Simone Biles ’ Olympic Team Final Withdrawal Could Help Athletes Put Their Mental Health First
When Simone Biles strode into Ariake Gymnastics Center for the women’s gymnastics team competition on July 27, the expression on her face said it all. Normally all smiles and easy-going, Biles appeared sternly serious and maybe even troubled. That expression only deepened after she landed her vault in the first round. Intending to do a two and a half twisting vault, Biles lost her bearings in midair and only managed one and a half twists. The low difficulty and execution scores only sealed the deal. “That score unfortunately would go up like that for the team, and I felt I robbed them of a couple of tenths when...
Source: TIME: Health - July 28, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized olympics Tokyo Olympics Source Type: news

The CDC Is About to Recommend That Vaccinated Americans Mask Up Again
The nation’s top health agency is expected to backpedal Tuesday on its masking guidelines and recommend that even vaccinated people wear masks indoors in parts of the U.S. where the coronavirus is surging, according to a federal official. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because the person was not authorized to release the data. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention was expected to make an announcement later Tuesday. For much of the pandemic, the CDC advised Americans to wear masks outdoors if they were within 6 feet of one another. Then in April, as vaccination rates rose sharply, the agency eas...
Source: TIME: Health - July 27, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mike Stobbe/Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

The Story Behind Team USA Women ’s Gymnasts’ Leotards
There was probably little doubt that when the U.S. women’s gymnastics team walked into the arena at the Tokyo Olympics for the team event, their leotards would embody some red, white and blue theme. And the women did not disappoint. Striding on to the mats, the four-woman team event squad resembled patriotic superheroes in their red-sleeved leotards with a white band across the chest and blue bottom. And that was the idea. Jeanne Diaz, senior designer and director of custom at GK Elite, the leotard manufacturer that for the first time made the women’s Olympic uniforms, says the theme for the leotards was Modern...
Source: TIME: Health - July 27, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park/Tokyo Tags: Uncategorized olympics Tokyo Olympics Source Type: news

Can Employer Mandates Get More Americans Vaccinated? New York and California Are Finding Out
What to do about the U.S. vaccine uptake rate? Even with what appears to be a slight increase as people try to protect themselves against the more transmissible Delta variant now spreading through many parts of the country, only a pitiful 0.1% or so of Americans are currently getting their first dose every day. That’s a far cry from the urgent scramble that Delta demands, especially given that only about half the country is fully vaccinated—and some places, like Louisiana (36.6%) and Arkansas (36%), are lagging woefully behind. So far, the U.S. vaccination drive has largely relied on carrots—the idea has ...
Source: TIME: Health - July 26, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alex Fitzpatrick Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

The 6 Factors That Will Determine the Severity of the COVID-19 Surge in the U.S. This Fall
Here we go again. The United States is now experiencing a fourth wave of COVID-19, with very rapidly rising infections. The surge in new daily cases is driven by the Delta variant, which makes up 83% of sequenced samples in the U.S. and which is estimated to be twice as transmissible as the original strain. One of the reasons that Delta spreads more easily is that a person infected with this variant has a viral load 1,000 times higher than someone infected with the original version of SARS-CoV-2. [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] Hospitalizations and deaths are also rising, though more slowly than cases, reflect...
Source: TIME: Health - July 26, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Gavin Yamey and Nahid Bhadelia Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Summer Camps Across the U.S. Are Dealing With COVID-19 Outbreaks. So What Happens When School Starts?
Clear Creek Community Church took COVID-19 seriously from the beginning. The interdenominational church, which has five locations in and around Texas’ Galveston County, suspended in-person services through most of spring 2020, and required attendees to wear masks until this past May. When the church announced a five-day summer ministry camp for kids in grades 6 to 12 for this June, it also shared a set of protocols the camp would enforce to curb the spread of the virus: More hand-washing stations were to be installed. Spray hand sanitizers would be given to every group. Attendees would be encouraged to keep six feet ...
Source: TIME: Health - July 26, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

