What you should know about knee instability and dislocations in young athletes
Pain in the kneecap (patella) is very common in young athletes. It’s estimated that up to 15% of adolescents get some degree of patellofemoral pain. Most can be treated with rest, ice, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and sometimes rehab exercises. But instability of the patella — known as patellofemoral instability — is relatively less common, and more worrisome for children and adolescents. The term “patellofemoral instability” can refer to either a traumatic injury in which a person dislocates their patella, or just general instability in the knee that a person may feel or a p...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - February 8, 2018 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Connor Ertz Tags: Ask the Expert Dr. Matthew Milewski Orthopedic Center patellofemoral pain syndrome Sports Medicine Division Source Type: news

From the heart: The tale of a three-time transplant recipient
Playing youth hockey and Little League in the spring of 1988, I started to become easily fatigued. I became very weak and could no longer run around. By May, a visit to my pediatrician resulted in a trip to the Boston Children’s Hospital Cardiology Clinic on Fegan 6 and the first of many cardiac catheterizations I would receive in my life. The results of that first procedure were shared in my corner room across from the nurses’ station on 6 East (the cardiac step-down at the time): I would need a heart transplant for cardiomyopathy. It was Friday the 13th. I was 10 years old. Tim, before he ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - February 7, 2018 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tim Gallagher Tags: Our Patients’ Stories cardiac catheterization cardiomyopathy heart transplant Heart transplant program kidney transplant Pediatric Transplant Center (PTC) Source Type: news

Mindfulness for busy parents who don ’t have time
I know the last thing you need is another item on your to-do list. If you’re a parent — especially a parent of a child with a medical condition — your time, energy and resources are already spread precariously thin. You’re exhausted. You’re worried. And you have no idea what’s coming next. It’s hard enough to show up for life’s daily challenges without the added task of trying to learn mindfulness. But here’s the thing about mindfulness: It holds space for you to feel that exhaustion; that worry and that uncertainty. Mindfulness acknowledges the churning waves, while he...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - February 5, 2018 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Elisa Boxer Tags: Health & Wellness Mental Health Parenting meditation mindfulness positive thinking Source Type: news

Care for your family by caring for your heart
February is American Heart Month — a time for us all to think about keeping our hearts as healthy as possible. Heart health is an important goal: according to the American Heart Association, heart disease accounts for nearly 801,000 deaths in the U.S., every year — that’s about 1 of every 3 deaths. As parents, it’s not always easy to take the time to be heart-healthy, especially when caring for a sick child. But making small changes can have a big impact on your ability to remain healthy and strong — and at your very best to care for a sick child. Take charge of your diet Spending time in the ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - February 2, 2018 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Eva Gomez Source Type: news

Teamwork and toughness: Living with cerebral palsy
Growing up in Querétaro, Mexico, María was an exceptionally bright and inquisitive child. At just 18 months old, she spoke at the level of a 6-year-old, and could even sing the tongue-twisting “Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious” song. Her parents marveled at her intelligence at such a young age, but there was something in her development that seemed off. “At 1 year, she wasn’t crawling well and had difficulty standing,” her mother, María José, recalls. “She hadn’t learned to walk by 18 months, and she would crawl by pulling her two legs at the same time...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - February 2, 2018 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Connor Ertz Tags: Our Patients’ Stories cerebral palsy Cerebral Palsy Center Child and Young Adult Hip Preservation Program Dr. Benjamin Shore Dr. Donna Nimec Source Type: news

A first birthday made possible by cardiac tumor surgery
Today is Oliver Cameron’s first birthday and he and his parents have a lot to celebrate. After a year of uncertainty, they will be enjoying a quiet dinner with family at their home in Wantage, a town in Oxfordshire, England. “Having him home and healthy is the best present ever,” says his mom, Lydia. She and her husband, Tim, are looking forward to some quiet time alone with Oliver and their family after spending much of the last year fighting for his life. Oliver was born with a large, non-cancerous tumor, called a cardiac fibroma, inside his heart. It was so rare that only a handful of doctors in the U....
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - January 31, 2018 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Ellen Greenlaw Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories cardiac fibroma Cardiac Tumor Program Dr. Pedro del Nido Dr. Tal Geva Source Type: news

