13 June 2019: Mighty magnets, and aerosols in the atmosphere
This week, a record-breaking magnetic field, and aerosols ’ potential effects on the atmosphere.In this episode:00:45 Making massive magnetsResearchers have created the world ’s strongest direct current magnetic field. Research article: S. Hahn et al.08:38 Research HighlightsMacaques ’ musicality and human consumption of microplastics. Research Article: Divergence in the functional organization of human and macaque auditory cortex revealed by fMRI responses to harmonic tones; Research Highlight: What a bottled-water habit means for intake of ‘microplastics’10:55 A...
Source: Nature Podcast - June 12, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Improving the implementation of school-based policies and practices to improve student health
Alongside learning about mathematics, history, languages and many other things, schools are a recommended setting for interventions to improve health. However, it can be difficult to implement these interventions and, in November 2017, Luke Wolfenden of the University of Newcastle in Callaghan, Australia and colleagues published their new Cochrane Review looking into how this might be done. Luke tells us what they found in this podcast. (Source: Podcasts from The Cochrane Library)
Source: Podcasts from The Cochrane Library - June 11, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: Cochrane Source Type: podcasts

Updates On Patient Care From ASCO: New Ways To Educate Patients Like Micro-learning Videos, Analysis About Cost-Effective Breast Cancer Screening
Neelima Denduluri MD @ndenduluri1 Of US Oncology Research Discusses Updates On Patient Care From ASCO: New Ways To Educate Patients Like Micro-learning Videos, Analysis About Cost-Effective Breast Can... Author: Annual-Meeting Added: 06/07/2019 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - June 8, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

Caring For Every Patient And Learning From Every Patient
Yousuf Zafar, MD, discusses the importance of patient care.Financial barriers to clinical trial enrollment are an area of active investigation. Financial toxicity as a concept describes how high c... Author: Annual-Meeting Added: 06/07/2019 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - June 7, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

Toxicity Of Nivolumab & Ipilimumab: Were Still Learning How To Leverage These Treatments In The Pre-Operative Setting
Tina Cascone MD Of The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center Discusses Toxicity Of Nivolumab & Ipilimumab: Were Still Learning How To Leverage These Treatments In The Pre-Operative Setting.... Author: Annual-Meeting Added: 06/06/2019 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - June 6, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

06 June 2019: Microbes modifying medicine and kickstarting plate tectonics
This week, how gut microbes might be affecting drugs, and a new theory on the beginning of plate tectonics.In this episode:00:45 Microbes metabolising drugsResearchers are investigating whether the gut microbiota can alter the activity of medicinal drugs.Research article:Zimmermann et al. 06:40 Research HighlightsElephants counting with smell, and audio activity monitoring.Research Highlight:Elephants have a nose for portion sizeResearch Highlight:Deep learning monitors human activity based on sound alone08:57 The origin of plate tectonics?A new theory suggests that sediment may have lubricated the Earth ’s tect...
Source: Nature Podcast - June 5, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

GENTleMEN Study: www.Gentlemen.org, Get A Saliva Kit Mailed To You & Learn If You Carry Cancer Risk Mutations
Heather Cheng MD Of Seattle Cancer Care Alliance Discusses GENTleMEN Study: www.Gentlemen.org..., Get A Saliva Kit Mailed To You & Learn If You Carry Cancer Risk Mutations. Author: Annual-Meeting Added: 06/03/2019 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - June 4, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

SITC Advances In Cancer Immunotherapy: Great Opportunity For Clinicians To Learn About All The Different Aspects Of Immunotherapy
Elizabeth Buchbinder MD Of DFCI Discusses SITC Advances In Cancer Immunotherapy: Great Opportunity For Clinicians To Learn About All The Different Aspects Of Immunotherapy. Author: Annual-Meeting Added: 06/03/2019 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - June 4, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

"Remembering" with Donald Mackay (BS 157)
Donald Mackay (click to play interview)This month ’s episode of Brain Sciencefeatures Dr. Donald Mackay, author of Remembering: What 50 Years of Research with Famous Amnesia Patient H.M. Can Teach Us about Memory and How It Works. H.M. may have been the most studied patient in history, but Mackay's work uncovers some surprising discoveries about the role of the hippocampus in language, as well as important implications for the aging brain.How to get this episode:FREE: audio mp3 (click to stream, right click to download)Coming Soon: Episode Transcript — delayed by illnessPremium Subscribers have unlimi...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - May 24, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Books Cognitive Science Interviews Language Memory Neuroscience Podcast Show Notes Source Type: podcasts