How Tokyo Olympics COVID-19 Countermeasures May Be Falling Short
Holding an Olympics during a pandemic was never going to be easy, and the Tokyo Organizing Committee consulted with numerous public health experts and invested in tracking app systems to help curb the spread of the virus within the Olympic community. But despite these strict countermeasures, an imperfect system and practical issues in compelling thousands of people from around to world to comply with often intense and inconvenient protocols are already leading to lapses that are opening the door for SARS-CoV-2, and in particular its Delta variants, to spark new infections that could quickly flare up into clusters of cases....
Source: TIME: Health - July 25, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park/Tokyo Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Tokyo Olympics Source Type: news

How Will Empty Stands Affect Olympic Athletes in Tokyo?
The Opening Ceremony provided the first taste of what an Olympics without fans is like—devoid of the normal buzz of excitement and roar of the appreciative crowd, it was more solemn than celebratory. But it’s one thing to miss the noise for Opening Ceremony, quite another when it’s gone from the competitive events. Not every sport will be as affected by the loss of spectators at the Tokyo Games. Athletes competing in events like archery, which requires concentration and quiet, for example, might actually appreciate the respite. But team-based sports and events like swimming races might seem, well, a littl...
Source: TIME: Health - July 25, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized olympics Tokyo Olympics Source Type: news

When Parents Said No to Their Kids Being Vaccinated, This Teenager Created VaxTeen. It ’s Now More Crucial Than Ever
Like many 18-year-olds, Kelly Danielpour is preparing to start college in the fall, planning out her classes, buying dorm necessities and wondering what her roommate will be like. Unlike many 18-year-olds, she’s also spending her spare time helping teens across the country navigate vaccine-hesitant parents and get their COVID-19 vaccines. As the highly contagious Delta variant spreads, posing a greater risk for people who are unvaccinated and stoking fears of a fourth wave of COVID-19 cases, health experts are urging more Americans to get vaccinated. “This is becoming a pandemic of the unvaccinated,” Roch...
Source: TIME: Health - July 22, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katie Reilly Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 nationpod News Source Type: news

Why the Respiratory Disease RSV Is Having an Off-Season Surge
Dr. James Antoon, an assistant professor of pediatrics at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, often goes an entire summer without diagnosing a single case of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). The common illness, which typically results in mild, cold-like symptoms but can be severe in infants and elderly adults, usually goes along with the winter flu season. But this summer, RSV cases are spiking, particularly in southern states. Around 2,000 confirmed cases were recorded across the U.S. during the week of July 10, 2021, compared to less than a dozen during the week of July 25, 2020. The actual number of infections is li...
Source: TIME: Health - July 22, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

How Olympians Are Fighting to Put Athletes ’ Mental Health First
Jackson Avenue is the main road that cuts through Oxford, Miss. At its northern limit, it circles the Ole Miss campus where Raven Saunders had spent the past three years as a student athlete. At its western end, Jackson splits into a T junction populated by a cluster of familiar American fast food restaurants and retail chains: a Walmart Supercenter, a Home Depot, a Popeye’s, a Chick-Fil-A. Saunders, a senior at University of Mississippi and a star shot putter on the school’s track and field team, knew the intersection well. Turn right, and the road led home. Turn left, and the highway hugged a steep drop-off f...
Source: TIME: Health - July 22, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized olympics Tokyo Olympics Source Type: news

COVID-19 Caused U.S. Life Expectancy to Drop 1.5 Years
Life expectancy in the United States dropped the most in more than seven decades last year as Covid-19 sent hundreds of thousands of Americans to early deaths. The pandemic’s disproportionate toll on communities of color also widened existing gaps in life expectancy between White and Black Americans, according to estimates released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The tally represents an extraordinarily grim accounting of an ongoing catastrophe. The first year of the pandemic delivered a bigger blow to American life expectancy than any year of the Vietnam War, the AIDS crisis or the “deaths of...
Source: TIME: Health - July 21, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Tozzi / Bloomberg Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 overnight wire Source Type: news