Solving the mystery of a shapeshifting neck tumor
Jaedin, 10 years old, holds the control for a remote-controlled race car, Christmas 2017. Amanda Brown couldn’t shake an uneasy intuition that something just seemed “off” throughout her second pregnancy. During a scheduled caesarian section at her local hospital in North Carolina, her instinct proved to be true. “I had given birth to my first son by C-section so I knew what to expect,” Amanda says. “But this time around, as the surgeons totally stalled in the middle of the delivery, I thought to myself, ‘it doesn’t take this long to pull a baby out.’” When her son...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - January 24, 2018 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Kat J. McAlpine Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Center for Airway Disorders cervical teratoma Dr. Reza Rahbar germ cell tumor Neck and Skullbase Surgery Program at Boston Children's NICU Solid Tumors Center at Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Source Type: news

Enjoying life to her full potential with cerebral palsy
For a month, Nikki Puzzo walked around with a hockey puck strapped to her torso. But this mother of two wasn’t just being silly or exhibiting her love of sports. Instead, she was demonstrating solidarity with her younger daughter, Stella. The little girl, who has spastic diplegia cerebral palsy (CP), had a device called a baclofen pump implanted into her abdomen. “I wanted her to feel more comfortable and know that she wasn’t alone,” explains Nikki. Targeting spasticity Like many kids with CP, Stella has spasticity, or severe tightness and stiffness, in her leg muscles. A medication called baclofen...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - January 23, 2018 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories baclofen pump cerebral palsy Cerebral Palsy Center Dr. Brian Snyder Dr. Donna Nimec Dr. Elizabeth Barkoudah Kristin Buxton Source Type: news

Surgery to remove blood clot saves London ’s kidneys
Todd and Lindsey Taylor had barely settled in at home in Syracuse, New York with their new baby, London, when their world turned upside down. London, who had seemed perfectly healthy at birth, woke up nine days later vomiting and struggling to breathe. They rushed her to their local children’s hospital. “The doctors did an ultrasound and found a large blood clot in her aorta that was blocking the flow of blood to her kidneys,” says Todd. “They said she was in near fatal condition when we arrived, but they put her on dialysis and were able to stabilize her.” Desperate for options The doctors in...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - January 19, 2018 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Ellen Greenlaw Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories blood clot Dr. Anne Hansen Dr. Heung-Bae Kim Midaortic Syndrome and Renovascular Hypertension (MAS/RVH) Program neonatal intensive care unit Source Type: news

New treatment for SMA offers hope for Arianna
For the first few months of Arianna Condon’s life, everything was moving along fine. She was a happy baby, and seemed to be developing much like her older sister, Tessa. “She was gaining weight, and seemed to be doing great,” says Arianna’s mom, Marina. “She did have problems with reflux, but it was nothing too unusual for a baby.” But by the time Arianna was 3 months old, Marina started to have concerns. Arianna wasn’t lifting her head the way Tessa had at that age. Something didn’t seem right. “I brought it up to her pediatrician, but she told me that all babies devel...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - January 16, 2018 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Ellen Greenlaw Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Dr. Basil Darras spinal muscular atrophy spinal muscular atrophy program Spinraza Source Type: news

Coming of age in a Snapchat world: How do I keep my child safe?
Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Tumblr, YouTube, Snapchat, WhatsApp, Reddit. As a parent, your instinct is always to protect your child. But how 
do you protect them in the ever-evolving digital landscape? Social media has become a part of our everyday lives and is changing the way we interact with the world around us. According to a study by Common Sense Media, teenagers use an average of nine hours of entertainment media a day and tweens (ages 8-12) use an average of six hours per day. This does not include using media for school or homework. What is the long-term impact of this amount of media exposure on the developing...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - January 15, 2018 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Marie Reilly and Amy Young Tags: Ask the Expert Parenting Teen Health ADHD Division of Developmental Medicine social media Source Type: news

Building a healthy heart through cardiac fitness
This spring, Joao DeToledo will be stepping onto the volleyball court to play for his high school team for the first time. It will be a proud moment for the high school senior from Somerville — playing a competitive sport is a goal he hadn’t dreamt possible just a few years ago. Though Joao has always loved sports, he was born with Ebstein’s anomaly, a congenital heart condition that, until recently, has forced him to spend a lot of time on the sidelines. When Joao expressed frustration at not being able to participate in gym and sports as much as he’d like, his cardiologist, Dr. David Fulton, recom...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - January 11, 2018 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Ellen Greenlaw Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Cardiac Fitness Program Dr. David Fulton Dr. John Emans Ebstein's anomaly kyphosis Source Type: news

