaccines Work. Here ’s the Real-World Proof
It’s one thing to test a vaccine, and another to see it in action in the real world. More than two months after the first vaccines were authorized in the U.K. and U.S., strong data have emerged showing that the shots are doing what they are supposed to do: protect people from COVID-19. In a study published Feb. 24 in the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers in Israel and the U.S. report that the vaccine made by Pfizer-BioNTech was highly effective in protecting against infection with the COVID-19 virus, lowering people’s chances of getting sick with the disease—especially severe disease—and ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 24, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Moderna Ships a New COVID-19 Vaccine for Testing Against More Infectious Variant
This study will investigate whether adding a third dose of already authorized vaccine can increase virus-fighting antibodies to levels that would provide the same protection as the two-dose regiment provided against the original, non-mutated virus. The company is also testing a new vaccine that it developed specifically against the B.1.351 variant. Moderna’s vaccine relies on mRNA technology, which enables the company to rapidly develop new versions simply by changing the genetic information programmed into the shot. (The original vaccine was developed in a record 42 days, and began human testing in a record 63 days...
Source: TIME: Health - February 24, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Ghana Receives World ’s First Coronavirus Vaccine Delivery from COVAX
(ACCRA, Ghana) — Ghana received the world’s first delivery of coronavirus vaccines from the United Nations-backed COVAX initiative on Wednesday—the long-awaited start for a program that has thus far fallen short of hopes that it would ensure shots were given quickly to the world’s most vulnerable people. The arrival of 600,000 doses of the AstraZeneca vaccine in the West African country marks the beginning of the largest vaccine procurement and supply operation in history, according to the World Health Organization and UNICEF. It is a linchpin of efforts to bring the pandemic to an end and has been ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 24, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: FRANCIS KOKUTSE and CARLEY PETESCH / AP Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 News Desk wire Source Type: news

FDA Confirms Johnson & Johnson Single-Dose Vaccine Protects Against COVID-19, Signals Decision on Emergency Authorization Near
(WASHINGTON) — Johnson & Johnson’s single-dose vaccine protects against COVID-19, according to an analysis by U.S. regulators Wednesday that sets the stage for a final decision on a new and easier-to-use shot to help tame the pandemic. The Food and Drug Administration’s scientists confirmed that overall the vaccine is about 66% effective at preventing moderate to severe COVID-19. The agency also said J&J’s shot—one that could help speed vaccinations by requiring just one dose instead of two—is safe to use. That’s just one step in the FDA’s evaluation of a third vaccin...
Source: TIME: Health - February 24, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: FRANCIS KOKUTSE and CARLEY PETESC / AP Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 News wire Source Type: news

You May Be Surprised by the Type of American Who is Postponing Basic Health Care During the Pandemic
There’s more than one way to get sick during the COVID-19 pandemic. You can contract the virus, of course, as more than 28 million Americans already have. Or you can dodge the disease but still suffer from the disruption caused by quarantines and social distancing, if they lead you to neglect routine health care. That, a new TIME-Harris Poll survey shows, is just what too many of us are doing. ( function() { var func = function() { var iframe = document.getElementById('wpcom-iframe-15f249b5273bbd9b00ac5da4e954d4a6') if ( iframe ) { iframe.onload = function() { iframe.contentWindow.postMe...
Source: TIME: Health - February 23, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

U.S. Death Toll From COVID-19 Passes the 500,000 Mark
As of Monday, Feb. 22, 2021, the COVID-19 virus has claimed more than 500,000 lives in the United States, planting yet another grim milestone in a scourge that has wrecked misery in one of the most developed countries in the world. That equates to 1 in 658 Americans in just under a full year since the first reported death directly attributed to the novel coronavirus. ( function() { var func = function() { var iframe = document.getElementById('wpcom-iframe-5e4af606800dcb16125dfe6f3a0b8ac0') if ( iframe ) { iframe.onload = function() { iframe.contentWindow.postMessage( { 'msg_type': 'poll...
Source: TIME: Health - February 22, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Chris Wilson Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Baseball Stadiums, Theme Parks, Cathedrals: See the World ’s Makeshift COVID-19 Vaccination Hubs
Earlier in the COVID-19 pandemic, as arriving patients quickly overwhelmed hospitals from China to Italy to New York, officials converted all manner of public spaces into makeshift treatment hubs in a wartime-like effort to save as many people as possible. Now, as cases fall in many countries, public spaces are being changed once again—this time into mass vaccination hubs, where hundreds or even thousands of people can be inoculated against COVID-19 in a given day. Below, see some of the world’s most impressive makeshift COVID-19 vaccination hubs, from New York’s Citi Field to Moscow’s Krylatskoye I...
Source: TIME: Health - February 22, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Maïa Booker and Alex Fitzpatrick Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