How COVID-19 Long Haulers Could Change the U.S. Disability Benefits System
When COVID-19 began spreading in the U.S. in March 2020, McKale Santin was working at a nursing home in Burlington, Vermont. She and her coworkers didn’t yet know how deadly the virus would become, but she remembers feeling nervous as the first patients got sick and she was asked to examine them with only a surgical mask, not the more protective N95 mask that she wore to test for conditions like tuberculosis. One day, a patient pulled down her own mask to sneeze while Santin was conducting a respiratory assessment. Soon after, the woman became one of Vermont’s first people to die from COVID-19—and Santin...
Source: TIME: Health - July 20, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Abigail Abrams Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Source Type: news

This Is What Happens When an Athlete Tests Positive for COVID-19 at the Tokyo Olympics
Japanese health authorities have an aggressive testing plan in place for the Tokyo Olympics, but positive COVID-19 tests are already cropping up. With the Olympics taking place during a pandemic, in a city under a state of emergency, the Tokyo Organizing Committee has created a stringent set of policies governing how athletes and their coaches, trainers and other staff must behave to minimize the risk of both importing infections and spreading disease in the Olympic community. But even with aggressive testing, infections can happen. That’s because the virus is so unpredictable, and even though about 80% of athletes r...
Source: TIME: Health - July 20, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 olympics Tokyo Olympics Source Type: news

A Fourth Wave of COVID-19 Is Brewing in the U.S. Is There Enough Time to Stop it?
With every passing day, the United States appears more likely to be on the cusp of a dreaded fourth wave of COVID-19 infections, even as the percentage of fully vaccinated Americans inches toward 50%. In the past two weeks, the number of average new daily cases has more than doubled, from 13,200 on July 4 to more than 32,300 on July 18, a surge that harbors grim reminders of the fronts of the second and third waves in the summer and fall of 2020. But on closer inspection, this surge looks significantly different than those we have seen in the past—and may very well be worse than it looks on the page. [time-brightcove...
Source: TIME: Health - July 19, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Chris Wilson Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Texas Lawmaker in D.C. on Testing Positive for COVID-19: ‘Let This Be a Reminder’
On Monday, 51 Texas lawmakers boarded planes to Washington, D.C. The legislators, the bulk of the Texas House of Representatives Democratic delegation, had fled their state in hopes of stopping a vote on bills that would change the times and ways that citizens in the state may vote, as well as the experience Texans may have while casting a ballot. The Democrats say the proposed laws would come with the very real possibility of voter suppression and intimidation; one measure in question, for example, would allow untrained and armed poll watchers to stand close enough to voters to see how they vote. [time-brightcove not-tgx...
Source: TIME: Health - July 18, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Janell Ross Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

China Reviewing WHO Plan for Next Phase of Virus-Origin Probe
China said it was reviewing plans for further inquiry into the origins of the coronavirus, after the World Health Organization chief urged Beijing to cooperate in the next phase of the investigation. Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian told a regular news briefing Friday that Beijing was mulling over a proposal made by WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus. Zhao reaffirmed China’s position that any decision on continuing the probe “should be reached by all members through consultation.” “The Chinese side noted the draft plan made by Tedros and the secretariat and the Chinese sid...
Source: TIME: Health - July 16, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Bloomberg Tags: Uncategorized China Londontime wire Source Type: news

The U.S. Reported a Record 93,000 Drug Overdose Deaths During the 2020 Pandemic Year
(NEW YORK) — Overdose deaths soared to a record 93,000 last year in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, the U.S. government reported Wednesday. That estimate far eclipses the high of about 72,000 drug overdose deaths reached the previous year and amounts to a 29% increase. “This is a staggering loss of human life,” said Brandon Marshall, a Brown University public health researcher who tracks overdose trends. The nation was already struggling with its worst overdose epidemic but clearly “COVID has greatly exacerbated the crisis,” he added. Lockdowns and other pandemic restrictions isolated thos...
Source: TIME: Health - July 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: MIKE STOBBE/AP Tags: Uncategorized Addiction COVID-19 wire Source Type: news