The joy of cooking (and eating) after tracheomalacia
For most little kids, a trip to the supermarket is an annoying chore, made tolerable only by the opportunity to request sugary snacks as a reward. But when Charlotte McQueen accompanies her mother, Erin, to the store, it’s a journey marked by imagination and delight. “Mom, can we get that?” she asks, pointing to a can of pureed pumpkin. “Oh, and we’ll need marshmallows and we can make chocolate frosting. It will be a great cake!” At nearly 5 years old, Charlotte is an avid baker — a talent she picked up not at culinary school, but at the Yawkey Family Inn. There, a volunteer taught...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - January 10, 2018 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Dori Gallagher Dr. Michael Manfredi Dr. Russell Jennings Esophageal and Airway Treatment Center esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula posterior tracheopexy tracheomalacia Yawkey Fa Source Type: news

The five emotions of raising a child with infantile scoliosis
One night, while doing our son’s usual bath routine, I saw what looked like a hump on his back. Avery was 6 months old at the time. At first, I thought that it was just something I was imagining, but the hump never went away. In fact, it seemed to get worse. When Avery was 13 months old, he was officially diagnosed with infantile scoliosis, a rare form of scoliosis that occurs in children under 2 years of age. The first hospital we were referred to would not even consider treating Avery until he was at least 18 months, and that was not a guarantee, so after doing some research, we came to Boston Children’s Hosp...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - January 9, 2018 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Christina Poce Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Michael Glotzbecker Orthopedic Center scoliosis Spinal Program Source Type: news

Celebration = intoxication is a dangerous message for kids
On New Year’s Eve, CNN fielded reporters all over the country to cover and arguably, to define how Americans celebrate. A report from a “puff, pass and paint” party in Denver, in which revelers flaunted their marijuana use, caught the attention of millions of viewers and became a subject of discussion nationally. The arrival of marijuana in the realm of legal and now socially-accepted substances, strengthens the message that substance use is required for having a good time.Showcasing marijuana use on national television is relatively new following the recent liberalization of marijuana policy in several s...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - January 8, 2018 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Nicholas Chadi and Sharon Levy Tags: Ask the Expert Parenting Teen Health Adolescent Substance Abuse Program Source Type: news

Helping kids get fit — one step at a time
Families participating in Fitness in the City (FIC), a partnership with Boston Children’s Hospital, get referrals to resources and educational offerings like this cooking class. “How many tortillas do you eat at dinner?” Francisca Guevara asks the boy and his parents. “Okay,” she says when they tell her three. “Do you think you could eat two instead? Or even just one?” They nod in agreement: That seems possible. As the associate director of community health and outreach for Charles River Community Health, Guevara recognizes the need to meet families where they are, tailoring her su...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - January 4, 2018 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Health & Wellness Parenting Fitness in the City (FIC) Office of Community Health Shari Nethersole Source Type: news

New year. New lungs.
I’ve had asthma and chronic lung disease since I was very young. I had to use everything — from my head to my toes — to help me breathe. I remember being able to hear myself wheezing, to feel my lungs rattling. I had marks all over my face from my oxygen mask. I thought I would never be clear of mucus and never be able to walk without being out of breath. All I ever wanted was to breathe. I spent so much energy trying to breathe that I didn’t have much left for eating, so I was really skinny. I spent a lot of time in a wheelchair. When I was able to walk, it would be for short distances and my shoul...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - January 3, 2018 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Ndeye "Fatou" Seck Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories chronic lung disease double lung transplant Francis Fynn-Thompson Gary Visner Lung Transplant Program Pediatric Transplant Center (PTC) Source Type: news

Striking a balance: Charlie ’s recovery from neonatal stroke
“Hey, Charlie,” says Dr. Michael Rivkin as he gently dangles a small rubber ducky in front of the little boy. “Would you like this?” A wide smile breaks out across the toddler’s face. Why yes, he certainly would like that duck. He reaches and grasps at it, closing his tiny fingers around the toy. For Charlie Strzempek, it’s nothing more than a playful act. But for his parents, Kathleen and Tom, it’s a major accomplishment. Dr. Rivkin isn’t simply offering his patient a toy. He’s testing his ability to grab and hold an object in his right hand — the side of his bod...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - December 27, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Dr. Michael Rivkin Julie Croteau occupational therapy stroke Stroke and Cerebrovascular Center Source Type: news

Four moving forward, following living donation
Many children wait months — and sometimes years — for a transplant, but thanks to the generosity of living donors, some kids don’t have to wait. Read about the lives and futures of four children saved by living donation. Helping Sloan live up to her name Without Lt. Steve Tenney, 7-month-old Sloan wouldn’t be nursing, beginning to roll over on her own or meeting other milestones. “I did what anyone would have done,” says Tenney, who donated a piece of his liver when Sloan was only 5 months old. “Sloan means ‘warrior,’” her mom, Sarah says. “We didn&rsqu...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - December 21, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Emily Williams Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories kidney transplant Kidney Transplant Program Liver transplant Liver Transplant Program living donation living donor pediatric transplant Pediatric Transplant Center (PTC) Source Type: news

