TWiV 648: Life is for learning
Daniel Griffin provides a clinical report on COVID-19, followed by a review of the findings that children shed as much SARS-CoV-2 viral RNA from the respiratory tract as older patients, the lineage giving rise to SARS-CoV-2 has been circulating in bats in China for decades, and answers to listener questions. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, Rich Condit, and Brianne Barker Guest: Daniel Griffin and Chuck Knirsch Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Roche trial of Actemra for COVID-19 fails (...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - August 2, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

How Hiroshima survivors helped form radiation safety rules, and a path to stop plastic pollution
Contributing Correspondent Dennis Normile talks about a long-term study involving the survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings. Seventy-five years after the United States dropped nuclear bombs on the two cities in Japan, survivors are still helping scientists learn about the effects of radiation exposure. Also this week, Sarah talks with Winnie Lau, senior manager for preventing ocean plastics at Pew Charitable Trusts about her group’s paper about what it would take to seriously fight the flow of plastics into the environment. This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy. Listen to previou...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - July 21, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Tackling racism with Annabel Sowemimo, Shani Scott and Joan Saddler OBE
The signs and symptoms of racism have long permeated our society, and are embedded in our clinical practice and medical education. Recent events in the US, including the murder of George Floyd, have brought the Black Lives Matter movement to the fore of public consciousness, and have sparked outrage and protests in countries around the world. COVID-19 has exposed the inequalities in our healthcare systems, as the virus has had a disproportionate impact on some ethnic minority communities. In this week ’s episode, we discuss colonial undertones to contraception policy-making, how doctors remaining silent on racial iss...
Source: The BMJ Podcast - July 16, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Making the drug and device system fit for patients
A series of medical scandals prompted Jeremy Hunt, former UK health secretary to launch the Independent Medicines and Medical Devices Safety Review - with the explicit aim of strengthening the patient voice in order to help build a "system that listens, hears and acts – with speed, compassion and proportionality" That report is out, and describes a system that does anything but. In this podcast, Sir Cyril Chantler, the review's vice chair discusses their recommendations, for better regulation, transparency and patient advocacy in the use of medicines and medi cal devices. Read the full report: https://ww...
Source: The BMJ Podcast - July 15, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

SCCM Pod-418 COVID-19 Learning: Conversion of a Children's Hospital to an Adult Hospital
Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx, New York, USA, quickly converted a children's hospital to an adult COVID-19 hospital. (Source: SCCM PodCast - iCritical Care)
Source: SCCM PodCast - iCritical Care - July 9, 2020 Category: Intensive Care Authors: The Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) Tags: Medicine Source Type: podcasts

The six-year-old space agency with hopes for Mars
On this week’s podcast, an ambitious Mars mission from a young space agency, and how crumbling up rocks could help fight climate change.In this episode:00:46 Mars hopesIn a few weeks the UAE’s first mission to Mars is due to launch. We speak to the mission leads to learn about the aims of the project, and how they developed the mission in under six years. News Feature: How a small Arab nation built a Mars mission from scratch in six years; News Feature: Countdown to Mars: three daring missions take aim at the red planet09:53 Research HighlightsPluto appears to be losing its atmosphere, and s...
Source: Nature Podcast - July 8, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Coronapod: The state of the pandemic, six months in
In a few weeks, we’ll be wrapping up Coronapod in its current form. Please fill out our short survey to let us know your thoughts on the show.In this episode:03:13 What have we learnt?We take a look back over the past six months of the pandemic, and discuss how far the world has come. It’s been a period of turmoil and science has faced an unprecedented challenge. What lessons can be learned from the epidemic so far to continue the fight in the months to come?Financial Times: Coronavirus tracked: the latest figures as countries start to reopenWellcome Open Research: What settings have been linked to SARS-CoV-2 t...
Source: Nature Podcast - June 26, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

"Are You Sure? The Unconscious Origins of Certainty" (BS 173)
Virginia “Ginger” Campbell, MD This month’s special episode of Brain Science features excerpt from the bestseller Are You Sure? The Unconscious Origin of Certainty by longtime host Dr. Ginger Campbell.. While it might seem ironic to talk about certainty during these extremely uncertain times, understanding how our brain generates the feeling of knowing or certainty is actually more relevant than ever.Are You Sure? The Unconscious Origins of Certainty is based on several early episodes of Brain Science and highlights the work of retired neurologist D...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - June 26, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Books Cognitive Science Consciousness Decision Making Neuroscience Podcast Show Notes Psychology Source Type: podcasts

