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Teagan ’s triumphant return: Dancing after Perthes disease
Teagan has lived and breathed dance — ballet, jazz, tap, and more — since she was 5 years old. “It’s what makes me happy,” the now 12-year-old says. But two years ago, she started to feel pain in her hip that persisted after dance class and worsened over time. As her spring dance season wrapped up with four shows in two days, Teagan ended the final show with her pain at its worst. But since her injury didn’t seem to be anything more than a minor muscle pull, her mother Jeannine had Teagan lay low over the summer, hoping that rest would help the pain go away. When dance classes started ag...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 22, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Connor Ertz Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Child and Young Adult Hip Preservation Program Dr. Benjamin Shore Legg-Calves-Perth Disease Orthopedic Center Source Type: news

Supporting Latino families: The power of relationships
Cecilia and Sara Navigating a child’s medical journey can be difficult on any parent. But for a mother or father not familiar with the U.S. healthcare system or whose first language isn’t English, the journey is much more complex. Just ask one of the attendees at Fuente de Luz (“Fountain of Light”), the monthly informational group for Spanish-speaking families at Boston Children’s Hospital. On the first Tuesday of every month, around eight to ten Latino mothers — and occasionally fathers — get together to share their experiences and receive support from each other. There are hands ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 21, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Nicole Nover Tags: Parenting Source Type: news

Cadagan: Humor and tenacity after a stroke
Most parents try to discourage their children from indulging in humor about bodily functions like burping. But for Daniel and Lori Hooley, a simple smirk in response to a belch was the sign they needed that their daughter, Cadagan, was going to be okay. It was 2012 and 7-year-old Cadagan was asleep, tucked into bed for the night. Around 11 p.m., she suddenly awoke — but it wasn’t because of a nightmare or a late-night request for a glass of water. Instead, she seemed limp and couldn’t focus. Then she began throwing up. Born with an extremely rare genetic disorder called trisomy 12p, the little girl had al...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 20, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Dr. Cameron Trenor Dr. Laura Lehman Dr. Michael Rivkin stroke Stroke and Cerebrovascular Center vasculitis Source Type: news

Code talker: A Q & A with genetic counselor Kira Dies
Your child has just been diagnosed with a rare genetic disorder. Your pediatrician has never heard of the condition and the internet doesn’t offer much information. Where do you turn? Kira Dies, a genetic counselor in the Department of Neurology at Boston Children’s Hospital, helps parents with these hard questions every day. One of about only 4,000 genetic counselors in the country, Dies has been trained in handling both the scientific and emotional sides of genetic disorders. Dies was also the recent winner of the Code Talker Award, presented by Genome Magazine and the National Society of Genetic Counselors (...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 17, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Ellen Greenlaw Tags: Ask the Expert genetic counselor Kira Dies Mustafa Sahin Neurogenetics Program SPG47 tuberous sclerosis complex tuberous sclerosis program Source Type: news

Inside the NICU: Shining light on the healing power of touch
Abigail underwent open-heart surgery and received care in Boston Children’s Cardiac Intensive Care Unit Traveling through Boston Children’s Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), you feel the warmth of natural light and a soothing sense of calm. One mom, leaning delicately over her son’s bedside, caresses his forehead and gently whispers a lullaby. Only a few steps away, a father rests in a chair with his tiny son on his chest. Lifesaving technology fills the 24-bed NICU and a reassuring team of specialized physicians, nurses and Child Life Specialists monitor, treat and embrace their delicate patients. Nea...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 16, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Maureen McCarthy Tags: Our Patients’ Stories neonatal intensive care unit NICU Source Type: news

Danny ’s journey to a biventricular heart
The first hint that something wasn’t quite right with Danny Sanchez-Garcia’s heart came at his mom’s six-month prenatal visit. “There was a little blip on the ultrasound, but then it was gone on the next one, so they didn’t think it was anything and I didn’t worry any more about it,” says Danny’s mom, Cynthia. Cynthia was overjoyed when Danny was born at her local hospital seeming perfectly healthy. But as the hospital staff monitored Danny overnight, they noticed his oxygen level was lower than normal and decided to run more tests. His doctors believed the tests pointed to a...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 15, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Ellen Greenlaw Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Biventricular Repair Complex Biventricular Repair Program congenital heart valve program double outlet right ventricle Dr. Christopher Baird Dr. Roger Breitbart ECMO Pulmonary atresia tetra Source Type: news

