The South Pole ’s IceCube detector catches a ghostly particle from deep space, and how rice knows to grow when submerged
A detection of a single neutrino at the 1-square-kilometer IceCube detector in Antarctica may signal the beginning of “neutrino astronomy.” The neutral, almost massless particle left its trail of debris in the ice last September, and its source was picked out of the sky by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope soon thereafter. Science News Writer Daniel Clery joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss the blazar fingered as the source and how neutrinos from this gigantic matter-gobbling black hole could help astronomers learn more about mysterious high-energy cosmic rays that occasionally shriek toward Earth. Read the r...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - July 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Academic Excellence Due to Efforts or Intelligence: Curious? Read on
There has been a long standing debate in intellectual circles: what leads to superior performance? Is it due to talent or intelligence or is it due to efforts and hard work? Reams of books have been written on the subject including some of my favorites:  ‘Talent is overrated’, ‘Outliers’ etc. Applied to the classroom the question becomes why did Tom get an A or aced the JEE/GRE , was it because he is smarter that Harry or was it because he studied more and better? Answers to questions like these have profound implications for how children learn and grow-  believing that effort matters more...
Source: The Mouse Trap - July 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: sandygautam Tags: education #PosEd character strengths curiosity deliberate practice efforts grit Intelligence Positive Education talent Source Type: podcasts

What Good (and Bad) are Positive Emotions?
There is a seminal article by Barbara Fredrickson titled ‘What good are positive emotions?’ which introduces the broaden-and-build theory of positive emotions. As per this theory, while negative emotions are associated with specific action tendencies, positive emotions broaden the thought-action repertoire available at that moment and help build physical, social and intellectual resources over the long run. To take an example, joy is associated with creativity, and more loose associations, etc, all involving a move away from rigidity and fixedness to flexibility and fluency in thinking ;  joy is also assoc...
Source: The Mouse Trap - June 17, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: sandygautam Tags: emotion adaptations emotions evolution play Source Type: podcasts

Understanding gene-gene interactions via machine learning: Pandoras box?
Speaking from the 2018 European School of Hematology (ESH) Clinical Updates on Acute Leukemias, held in Budapest, Hungary, Andrew Wei, MBBS, PhD, FRACP, FRCPA, from Monash University, Melbourne, Austr... Author: VJHemOnc Added: 06/11/2018 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - June 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

Patients Can Learn More About Gentlemens Study from www.gentlemenstudy.org
Heather H. Cheng MD, PhD, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, explains how Patients Can Learn More About Gentlemen's Study from www.gentlemenstudy.org... at ASCO 2018. Author: Annual-Meeting Added: 06/04/2018 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - June 4, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

The Reading Brain with Maryanne Wolf (BS 145)
Dr Maryanne Wolf (click to play audio) In her recent book Tales of Literacy for the 21st Century, Dr. Maryanne Wolf revisits some of the key ideas of her wonderful first book Proust and the Squid: The Story and Science of the Reading Brain. Since Dr. Wolf was one of my earliest guests back in BSP 29, I was eager to talk with her again. In BS 145 we touch on several key ideas. First, she emphasized again that reading is very different from language. All normal humans learn their first language, almost automatically as long as they are exposed to language during the critical period early in life, but...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - May 25, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Brain Plasticity Interviews learning Neuroscience Podcast Show Notes Reading and the Brain Source Type: podcasts

Language in the Brain (BS 144) with Angela Friederici
Angela Friederici’s new book Language in Our Brain: The Origins of a Uniquely Human Capacity captures decades of research. Although the book is quite technical, our recent conversation (BS 144) provides an excellent overview to listeners of all backgrounds. Our earliest knowledge was acquired from patients with brain lesions, but newer tools allow researchers to correlate concepts from Linguistics, such as phonology, syntax and semantics, with the neuroscientific tools such as EEG and imaging.EEG evidence shows that phonology (sound) and syntax (grammar) are processed very quickly (by ~150ms) and automatically, while...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - April 27, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Books brain imaging Brain Research Interviews Linquistics Neuroscience Podcast Show Notes Source Type: podcasts