The gift of being heard
When Keira Kelley started collapsing shortly after her first birthday, her parents were terrified. But what was almost as upsetting was the feeling that no one believed something was actually wrong with their daughter. “The first time it happened, she tripped over a chair and was unconscious and grey,” says Kate, her mom. “My husband thought she was gone. He called 911, and when the EMTs arrived she started to come to. They thought maybe she had the wind knocked out of her.” The Kelleys took her to urgent care near their home in Norwood, but she seemed okay, so they chalked it up to a one-time fluke...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - December 19, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Ellen Greenlaw Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Dr. Doug Mah Dr. Kathy Jenkins Electrophysiology Service pacemaker Pacemaker and ICD Program Source Type: news

Reading to teach and heal: More books for 8-12 year olds
The holiday season is a time to reflect, find gratitude and show kindness, especially to those who may be struggling. It’s also a great time to escape the chaos and hunker down with a good book. Why not do both? Today, there are more and more books about children and teens coping with physical and mental health issues that help young readers empathize with these characters but also relate, especially if they’re faced with a similar condition. We’ve selected five books that will not only make great gifts for the kids on your list, but also will stay with them long after those holiday decorations are put aw...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - December 15, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Patty Lenz Bovie Tags: Parenting autism clubfoot dyslexia eating disorder OCD Source Type: news

Isaac ’s story: A ‘new normal’ with short bowel syndrome
It was the morning after their baby son Isaac had come home from the hospital, and Jennifer and Brian Campbell were performing the same sweet act of bonding as many new parents: giving him a bath in the sink. But as they maneuvered around the room, they suddenly realized something was very wrong. “I fell to the floor and started screaming and crying as formula shot out of his stomach,” remembers Jennifer. “I thought we’d broken him.” The reality, of course, was that the Campbells were simply adjusting to their new “normal” — something any parent of a medically complex child c...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - December 14, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Center for Advanced Intestinal Rehabilitation cerebral palsy Dr. Christopher Duggan Dr. Mark Puder Dr. Tom Jaksic necrotizing enterocolitis short bowel syndrome (SBS). Source Type: news

Makayla ’s story: Living with Leri-Weill Dyschondrosteosis
Our daughter Makayla was born perfectly healthy on April 5th, 2014, passing all of the usual newborn screenings without issue. From day one, her personality shone through. She was strong-willed and had a smile that would light up her eyes before her mouth even showed a hint of joy. But over the next 3 months, Makayla wasn’t eating well and wasn’t gaining enough weight.  Our pediatrician referred us to Dr. Elizabeth Hait, a gastroenterologist at Boston Children’s Hospital. Dr. Hait would change Makayla’s formula multiple times and put her on medication for her acid reflux. Her pediatrician also ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - December 12, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Kerri Theriault Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Division of Endocrinology Dr. James Kasser Dr. Travis Matheney hip dysplasia Orthopedic Center Otolaryngology Department Source Type: news

Three simple ways we can all help prevent gun violence
We are coming up on the fifth anniversary of the Sandy Hook shooting, in which a young man opened fire on a classroom of first-graders, killing 20 of them and 6 adults — after having killed his mother at home. While nothing can eclipse this tragedy, since then there have been many more tragedies, such as the shooting in Las Vegas, the church shooting in Texas and the recent shooting in Northern California where, thanks to the quick actions of the staff of a local elementary school, the shooter’s attempts to enter the school were foiled. He shot through the windows instead, injuring a child. In 2014, more than 3...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - December 11, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Claire McCarthy Tags: Ask the Expert Kids' Safety Claire McCarthy MD Gun safety Source Type: news

Caroline ’s life-changing backpack
Caroline at a recent appointment getting her height and weight checked When it comes to being active, there is no stopping Caroline Spaulding. Whether speaking on behalf of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) legislation on Capitol Hill, performing in a ballet recital or lacing up her cleats for a soccer game, Caroline, 13, is a force to be reckoned with. Her strong sense of determination is what carried her through her Crohn’s disease diagnosis and the 12-week, formula-only treatment plan — exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) — that followed. “When I was nine years old, I stopped growing and started los...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - December 8, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Maureen McCarthy Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Bridget Hron Crohn's disease Exclusive Enteral Nutrition Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center Jocelyn Silvester Naamah Zitomersky Source Type: news