The healthy holiday guide for families
Holiday gatherings are for family, friends and … food. No matter which holidays you celebrate, they’re sure to include delicious treats — some healthy, most not. It may seem nearly impossible to always practice healthy eating habits, but there are some things you and your kids can do to stay on course this holiday season. Plan ahead Prepare healthy items for parties at home and for potlucks, bring your kids’ favorite vegetable dish or search online for “holiday vegetable and fruit platters.” There are lots of fun recipe ideas on Google and Pinterest, like a turkey-themed platter of ve...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 14, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Amanda Rauf, Abigail Seibert and Sharon Weston Tags: Health & Wellness Optimal Weight for Life (OWL) Program Source Type: news

How precision medicine turned Jesus ’ unique tumor into an operable one
On a hot, August day in a Boston park, Jesus Apolinaris Cruz cooled off with a water squirt gun fight with his mother and sister. As he nimbly ran and dodged their aim, he twisted around to sneak shots of water back in their direction.  Peals of laughter rang out from the group as Jesus landed a jet of water on his sister. It’s hard to imagine that just weeks earlier, Jesus, 13, had undergone surgery near his hip to remove an unclassified tumor, so-described because it couldn’t be categorized as any specific kind of cancer. “We had been praying for months that the surgery would go well,” says M...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 13, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Kat J. McAlpine Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Research and Innovation Cancer clinical trials Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Dr. Katherine Janeway Dr. Steven DuBois Experimental Therapeutics Program pediatric cancer precision medicine sarcoma Solid Tumors C Source Type: news

Reena ’s story: A bright future with short bowel syndrome
She’s just 16, but Reena Zuckerman knows exactly what she wants to be doing in another 10 years. “My dream is to play on the press team in the annual Women’s Congressional Softball Game,” says the aspiring political journalist. Since 2009, the event has pitted members of Congress against the press corps, raising nearly a million dollars for charity. “When I’m not doing schoolwork or watching TV, I’m listening to political podcasts and NPR,” Reena confesses. It’s an impressive goal, but one that’s no doubt attainable for this driven teen, who’s been pushing h...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 10, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Center for Advanced Intestinal Rehabilitation Dr. Tom Jaksic G-tube short bowel syndrome (SBS). volvulus Source Type: news

Why you should only use antibiotics if truly necessary
Let’s be honest: most parents feel better when their sick child is prescribed an antibiotic. There’s just something so reassuring about having a prescription. It’s hard to feel like all you can do is wait and give your child TLC; it feels better to do something. Even when the doctor says that your child has a virus, and explains that antibiotics treat bacteria, not viruses, it’s common for parents to think: but what if there is even a little chance that there is a bacterial infection along with — or instead of — the virus? It can’t hurt to be safe, right? But that’s the thing...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 9, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Claire McCarthy Tags: Ask the Expert Health & Wellness antibiotics Claire McCarthy MD Source Type: news

Police save lives every day, just not this way — a liver for Sloan
Sloane and Lt. Tenney A police officer’s job is all about action and reaction. “We see something, react to it and, typically, it’s over quickly,” says Lt. Steve Tenney of the Keene, New Hampshire, Police Department. But on the morning of Sept. 8, while Steve lay in a hospital bed at Lahey Hospital & Medical Center in Burlington, Massachusetts, action/reaction wasn’t part of the equation. This time, there was time to think. Even so, the decision to donate a piece of his liver to save Sloan — a baby he’d never even met — was made without hesitation. “I did what anyone...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 8, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Emily Williams Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories biliary atresia Dr. Christine Lee Dr. Heung-Bae Kim Dr. Khashavar Vakili Liver transplant Liver Transplant Program living donor Source Type: news

Parent-to-parent: Tips for Home Parenteral Nutrition families
Four-year-old Thomas Onorato is a young zoologist at heart. Often seen with binoculars in hand, the adventurous preschooler is particularly drawn to bird watching. He enjoys talking about his feathery friends and studying their beauty and habitat. Thomas’ love of animals runs so deep that he says he wants to be a veterinarian when he grows up. “Thomas is obsessed with animals. It’s his love,” says his mother, Melissa. Beyond his quest to care for animals, Thomas has two other important missions — to manage the rare condition, microvillus inclusion disease (MVID) and receive the ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 7, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Maureen McCarthy Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Parenting Dr. Bram Raphael home parenteral nutrition Microvillus inclusion disease Source Type: news