The Best Exercises to Sneak Into Your Workday
You don’t need a gym membership, equipment or even a big chunk of time to reap the rewards of exercise. In fact, you can squeeze some of the best moves for your body into a busy workday. The key is remembering that “all movement counts,” says NiCole Keith, president of the American College of Sports Medicine and kinesiology professor at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. Here are three simple exercises you can easily add to any workday—without cutting too much into your calendar. Walk more Walking is one of the simplest, most accessible ways to increase your activity. Adding more ste...
Source: TIME: Health - February 22, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Pam Moore Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

The Science of Awe and the Mars Perseverance Rover
A version of this article appeared in this week’s It’s Not Just You newsletter. SUBSCRIBE HERE to have an essay delivered to your inbox every Sunday. Perseverance and Why Feeling Awe Increases Empathy Here’s a secret: I am a recovering cynic with recurring pessimistic tendencies. It’s hereditary. On a sunny day, my Irish grandfather would look out the window and say: “We’ll pay for this.” And I won’t even get into the generations of head-spinning drama on the Russian side. Lately, for all the obvious reasons, it’s been way too easy to fall into compulsive fretting. B...
Source: TIME: Health - February 21, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Susanna Schrobsdorff Tags: Uncategorized Evergreen It's Not Just You Source Type: news

India ’s Vaccine Rollout Stumbles as COVID-19 Cases Decline. That’s Bad News for the Rest of the World
India’s COVID-19 vaccination scheme looked set for success. For the “pharmacy of the world,” which produced 60% of the vaccines for global use before the pandemic, supply was never going to be a problem. The country already had the world’s largest immunization program, delivering 390 million doses annually to protect against diseases like tuberculosis and measles, and an existing infrastructure that would make COVID-19 vaccine distribution easier. Ahead of the launch, the government organized dry runs, put up billboards touting the vaccines and replaced phone ringing tones with a message urging peo...
Source: TIME: Health - February 19, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Abhishyant Kidangoor Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature India overnight Source Type: news

It ’s Not Clear That We Actually Need Human Challenge Trials for COVID-19, But the U.K. Is Moving Ahead With Them Anyway
On Feb. 17, health officials in the UK announced that they are ready to start exposing healthy volunteers to the COVID-19 virus in a carefully controlled study. The so-called human challenge trial is the first of its kind for COVID-19 and will help scientists learn how much virus is needed to cause infection, among other important questions. The practice of intentionally exposing healthy people to a disease-causing (and potentially deadly) pathogen isn’t new in science, but it remains controversial. Scientists must balance the benefits of exposing people—which mostly fall in the realm of new knowledge about the...
Source: TIME: Health - February 18, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

To Vaccinate U.S. Veterans, Health Care Workers Must Cross Mountains, Plains and Tundra
A Learjet 31 took off before daybreak from Helena Regional Airport in Montana in late January, carrying six Veterans Affairs medical providers and 250 doses of historic cargo cradled in a plug-in cooler designed to minimize breakage. Even in a state where 80-mph speed limits are normal, ground transportation across long distances is risky for the Moderna mRNA-1273 vaccine, which must be used within 12 hours of thawing. The group’s destination was Havre, Mont., 30 miles from the Canadian border. About 500 military veterans live in and around this small town of roughly 9,800, and millions more reside in similarly rural...
Source: TIME: Health - February 18, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Patricia Kime / Kaiser Health News Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

COVID-19 Bill Would Fund Genomic Sequencing, Expanding U.S. Ability to Identify Virus Mutations
(WASHINGTON) — U.S. scientists would gain vastly expanded capabilities to identify potentially deadlier coronavirus mutations under legislation advancing in Congress. A House bill headed for floor debate would provide $1.75 billion for genomic sequencing. The U.S. now maps only the genetic makeup of a minuscule fraction of positive virus samples, a situation some experts liken to flying blind. It means the true domestic spread of problematic mutations first identified in the United Kingdom and South Africa remains a matter of guesswork. Such ignorance could prove costly. One worry is that more transmissible forms suc...
Source: TIME: Health - February 17, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR / AP Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 News Desk wire Source Type: news