What You Need to Know About COVID-19 Booster Shots
Since the U.S. began a massive country-wide vaccination effort against COVID-19 last winter, a majority of adult Americans have been immunized. But now it seems that all of them may need an additional dose next year. Public health experts including Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, stress that studies continue to show that the three vaccines currently authorized in the U.S. protect against COVID-19 disease, including against variants of the virus that are more transmissible. But as effective as the vaccines are, they can’t provide 100% immunity against disease. ...
Source: TIME: Health - July 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

How Climate Change Science Has Changed Due to COVID-19 Restrictions
In late 2019, expeditioners and guides Hilde Falun and Sunniva Sorby went to Norway’s remote Svalbard archipelago to complete a long-term goal of being the first female team to over winter in the Arctic. But the pair’s planned return home to mainland Norway coincided with the start of the COVID-19 pandemic and pretty quickly they found themselves stranded. There had been plans for a ship carrying friends and family to come and collect them as the ice began to melt in March, but travel restrictions got in the way, and they couldn’t come home until September. So instead, they spent the winter and much of sp...
Source: TIME: Health - July 14, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jennifer Duggan Tags: Uncategorized climate change COVID-19 Source Type: news

A New Postpartum Depression Drug Could Lead to a Revolution in Treating Women ’s Mental Health Issues
About one in seven women who give birth in the U.S. experience postpartum depression—a condition that can leave them exhausted, make it difficult for them to bond with their babies, and even generate thoughts of suicide. Left untreated, the condition can become chronic and interfere with the development of suffering mothers’ babies. It also takes a toll on society at large; untreated maternal mental health conditions cost the U.S. more than $14 billion a year, according to a 2019 study from Mathematica, a social policy research firm. Despite this, many women struggling with postpartum depression do not receive ...
Source: TIME: Health - July 13, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

The FDA ’s New Guillain-Barre Warning For the J & J Vaccine Reflects a Small Increased Risk of the Illness
As millions of people get vaccinated against COVID-19, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are closely monitoring reports of side effects and adverse events among people getting immunized. On July 12, the FDA added a warning about the risk of Guillain-Barre to the single-dose Janssen/Johnson & Johnson vaccine. Anyone who receives the shot moving forward will get an updated fact sheet informing them of the small but increased risk. There have not been significant reports of the syndrome linked to the two other vaccines authorized in the U.S., made by Pfize...
Source: TIME: Health - July 13, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Contraceptive Access May Not Be as Life-Changing for the World ’s Poorest Women as Previously Thought, According to a New Study
At the Generation Equality Forum in Paris in early July, the U.N. attracted political and business leaders from across the globe to talk about gender equality, and also invited them to put their moneys where their mouths were. Among the Forum’s seven key platforms were a push for more economic justice for women—meaning equal access to education and jobs and caregiving support—and a greater ability for women to control their “bodily autonomy”—meaning more access to sex education, contraception and abortion services. It’s an article of faith among development experts that those two a...
Source: TIME: Health - July 13, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Belinda Luscombe Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

The Only Way for the U.S. to Reach Herd Immunity Is With COVID-19 Vaccine Mandates
To encourage more people to get a COVID-19 vaccine and reach herd immunity, U.S. government leaders and their corporate partners are now dangling many carrots to hesitant Americans. Free childcare, free car rides, even free beer has been offered. But new evidence is emerging in places like Ohio where, after state health authorities set up a lottery offering millions of dollars to people who got the jab, vaccination rates flatlined after an initial bump. [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] According to our analysis of Ipsos polling, such incentives won’t persuade about a quarter of American adults. And accord...
Source: TIME: Health - July 12, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Clifford A. Young and Justin Gest Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Psychiatry Is Still Stuck in Freud ’s Era. Big Data Can Revolutionize How We Care for Patients
I have a problem. I am a psychiatrist in the 21st century and yet I still evaluate patients the way Freud did a century ago: I sit with a patient and, by carefully observing how and what they say, I expect them to tell me what’s wrong. The problem isn’t that I speak with and listen to my patients. Every doctor of every speciality does that. Rather, my problem is that I never measure the data I think are most important to my treatment of psychiatric diseases. Consider how I evaluate a patient for psychosis in the emergency room. When I speak with them, I want to know what their life is like—what’s th...
Source: TIME: Health - July 9, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Daniel Barron Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Pfizer-BioNTech Report ‘Encouraging’ Data on the Efficacy of Booster Shots
Pfizer-BioNTech said in a statement on July 8 that data from studies looking at the effects of a booster shot of its COVID-19 vaccine are “encouraging.” The companies are testing a third dose of its two-dose regimen—currently permitted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) under an emergency use authorization—to see how effective the added shot might be in controlling variants of SARS-CoV-2 that are now overtaking the original virus that the vaccines were targeting. Early data from those studies showed that a booster dose, given six months after the second dose, triggers five to 10 times th...
Source: TIME: Health - July 8, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