When a rare injury meets steadfast determination
As just a freshman in high school, Chris was coming off an incredibly successful fall cross-country season. He had regularly placed among the top performers during races — often one of the lone freshmen amongst all upperclassmen — and had even placed first once during the season. He had his sights set on the winter track season, which came with equally high expectations. But just two days before Christmas, while competing in the 300-meter track event at the Reggie Lewis Center in Boston, Chris’ season was cut short. In the middle of the race, he felt his hamstring go from loose to tight very quickly, culm...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 6, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Connor Ertz Tags: Our Patients’ Stories distance running Dr. Benton Heyworth Orthopedic Center Sports Medicine Division Source Type: news

Dealing with a diagnosis of epilepsy: Common questions from parents
A diagnosis of epilepsy can seem overwhelming: You likely have a lot of questions about how seizures — and their treatment — will affect your child’s life and what that might mean for your family. That’s why education is crucial for helping ensure that you understand as much as possible about the condition. Events such as the Fifth Annual Epilepsy Awareness Day at Disneyland are wonderful opportunities to learn from experts and from other families. Here, Dr. Arnold Sansevere of the Epilepsy Center at Boston Children’s Hospital answers five common questions from parents and kids. What causes s...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 2, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Ask the Expert Diseases & Conditions Dr. Arnold Sansevere epilepsy epilepsy center seizures Source Type: news

Happy Halloween to our patients
To the princesses and princes who slay dragons, the firefighters who battle things bigger than fire, the superheroes whose bravery makes us brave and the fairies who touch us with their magic — you inspire us today and every day.   Click on the photos below to read their stories.  Will and Mikey Allie Sebastian and August Zoe and Ava Jayce Molly and Wills Sebastian and Julia Oliver and his parents Kennedy Jeffrey and his parents Camden Brayden and Carter Joey Jett Lis Amanda and Macy Lonnie Lu and Maya var meta...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - October 31, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jenny Fernandez Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Halloween Source Type: news

‘Please take good care of our baby sister’: Help for Addison’s hemangioma
Most parents dress their baby girls in headbands for fun. But for Addison Quandt, these accessories, adorned with bows and flowers, weren’t a frivolous fashion statement. Instead, they helped hold in place the gauze that covered a large hemangioma on the back of her neck. “People always said what a fashionable baby she was,” says her mom, Dianne. “If they only knew.” Addison was born with four hemangiomas, common benign vascular tumors that typically appear as red birthmarks within a week or two of birth. In many cases, they don’t cause problems and clear up without treatment. But not on...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - October 30, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Dr. Belinda Dickie Dr. Denise Adams Dr. Marilyn Liang hemangioma Vascular Anomalies Center Source Type: news

From Buenos Aires to Boston for pediatric stroke care
Twice a year, Osvaldo and Sol board a plane in Buenos Aires, Argentina. For a week or more, they leave behind their home, their friends, their jobs — and, sometimes, their two daughters, Ines and Clara. But what waits for them, a continent away, is worth it. In Boston, they say, they have found expert care for their son, Francisco. “Francisco was perfectly fine when he was born,” says Sol. “But two days later, we were having trouble waking him up.” Although initially doctors assured the family that his behavior was normal, they quickly transferred him to the neonatal intensive care unit when h...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - October 27, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Dr. Cameron Trenor Dr. Michael Rivkin International Health Services physical therapy stroke Stroke and Cerebrovascular Center Source Type: news

Courtney ’s story: Piecing together a genetic puzzle
Courtney Whitmore was born 22 years ago with a cleft palate, two clubbed feet and fists that were so tightly clenched they couldn’t be pulled apart. Since Courtney was an otherwise happy and healthy baby, neither her parents nor her doctor saw cause to be concerned about these seemingly unrelated conditions. What they didn’t realize was that these were the first clues to a genetic puzzle that would take ten years to unravel. The next clue came at age 3. “One day my dad and I were playing peekaboo, and suddenly I couldn’t see,” says Courtney. “My parents rushed me to the hospital and the ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - October 25, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Ellen Greenlaw Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories brain aneurysm Cardiovascular Genetics Program Cerebrovascular Surgery and Interventions Center Dr. Darren Orbach Dr. Lawrence Karlin Dr. Pedro del Nido Dr. Ronald Lacro Loeys-Dietz syndrome Source Type: news