Guinea Declares Ebola Epidemic as Neighboring Countries Act to Prevent Further Spread
DAKAR, Senegal — Guinea has officially declared it has an Ebola epidemic after at least three people have died and four others have been infected in the West African nation. Neighboring Sierra Leone and Liberia have put their citizens on high alert as the three West African nations battled the world’s deadliest Ebola outbreak from 2014 to 2016, which began in Guinea and in which more than 11,300 people died. Sierra Leone’s President Julius Maada Bio has flown to consult with Guinean President Alpha Conde. Guinea’s new Ebola outbreak occurred in N’Zerekore, in southern Guinea, where health offi...
Source: TIME: Health - February 16, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CARLEY PETESCH / AP Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

How to Work from Home Without Burning Out
Working remotely is a luxury—but it’s also an acquired skill. For employees lucky enough to be able to work from home at least some of the time, the trick to staying motivated and preventing burnout is to keep the office and the home from truly becoming one. That’s been challenging during the coronavirus pandemic, which has forced millions of people all over the world to suddenly turn their home into their office. Despite the abrupt change of scenery, many of the same productivity rules still apply, says Wendy Wood, a professor of psychology and business at the University of Southern California and author...
Source: TIME: Health - February 16, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Laura Entis Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Democrats ’ Push to Expand Medicaid Depends on Red States Taking the Bait
Every week, Shellie Fry carefully plans out each meal she, her 81-year-old father, and her 30-year-old son will eat. She buys the least amount of food she thinks they can manage because money has been tight since her father lost his job cleaning charter buses in March, after the pandemic hit. Without health insurance, she pays out of pocket for the medications she needs for her bipolar disorder, heartburn and blood pressure, and by the time the family pays its other bills, as well as her father’s Medicare contribution and medications, there is little money left. “I’ve had a few times where I just didn&rsq...
Source: TIME: Health - February 14, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Abigail Abrams Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

A Love Letter For All the Days After Valentine ’s Day
A version of this article appeared in this week’s It’s Not Just You newsletter. SUBSCRIBE HERE to have an essay delivered to your inbox every Sunday. GIVING ORDINARY LOVE ITS BEAUTIFUL DUE The most loving thing I ever saw my father do for my mother was getting up before dawn in the permafrost of February to warm up her car. This was no small feat in rural Massachusetts. Half the time, just to get out of the house, you had to hurl yourself against the door to push through two feet of drifted snow. Mom hated being cold more than almost anything. Her little birdy shoulders would contract at the start of winter ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 14, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Susanna Schrobsdorff Tags: Uncategorized Evergreen It's Not Just You Source Type: news

Thousands More COVID-19 Patients Were Sent to New York Nursing Homes Than Previously Thought
(NEW YORK) — More than 9,000 recovering coronavirus patients in New York state were released from hospitals into nursing homes early in the pandemic under a controversial directive that was scrapped amid criticism it accelerated outbreaks, according to new records obtained by The Associated Press. The new number of 9,056 recovering patients sent to hundreds of nursing homes is more than 40% higher than what the state health department previously released. And it raises new questions as to whether a March 25 directive from Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s administration helped spread sickness and death among residents, a cha...
Source: TIME: Health - February 12, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Bernard Condon and Jennifer Peltz / AP Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 New York overnight wire Source Type: news

Exclusive: New York Tells Hospitals In Leaked Email That Staff ‘Must’ Come Before the Elderly In COVID-19 Vaccination Drive
The state of New York has warned hospitals that they cannot start giving COVID-19 vaccines to elderly people until they finish vaccinating hospital staff members, according to an email sent to hospitals across the state just before midnight on Feb. 5 from the governor’s vaccination chief, and obtained by TIME this week. The memo from Larry Schwartz, an adviser to Governor Andrew Cuomo who is overseeing the vaccination drive across the state, presents a dilemma for some New York hospitals, which have faced widespread hesitancy among staff members to take the vaccine. Schwartz’s email says that hospitals cannot v...
Source: TIME: Health - February 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Simon Shuster Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

The U.S. COVID-19 Vaccine Rollout Is Getting Faster. But Is it Enough?
On Dec. 8, 2020, when then-President Elect Joe Biden promised that his incoming administration would deliver 100 million doses of COVID-19 vaccine to patients’ arms in his first 100 days in office, none of the highly anticipated inoculations were yet authorized. Even with highly promising results from medical trials and months of planning by state and federal authorities for the rollout, it is not a safe bet to hinge grand political ambitions on a cat’s cradle of government bureaucracies. While the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued an emergency use authorization for the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine three days...
Source: TIME: Health - February 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Chris Wilson Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Do Vaccines Stop the Spread of COVID-19? What You Need to Know
The way most people think of vaccines is pretty simple: you get vaccinated, and your immune system is primed and trained to fight off the invisible intruder in question, be it virus or bacteria. If you’re protected, you can’t be infected, and if you’re not infected, then you can’t spread it to anyone else. And that’s true most of the time. But not all vaccines work that way, and it’s not actually what the two COVID-19 vaccines authorized by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration—made by Moderna and Pfizer-BioNtech—are designed to do. Their effectiveness is measured by how well...
Source: TIME: Health - February 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

