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Debate on Glyphosate Use Comes to a Head in Argentina
Academics discuss the impacts on health and the environment of the use of glyphosate in Argentine agriculture, during a Dec. 6 conference at the University of Buenos Aires. Concern about this topic is now on the country’s public agenda. Credit: Daniel Gutman / IPSBy Daniel GutmanBUENOS AIRES, Dec 8 2017 (IPS)In and around the city of Rosario, where most of Argentina’s soybean processing plants are concentrated, a local law banned the use of glyphosate, the most widely-used herbicide in Argentina. But two weeks later, producers managed to exert enough pressure to obtain a promise that the ban would be overturned...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - December 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Daniel Gutman Tags: Active Citizens Civil Society Development & Aid Economy & Trade Editors' Choice Environment Food & Agriculture Headlines Health Latin America & the Caribbean Population Poverty & SDGs Regional Categories Source Type: news

Paraguay Congress legalizes planting of medical marijuana
ASUNCION (Reuters) - Paraguay's Congress passed a bill on Tuesday creating a state-sponsored system to import marijuana seeds and grow the plant for medical uses, a decision that followed other countries in Latin America. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - December 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Julia Marino ’s Olympic story: Achieving after injury
Julia Marino is always thinking about her story, and it would be hard not too, given how much of an adventure her life has been so far. “Being adopted out of Paraguay to have a normal life in America would’ve been enough of a story itself,” she says. “But I’ve had the chance to live a life beyond what anybody could even dream of.” As an Olympic skier, Julia has been competing at the top of her sport for almost a decade. In 2014, she reached the pinnacle of snow sports at the Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia. But how she got there – and where she plans on going now – was heavi...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 27, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Connor Ertz Tags: Our Patients’ Stories ACL injury ACL injury prevention ACL reconstruction ACL tear Dr. Martha Murray Sports Medicine Division Source Type: news

In Paraguay, urging young people to end dating violence
ASUNCI ÓN, Paraguay – At only 16 years old, Laura* has already experienced intimate partner violence. “For two years, I put up with verbal and even physical abuse,” she said, referring to an ex-boyfriend. “It’s one of the worst things I have ever experienced. I was afraid, and I didn't know what to do or who to go to. ”Violence against womenis a global epidemic, one that reaches some 1 in 3 women around the world.And it starts early. (Source: UNFPA News)
Source: UNFPA News - November 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: zerzan Source Type: news

The 7 Countries Anthony Bourdain Has Visited Most
This article originally appeared on FoodandWine.com (Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories)
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Max Bonem / Food and Wine Tags: Uncategorized onetime onetimetravel Source Type: news

Mercury Mining Awaits International Control in Mexico
Artisanal gold mining in Latin America uses mercury, a practice that should be modified in countries that have ratified the international Minamata Convention for the control of this toxic metal. Credit: Thelma Mejía/IPSBy Emilio GodoyMEXICO CITY, Sep 26 2017 (IPS)For environmentalist Patricia Ruiz the only word that comes to mind is “devastating,” when describing the situation of mercury mining in her home state of Querétaro in central Mexico.“There are a large number of pits (from which the mercury is extracted), and there are the tailing ponds containing mining waste, all of which drains i...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - September 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Emilio Godoy Tags: Development & Aid Economy & Trade Editors' Choice Environment Global Governance Headlines Health IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Latin America & the Caribbean Natural Resources Regional Categories gold mining mercury Mexico Minam Source Type: news

Cases of acute pesticide poisoning in Colonia Puerto Pirap ó, Itapúa, Paraguay, February, 2014 - Pedrozo ME, Ocampos S, Galeano R, Ojeda A, Cabello A, De Assis D.
In Paraguay, pesticides are the causative agent in 13.7% of poisonings, especially organophosphorus compounds. Such poisoning produces the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase generating three possible clinical conditions: acute poisoning, intermediate syndr... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 24, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Home and Consumer Product Safety Source Type: news