Fighting for the next family: Mom ’s experience inspires nutrition support guidelines
As Michelle Marti watched her twin sons, Nicholas and Max, run around the playground, she worried. To a stranger — like the representative of their local school’s Planning and Placement Team (PPT), there to evaluate the boys’ eligibility for special needs services in kindergarten — they looked like any other kids having fun. But their playfulness masked a serious illness: short bowel syndrome, the result of a condition called Hirschsprung’s disease. “They look healthy on the outside because all of their medical differences are under their clothes,” admits Michelle. Those difference...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - October 24, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Parenting Center for Advanced Intestinal Rehabilitation Hirschsprung's disease Jessica McCaig short bowel syndrome (SBS). total parenteral nutrition Source Type: news

Looking to the future: Robot-assisted surgery offers hope for Brendan
Brendan Randolph focuses on the lane in front of him, takes a few steps and lets the ball fly down the lane. He waits to see where it lands and then turns back, grinning with satisfaction: With all ten pins down, it’s a strike. Bowling is one of his favorite pastimes, and he’s thrilled to be back at it. That’s no small feat for this 17-year-old, who underwent brain surgery just a few months ago. Brendan and his parents, Joanne and Chris Running out of options for epilepsy Brendan began experiencing seizures within just a few hours of his birth and was diagnosed with epilepsy, believed to be the result of ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - October 23, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Dr. Phillip Pearl Dr. Scellig Stone epilepsy epilepsy center robotics seizures Source Type: news

Jenna ’s story: How two surgeons changed her path in life
“Your daughter was a very sick little girl.” Those were the first words that came out of Dr. Peter Waters’ mouth as he addressed my parents in the waiting room of Boston Children’s Hospital, back in 1999. They had been anxiously waiting, wondering and worrying about my condition. “Will they get it all?” “Will she be the same?” “Will she survive?” All of these questions occupied the minds of my parents as they sat waiting for their two-year-old daughter to come out of emergency surgery. A life-saving procedure …it’s what now inspires me to want to bec...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - October 19, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jenna Lahey Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Division of Sports Medicine Dr. Lyle Micheli Dr. Peter Waters Hand and Orthopedic Upper Extremity Program Orthopedic Center Septic arthritis Source Type: news

Looking at the whole child: Coordinated care for spina bifida helps Jeffrey thrive
Jeffrey Marotz and his family may have driven to Boston Children’s Hospital from their home in New York, but it was really the boy’s feet that brought him here. Born with severe spina bifida, a complex birth defect that affects the development of a child’s spinal cord, spine and brain, Jeffrey had also been diagnosed with clubfoot, a related orthopedic condition that causes the foot to twist unnaturally. Previous surgeries hadn’t worked and the braces that had been custom made for then three-year-old Jeffrey didn’t fit correctly. “Nothing was working,” says his mom, Michelle. A tea...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - October 18, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jenny Fernandez Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories clubfoot Dr. Benjamin Warf Dr. Carlos Estrada Dr. Lawrence Karlin Dr. Terry Buchmiller Rebecca Sherlock spina bifida Source Type: news

Keeping the Beat: A retreat for kids with pacemakers and ICDs
Photos by Richard Koch Every year in early September, something extraordinary happens at the YMCA Camp Burgess on Cape Cod. That’s when a group of kids with pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) descend on the campground for the Keeping the Beat Retreat, a weekend filled with games, outdoor activities, dancing, singing and bonding. This year, I was lucky enough to get to join in on their fun as a volunteer counselor. The weekend began with hugs, high-fives and screams of excitement as the kids piled off the bus and connected with old friends and former counselors. As a first-timer, I was clear...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - October 17, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Ellen Greenlaw Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Amy Walsh Dr. Doug Mah Dr. Laura Bevilacqua ICDs implantable cardioverter defibrillators Keeping the Beat Retreat pacemaker Source Type: news

Enjoying life, finally free of seizures
Kristen Grip stood in the middle of the basketball court, motionless. Around her, the action continued as usual — the smack of the ball on the polished wood floor, the rush of her teammates as they darted back and forth, the satisfying swish and shout of victory as someone made a basket. Yet the high school freshman stared vacantly into space, her only movement a small tap of her fingers together. Later, after the coach had blown a whistle and halted the game, Kristen learned that it had happened again: she’d had another seizure. Embarrassed and frustrated, she bid her friends farewell and headed to the school ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - October 16, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Dr. Annapurna Poduri epilepsy epilepsy center seizures Source Type: news