The quantum space lab
This week, the spaceborne lab that allows investigation of quantum states, and the debate surrounding how mountain height is maintained.Shutdown StemOn the tenth of June, Nature joined #ShutdownStem #strike4blacklives.Podcast: #ShutDownSTEM and the Nature Podcasthttps://www.shutdownstem.com/Editorial: Systemic racism: science must listen, learn and changeNews: Thousands of scientists worldwide to go on strike for Black livesIn this episode:01:18 Space labScientists have built a lab on the international space station, allowing them to remotely investigate quantum phenomena in microgravity. Research Artic...
Source: Nature Podcast - June 11, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

#ShutDownSTEM and the Nature Podcast
On the tenth of June, Nature will be joining #ShutdownStem #strike4blacklives. We will be educating ourselves and defining actions we can take to help eradicate anti-Black racism in academia and STEM . Please join us.https://www.shutdownstem.com/Editorial: Systemic racism: science must listen, learn and changeNews: Thousands of scientists worldwide to go on strike for Black lives  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - June 10, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Coronapod: The heavy toll on people of colour
In this episode:00:45 Black Lives MatterThe killing of George Floyd, a black man, by police in Minnesota has sent a shockwave of anger around the globe. As unrest continues, we discuss the protests in Washington DC and ask how scientists are reacting.04:01 The outsized toll of covid-19 on people of colourReports from around the globe are showing that ethnic minorities are at much higher risk of infection and death from the coronavirus. But why might that be? And what can be done about it?News: How to address the coronavirus’s outsized toll on people of colourWorld View: How environmental racism is fuelling ...
Source: Nature Podcast - June 5, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

SCCM Pod-416 COVID-19 Learning: Multiple Patients on a Single Ventilator
In a situation where ventilators are in short supply, multiple patients on a single ventilator could be a strategy of last resort. (Source: SCCM PodCast - iCritical Care)
Source: SCCM PodCast - iCritical Care - May 28, 2020 Category: Intensive Care Authors: The Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) Tags: Medicine Source Type: podcasts

"The Brain from the Inside Out" with Gy örgy Buzsáki (BS 172)
György Buzsáki (click to listen, Right click to download mp3) In this month’s episode of Brain Science I talk with neuroscientist György Buzsáki about his new book The Brain from Inside Out. We explore how abandoning what he calls the "Outside In" approach to understanding the brain can lead to surprising new insights. This includes a new appreciation for the importance of the brain’s spontaneous activity and the implications for learning and memory.Note: Dr. Buzsáki first interview ( BSP 31 ) is now available free as an episode extra in t...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - May 22, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Brain Research Interviews Neuroscience Podcast Show Notes Rhythms and Oscillations Source Type: podcasts

"The Brain from Inside Out" with Gy örgy Buzsáki (BS 172)
György Buzsáki (click to listen, Right click to download mp3) In this month’s episode of Brain Science I talk with neuroscientist György Buzsáki about his new book The Brain from Inside Out. We explore how abandoning what he calls the "Outside In" approach to understanding the brain can lead to surprising new insights. This includes a new appreciation for the importance of the brain’s spontaneous activity and the implications for learning and memory.Note: Dr. Buzsáki first interview ( BSP 31 ) is now available free as an episode extra in t...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - May 22, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Brain Research Interviews Neuroscience Podcast Show Notes Rhythms and Oscillations Source Type: podcasts

Psychosocial response to epidemics – lessons from Ebola applied to COVID-19
In this podcast, CPD Online Deputy Editor Dr Howard Ryland talks to Dr Peter Hughes about his experience of working in West Africa during the Ebola outbreak. They discuss what comparisons can be drawn between Ebola and COVID-19 and examine the lessons we can learn from the psychosocial response seen in West Africa – from the perspective of patients, healthcare workers and wider society. (Source: Raj Persaud talks to...)
Source: Raj Persaud talks to... - April 28, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Royal College of Psychiatrists Tags: Science & Medicine Source Type: podcasts

Matthew Cobb on "The Idea of the Brain" (BS 171
Matthew Cobb (click to play, R click to download This episode of Brain Science is an interview with neuroscientist Matthew Cobb author of "The Idea of the Brain: The Past and Future of Neuroscience."Cobb approaches the history of neuroscience from a different perspective than previous writers. He writes from the perspective of a working scientist with a deep interest in the history of ideas and the interaction between science and culture. This approach makes for a fascinating discussion.Through out history assumptions about the brain have been influenced by both culture a...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - April 24, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Books Interviews Neuroscience Podcast Show Notes Source Type: podcasts