4 Key Insights When Raising Money for Your Medtech Startup: Interview with Bruce Shook, CEO of Intact Vascular
Welcome to the Medsider interview series, a regular feature at MassDevice. All interviews are conducted by Scott Nelson, Founder of Medsider and Group Director for WCG. We hope you enjoy them! Bruce Shook joined Intact Vascular in 2014 as President and CEO. A highly-experienced, medical device executive with more than 30 years of industry experience, Bruce was previously Co-founder, Director, President, and CEO of Neuronetics, which is a privately held medical device company that markets a non-invasive brain stimulation technology for the treatment of depression. Previously, Shook was Co-founder, Director, P...
Source: Mass Device - February 27, 2017 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Blog medsider Source Type: news

Women Have ALWAYS Lived Longer Than Men
Men still aren’t living as long as women — and that holds true for humans’ primate cousins as well, a new study shows. In the study, researchers looked at data from six populations of humans from both modern and historical times, in different countries. The investigators found that, “in spite of the huge gains in human longevity over the past century, the male-female difference has not shrunk,” said Susan Alberts, a professor of biology at Duke University and a co-author of the new study. The researchers did find that the the amount by which women outlived men varied across populations. For in...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

In rough times, some reasons for optimism: lessons from Latin America on REDD+
This article provides a summary of some important emerging lessons to date on REDD+ from the Latin American region. REDD+ has already proven to be successful, but under certain conditions A number of lessons on REDD+ can be learnt from the agreement between Norway and Brazil. First, REDD+ can achieve measurable results. While the deforestation trend in the Latin American country picked up a bit recently, the decrease from historical deforestation trends is clear. Second, a minimum level of readiness is required. Brazil had the in-house capacities on policy design, policy implementation, monitoring, and enforcement. If the...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 15, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Viveve wins FDA 510(k) for its Viveve System
Viveve (NSDQ:VIVE said today it won FDA 510(k) clearance for its Viveve System, now cleared for use in general surgical procedures for electrocoagulation and hemostasis. The company’s Viveve System is designed as a non-surgical treatment for post-partum laxity of the vaginal introitus. “FDA 510(k) clearance for the Viveve System represents a major milestone in our efforts to bring this safe and effective technology to patients in the United States who can benefit from it. We are grateful to all of the clinicians and researchers who have supported the development of the Viveve System over the past seve...
Source: Mass Device - October 6, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: 510(k) Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Regulatory/Compliance Women's Health Viveve Source Type: news

Injuries caused by the venomous catfish pintado and cachara (Pseudoplatystoma genus) in fishermen of the Pantanal region in Brazil - Aquino GN, Souza CC, Haddad V, Sabino J.
INTRODUCTION:: the fishing activity throughout the Upper Paraguay River Basin has huge financial and biological importance. This retrospective study investigated the occurrence of injuries caused by fish of the Pseudoplatystoma genus (spotted catfish or pi... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 12, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Non-Human Animals and Insects Source Type: news

Viveve lands S. Korea regulatory clearance for Viveve System
Viveve (NSDQ:VIVE) said today it won regulatory approval from the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety in South Korea for its Viveve non-surgical treatment for post-partum laxity of the vaginal introitus. The company said it already inked an exclusive distribution partnership in South Korea with JOYMG, a medical device distributor in the region. “The receipt of market approval in South Korea represents another important milestone in our commercialization of the Viveve System in Asia and our quest to make this clinically proven treatment available to the millions of women around the world who are living wit...
Source: Mass Device - August 5, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Regulatory/Compliance Women's Health Viveve Source Type: news