4 trends in epilepsy research and care
Despite the fact that epilepsy is the third most common brain disorder — affecting an estimated one percent of children — there’s still much we don’t know about this condition. In fact, in about 75 percent of cases, epilepsy has no known cause. Research is crucial to help physicians learn more about the roots of epilepsy in children and develop potential treatments for it. “One third of our patients have treatment-refractory epilepsy. Unless we try to discover what causes an individual’s epilepsy, we can not take a personalized or precision approach to treatment. Parents should know that...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - October 11, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Dr. Annapurna Poduri epilepsy epilepsy center seizures Source Type: news

One year later: Abbey D ’Agostino reflects on her Olympic moment
It’s August during the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janiero, Brazil. Abbey D’Agostino is a runner in the 5,000-meter preliminary heat. She smiles and waves at the camera as it pans in front of the participants at their starting blocks — a positive, self-assured smile that stands out amongst the competitive grimaces around her. In this moment, she is where all track and field athletes aspire to be — at the pinnacle of their sport in an Olympic stadium. From injured to inspired With about a mile to go in the event, Nikki Hamblin of New Zealand is running in front of D’Agostino when she stumbl...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - October 10, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Connor Ertz Tags: Our Patients’ Stories ACL injury ACL injury prevention ACL surgery Dr. Mininder Kocher Sports Medicine Division Source Type: news

Teens and opioids: Time for an open conversation
National surveys have found that teens today are much less likely to use alcohol and drugs compared to their parents’ generation. In fact, the proportion of high school seniors who chose not to use alcohol, tobacco, marijuana or other drugs has increased from 3 percent to 25 percent in the last thirty years. This remarkable good news is overshadowed by the growing number of teens who are daily marijuana users and the recent increase in opioid-related deaths among young people. It is important to understand the roots of this discrepancy in order to address it. Statistics show that between 2014 and 2015, the rates of d...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - October 9, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Nicholas Chadi Tags: Ask the Expert Parenting Teen Health Adolescent Substance Abuse Program Source Type: news

Back in Kosovo after life-saving surgery, Lis ’s heart remains in Boston
Like many kids, Lis Spahiu loves wearing his Boston Celtics and New England Patriots t-shirts. His mom, Zana, jokes that sometimes she needs to hide them so he’ll wear something else. But Lis isn’t a typical Boston sports fan. This 5-year-old from Kosovo has grown to love Boston, and its sports teams, after several trips to the Boston Children’s Hospital to receive life-saving care for his heart. “In Kosovo, the health care system is very poor,” explains Lis’s mom Zana. “So when Lis contracted Kawasaki disease at 5 months old, he was misdiagnosed.” Kawasaki disease cause...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - October 6, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Ellen Greenlaw Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Coronary Artery Program Dr. Jane Newburger Dr. Luis Quinonez Kawasaki disease Kawasaki Disease Program Source Type: news

The space between heartache and happiness: Two sons with adrenoleukodystrophy
The Rojas family at a recent visit to Boston Children’s. When Paul and Liliana Rojas talk about their life, they describe it in one of two ways — the way it was before their sons, 10-year-old Brandon and 7-year-old Brian, were diagnosed with ALD, and the way it is after. Their story is one of heartbreak — but also hope, in the form of a new clinical trial. Learn more about the results of the clinical trial, recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine, that halted the progression of Brian’s ALD. ALD is short for adrenoleukodystrophy, a debilitating brain disease that simply goes by...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - October 4, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Emily Williams Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Research and Innovation adrenoleukodystrophy ALD clinical trial Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center David Williams MD gene therapy Lorenzo's Oil New England Jour Source Type: news

Hip pain in young athletes: Q & A with a sports medicine specialist
When your child plays a sport, it’s often hard to tell where everyday aches and pains end and a potentially serious injury begins. Bumps and bruises are anything but rare in contact sports, and muscle soreness can be a common complaint for any young athlete — especially given the rigor of youth athletics these days. So how do you know when your child’s hip pain is due to an actual injury? Dr. Mininder Kocher, orthopedic surgeon and Associate Director of the Sports Medicine Division at Boston Children’s Hospital, helps answer parents’ questions about hip pain in young athletes. What are s...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - October 3, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Connor Ertz Tags: Ask the Expert Child and Young Adult Hip Preservation Program Division of Sports Medicine Dr. Mininder Kocher FAI femoracetabular impingement hip dysplasia hip impingement labral tear Source Type: news