I Got a J & J Vaccine. Should I Get a Booster Shot as Delta Spreads?
Welcome to COVID Questions, TIME’s advice column. We’re trying to make living through the pandemic a little easier, with expert-backed answers to your toughest coronavirus-related dilemmas. While we can’t and don’t offer medical advice—those questions should go to your doctor—we hope this column will help you sort through this stressful and confusing time. Got a question? Write to us at covidquestions@time.com. Today, N.C. in Washington, D.C., asks: I got a Johnson & Johnson vaccine. With the Delta variant spreading, I’ve heard that some people in my position are also getting s...
Source: TIME: Health - July 8, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID Questions COVID-19 Source Type: news

Tokyo ’s Plan to Avoid Pandemic Disaster During the Olympics
The Olympics and COVID-19 were never going to be compatible. The cardinal rule when it comes to controlling an infectious disease is to limit the contact people have with one another. Yet the very essence of the two weeks of competition, which begin on July 23 in Tokyo, is to invite the world to meet, greet and engage in friendly—and often socially not so distant—contests. An estimated 70,000 athletes, coaches, staff, officials and media will be descending on Tokyo from July to August for the Olympic and Paralympic Games—at a time when infections in the city are rising again. On July 8, the government d...
Source: TIME: Health - July 8, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine olympics overnight Tokyo Olympics Source Type: news

What We Learned About Relationships During the Pandemic
The pseudo-scientific formula that explains most human bonding is basically time + affection + togetherness = relationship. So what happens to humans and their interconnectedness when two of the key elements—time and togetherness—are removed or increased? Can digital communication replace human to human contact? How do couples cope with stressful events they have never before encountered? This is the focus of a series of studies published in the Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, which has dedicated several special issues to relationships in the time of COVID-19. “When COVID hit it became clear...
Source: TIME: Health - July 6, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Belinda Luscombe Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

This Week ’s Heat Wave Is Pushing Businesses and Workers to Their Limit
Portland food cart co-owners Eric and Nicole Gitenstein didn’t have much choice about whether to open their business during this week’s unprecedented heat wave plaguing the Pacific Northwest. Excess heat from their refrigerators and burners often raises temperatures inside their cart, MF Tasty, 10 to 15 degrees higher than those outside. With area temperatures peaking at 116° F on June 28, working in such conditions could have put their lives in danger. “It’s better to lose a weekend than to lose your life, or be hospitalized for heat exhaustion,” Eric says. His fears were warranted—...
Source: TIME: Health - July 2, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alejandro de la Garza Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