Paraguay reports first cases of microcephaly linked to Zika
ASUNCION (Reuters) - Paraguay has recorded its first two cases of babies born with the microcephaly birth defect associated with the Zika virus, health authorities in the South American country said on Wednesday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - July 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Demographic and clinical characteristics of patients referred to the psychiatry unit of the emergency department at the National University of Asunción's General Hospital, Paraguay - Torales J, Ventriglio A, Barrios I, Arce A.
All psychiatric consultations carried out over one year at the Psychiatry Unit of the Emergency Department at the National University of Asunción's Clinical Hospital, Paraguay were analysed with the aim of quantifying the clinical and demographic characte... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 21, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Talking Openly – The Way to Prevent Teenage Pregnancy
A teenage mother and her toddler in Bonpland, a rural municipality in the northern province of Misiones in Argentina. Latin America has the second highest regional rate of early pregnancies in the world, after sub-Saharan Africa. Credit: Fabiana Frayssinet/IPSBy Fabiana FrayssinetBUENOS AIRES, Jul 8 2016 (IPS)In plain and simple language, an Argentine video aimed at teenagers explains how to get sexual pleasure while being careful. Its freedom from taboos is very necessary in Latin American countries where one in five girls becomes a mother by the time she is 19 years old.“For good sex to happen, both partners have t...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - July 8, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Fabiana Frayssinet Tags: Active Citizens Civil Society Development & Aid Editors' Choice Education Featured Gender Headlines Health Human Rights Inequity IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Latin America & the Caribbean Population Poverty & SDGs TerraViva Source Type: news

Talking Openly – The Way to Prevent Teenage Pregnancy
A teenage mother and her toddler in Bonpland, a rural municipality in the northern province of Misiones in Argentina. Latin America has the second highest regional rate of early pregnancies in the world, after sub-Saharan Africa. Credit: Fabiana Frayssinet/IPSBy Fabiana FrayssinetBUENOS AIRES, Jul 8 2016 (IPS)In plain and simple language, an Argentine video aimed at teenagers explains how to get sexual pleasure while being careful. Its freedom from taboos is very necessary in Latin American countries where one in five girls becomes a mother by the time she is 19 years old.“For good sex to happen, both partners have t...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - July 8, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Fabiana Frayssinet Tags: Active Citizens Civil Society Development & Aid Editors' Choice Education Featured Gender Headlines Health Human Rights Inequity IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Population Poverty & SDGs Women's Health adolescent Adolescents Source Type: news

Pageant highlights 'another kind of beauty'
Luis Cobelo photographed a beauty pageant in Paraguay called Miss Gordita ("Miss Chubby" in English). The young women are taught better eating habits and how to be more comfortable in their skin. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - July 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Viveve inks Latin American distribution deals
Viveve (NSDQ:VIVE) said today it inked 6 new distribution deals to expand the availability of its Viveve non-surgical treatment for post-partum laxity of the vaginal introitus to 14 Latin American countries. The women’s health company said it inked deals with Sirex S.A., Torregal, Alphaeon Columbia S.A.S., Vitre-Tech, Coolmed S.A., Adenor S.A. and MARC Group International to bring the system to Argentina, Peru, Paraguay, Chile, Ecuador, Mexico, Panama, Costa Rica, Guatemala and the Dominican Republic. “The Latin American region represents one of the world’s largest markets for aesthetic medical ...
Source: Mass Device - July 5, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Distribution Women's Health Viveve Source Type: news

Women’s Health Takes Center Stage at UN Population Awards   
By Aruna DuttUNITED NATIONS, Jun 24 2016 (IPS)Social Scientist, Carmen Barroso and Polish Organisation, Childbirth in Dignity received the United Nations Population Awards here Thursday for their outstanding work in population, improving individuals’ health and welfare, and specifically for their decades-long leadership in women’s rights.“I dedicate this award to anonymous health providers everywhere, who day in and day out help women to exercise their rights and preserve their health,” said Barroso on accepting the award.Barroso has been actively involved in reproductive health and population issue...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 24, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Aruna Dutt Tags: Aid Civil Society Development & Aid Featured Gender Gender Violence Global Governance Headlines Health IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Population Poverty & SDGs Women in Politics Women's Health sexual and reproductive health Source Type: news