My Kids Are in Daycare. How Should That Affect My Family ’s Social Distancing Strategy?
Welcome to COVID Questions, TIME’s advice column. We’re trying to make living through the pandemic a little easier, with expert-backed answers to your toughest coronavirus-related dilemmas. While we can’t and don’t offer medical advice—those questions should go to your doctor—we hope this column will help you sort through this stressful and confusing time. Got a question? Write to us at covidquestions@time.com. Today, Mike from Wisconsin asks: “My wife and I have two kids, both in daycare full-time. Is it safe for kids who are in daycare/school together to get together outside of s...
Source: TIME: Health - February 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID Questions COVID-19 Source Type: news

COVID-19 Case Counts Have Started Falling in the U.S. This May Be Why
From the end of 2020 into early 2021, the U.S. was locked on a pathway of continually breaking and re-breaking COVID-19 records. In December, more than 200,000 new infections in a single day were reported for the first time. Only about a month later, the country hit a somber new record: 300,000 diagnoses in a single day. After months near those dizzyingly high marks, daily case numbers have fallen dramatically. On Feb. 9, there were 92,666 new diagnoses, the third day in a row the tally was below 100,000—which last happened on Dec. 25. ( function() { var func = function() { var iframe = document.getEle...
Source: TIME: Health - February 10, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Should Someone With Asthma Get a COVID-19 Vaccine Before Someone With Cancer? The Next Big Challenge in the Vaccine Rollout
In an ideal world, there would be enough vaccines to inoculate everyone who wanted to get immunized against COVID-19. People would get their shots on a first come, first serve basis, we’d achieve herd immunity in a matter of months and COVID-19 would become a soon-distant memory. But with some 240 million people over age 16 who need a COVID-19 vaccine (and two doses at that), and just over 42 million administered by early February, supply is far below demand, and will likely remain that way for months to come, despite vaccine makers pushing production lines as hard as they can. As the U.S. works through the vaccine ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 10, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Healthy Planet, Healthy People. How Slowing Climate Change Saves Lives
Just because the United States has re-joined the Paris Agreement doesn’t mean that the world is on a path to a better climate future. The 2015 agreement, in which signatories pledged to collectively cap global warming at “well below” 2°C above pre-industrial levels, is only the first step. Member nations still have to adopt ambitious carbon emission reduction plans, known as Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs), and with the current level of commitments the world is on track for a global temperature rise of more than 2.5°C. However, a study published in a special issue of The Lancet Planetar...
Source: TIME: Health - February 10, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Aryn Baker Tags: Uncategorized Brief climate change embargoed study Londontime overnight Source Type: news

WHO Mission Finds COVID-19 Is ‘Extremely Unlikely’ to Have Originated from Wuhan Lab
(WUHAN, China) — The coronavirus most likely first appeared in humans after jumping from an animal, a team of international and Chinese scientists looking for the origins of COVID-19 said Tuesday, dismissing as unlikely an alternate theory that the virus leaked from a Chinese lab. A closely watched visit by World Health Organization experts to Wuhan—the Chinese city where the first coronavirus cases were discovered — did not dramatically change the current understanding of the early days of the pandemic, said Peter Ben Embarek, the leader of the WHO team. But it did “add details to that story,&rdquo...
Source: TIME: Health - February 9, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: EMILY WANG FUJIYAMA/AP Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 wire Source Type: news

Is It Time to Wear a Better Mask for COVID-19? We Asked the Experts
Face masks are much more than a symbol. Over the last year, we’ve learned that countries and regions that encourage or require masking seem to do better at slowing the spread of COVID-19 than places that don’t, and new evidence suggests that masking may protect both the wearer and the people around them. Many TIME readers have recently reached out with questions about masks—which kind of mask should they wear? How do they wear them correctly? Should they be double-masking? And so on. So we asked the masking experts for tips based on the latest research. Is It Time to Upgrade Your Mask? Early in the pande...
Source: TIME: Health - February 8, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news