Bouncing back: Nolan ’s life after stroke
Although he’s only a little over a year old, Nolan Morel is a bona fide charmer. Clad in a red shirt and navy blue suspenders, he flashes a happy grin at his mother, Rosalia; his physician, Dr. Laura Lehman; and the others in the room. “Look at those dimples!” someone coos, and he giggles in response. “I can’t believe how social he’s being,” laughs Rosalia. “He wasn’t always like this.” In fact, Nolan’s first several days of life were anything but lighthearted. Just a few hours after his birth at a hospital north of Boston, he stopped breathing and had to be...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - December 7, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories child life Dr. Laura Lehman feeding therapy occupational therapy physical therapy stroke Stroke and Cerebrovascular Center Source Type: news

Lauren ’s story: How roller derby saved my life
I wasn’t a particularly athletic child. The second day of soccer practice, in sixth grade, we had to run laps around the soccer field, and 10-year-old me said, “I feel like I’m going to have a heart attack!” My coach disagreed. I quit. That much running was not for me. Fifteen years later, at age 25, I had not only joined a roller derby league, but had also worked my way up to doing contact drills at practice in just three months. I felt incredible! I felt powerful! I felt unstoppable… until I went into cardiac arrest at a Thursday night practice this past July. A lost two days I woke up the ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - December 6, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Lauren Simano Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories ALCAPA Boston Adult Congenital Heart Program Coronary Artery Program Dr. Luis Quinonez Source Type: news

Daughter ’s neurosurgery inspires mom to give back
Danielle Parkman isn’t a doctor or nurse. In fact, she’s not a clinician of any kind. And yet every day she makes the lives of patients in the Boston Children’s Hospital Division of Pulmonary and Respiratory Diseases a little bit easier. As the Senior Administrative Associate for Pharmaceutical Benefits and Prior Authorization Specialist, Danielle is responsible for getting approvals for pharmacy benefits and prior authorizations for all pulmonology patients. It’s a daunting task, but she doesn’t take no for an answer. “I love my job, and I love fighting for my patients,” says Dani...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - December 5, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Ellen Greenlaw Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Department of Neurology Division of Pulmonary and Respiratory Diseases Hydrocephalus Hydrocephalus Program Source Type: news

Whatever it takes: Fighting for Michael
Michael stood at the top of the hill, staring down at the glittering white snow. The prospect of skiing to the bottom was scary — on previous trips, he’d refused to try, worried that he would fall. But this time was different. He was ready to take a chance. Attempting to balance without using poles, he pushed himself forward and glided through the powder as his family cheered him on. By the end of the day, the 8-year-old had sailed down the slopes five times, all by himself. The accomplishment was even more meaningful for his parents, Bill and Lisa Smith, who have watched him fight to survive — and thrive...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 30, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Center for Advanced Intestinal Rehabilitation Dr. Tom Jaksic G-J tube Hale Center for Families short bowel syndrome (SBS). volvulus Source Type: news

Prepared for the unexpected: How Henri beat C. diff
Henri and his sister, Lucienne From the time he was born, Henri has been very reactive — to everything. As a baby, he was allergic to milk and soy, which led to weeping eczema all over his body. His allergies meant frequent ear infections and sinus infections. As a toddler, he was anemic and underweight. He had two urinary tract infections (UTIs) with fevers. At age 3, he had a circumcision because of the repeated UTIs. At age 4, a sinus infection spread to his eye orbit. Every sunscreen on the market gave him (and still gives him) a rash. At age 5, a bug bite on his ear led to a cartilage infection that required ant...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 29, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Marie Vedder Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories C-diff fecal transplant gastroenterology Lori Zimmerman Sonia Ballal Source Type: news

Lauren ’s life after transplant: Proving the impossible possible
I was born on January 29, 1992 with a birth defect called gastroschisis, which meant that my intestines extended outside my body through a small hole in my abdominal wall. I received a liver, small and large bowel transplant in December of 1992, just before my first birthday. Though I was transplanted in Pennsylvania, I have been cared for by the brilliant team at Boston Children’s Hospital ever since. When I was first recovering in Pennsylvania, my parents were told that I would never be able to swim in the ocean because I would have to have a central line in for the rest of my life. Well, to that person I would lik...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 28, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Lauren Ainsworth Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories gastroschisis multivisceral transplant Pediatric Transplant Center (PTC) Source Type: news