Helping parents with children who display challenging behaviour
Looking after a young child is hard enough, but when that child has learning difficulties and displays challenging behaviour - the burden on parents can be extreme. That behaviour may prompt a visit to the doctor, and in this podcast we’re talking about how parents can be supported in that - what services are available. We’ll also be discussing... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - May 17, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Can fMRI Read Your Mind? (BS 156 with Russ Poldrack)
Russell Poldrack (click to play audio) This month’s episode of Brain Science is an interview with Stanford psychologist Russell A Poldrack, author of The New Mind Readers: What Neuroimaging Can and Cannot Reveal about Our Thoughts. We talk about the principles of how fMRI works and how new methods are overcoming some of the problems from the early days in the field. Because Dr. Poldrack has been in the field since its infancy, he is uniquely placed to give us both an overview of the history and an analysis of its progress. We emphasize several important principles that must be honored in orde...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - April 26, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Books brain imaging Interviews Neuroscience Podcast Show Notes Psychology Source Type: podcasts

Immunotherapy Combinations_ Is this the Future for Treating Lung Cancer_ [360p]
As we learn more about immunotherapy for lung cancer, combinations with multiple immunotherapy agents are being explored. Medical oncologist Dr. Eddie Garon considers whether combinations are likely t... Author: cancergrace Added: 04/01/2019 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - April 1, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

Learning curves in 500 robot-assisted partial nephrectomies: the bed-side assistant counts
Philip Zeuschner, MD of Universitt des Saarlandes, Saarbrcken (UKS) discusses Learning curves in 500 robot-assisted partial nephrectomies: the bed-side assistant counts at the Kidney Cancer Associat... Author: kidneycancer Added: 04/01/2019 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - April 1, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

Neuroscience and AI with Paul Middlebrooks (BS 155)
Paul Middlebrooks host of Brain-Inspired podcast BS 155 is an interview with neuroscientist Paul Middlebrooks, host of the Brain-Inspired podcast. We explore the main theme of his show, which is the intersection between neuroscience and artificial intelligence (AI).We explore topics such as Deep Learning and the challenges of interdisciplinary science. Neural nets and other forms of AI may be inspired by real neurons, but they are actually very different. On the other hand the scientists working AI have developed techniques for dealing with large amounts of data. These techniques have pot...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - March 22, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Artificial Intelligence Interviews Neuroscience Podcast Show Notes Source Type: podcasts

Talk Evidence - Radiation, fertility, and pneumonia
Helen Macdonald and Carl Heneghan are back again talking about what's happened in the world of evidence this month. They start by talking about how difficult a task it is to find evidence that's definitely practice changing, what GPs can learn from Malawian children with nonsevere fast-breathing pneumonia, how radiation dosage varies... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - February 27, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Spotting slavery from space, and using iPads for communication disorders
In our first segment from the annual meeting of AAAS (Science ’s publisher) in Washington, D.C., host Sarah Crespi talks with Cathy Binger of University of New Mexico in Albuquerque about her session on the role of modern technology, such as iPads and apps, in helping people with communication disorders. It turns out that there’s no killer app, but some de vices do help normalize assistive technology for kids. Also this week, freelance journalist Sarah Scoles joins Sarah Crespi to talk about bringing together satellite imaging, machine learning, and nonprofits to put a stop to modern-day slavery. In our month...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - February 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Goran Henriks - How an 80 year old woman called Esther shaped Swedish Healthcare
J önköping has been at the centre of the healthcare quality improvement movement for years - but how did a forested region of Sweden, situated between it's main cities, come to embrace the philosophy of improvement so fervently? Goran Henriks, chief executive of learning and innovation at Qulturum in Jönköping joins us to explain. He also tells... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - January 25, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Peering inside giant planets, and fighting Ebola in the face of fake news
It ’s incredibly difficult to get an inkling of what is going on inside gas giants Saturn and Jupiter. But with data deliveries from the Cassini and Juno spacecraft, researchers are starting to learn more. Science Staff Writer Paul Voosen talks with host Sarah Crespi about new gravity measurements fr om Cassini’s last passes around Saturn. Using these data, researchers were able to compare wind patterns on Saturn and Jupiter and measure the mass and age of Saturn’s rings. It turns out the rings are young, relatively speaking—they may have formed as recently as 10 million years ago, after d inosaurs ...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - January 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Personalized Prognoses for Myelodysplastic Syndromes Using Machine Learning
Aziz Nazha MD of Cleveland Clinic discusses using Personalized Prognoses for Myelodysplastic Syndromes Using Machine Learning at ASH 2018 Author: ASHReport Added: 12/14/2018 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - December 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