How COVID-19 disease models shape shutdowns, and detecting emotions in mice
On this week ’s show, Contributing Correspondent Kai Kupferschmidt talks with host Sarah Crespi about modeling coronavirus spread and the role of forecasts in national lockdowns and other pandemic policies. They also talk about the launch of a global trial of promising treatments. See all of our News coverage of the pandemic here. See all of our Research and Editorials here. Also this week, Nadine Gogolla, research group leader at the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology, talks with Sarah about linking the facial expressions of mice to their emotional states using machine learning. This week’s episod e was pr...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - March 31, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

"A Brain for Numbers" with Andreas Nieder (BS 170)
Andreas Nieder (click to play, R click to download) BS 170 is an interview with Andreas Nieder, author of A Brain for Numbers: The Biology of the Number Instinct. We talk about the surprising discovery that a wide variety of animals have a number instinct, which is called the approximate number system. This appears to provide the basis for the more abstract mathematical abilities that are seen in humans. We also explore the relationship between mathematics and language. How to get this episode:FREE: audio mp3 (click to stream, right click to download)Episode Transcript Coming Soon!Premium Su...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - March 27, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Brain Research Neuroscience Podcast Show Notes Source Type: podcasts

Coronapod: “Test, test, test!”
In the first of our new podcast series, Benjamin Thompson, Noah Baker, and Amy Maxmen discuss the epidemiology needed to control the Covid-19 outbreak.In this episode:03:57 Testing timesCase numbers of Covid-19 have leapt around the world in recent days, but how many undetected cases are out there? We talk about the urgent need to deploy two of the cornerstones of effective epidemiology – testing and contact tracing – and discuss why these measures aren’t being rolled out worldwide.News article: Scientists exposed to coronavirus wonder: why weren’t we notified?; News article: South Korea is reportin...
Source: Nature Podcast - March 20, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Glial Cells with Doug Fields (BS 169)
Click to play interview. Right Click to download mp3. BS 169 is an exploration of glial cells with R Douglas Fields, author of The Other Brain: The Scientific and Medical Breakthroughs That Will Heal Our Brains and Revolutionize Our Health. Glial cells outnumber the neurons in our nervous system, but until the last few years they were thought to merely support cells. Dr. Fields takes us through the discovery that they have their own signaling methods and are much more important than we ever imagined.This interview first aired in 2010, but Dr. Fields reviewed the original transcript and made no sign...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - March 13, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Books Brain Research Glial Cells Interviews Neuroscience Podcast Show Notes Source Type: podcasts

"Cognitive Gadgets" with Cecilia Heyes (BS 168
Cecelia Heyes (click to play, right click to download audio) BS 168 is an interview with psychologist Cecilia Heyes from Oxford University in the UK. We talk about her fascinating book "Cognitive Gadgets: The Cultural Evolution of Thinking." Our focus is on exploring the evidence that several cognitive skills that appear to be unique to humans are learned from other people rather than being inherited genetically as is often assumed. Her proposal that language is a cognitive gadget NOT a cognitive instinct is controversial and has very important implications.Cognitive Gadget...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - February 28, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Books Brain Evolution Cognitive Science Interviews Language learning Podcast Show Notes Psychology Source Type: podcasts

20 February 2020: Improving battery charging, and harnessing energy from the air
This week, machine learning helps batteries charge faster, and using bacterial nanowires to generate electricity from thin air.In this episode:00:46 Better battery chargingA machine learning algorithm reveals how to quickly charge batteries without damaging them. Research Article: Attia et al.07:12 Research HighlightsDeciphering mouse chit-chat, and strengthening soy glue. Research Highlight: The ‘silent’ language of mice is decoded at last; Research Article: Gu et al.09:21 Harnessing humidityA new device produces electricity using water in the air. Research Article: Liu ...
Source: Nature Podcast - February 19, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Stanislas Dehaene on "How We Learn" (BS 167)
Stanislas Dehaene (Click to play, R click to download MP3) BS 167 is an interview with Stanislas Dehaene about his new book How We Learn: Why Brains Learn Better Than Any Machine . . . for Now.  According to neuroscientist Dehaene neuroscience has revealed that human babies are incredible "learning machines" whose abilities exceed those of the best current artificial intelligence. We explore why this is so and how this information could be used to help learners (and teachers) of all ages. How to get this episode:FREE: audio mp3 (click to stream, right click to download)Buy Ep...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - February 14, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Books Brain Plasticity Cognitive Science Development Interviews learning Neuroscience Podcast Show Notes Source Type: podcasts