Julia Marino ’s Olympic story: Achieving after injury
Julia Marino is always thinking about her story, and it would be hard not too, given how much of an adventure her life has been so far. “Being adopted out of Paraguay to have a normal life in America would’ve been enough of a story itself,” she says. “But I’ve had the chance to live a life beyond what anybody could even dream of.” As an Olympic skier, Julia has been competing at the top of her sport for almost a decade. In 2014, she reached the pinnacle of snow sports at the Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia. But how she got there – and where she plans on going now – was heavi...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 27, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Connor Ertz Tags: Our Patients’ Stories ACL injury ACL injury prevention ACL reconstruction ACL tear Dr. Martha Murray Sports Medicine Division Source Type: news

Chocolate chip cookies, bike rides and hugs: Why I am thankful for Mommy
Four-year-old Lotte is an aspiring artist and writer. When she was 10 months old, she was treated for vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) at Boston Children’s Hospital. Here Lotte pens her first blog post to share why she is thankful for her Mommy. To: Mommy I am thankful for you because you drive me to school. You get me special treats. You have fun with me. You make me chocolate chip cookies. You read me stories. You go on bike rides with me. You give me big hugs. I love you, Mommy. Love, Lotte The post Chocolate chip cookies, bike rides and hugs: Why I am thankful for Mommy appeared first on Thriving Blog...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 23, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Lotte Bigelow Source Type: news

Teagan ’s triumphant return: Dancing after Perthes disease
Teagan has lived and breathed dance — ballet, jazz, tap, and more — since she was 5 years old. “It’s what makes me happy,” the now 12-year-old says. But two years ago, she started to feel pain in her hip that persisted after dance class and worsened over time. As her spring dance season wrapped up with four shows in two days, Teagan ended the final show with her pain at its worst. But since her injury didn’t seem to be anything more than a minor muscle pull, her mother Jeannine had Teagan lay low over the summer, hoping that rest would help the pain go away. When dance classes started ag...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 22, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Connor Ertz Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Child and Young Adult Hip Preservation Program Dr. Benjamin Shore Legg-Calves-Perth Disease Orthopedic Center Source Type: news

Supporting Latino families: The power of relationships
Cecilia and Sara Navigating a child’s medical journey can be difficult on any parent. But for a mother or father not familiar with the U.S. healthcare system or whose first language isn’t English, the journey is much more complex. Just ask one of the attendees at Fuente de Luz (“Fountain of Light”), the monthly informational group for Spanish-speaking families at Boston Children’s Hospital. On the first Tuesday of every month, around eight to ten Latino mothers — and occasionally fathers — get together to share their experiences and receive support from each other. There are hands ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 21, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Nicole Nover Tags: Parenting Source Type: news

Cadagan: Humor and tenacity after a stroke
Most parents try to discourage their children from indulging in humor about bodily functions like burping. But for Daniel and Lori Hooley, a simple smirk in response to a belch was the sign they needed that their daughter, Cadagan, was going to be okay. It was 2012 and 7-year-old Cadagan was asleep, tucked into bed for the night. Around 11 p.m., she suddenly awoke — but it wasn’t because of a nightmare or a late-night request for a glass of water. Instead, she seemed limp and couldn’t focus. Then she began throwing up. Born with an extremely rare genetic disorder called trisomy 12p, the little girl had al...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 20, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Dr. Cameron Trenor Dr. Laura Lehman Dr. Michael Rivkin stroke Stroke and Cerebrovascular Center vasculitis Source Type: news

Code talker: A Q & A with genetic counselor Kira Dies
Your child has just been diagnosed with a rare genetic disorder. Your pediatrician has never heard of the condition and the internet doesn’t offer much information. Where do you turn? Kira Dies, a genetic counselor in the Department of Neurology at Boston Children’s Hospital, helps parents with these hard questions every day. One of about only 4,000 genetic counselors in the country, Dies has been trained in handling both the scientific and emotional sides of genetic disorders. Dies was also the recent winner of the Code Talker Award, presented by Genome Magazine and the National Society of Genetic Counselors (...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 17, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Ellen Greenlaw Tags: Ask the Expert genetic counselor Kira Dies Mustafa Sahin Neurogenetics Program SPG47 tuberous sclerosis complex tuberous sclerosis program Source Type: news