Diabetes Core Update – December 2018
Diabetes Core Update is a monthly podcast that presents and discusses the latest clinically relevant articles from the American Diabetes Association’s four science and medical journals – Diabetes, Diabetes Care, Clinical Diabetes, and Diabetes Spectrum. Each episode is approximately 15 minutes long and presents 5-6 recently published articles from ADA journals. Intended for practicing physicians and health care professionals, Diabetes Core Update discusses how the latest research and information published in journals of the American Diabetes Association are relevant to clinical practice and can be applied in a ...
Source: Diabetes Core Update - November 29, 2018 Category: Endocrinology Authors: American Diabetes Association Source Type: podcasts

The worst year ever and the effects of fasting
When was the worst year to be alive? Contributing Correspondent Ann Gibbons talks to host Sarah Crespi about a contender year that features a volcanic eruption, extended darkness, cold summer, and a plague. Also on this week’s show, host Meagan Cantwell talks with Andrea Di Francesco of the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute on Aging in Baltimore, Maryland, about his review of current wisdom on fasting and metabolism. Should we start fasting—if not to extend our lives maybe to a t least to give ourselves a healthy old age?  In a special segment from our policy desk, Deputy Editor D...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - November 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

HAL will see you now
Machines that can learn and correct themselves already perform better than doctors at some tasks, but not all medicine is task based - but will AI doctors ever be able to have a therapeutic relationship with their patients? In this debate, Jörg Goldhahn, deputy head of the Institute for Translational Medicine at ETH Zurich thinks that the... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - November 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

How the appendix could hold the keys to Parkinson ’s disease, and materials scientists mimic nature
For a long time, Parkinson ’s disease was thought to be merely a disorder of the nervous system. But in the past decade researchers have started to look elsewhere in the body for clues to this debilitating disease—particularly in the gut. Host Meagan Cantwell talks with Viviane Labrie of the Van Andel Institute in Grand R apids, Michigan, about new research suggesting people without their appendixes have a reduced risk of Parkinson’s. Labrie also describes the possible mechanism behind this connection. And host Sarah Crespi talks with Peter Fratzl of the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces in...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - November 1, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Machine Learning & AI Contributions To Research
Diana Roettger, PhD, Head of Scientific and Medical Affairs and Imaging Clinical Research Expert at AIG Discusses Machine Learning & AI Contributions To Research. At ESMO Oncology Conference - Munich,... Author: kidneycancer Added: 10/26/2018 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - October 26, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

Explore the Synaptome with Seth Grant (BS 150)
Seth Grant (click image to play interview) Dr. Seth Grant, director of the Genes To Cognition project in the UK, has been studying the molecular biology of the synapse for decades. This month marks his fourth appearance on Brain Science (BS 150). In his latest interview we discuss the findings of his latest paper in Neuron, and he also provides an overview of how this paper fits into his larger body of work. Longtime listeners will appreciate this update, but the material is also accessible to new listeners of all backgrounds.In earlier work Grant and his team discovered that vertebrate synapses ar...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - October 26, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Brain Evolution Brain Research Interviews learning Memory Neuroscience Podcast Show Notes Source Type: podcasts

"Peer Pairing" -- The Discovery Files
Researchers have found neural evidence of early learning among infants who were coupled with a peer, as compared to those infants who viewed the instruction alone. Critically, the more often that new, unfamiliar partners were paired with the infants, the better results the babies showed. (Source: The Discovery Files)
Source: The Discovery Files - October 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: National Science Foundation Source Type: podcasts

What's it like to live with a vaginal mesh?
What can we learn from the shameful story of vaginal mesh? That thousands of women have been irreversibly harmed; that implants were approved on the flimsiest of evidence; that surgeons weren ’t adequately trained and patients weren’t properly informed; that the dash for mesh, fuelled by its manufacturers, stopped the development of alternatives;... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - October 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