How the Delta Variant Affects Whether You Should Wear a Mask or Not
As infections involving the new Delta variant of the COVID-19 virus continue to increase around the world, including in the U.S., health experts are yet again revisiting advice about who should wear masks and when. On June 28, the Los Angeles County public health department advised all people, including those who are vaccinated, to wear masks in most indoor public settings, based on the fact that nearly half of the virus from cases in the county that were genetically sequenced now belong to the Delta variant. The variant, first identified in India, is far more contagious than previous strains of SARS-CoV-2, and could cause...
Source: TIME: Health - July 1, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Juul Is Paying $40 Million to Rebuild Its Reputation. Will It Work?
Juul Labs reached a $40 million settlement with North Carolina Attorney General Josh Stein this week, agreeing to limit its sales and marketing practices to quell underage use of its potent e-cigarettes. The settlement is also part of an “ongoing effort to reset our company and its relationship with our stakeholders” and “earn trust through action,” as a Juul spokesperson put it in a statement. In other words: Juul is trying to shed its reputation as the company that fueled a youth vaping epidemic, and it’s willing to pay $40 million to do it. [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] But ...
Source: TIME: Health - June 29, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Walmart Announces Its Own Brand of Low-Cost Analog Insulin
Walmart Inc. will offer its own brand of analog insulin for people with diabetes, an effort to boost its pharmacy business and counter Amazon.com Inc.’s recent push to sell more medications. The world’s largest retailer will begin selling ReliOn NovoLog this week in its U.S. pharmacies with a prescription, Walmart said in a statement Tuesday. The medicine will cost between 58% and 75% less than the current cash price of branded insulin products for uninsured patients, Walmart said. More than 3 million Walmart customers are diabetic, and the retailer already offers human insulin to them for about $25. But that t...
Source: TIME: Health - June 29, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Matthew Boyle and Angelica LaVito / Bloomberg Tags: Uncategorized Companies wire Source Type: news

Juul Will Pay $40 Million to North Carolina in Landmark Teen Vaping Settlement
(DURHAM N.C.) — Electronic cigarette giant Juul Labs Inc. will pay $40 million to North Carolina and take more action to prevent underage use and sales, according to a landmark legal settlement announced Monday after years of accusations that the company had fueled an explosion in teen vaping. A state judge accepted the first-of-its-kind agreement with a state. North Carolina Attorney General Josh Stein had sued Juul, accusing it of employing unfair and deceptive practices that targeted young people to use its vaping products, which deliver addictive nicotine. The lawsuit had been scheduled for trial next month. [tim...
Source: TIME: Health - June 28, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: GARY D. ROBERTSON / AP Tags: Uncategorized Companies wire Source Type: news

The So-Called Delta Plus Variant of COVID-19 Is Dangerous But Appears Unlikely to Be a Game-Changer
As if the already worrisome Delta variant, first identified in India, wasn’t concerning enough, now there’s Delta Plus. The latest variant of SARS-CoV-2 was announced by Indian health officials in late June, and labelled by the Indian government as a variant of concern. By June 24, only about 40 cases of Delta Plus infections were reported by Indian health officials, based on genetic sequencing of the virus from positive patients. But given the original Delta strain’s ability to transmit more efficiently from person to person, and to potentially cause more severe disease, health authorities are rightly ra...
Source: TIME: Health - June 25, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

What to Know About COVID-19 Vaccines and Heart Conditions in Younger People
On June 23, a group of scientists told the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices that mRNA vaccines (those made by Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna) have a “likely association” with heart risks for younger people. Understandably, that’s still generating a lot of attention. Here’s what you should know about COVID-19 vaccines and heart problems. The heart issues in question are called myocarditis and pericarditis Those refer, respectively, to inflammation of the heart and the lining around it. While they sound scary, both tend to clear up on th...
Source: TIME: Health - June 25, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

The Pandemic Caused the Biggest Decline in U.S. Life Expectancy since World War 2. Black and Hispanic Americans Have Suffered the Most
Although James Toussaint has never had COVID-19, the pandemic is taking a profound toll on his health. First, the 57-year-old lost his job delivering parts for a New Orleans auto dealership in spring 2020, when the local economy shut down. Then, he fell behind on his rent. Last month, Toussaint was forced out of his apartment when his landlord—who refused to accept federally funded rental assistance—found a loophole in the federal ban on evictions. Toussaint has recently had trouble controlling his blood pressure. Arthritis in his back and knees prevents him from lifting more than 20 pounds, a huge obstacle for...
Source: TIME: Health - June 23, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Liz Szabo / Kaiser Health News Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