Inside the NICU: Shining light on the healing power of touch
Abigail underwent open-heart surgery and received care in Boston Children’s Cardiac Intensive Care Unit Traveling through Boston Children’s Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), you feel the warmth of natural light and a soothing sense of calm. One mom, leaning delicately over her son’s bedside, caresses his forehead and gently whispers a lullaby. Only a few steps away, a father rests in a chair with his tiny son on his chest. Lifesaving technology fills the 24-bed NICU and a reassuring team of specialized physicians, nurses and Child Life Specialists monitor, treat and embrace their delicate patients. Nea...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 16, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Maureen McCarthy Tags: Our Patients’ Stories neonatal intensive care unit NICU Source Type: news

Danny ’s journey to a biventricular heart
The first hint that something wasn’t quite right with Danny Sanchez-Garcia’s heart came at his mom’s six-month prenatal visit. “There was a little blip on the ultrasound, but then it was gone on the next one, so they didn’t think it was anything and I didn’t worry any more about it,” says Danny’s mom, Cynthia. Cynthia was overjoyed when Danny was born at her local hospital seeming perfectly healthy. But as the hospital staff monitored Danny overnight, they noticed his oxygen level was lower than normal and decided to run more tests. His doctors believed the tests pointed to a...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 15, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Ellen Greenlaw Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Biventricular Repair Complex Biventricular Repair Program congenital heart valve program double outlet right ventricle Dr. Christopher Baird Dr. Roger Breitbart ECMO Pulmonary atresia tetra Source Type: news

The healthy holiday guide for families
Holiday gatherings are for family, friends and … food. No matter which holidays you celebrate, they’re sure to include delicious treats — some healthy, most not. It may seem nearly impossible to always practice healthy eating habits, but there are some things you and your kids can do to stay on course this holiday season. Plan ahead Prepare healthy items for parties at home and for potlucks, bring your kids’ favorite vegetable dish or search online for “holiday vegetable and fruit platters.” There are lots of fun recipe ideas on Google and Pinterest, like a turkey-themed platter of ve...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 14, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Amanda Rauf, Abigail Seibert and Sharon Weston Tags: Health & Wellness Optimal Weight for Life (OWL) Program Source Type: news

How precision medicine turned Jesus ’ unique tumor into an operable one
On a hot, August day in a Boston park, Jesus Apolinaris Cruz cooled off with a water squirt gun fight with his mother and sister. As he nimbly ran and dodged their aim, he twisted around to sneak shots of water back in their direction.  Peals of laughter rang out from the group as Jesus landed a jet of water on his sister. It’s hard to imagine that just weeks earlier, Jesus, 13, had undergone surgery near his hip to remove an unclassified tumor, so-described because it couldn’t be categorized as any specific kind of cancer. “We had been praying for months that the surgery would go well,” says M...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 13, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Kat J. McAlpine Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Research and Innovation Cancer clinical trials Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Dr. Katherine Janeway Dr. Steven DuBois Experimental Therapeutics Program pediatric cancer precision medicine sarcoma Solid Tumors C Source Type: news

Reena ’s story: A bright future with short bowel syndrome
She’s just 16, but Reena Zuckerman knows exactly what she wants to be doing in another 10 years. “My dream is to play on the press team in the annual Women’s Congressional Softball Game,” says the aspiring political journalist. Since 2009, the event has pitted members of Congress against the press corps, raising nearly a million dollars for charity. “When I’m not doing schoolwork or watching TV, I’m listening to political podcasts and NPR,” Reena confesses. It’s an impressive goal, but one that’s no doubt attainable for this driven teen, who’s been pushing h...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 10, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Center for Advanced Intestinal Rehabilitation Dr. Tom Jaksic G-tube short bowel syndrome (SBS). volvulus Source Type: news

Why you should only use antibiotics if truly necessary
Let’s be honest: most parents feel better when their sick child is prescribed an antibiotic. There’s just something so reassuring about having a prescription. It’s hard to feel like all you can do is wait and give your child TLC; it feels better to do something. Even when the doctor says that your child has a virus, and explains that antibiotics treat bacteria, not viruses, it’s common for parents to think: but what if there is even a little chance that there is a bacterial infection along with — or instead of — the virus? It can’t hurt to be safe, right? But that’s the thing...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 9, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Claire McCarthy Tags: Ask the Expert Health & Wellness antibiotics Claire McCarthy MD Source Type: news

Police save lives every day, just not this way — a liver for Sloan
Sloane and Lt. Tenney A police officer’s job is all about action and reaction. “We see something, react to it and, typically, it’s over quickly,” says Lt. Steve Tenney of the Keene, New Hampshire, Police Department. But on the morning of Sept. 8, while Steve lay in a hospital bed at Lahey Hospital & Medical Center in Burlington, Massachusetts, action/reaction wasn’t part of the equation. This time, there was time to think. Even so, the decision to donate a piece of his liver to save Sloan — a baby he’d never even met — was made without hesitation. “I did what anyone...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 8, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Emily Williams Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories biliary atresia Dr. Christine Lee Dr. Heung-Bae Kim Dr. Khashavar Vakili Liver transplant Liver Transplant Program living donor Source Type: news