What we can learn from a cluster of people with an inherited intellectual disability, and questioning how sustainable green lawns are in dry places
A small isolated town in Colombia is home to a large cluster of people with fragile X syndrome —a genetic disorder that leads to intellectual disability, physical abnormalities, and sometimes autism. Spectrum staff reporter Hannah Furfaro joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss the history of fragile X in the town of Ricaurte and the future of the people who live there. Also this week, we talk about greening up grass. Lawns of green grass pervade urban areas all around the world, regardless of climate, but the cost of maintaining them may outweigh their benefits. Host Meagan Cantwell talks with Maria Ignatieva of The Uni...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - October 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Encore interview with Eve Marder (BS 148)
Eve Marder as drawn by B Marder Last month (BS 147) I discussed Charlotte Nassim's wonderful biography of pioneering neuroscientist Dr Eve Marder, so this month I am sharing the interview I did with her back in 2009. I originally learned of Dr. Marder's work when I went to Neuroscience 2008, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience. At that time Dr. Marder was serving as the president of SfN so we talk a bit about that during our conversation. We also talk about what it was like for her as a member of the first large cohort of women entering science. Everything in this interview remains t...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - August 24, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Brain Research Interviews Neuroscience Podcast Show Notes Source Type: podcasts

ADD-How much can myeloma patients learn from support groups?
In this weeks video, Dr. Brian G.M. Durie discusses the ways patients can learn from one another at IMF-affiliated support groups.The BOTTOM LINE: Support groups are a great way to find out about... Author: InternationalMyelomaFoundation Added: 08/06/2018 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - August 6, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

The South Pole ’s IceCube detector catches a ghostly particle from deep space, and how rice knows to grow when submerged
A detection of a single neutrino at the 1-square-kilometer IceCube detector in Antarctica may signal the beginning of “neutrino astronomy.” The neutral, almost massless particle left its trail of debris in the ice last September, and its source was picked out of the sky by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope soon thereafter. Science News Writer Daniel Clery joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss the blazar fingered as the source and how neutrinos from this gigantic matter-gobbling black hole could help astronomers learn more about mysterious high-energy cosmic rays that occasionally shriek toward Earth. Read the r...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - July 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Academic Excellence Due to Efforts or Intelligence: Curious? Read on
There has been a long standing debate in intellectual circles: what leads to superior performance? Is it due to talent or intelligence or is it due to efforts and hard work? Reams of books have been written on the subject including some of my favorites:  ‘Talent is overrated’, ‘Outliers’ etc. Applied to the classroom the question becomes why did Tom get an A or aced the JEE/GRE , was it because he is smarter that Harry or was it because he studied more and better? Answers to questions like these have profound implications for how children learn and grow-  believing that effort matters more...
Source: The Mouse Trap - July 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: sandygautam Tags: education #PosEd character strengths curiosity deliberate practice efforts grit Intelligence Positive Education talent Source Type: podcasts

What Good (and Bad) are Positive Emotions?
There is a seminal article by Barbara Fredrickson titled ‘What good are positive emotions?’ which introduces the broaden-and-build theory of positive emotions. As per this theory, while negative emotions are associated with specific action tendencies, positive emotions broaden the thought-action repertoire available at that moment and help build physical, social and intellectual resources over the long run. To take an example, joy is associated with creativity, and more loose associations, etc, all involving a move away from rigidity and fixedness to flexibility and fluency in thinking ;  joy is also assoc...
Source: The Mouse Trap - June 17, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: sandygautam Tags: emotion adaptations emotions evolution play Source Type: podcasts

Understanding gene-gene interactions via machine learning: Pandoras box?
Speaking from the 2018 European School of Hematology (ESH) Clinical Updates on Acute Leukemias, held in Budapest, Hungary, Andrew Wei, MBBS, PhD, FRACP, FRCPA, from Monash University, Melbourne, Austr... Author: VJHemOnc Added: 06/11/2018 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - June 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

Patients Can Learn More About Gentlemens Study from www.gentlemenstudy.org
Heather H. Cheng MD, PhD, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, explains how Patients Can Learn More About Gentlemen's Study from www.gentlemenstudy.org... at ASCO 2018. Author: Annual-Meeting Added: 06/04/2018 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - June 4, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

The Reading Brain with Maryanne Wolf (BS 145)
Dr Maryanne Wolf (click to play audio) In her recent book Tales of Literacy for the 21st Century, Dr. Maryanne Wolf revisits some of the key ideas of her wonderful first book Proust and the Squid: The Story and Science of the Reading Brain. Since Dr. Wolf was one of my earliest guests back in BSP 29, I was eager to talk with her again. In BS 145 we touch on several key ideas. First, she emphasized again that reading is very different from language. All normal humans learn their first language, almost automatically as long as they are exposed to language during the critical period early in life, but...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - May 25, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Brain Plasticity Interviews learning Neuroscience Podcast Show Notes Reading and the Brain Source Type: podcasts