The U.S. COVID-19 Outbreak Is Still Bad —And it Could Get Worse
In many places across the United States, COVID-19 feels over. Unmasked citizens run rampant. New York City is planning an August mega-concert in Central Park. I’m as hopeful as the rest of us, but I think we may be suffering from memory loss. Let’s start from this time last year, when many Americans were exuberantly returning to newly reopened beaches, parks and restaurants after a seemingly eternal three months—three whole months!—of quarantine. Universal observance of safety guidelines was surely going to be sufficient to limit viral spread. We know how that turned out. By mid-June 2020, there wer...
Source: TIME: Health - June 23, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Time Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Medical Schools Usually Don ’t Teach How Conditions Look on Different Skin Tones. Malone Mukwende Is Trying to Change That
When Malone Mukwende, 21, started medical school in London, he identified a fundamental problem: almost all the images and data used in its teaching were based on studies of white patients. But medical symptoms can present very differently on Black and brown skin, leading to misdiagnosis, suffering and even death. Still a student, he has recently launched both a handbook, Mind the Gap, and Hutano, a new online platform intended to empower people with knowledge about their health. I asked him what he hoped to achieve and the wider lessons for all of us. [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] AJ: For people who don&rs...
Source: TIME: Health - June 22, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Angelina Jolie Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

After Weeks of Declining Vaccination Rates in the U.S., They Went Back Up in June. Will the Momentum Last?
On April 8, more than 4.3 million people in the U.S. received a COVID-19 vaccine dose. But after that peak, the numbers began to fall. By June 3, the national seven-day average for daily shots given had dropped to 850,000. But after that—with weeks to go before the Fourth of July, the date by which President Joe Biden wanted 70% of U.S. adults to have gotten at least one shot—the numbers began to creep back up. On June 7, according to U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) data, the seven-day average for daily vaccinations again broke a million. It shrank a bit after that, but was still close to ...
Source: TIME: Health - June 22, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

In Texas-Mexico Border Towns, COVID-19 Has Had an Unconscionably High Death Toll
Alfredo “Freddy” Valles was an accomplished trumpeter and a beloved music teacher for nearly four decades at one of the poorest middle schools in El Paso, Texas. He was known for buying his students shoes and bow ties for their band concerts, his effortlessly positive demeanor and his suave personal style—“he looked like he stepped out of a different era, the 1950s,” says his niece, Ruby Montana. While Valles was singular in life, his death at age 60 in February 2021 was part of a devastating statistic: He was one of thousands of deaths in Texas border counties—where coronavirus mortalit...
Source: TIME: Health - June 22, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: René Kladzyk, Phil Galewitz and Elizabeth Lucas | El Paso Matters and KHN Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

U.S. Nursing Home Deaths Soared 32% in 2020, Government Watchdog Says
(WASHINGTON) — Deaths among Medicare patients in nursing homes soared by 32% last year, with two devastating spikes eight months apart, a government watchdog reported Tuesday in the most comprehensive look yet at the ravages of COVID-19 among its most vulnerable victims. —“We knew this was going to be bad, but I don’t think even those of us who work in this area thought it was going to be this bad,” said Harvard health policy professor David Grabowski, a nationally recognized expert on long-term care, who reviewed the report for The Associated Press. [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”...
Source: TIME: Health - June 22, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar / AP Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 overnight wire Source Type: news

‘Not Equitable and Not Fair.’ How the WHO Plans to Solve Africa’s Desperate Shortage of COVID-19 Vaccines
(JOHANNESBURG) — The World Health Organization is in talks to create the first-ever technology transfer hub for coronavirus vaccines in South Africa, a move to boost supply to the continent that’s desperately in need of COVID-19 shots, the head of the U.N. agency announced. The new consortium will include drug makers Biovac and Afrigen Biologics and Vaccines, a network of universities and the Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention. They will develop training facilities for other vaccine makers to make shots that use a genetic code of the spike protein, known as mRNA vaccines. “We are now in dis...
Source: TIME: Health - June 21, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 wire Source Type: news

Human Waste Could Be The Next Big Weapon in Controlling COVID-19
If you’re a student or a faculty member who spends any time on the University of California, San Diego campus, you may know a lot more about what’s in your pee and poop—and that of your colleagues—than you might care to admit. Members of the UCSD community can download an app that tells them the COVID-19 status of the wastewater generated in the buildings where they spend the most time. In fact, it offers quite a bit of additional detail too, telling users whether any disease-causing microbes are flourishing in that sewage. If the COVID-19 virus is detected, campus regulars get a notification that t...
Source: TIME: Health - June 18, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