Meet the New Stevia! GMOs 2.0 Get Dressed for Success
Our culture is smitten with the notion that technology can save us - or at least create great business opportunities! Cargill, for example, is working on a new food technology that mimics stevia, a sugar substitute derived from plant leaves, for the "exploding sports nutrition market." Cargill's new product, EverSweet, uses genetically engineered yeast to convert sugar molecules to mimic the properties of stevia, with no need for the plant itself. It was developed using synthetic biology (or "synbio" for short), a new form of genetic engineering that involves changing or creating DNA to artificially...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 14, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Norway Is The First Country To Ban Deforestation
Norway is so woke to deforestation, it's the first nation to outlaw it.  On May 24, Norway committed to zero deforestation, reports UN partner Climate Action. The groundbreaking move means that the nation pledges to ban any product in its supply chain that contributes to the deforestation of rainforests through the government’s public procurement policy.  “This is an important victory in the fight to protect the rainforest. Over the last few years, a number of companies have committed to cease the procurement of goods that can be linked to destruction of the rainforest,” Nils Hermann ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 7, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Meet Paz: Paraguay’s HLHS pioneer
Before Maria de la Paz was born, her parents Violeta Gustale and Orlando Cazal learned their unborn daughter had a complex congenital heart disease called hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). With HLHS, the left side of the newborn’s heart is so underdeveloped that it cannot pump enough oxygenated blood throughout the body. The standard treatment is a series of three corrective surgeries to re-route blood flow through the heart. The first surgery is performed at birth, the second at six months and the third about two or three years later. Violeta and Orlando were presented with four options: Travel from their hom...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - April 20, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Erin Horan Tags: Our Patients’ Stories congenital heart disease Dr. Christopher Baird Dr. Pedro del Nido HLHS Source Type: news

These Travel Photos Are Dino-Mite
For extinct beasts, these dinosaurs sure get around. Then again, it helps to have Jorge Saenz as your tour guide. The Paraguay-based photographer is helping some toy terrestrials see South America as he documents their travels under the hashtag #dinodinaseries. The adventure started in Bolivia with a green brachiosaurus named Dino. When Dino became a hit, Saenz picked up a few friends for him, including “Dina the Stegosaurus, Spiny the Spinosaurus, and Brachy, a brown brachiosaurus who also happens to be Dino’s girlfriend,” Saenz explained, according to BoredPanda. Since then, the curious dinosaurs have b...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 15, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

MassDevice.com +3 | The top 3 medtech stories for March 3, 2016
Say hello to MassDevice +3, a bite-sized view of the top three medtech stories of the day. This feature of MassDevice.com’s coverage highlights our 3 biggest and most influential stories from the day’s news to make sure you’re up to date on the headlines that continue to shape the medical device industry.   3. Virtual Incision’s inside-the-body surgical robot logs 1st-in-human use Virtual Incision this week announced the 1st-in-human use of its miniaturized robotically assisted surgical device, which was used in a colon resection procedures in Paraguay. The RASD is designed to operate entirely...
Source: Mass Device - March 3, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: News Well Plus 3 Source Type: news

Virtual Incision’s inside-the-body surgical robot logs 1st-in-human use
Virtual Incision this week announced the 1st-in-human use of its miniaturized robotically assisted surgical device, which was used in a colon resection procedures in Paraguay. The RASD is designed to operate entirely within the abdominal cavity via a single surgical incision. A spinout from the University of Nebraska, Virtual Incision raised $11.2 million last summer to fund a feasibility trial of the device. The company said the patients in Asunción, Paraguay, who are “recovering well,” were treated as part of the trial. “To the best of our knowledge, this is the 1st time an active ...
Source: Mass Device - March 3, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Clinical Trials Robot-Assisted Surgery Virtual Incision Corp. Source Type: news

The Latest On Zika: Experts Are Divided Over Genetically Modified Mosquitos
The Zika virus, which is spread by the Aedes aegypti mosquito, is strongly suspected to be linked to a new wave of microcephaly cases in Brazil. Babies born with the birth defect have smaller heads and sometimes brains that aren't fully developed, which can result in life-long developmental problems.    Zika is currently spreading through Central and South America and the Caribbean, and with the high volume of news about the virus, it's tough to stay up-to-date. Check out our full coverage, or read our daily recaps. Here are four updates, opinions and developments to know about now:   1. ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 16, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What Pregnant Women Should Know About Zika Virus
On Monday, the World Health Organization declared a "public health emergency of international concern" due to the cluster of birth defects potentially linked to Zika virus.   No one is probably more concerned about this connection than the world’s pregnant women, especially those who are living in an area where there is ongoing Zika virus transmission. While the virus’ symptoms (fever, headache, joint pain, conjunctivitis) are no cause for alarm and rarely require hospitalization, the disease is suspected of causing severe birth defects like microcephaly, when a baby is born with an abnormally sm...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 2, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