Language in the Brain (BS 144) with Angela Friederici
Angela Friederici’s new book Language in Our Brain: The Origins of a Uniquely Human Capacity captures decades of research. Although the book is quite technical, our recent conversation (BS 144) provides an excellent overview to listeners of all backgrounds. Our earliest knowledge was acquired from patients with brain lesions, but newer tools allow researchers to correlate concepts from Linguistics, such as phonology, syntax and semantics, with the neuroscientific tools such as EEG and imaging.EEG evidence shows that phonology (sound) and syntax (grammar) are processed very quickly (by ~150ms) and automatically, while...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - April 27, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Books brain imaging Brain Research Interviews Linquistics Neuroscience Podcast Show Notes Source Type: podcasts

Transforming outcomes in advanced lung cancer: immunotherapy in unselected patients
Immunotherapeutic agents are increasingly becoming incorporated into clinical practice; however, there is still much to learn, including their optimal combinations, sequencing and usage. In this inter... Author: VJOncology Added: 04/20/2018 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - April 20, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

Caution Using Medicine Off-Label Limits learning from clinical studies
Marlise R. Luskin, MD, MSCE, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, discusses Caution Using Medicine Off-Label Limits learning from clinical studies at Imedex Great Debates 2018. Author: hematologydebates Added: 04/19/2018 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - April 20, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

Cognitive-behavioural therapy for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults
The Cochrane Developmental, Psychosocial and Learning Problems Group covers a wide range of topics relevant to the mental health of both adults and children in the more than 140 Cochrane Reviews it has produced to date. In March 2018, it added to these with a new review of cognitive-behavioural interventions for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in adults. We asked one of the authors, Pablo Lopez from INECO Foundation and Favaloro University in Buenos Aires, Argentina, to tell us more in this podcast. (Source: Podcasts from The Cochrane Library)
Source: Podcasts from The Cochrane Library - April 10, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Cochrane Source Type: podcasts

Veno-occlusive disease e-learning for nurses
Veno-occlusive disease (VOD) is a serious complication that can occur following stem cell transplantation, for which the appropriate management is essential. Here, John Murray, RGN, MSc, President of ... Author: VJHemOnc Added: 03/29/2018 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - March 29, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

His Bundle Pacing 'Very Viable' Alternative to RV Pacing
Learn about late-breaking registry data from ACC 2018, comparing patients who underwent His bundle or right ventricular pacing with study authors and HBP pioneers Drs Dandamudi and Vijayaraman. (Source: Medscape Cardiology Podcast)
Source: Medscape Cardiology Podcast - March 22, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Medscape Source Type: podcasts

Educational intervention for carers of lung cancer patients: learning about breathlessness
Breathlessness is a scary symptom for lung cancer patients and their family, who often act as informal carers. Speaking from the British Thoracic Oncology Group (BTOG) Annual Conference 2018, held in ... Author: VJOncology Added: 03/19/2018 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - March 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

The ABCD ’s of CB5T
Today’s post is about the Cybernetic Big Five Theory (CB5T) theory of personality structure [pdf and pdf] as proposed by Colin DeYoung et al. Colin and colleagues have proposed a structure of personality that is hierarchical and is build around the popular Big Five traits of Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness/Intellect, Conscientiousness and Agreeableness. English: A diagram to illustrate the layout of a hierarchical organisation. (Photo credit: Wikipedia) The top level of the hierarchy consists of metatraits of Stability and Plasticity also called Alpha and Beta. Stability is related to the shared variance bet...
Source: The Mouse Trap - March 10, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: sandygautam Tags: personality ABCD model Big Five personality traits CB5T Source Type: podcasts

Molecular subtypes of ALL: coming to a consensus
We are continually learning new facts about the molecular basis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and how it is evolving. In this insightful interview, Bijal Shah, MD, of the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer... Author: VJHemOnc Added: 03/09/2018 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - March 9, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

Research Summaries: Mental contrasting facilitates academic performance in school children
Today’s research summary builds on the work of Gabrielle Oettingen on WOOP/mental contrasting with implementation intentions. The paper [pdf] is co-authored by Angela Duckworth et al and successfully demonstrates the utility and incremental benefit of mental contrasting over mere positive thinking in achieving desired outcomes. The Power of Positive Thinking (EP) (Photo credit: Wikipedia) When one wants to achieve goals, then the first step is to clearly articulate the desired goal. It has been shown that merely having a goal vs not having a clear goal is instrumental in goal achievement.   Another process that...
Source: The Mouse Trap - March 4, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: sandygautam Tags: Research Summaries Angela Duckworth WOOP Source Type: podcasts