The U.S. Government Placed a Big Bet on an Antiviral Pill to Fight COVID-19
We’re not going to vaccinate our way completely out of this pandemic. With epidemiologists around the world increasingly accepting the reality that SARS-CoV-2 and its variants will become endemic viruses—like the seasonal flu—the push is on to develop antiviral medications that can be taken at home to prevent infections from leading to hospitalization and death. Today, the Department of Health and Human Services announced that the Biden Administration has authorized $3.2 billion to accelerate the development of antivirals already in the R&D pipeline, with the hope that at least one will be ready for r...
Source: TIME: Health - June 17, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

For HIV/AIDS Survivors, COVID-19 Reawakened Old Trauma —And Renewed Calls for Change
Forty years ago this month, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report noted a rare lung infection among five otherwise healthy gay men in Los Angeles, Calif. Though they didn’t know it at the time, the scientists had written about what would turn out to be one of the historical moments that launched the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic. Since then, HIV/AIDS has killed an estimated 35 million people, including 534,000 people in the U.S. from 1990 to 2018 alone, according to UNAIDS, making it one of the deadliest epidemics in modern history. Over...
Source: TIME: Health - June 17, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

The Affordable Care Act Survives After Supreme Court Dismisses Latest Challenge
(WASHINGTON) — The Supreme Court dismissed a major challenge to the Obama era health care law on Thursday, turning aside an effort by Republican-led states to throw out the law that provides insurance coverage for millions of Americans. The justices, by a 7-2 vote, left the entire law intact in ruling that Texas, other GOP-led states and two individuals had no right to bring their lawsuit in federal court. The Biden administration says 31 million people have health insurance because of the law popularly known as “Obamacare.” The law’s major provisions include protections for people with pre-existing...
Source: TIME: Health - June 17, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mark Sherman/AP Tags: Uncategorized Health Care wire Source Type: news

How COVID-19 Vaccination Became a Climate Metaphor
A version of this story first appeared in the Climate is Everything newsletter. If you’d like sign up to receive this free once-a-week email, click here. For years, climate policy experts have watched as the issue has been pushed off the stage at global summits to make way for the geopolitical conflict dujour. That trend has long frustrated climate advocates who sought to make leaders understand that the scientific reality of climate change is just as urgent—if not more so—than other flavor-of-the-month topics. With this in mind, it was notable when many of these same climate advocates sharply criticized...
Source: TIME: Health - June 17, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized climate change COVID-19 Source Type: news

We Used to Have a Lyme Disease Vaccine. Are We Ready to Bring One Back?
At my animal hospital in upstate New York, an epicenter of the U.S. tick epidemic, my dog Fawn lets out a whimper as the veterinarian injects her with her annual Lyme disease shot. I roll my eyes. She doesn’t know how good she has it. The injection means that if a tick bites her (and in rural New York, a tick always does), the creepy crawly will feast on dog blood that’s been supercharged with a Lyme bacteria-killing substance, and Lyme disease won’t be transmitted to Fawn. I wish I could be shot up with that superpower. Currently, there is no human vaccine for Lyme disease—even though more than two...
Source: TIME: Health - June 17, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mandy Oaklander Tags: Uncategorized Disease feature Source Type: news

My Home Country Has an Excellent Vaccination Track Record. What It Doesn ’t Have Is Vaccines
Every morning I sit at the breakfast table with my mother. She moved to New York about five years ago and having had her so close to me makes New York feel even more like home. Our morning meal, whipped up by my mom, is served up alongside a cup of Nepali chiya—a traditional black tea with milk, boiled with cardamom, cinnamon, and cloves. As we sit across the table sipping chiya from our hand-carved Nepali copper teacups, we catch up on life and current events, and share lighthearted laughter. For years, it’s been an uplifting start to my day. Unfortunately, our recent breakfasts have been much more somber. Ove...
Source: TIME: Health - June 16, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Prabal Gurung Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news