An Illustrated Guide To The Zika Outbreak
In October 2015, Brazilian health authorities notified the World Health Organization that an alarming number of Brazilian babies had been born with microcephaly, a rare, debilitating birth defect with lifelong consequences. Researchers quickly linked the spike in birth defects to the outbreak of a little-known tropical disease called Zika virus, which is transmitted by mosquito. Since its discovery in Uganda in 1947, Zika virus has popped up in different African and Asian countries, but no widespread outbreaks had occurred until 2013, when the virus infected an estimated 11 percent of the population of French Polynesi...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

An Illustrated Guide To The Zika Outbreak
In October 2015, Brazilian health authorities notified the World Health Organization that an alarming number of Brazilian babies had been born with microcephaly, a rare, debilitating birth defect with lifelong consequences. Researchers quickly linked the spike in birth defects to the outbreak of a little-known tropical disease called Zika virus, which is transmitted by mosquito. Since its discovery in Uganda in 1947, Zika virus has popped up in different African and Asian countries, but no widespread outbreaks had occurred until 2013, when the virus infected an estimated 11 percent of the population of French Polynesi...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 22, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Pregnant Women Shouldn't Travel To Countries With Zika Virus, CDC Says
People traveling to Central America and South America, as well as some islands in the Caribbean, should take special precautions against mosquito bites because of an outbreak of Zika virus, a previously rare disease that may be linked to serious birth defects. Pregnant women should consider avoiding the region, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advised. The CDC on Friday issued a "Level 2" travel notice for Brazil, Colombia, El Salvador, French Guiana, Guatemala, Honduras, Martinique, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Suriname, Venezuela and Puerto Rico, as well as the Caribbean islands Haiti and M...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 16, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mosquito Virus May Have Caused Brain Damage In Thousands Of Babies
RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — In the early weeks of Angelica Pereira's pregnancy, a mosquito bite began bothering her. At first it seemed a small thing. But the next day she awoke with a rash, a headache, a fever and a burning in her eyes. The symptoms disappeared within four days, but she fears the virus has left lasting consequences. Pereira's daughter Luiza was born in October with a head more than an inch (3 centimeters) below the range defined as healthy by doctors, a rare condition known as microcephaly that often results in mental retardation. A neurologist soon gave Pereira and her husband more bad news: The brain da...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 28, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

What You Need To Know About The Zika Virus
By: Mindy Weisberger Published: 12/16/2015 10:51 AM EST on LiveScience Infections with Zika virus, which is carried by mosquitos, are on the rise across the Americas, raising concerns among health officials. Although the virus is generally not life-threatening, evidence suggests that it may be responsible for recent increases in birth defects in Brazil and French Polynesia, where infections are more common.  On Thursday (Dec. 10), officials in Panama announced the country's first case of locally acquired Zika virus — meaning that a person caught the disease from a mosquito in that country, rather than while trav...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 16, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Zika virus infection – Paraguay
On 27 November 2015, the National IHR Focal Point of Paraguay notified PAHO/WHO of 6 laboratory-confirmed autochthonous cases of Zika virus infection in the city of Pedro Caballero, which is located in the northeast of the country and shares borders with Brazil. The diagnoses were made by the national reference laboratory, the Central Public Health Laboratory of the Ministry of Health, through reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique. Cases were identified from clusters of febrile patients whose samples tested negative for dengue and chikungunya. They presented with fever, headache, myalgia, arth...
Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks - December 3, 2015 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: dengue [subject], dengue haemhorragic fever, dengue fever, dengue virus, headache [subject], headache, migraine, chronic headache, health services [subject], Disease outbreak news [doctype], Paraguay [country], Region of the Americas [region] Source Type: news