Michelle is moving ahead after experiencing a stroke
In fall of 2014, I was a senior, excited about finishing high school in New Hampshire and heading off to college. But I could never have guessed what the year would bring. I was an avid lacrosse player and competing in my fifth game of a tournament when I started to notice I was having trouble seeing out of my left eye. Soon, my hand felt weird and I couldn’t grip the stick properly. As I sat on the sidelines, onlookers recommended I be taken to a local hospital. Recovering from stroke I can’t remember a lot of what happened next, but I know that the emergency doctors believed I had a stroke. They sent me to th...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - October 2, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Michelle Ostaudelafont Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Dr. Cameron Trenor Dr. Laura Lehman pediatric stroke Stroke and Cerebrovascular Center Source Type: news

Finally finding answers for cavernous malformation
It was early morning and Tiffany and Joe Palowski were worried. Their son, Michael, was undergoing a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan to determine the cause of his excruciating headache. The test — only expected to take about 45 minutes — now approached the two-hour mark. “They had to have found something,” Tiffany said as her panic rose. “I know they did.” About 10 days earlier, Michael had gotten sick, vomiting so intensely that he began throwing up blood. The 6-year-old had spent a week in a local hospital with a suspected case of norovirus before being sent home. But then he&rsq...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 29, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories cavernous malformations Cerebrovascular Surgery and Interventions Center Dr. Edward Smith Second opinion Source Type: news

Please don ’t judge: Supporting a friend whose child has a mental health condition
Shannon Larson and her family (photo courtesy of Jennifer Shore Photography) When my children were younger, I was always able to help them maneuver the difficulties of growing up. If it was their fear of going to school, attending playdates or being hesitant of trying a new activity, I was there to cheer them on, nudge when needed and assure them that everything would be okay. But as both of my children entered their teenage years, their anxiety and fears became more pronounced and debilitating, manifesting in panic attacks and depression. As a parent, I understood that my children would need more than just my reassuring w...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 28, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Shannon Larson Tags: Mental Health Parenting Department of Psychiatry Source Type: news

Experience Journal: Jake is charting new waters with HLHS
Jake Pickles was born with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), a serious congenital heart defect that causes parts of the left heart to be underdeveloped. As an infant and toddler, Jake had three open-heart surgeries to repair his heart. Now 22, Jake is one of the oldest patients to survive with HLHS. This makes his prognosis uncertain. At some point in the future, he may need a heart transplant or more procedures. But Jake and his close-knit family try not to dwell on this uncertainty. Instead, they live with gratitude and hope. “I’m just planning as if there’s nothing wrong,” says Jake. &ldquo...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 27, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Ellen Greenlaw Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories congenital heart defect Heart Center hypoplastic left heart syndrome Source Type: news

Jacob ’s story: What it’s like to have a stroke as a kid
My name is Jacob and I’m 8 years old. Two years ago, I had a stroke. At first, I didn’t realize what that meant, and I didn’t understand why I couldn’t move the way I used to. With time, I’ve been able to get most of my function back, but my right arm has something called dystonia. That means the muscles cramp up and sometimes my arm moves on its own or gets stiff. I can’t control it, and that makes life hard sometimes. I come to Boston Children’s Hospital every few months to see Dr. Michael Rivkin at the Stroke and Cerebrovascular Center there. Nobody likes having to go to the do...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 26, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jacob Downing Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Dr. Michael Rivkin stroke Stroke and Cerebrovascular Center Source Type: news

Getting her life back: Amelia overcomes chronic pain
The pain seemed to come from nowhere. Although fifth-grader Amelia Watt had sprained her ankle playing soccer a few weeks earlier, the injury had seemed inconsequential. Yet now, she couldn’t put any weight on her foot without crying. Soon, the burning pain crept up her leg and her foot began to turn purple. Even taking a shower had become excruciating. At age 11, this vibrant, active girl was relegated to crutches, afraid to walk. Eventually, Amelia’s local physicians diagnosed her with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), a chronic pain condition believed to be caused by malfunction of the nervous system. C...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 25, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories chronic pain Chronic Pain Clinic complex regional pain syndrome Dr. Edin Randall Pediatric Pain Rehabilitation Center (PPRC) Source Type: news

New concussion guidelines: Q & A with a sports medicine physician
For the last few years, concussions have been on the forefront of the minds of parents, coaches and athletes across the country, as their risks and prevalence become more well-known. This increase in visibility has raised a lot of concern about both the immediate and potential long-term effects of concussions sustained by children and adolescents. Luckily, research efforts have also increased, leading to a better understanding of how concussions should be managed in young athletes. At the 5th International Conference on Concussion in Sport held in Berlin, Germany, physicians and researchers around the world came together t...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 22, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Connor Ertz Tags: Ask the Expert Kids' Safety Division of Sports Medicine Dr. William Meehan sports concussion Sports Concussion Clinic Source Type: news