Parent-to-parent: Tips for Home Parenteral Nutrition families
Four-year-old Thomas Onorato is a young zoologist at heart. Often seen with binoculars in hand, the adventurous preschooler is particularly drawn to bird watching. He enjoys talking about his feathery friends and studying their beauty and habitat. Thomas’ love of animals runs so deep that he says he wants to be a veterinarian when he grows up. “Thomas is obsessed with animals. It’s his love,” says his mother, Melissa. Beyond his quest to care for animals, Thomas has two other important missions — to manage the rare condition, microvillus inclusion disease (MVID) and receive the ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 7, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Maureen McCarthy Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Parenting Dr. Bram Raphael home parenteral nutrition Microvillus inclusion disease Source Type: news

When a rare injury meets steadfast determination
As just a freshman in high school, Chris was coming off an incredibly successful fall cross-country season. He had regularly placed among the top performers during races — often one of the lone freshmen amongst all upperclassmen — and had even placed first once during the season. He had his sights set on the winter track season, which came with equally high expectations. But just two days before Christmas, while competing in the 300-meter track event at the Reggie Lewis Center in Boston, Chris’ season was cut short. In the middle of the race, he felt his hamstring go from loose to tight very quickly, culm...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 6, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Connor Ertz Tags: Our Patients’ Stories distance running Dr. Benton Heyworth Orthopedic Center Sports Medicine Division Source Type: news

Dealing with a diagnosis of epilepsy: Common questions from parents
A diagnosis of epilepsy can seem overwhelming: You likely have a lot of questions about how seizures — and their treatment — will affect your child’s life and what that might mean for your family. That’s why education is crucial for helping ensure that you understand as much as possible about the condition. Events such as the Fifth Annual Epilepsy Awareness Day at Disneyland are wonderful opportunities to learn from experts and from other families. Here, Dr. Arnold Sansevere of the Epilepsy Center at Boston Children’s Hospital answers five common questions from parents and kids. What causes s...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 2, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Ask the Expert Diseases & Conditions Dr. Arnold Sansevere epilepsy epilepsy center seizures Source Type: news

Happy Halloween to our patients
To the princesses and princes who slay dragons, the firefighters who battle things bigger than fire, the superheroes whose bravery makes us brave and the fairies who touch us with their magic — you inspire us today and every day.   Click on the photos below to read their stories.  Will and Mikey Allie Sebastian and August Zoe and Ava Jayce Molly and Wills Sebastian and Julia Oliver and his parents Kennedy Jeffrey and his parents Camden Brayden and Carter Joey Jett Lis Amanda and Macy Lonnie Lu and Maya var meta...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - October 31, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jenny Fernandez Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Halloween Source Type: news

‘Please take good care of our baby sister’: Help for Addison’s hemangioma
Most parents dress their baby girls in headbands for fun. But for Addison Quandt, these accessories, adorned with bows and flowers, weren’t a frivolous fashion statement. Instead, they helped hold in place the gauze that covered a large hemangioma on the back of her neck. “People always said what a fashionable baby she was,” says her mom, Dianne. “If they only knew.” Addison was born with four hemangiomas, common benign vascular tumors that typically appear as red birthmarks within a week or two of birth. In many cases, they don’t cause problems and clear up without treatment. But not on...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - October 30, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Dr. Belinda Dickie Dr. Denise Adams Dr. Marilyn Liang hemangioma Vascular Anomalies Center Source Type: news

From Buenos Aires to Boston for pediatric stroke care
Twice a year, Osvaldo and Sol board a plane in Buenos Aires, Argentina. For a week or more, they leave behind their home, their friends, their jobs — and, sometimes, their two daughters, Ines and Clara. But what waits for them, a continent away, is worth it. In Boston, they say, they have found expert care for their son, Francisco. “Francisco was perfectly fine when he was born,” says Sol. “But two days later, we were having trouble waking him up.” Although initially doctors assured the family that his behavior was normal, they quickly transferred him to the neonatal intensive care unit when h...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - October 27, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Dr. Cameron Trenor Dr. Michael Rivkin International Health Services physical therapy stroke Stroke and Cerebrovascular Center Source Type: news