The medical devices market in Latin America
By Kate Jablonski, Emergo Group Most people don’t realize it, but taken together, the major Latin American countries—Brazil, Mexico, Colombia, Chile, and Argentina—represent the third largest economy in the world, with a healthcare expenditure comparable to China and India. Their combined GDP exceeds $4.25 trillion and the medical device industry has grown into a significant combined market. It’s no surprise that medical device companies have their eye on Latin America. Starting points: Mexico & Brazil Mexico is the second largest country south of the US and a favorable starting point for medica...
Source: Mass Device - November 18, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: Blog Emergo Group Source Type: news

Reduction in Amazon deforestation avoids 1,700 deaths per year
(Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo) Because of decreasing deforestation and emissions from forest fires in the Amazon, the amount of particulate matter, ozone, carbon monoxide and other atmospheric pollutants released by burning biomass has fallen by 30 percent on average in dry season in Brazil, Paraguay, Bolivia and Argentina. This improvement in the region's air quality may be helping to prevent the premature deaths of some 1,700 adults per year throughout South America, according studies made in Brazil, UK and USA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 26, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Paraguay: We're protecting life of pregnant 10-year-old, fetus
(Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - June 15, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

From Mexico to Boston to fix Regina’s heart
Families throughout Mexico travel to the country’s capital for its world-class museums, ancient Aztec ruins, noted restaurants and hospitals. So for Elizabeth and Eduardo Torreblanca, flying 1,000 miles from their home in Cancun to deliver their firstborn in Mexico City was not unusual. But when their baby was born with an unusual condition, the Torreblancas would have to travel much further to give her a chance at life. Two days after Regina was born on November 20, 2010, an echocardiogram or “echo” revealed that she had hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), a serious and complex congenital heart ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - May 7, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jenny Fernandez Tags: All posts Heart conditions Our patients’ stories congenital heart defect Frank Pigula Gerald Marx Heart Center HLHS Source Type: news

Pregnant 10-year-old rape victim denied abortion in Paraguay
BOGOTA(Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Paraguay's decision to deny a pregnant 10-year-old girl an abortion after she was allegedly raped by her stepfather has sparked a national debate over the country's strict abortion law. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - May 5, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Stevia is a natural anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer agent
(NaturalNews) The native Indian tribe in Paraguay calls stevia "Kaa he-he" which means "sweet herb". The This local herb is believed to have been used for centuries by locals as a sweetener and for medicinal treatments. Stevia has been shown to not only contain a great flavor but... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 8, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Paraguayan small farmers fight back against multinational corporations destroying their lives
(NaturalNews) Armchair activists who insist, often violently, that genetically-modified organisms (GMOs) are "feeding the world" are clearly oblivious to the fact that this ominous crop technology is aggressively destroying biodiversity and leaving farmers and rural-dwellers all around... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 2, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Rep. Gary Palmer Tries To Stir Up Climate Change Controversy That Just Doesn't Exist
The following post first appeared on FactCheck.org. Rep. Gary Palmer falsely claimed on a radio show that temperature data used to measure global climate change have been “falsified” and manipulated. Palmer, a Republican from Alabama, cited the so-called Climategate episode of five years ago, in which emails written by climate scientists purportedly showed evidence of data manipulation, and a more recent accusation of climate scientists tampering with data from temperature monitoring stations. The Climategate scandal has been subject to several separate investigations, all of which exonerated all scientists in...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 12, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Child protection network and the intersector implementation of the circle of security as alternatives to medication - Becker AL, de Souza PH, de Oliveira MM, Paraguay NL.
OBJECTIVES: To describe the clinical history of a child with aggressive behavior and recurring death-theme speech, and report the experience of the team of authors, who proposed an alternative to medication through the establishment of a protection network... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - December 11, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Sharing the Joys and Responsibilities of Fatherhood
Partible paternity refers to shared fatherhood, and is found among many South American Amerindian societies. A new study explores adaptive aspects of partible paternity among Ache women and men in Paraguay. Shared fatherhood can serve as a form of social insurance against risk. The findings illustrate the rich social context to partnering and paternal care.read more (Source: Psychology Today Parenting Center)
Source: Psychology Today Parenting Center - November 12, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Peter B. Gray, Ph.D. Tags: Evolutionary Psychology Parenting Sex Social Life ache amazonia cross-cultural fatherhood. paternity life history partible paternity paternity certainty Robert Walker Ryan Ellsworth Source Type: news