Listening to Tanner: Finding help for a functional gastrointestinal disorder
For most families, movie night is simply an opportunity to enjoy each other’s company while soaking up some mindless entertainment. But for Tanner Chung and his family, a trip to the theater was life changing. As they watched the tale of a young girl with a mysterious illness play out on the big screen, they were struck by the similarities to Tanner’s own story. The film was the 2016 drama Miracles From Heaven, which is based on the true experiences of a girl who was treated by Dr. Samuel Nurko at Boston Children’s Hospital for a motility disorder. “We had been hoping for some guidance, some help, f...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 21, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Dr. Samuel Nurko Dr. Travis Matheney functional gastrointestinal disorder Miracles from Heaven Motility and Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders Center Source Type: news

How to manage family life when your child has cancer
Valerie, with husband Doron, son Evan and daughter Ruby When our daughter, Ruby, was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at one and a half years old, my husband and I were immediately transformed from working parents with two young children, to parental caregivers for a child with cancer. Between hospital stays, medications and appointments, there was so much to keep track of. It can be overwhelming at times, but there are ways to manage life after your child is diagnosed with cancer. Settle into to this new normal. It can be easy to stay in crisis mode when something like a cancer diagnosis interrupts y...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 20, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Valerie Graf Tags: Diseases & Conditions Parenting Cancer Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center Source Type: news

A guide to childhood brain tumors
There are many different types and classifications of pediatric brain tumors, based upon cell structure, composition, rate of growth and location. A child’s tumor may have the same microscopic appearance to an adult tumor, but the mutations that cause its growth are completely different. Learn about the six most common types of childhood brain tumors. var metaslider_28538 = function($) { $('#metaslider_28538').flexslider({ slideshowSpeed:3000, animation:"fade", controlNav:true, di...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 19, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jenny Fernandez Tags: brain tumors Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center Source Type: news

When transplant isn ’t the only option
Nine-year-old Ariana Dufane is happiest when she’s tumbling, whether she’s launching herself off the ground for a cartwheel or practicing how to perform the perfect split. In that moment, the fourth-grader focuses on nothing but strength and balance, a skill she has refined, not just in gymnastics but in life. Born with intestinal pseudo-obstruction — a disorder of abnormal intestinal motility function that may cause the body to go into intestinal failure — Ariana’s first few months were spent in and out of emergency rooms. Her symptoms began with a distended belly and an inability to hav...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 18, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Emily Williams Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Boston Children's Motility and Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders Center Colorectal and Pelvic Malformation Center Intestinal and Multivisceral Transplant Program intestinal transplant Leonel Rodriguez pseudo-obstruc Source Type: news

Brain surgery for a cavernous malformation gets Timmy back to being a kid
Eight-year-old Timmy LaCorcia was having a bad day. He didn’t feel well and had to leave school early. It was frustrating — he usually had perfect attendance — but not alarming. After all, it was March, a time when children often struggle with colds and other illnesses. “We just thought he had a stomach bug,” says his mother, Gina. But a week later, he still felt sick. This time, his head hurt. At home, Gina got him settled on the sofa and gently pulled a blanket over him as he dozed. Several minutes later, she checked back in on him and noticed that his foot was twitching. Turning him over, s...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 15, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories cavernous malformations Cerebrovascular Surgery and Interventions Center Dr. Edward Smith Source Type: news

Endometriosis and the gift of motherhood
When my first period came at age 13, it involved blood clots and extreme pain. I didn’t know what to expect or what was considered “normal,” but thankfully, my mother did. She recognized that my symptoms were unusual and immediately took me to see my pediatrician. I was first prescribed birth control pills, which seemed to help initially, but when my period remained heavy and painful, I was put on a different birth control pill that enabled me to have my period only four times a year. I thought my situation was normal – albeit uncomfortable and inconvenient. No one ever suggested that painful period...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 14, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Alice Hales Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Teen Health endometriosis Marc Laufer Source Type: news