ASFH Deep Learning for Geographic Atrophy
Emily Y. Chew, MD Director, Division of Epidemiology and Clinical Applications Medical Officer National Eye Institute (NEI), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (Source: As Seen From Here)
Source: As Seen From Here - February 2, 2020 Category: Opthalmology Authors: JYoungMD at gmail.com Source Type: podcasts

Stephen Macknik works on Prosthetic Vision (BS 166)
Stephen Macknik, PhD (click image to play, Right click to download mp3) This week neuroscientist Stephen Macknik returns on Brain Science 166 to discuss an exciting new approach to prosthetic vision. Unlike traditional approaches electrodes are not required. He explains how this work is based on recent discoveries in vision research along with techniques like optogenetics.Episode 166 is more technical than usual but Dr. Macknik makes his work accessible to all listeners. How to get this episode:FREE: audio mp3 (click to stream, right click to download)Episode Transcript: Coming SoonPremium Subsc...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - January 24, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Brain Research Cognitive Science Interviews Neuroscience Podcast Show Notes Vision Source Type: podcasts

Neuroscience and Magic (BS 165)
Click to play audio. Right click to download. BS 165 is an encore presentation of an interview with neuroscientists Stephen L. Macknik and Susana Martinez-Conde. We talk about their international bestseller "Sleights of Mind: What the Neuroscience of Magic Reveals about Our Everyday Deceptions."  Macknik and Martinez-Conde study vision, but several years ago they had the innovative idea of collaborating with magicians to explore how their use of both visual and cognitive illusions reveals secrets about how our brains work.This may sound esoteric, but it has practical consequence...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - January 10, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Books Brain Research Interviews Neuroscience Podcast Show Notes Source Type: podcasts

13 Years of Brain Science with Dr. Ginger Campbell (BS 164
Click to play, right click to download audio I am releasing this month’s episode of Brain Science a week early so that you can enjoy it during your Holiday travels. It is our 13th Annual Review episode. I share highlights from the episodes released in 2019 (153-163) plus some personal reflections on the recent 4-part series about Consciousness.I also announced that in 2020 Brain Science will come out twice a month, on the 2nd and 4th Friday. Although the Brain Science Podcast was produced every other week during its first two years, it has been a monthly show for the last 10+ years. I hope th...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - December 20, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Source Type: podcasts

Christof Koch on the Neuroscience of Consciousness (BS 163)
Christof Koch (click to play interview, right click to download mp3) Christof Koch returns to Brain Science for the 3rd time and in BS 163 he shares his new book The Feeling of Life Itself: Why Consciousness Is Widespread but Can't Be Computed. He tells us why he doesn't think the Neural Correlates of Consciousness (NCC) are enough to explain subjective experience and he gives us a brief overview of the Integrated Information Theory (IIT) of Consciousness. How to get this episode:FREE: audio mp3 (click to stream, right click to download)Buy Episode Transcript for $3 (Premium Link) (Also availabl...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - November 22, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Books Consciousness Interviews Neuroscience Podcast Show Notes Philosophy of Mind Source Type: podcasts

Building a landslide observatory, and the universality of music
You may have seen the aftermath of a landslide, driving along a twisty mountain road —a scattering of rocks and scree impinging on the pavement. And up until now, that’s pretty much how scientists have tracked landslides—roadside observations and spotty satellite images. Now, researchers are hoping to track landslides systematically by instrumenting an entire national park in Taiwan. The park is riddled with landslides—so much so that visitors wear helmets. Host Sarah Crespi talks with one of those visitors—freelance science journalist Katherine Kornei—about what we can learn from landsl...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - November 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Building a landslide observatory, and the universality of music
You may have seen the aftermath of a landslide, driving along a twisty mountain road —a scattering of rocks and scree impinging on the pavement. And up until now, that’s pretty much how scientists have tracked landslides—roadside observations and spotty satellite images. Now, researchers are hoping to track landslides systematically by instrumenting an entire national park in Taiwan. The park is riddled with landslides—so much so that visitors wear helmets. Host Sarah Crespi talks with one of those visitors—freelance science journalist Katherine Kornei—about what we can learn from landsl...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - November 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Learning Curves
(Source: The Discovery Files)
Source: The Discovery Files - November 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: National Science Foundation Source Type: podcasts