Has sugar lost its sweet spot? Paraguayan plant upends market
NEW YORK (Reuters) - The maker of America's top sugar brand Domino Sugar is launching its first no-calorie "natural" sweetener extracted from the stevia plant in Paraguay, the strongest sign yet that the upstart product is threatening to eat into raw-sugar demand. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - October 20, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Latin America on a Dangerous Precipice
A traffic jam in Jaciara, Brazil, caused by repairs to the BR-364 road. Credit: Mario Osava/IPSBy Diana CariboniMONTEVIDEO, Oct 2 2014 (IPS)“We could be the last Latin American and Caribbean generation living together with hunger.”The assertion, made by Raúl Benítez, a regional officer for the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO), shows one side of the coin: only 4.6 percent of the region’s population is undernourished, according to the latest figures.By 2030, however, most of the countries in the region will face a serious risk situation due to climate change.With a...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - October 2, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Diana Cariboni Tags: Climate Change Development & Aid Economy & Trade Energy Environment Featured Food & Agriculture Headlines Health Labour Latin America & the Caribbean Natural Resources Population Poverty & MDGs Projects Regional Categories Source Type: news

Comprehensive Sex Education: A Pending Task in Latin America
By Fabiana FrayssinetBUENOS AIRES, Sep 25 2014 (IPS)In most Latin American countries schools now provide sex education, but with a focus that is generally restricted to the prevention of sexually transmitted diseases – an approach that has not brought about significant modifications in the behaviour of adolescents, especially among the poor.The international community made the commitment to offer comprehensive sexuality education (CSE) during the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development in Cairo.“Although some advances have been made in the inclusion of sexual and reproductive education in sc...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - September 25, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Fabiana Frayssinet Tags: Active Citizens Civil Society Democracy Development & Aid Editors' Choice Education Featured Gender Headlines Health Human Rights Latin America & the Caribbean Population Poverty & MDGs Projects Regional Categories Women's Source Type: news

‘Therapeutic Abortion’ Could Soon Be Legal in Chile
Alicia is one of the millions of Chilean women who have had an illegal, unsafe abortion because in their country terminating a pregnancy is punishable with up to five years in prison, regardless of the circumstances. Now the country is moving towards legalising therapeutic abortion. Credit: Marianela Jarroud/IPSBy Marianela JarroudSANTIAGO, Sep 24 2014 (IPS)Chile, one of the most conservative countries in Latin America, is getting ready for an unprecedented debate on the legalisation of therapeutic abortion, which is expected to be approved this year.In Chile, more than 300,000 illegal abortions are practiced annually &nda...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - September 24, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Marianela Jarroud Tags: Active Citizens Civil Society Development & Aid Editors' Choice Featured Gender Global Governance Headlines Health Human Rights IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Latin America & the Caribbean Population Poverty & MDGs Regional Cate Source Type: news

Red Cross Around the World
[Slideshow] Responding to the Ebola Outbreaks in Western Africa The American Red Cross, along with the global Red Cross network, is helping amplify efforts and strengthen capacity of the Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia Red Crosses as a devastating outbreak of Ebola wreaks havoc on the region. Since March 2014, some 1,200 cases have been reported and more than 670 deaths have been linked to the virus, making it the deadliest outbreak of Ebola in recorded history. Helping Victims in Israel, the West Bank and Gaza As the security situation in the Occupied Palestine Territories and Israel continues to deteriorate, Red Cross...
Source: Red Cross Chat - July 31, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Niki Clark Tags: International ebola gaza iraq israel palestine paraguay Restoring Family Links Source Type: news

Paraguay: Standing up to Chagas
Chagas is a neglected disease that affects between eight and ten million people, mainly in Latin America. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) works in Paraguay's rural Chaco region, going into isolated communities to educate people about the disease and screen them for it. Internationally, MSF fights to improve access to diagnosis and treatment for the disease and advocates for more research and development into its treatment. All photos by Anna Surinyach (Source: MSF News)
Source: MSF News - July 7, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Web Intern Source Type: news