Calvin ’s gift: Second opinion provides answers and hope
It’s not often that parents breathe a sigh of relief when their child is diagnosed with a chronic, potentially debilitating condition. But that sense of peace is just what Paula and Scott Hurd felt when they were told that their son, Calvin, had a rare movement disorder. “We were so happy to finally understand what was happening,” says Paula. Slipping away The search for answers had begun several years earlier, when Calvin started limping. At first, his family thought he had simply tripped over something and injured himself. But when he didn’t improve, they took him to the doctor. A series of appoi...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 13, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories cerebral palsy Cerebral Palsy Program Dr. Benjamin Shore Dr. David Coulter dystonia Second opinion Source Type: news

Learning from our Lotte
Sam, Lotte and Caroline Parenting is a messy adventure – it tests our patience, our will and our energy, but never our concern, love or passion for our children. With three kids under 10, my wife, Caroline, and I have managed broken noses, split lips, cuts and bruises too numerous to count … even Lyme disease, skin disorders, and serious fevers – most seem to come with the territory. But there have been rare moments when one of our kids was sick and we didn’t know what was wrong or how to ease the pain, and in those moments, we felt pretty desperate. One of those times was when our 4-year-old daugh...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 12, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Sam Bigelow Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Richard Yu vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) Source Type: news

Making a difference, one blood donor at a time
When Mat Jacowleff walks into the Blood Donor Center (BDC) at Boston Children’s Hospital, the room lights up. Whoever is sitting at the front desk gets up to shake his hand, and as he walks by the donation room, waves and smiles fill the space. Mat, a Connecticut native now studying business at Northeastern University, loves spending time at the BDC and they love having him. This all started around six months ago. At a doctor’s appointment at Boston Children’s, Mat noticed a Give Pints for Half Pints sign that read, “One pint of donated blood can help up to four children.” Recently named ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 7, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Andrea Vega Tags: blood donation Blood Donor Center Cynthia MacKinlay Source Type: news

Hope for Kevin ’s heart: Five-year-old shines after novel treatment for Ebstein’s anomaly
As the lights dimmed and Pharrell Williams’ “Happy” blasted from loudspeakers, Kevin Nolan III took to the stage for his very first dance recital. Sporting striped pants, a turquoise bow tie and a black top hat, Kevin joined his class in performing two hip-hop jazz routines to a packed house. Kevin’s mood was perfectly in step with the song’s lyrics. “He had so much fun,” says Kevin’s mom, Laura. “He said he can’t wait to get on stage again.” While a first dance recital is a big deal for any 5-year-old, it’s especially poignant for Kevin, who was diagn...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 6, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Ellen Greenlaw Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Dr. Pedro del Nido Dr. Wayne Tworetsky Ebstein's anomaly Fetal Cardiology Program Source Type: news

Athletes at risk: Knowing the dangers of heat stroke
For many young athletes, fall sports practices have already started. Whether it’s football two-a-days, soccer practices on a sweltering turf field, or cross country training in the late summer sun, the threat of heat exhaustion and heat stroke is prevalent across all sports. It’s an important time for athletes and parents to be aware of the signs of heat illnesses, especially given that children and adolescents are more susceptible to heat stroke than adults. Younger athletes produce more heat during activity, sweat less, and adjust less rapidly to changes in environmental heat. Certain sports also carry unique...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 5, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Connor Ertz Tags: Ask the Expert Division of Sports Medicine Dr. Michael Beasley football heat exposure Source Type: news

Why parents really need to talk to their children about the news
These are strange, anxiety-provoking times. That’s true no matter where one lives or where one sits on the political spectrum; for all of us, it’s upsetting and confusing. If it feels that way for adults, just imagine what it’s like for children who catch snatches of information and conversations they don’t really understand. That’s why it’s really, really important that parents talk to their children about what is going on in our country and our world. It’s important for two reasons: First of all, children hear and see more than we think they do — and can be easily become up...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 1, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Claire McCarthy Tags: In the News Parenting Dr. Claire McCarthy Source Type: news

A parent ’s guide to clinical trials
Children with life-threatening conditions, such as cancer, are often candidates for clinical trials. What are they? Which factors should parents weigh in determining whether enrolling in one is a good option for their child? Dr. Steven DuBois, director of the Advancing Childhood Cancer Therapies Clinic at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, answers questions about clinical trials. What are clinical trials? Why are they important? Clinical trials are systematic, scientific investigations of new drugs or therapies for a specific disease. Through clinical trials, we have taken many fatal ped...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 1, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Irene Sege Tags: Ask the Expert Research and Innovation clinical trial Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center Dr. Steven DuBois Source Type: news