Transforming outcomes in advanced lung cancer: immunotherapy in unselected patients
Immunotherapeutic agents are increasingly becoming incorporated into clinical practice; however, there is still much to learn, including their optimal combinations, sequencing and usage. In this inter... Author: VJOncology Added: 04/20/2018 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - April 20, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

Caution Using Medicine Off-Label Limits learning from clinical studies
Marlise R. Luskin, MD, MSCE, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, discusses Caution Using Medicine Off-Label Limits learning from clinical studies at Imedex Great Debates 2018. Author: hematologydebates Added: 04/19/2018 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - April 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

Cognitive-behavioural therapy for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults
The Cochrane Developmental, Psychosocial and Learning Problems Group covers a wide range of topics relevant to the mental health of both adults and children in the more than 140 Cochrane Reviews it has produced to date. In March 2018, it added to these with a new review of cognitive-behavioural interventions for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in adults. We asked one of the authors, Pablo Lopez from INECO Foundation and Favaloro University in Buenos Aires, Argentina, to tell us more in this podcast. (Source: Podcasts from The Cochrane Library)
Source: Podcasts from The Cochrane Library - April 10, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Cochrane Source Type: podcasts

Veno-occlusive disease e-learning for nurses
Veno-occlusive disease (VOD) is a serious complication that can occur following stem cell transplantation, for which the appropriate management is essential. Here, John Murray, RGN, MSc, President of ... Author: VJHemOnc Added: 03/29/2018 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - March 29, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

His Bundle Pacing 'Very Viable' Alternative to RV Pacing
Learn about late-breaking registry data from ACC 2018, comparing patients who underwent His bundle or right ventricular pacing with study authors and HBP pioneers Drs Dandamudi and Vijayaraman. (Source: Medscape Cardiology Podcast)
Source: Medscape Cardiology Podcast - March 22, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Medscape Source Type: podcasts

Educational intervention for carers of lung cancer patients: learning about breathlessness
Breathlessness is a scary symptom for lung cancer patients and their family, who often act as informal carers. Speaking from the British Thoracic Oncology Group (BTOG) Annual Conference 2018, held in ... Author: VJOncology Added: 03/19/2018 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - March 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

The ABCD ’s of CB5T
Today’s post is about the Cybernetic Big Five Theory (CB5T) theory of personality structure [pdf and pdf] as proposed by Colin DeYoung et al. Colin and colleagues have proposed a structure of personality that is hierarchical and is build around the popular Big Five traits of Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness/Intellect, Conscientiousness and Agreeableness. English: A diagram to illustrate the layout of a hierarchical organisation. (Photo credit: Wikipedia) The top level of the hierarchy consists of metatraits of Stability and Plasticity also called Alpha and Beta. Stability is related to the shared variance bet...
Source: The Mouse Trap - March 10, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: sandygautam Tags: personality ABCD model Big Five personality traits CB5T Source Type: podcasts

Molecular subtypes of ALL: coming to a consensus
We are continually learning new facts about the molecular basis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and how it is evolving. In this insightful interview, Bijal Shah, MD, of the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer... Author: VJHemOnc Added: 03/09/2018 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - March 9, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

Research Summaries: Mental contrasting facilitates academic performance in school children
Today’s research summary builds on the work of Gabrielle Oettingen on WOOP/mental contrasting with implementation intentions. The paper [pdf] is co-authored by Angela Duckworth et al and successfully demonstrates the utility and incremental benefit of mental contrasting over mere positive thinking in achieving desired outcomes. The Power of Positive Thinking (EP) (Photo credit: Wikipedia) When one wants to achieve goals, then the first step is to clearly articulate the desired goal. It has been shown that merely having a goal vs not having a clear goal is instrumental in goal achievement.   Another process that...
Source: The Mouse Trap - March 4, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: sandygautam Tags: Research Summaries Angela Duckworth WOOP Source Type: podcasts

Genomics and acute leukemia management: artificial intelligence, deep learning & amp; pre-leukemic clones
An interesting session on the impact of genomic data on the management of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was held at the 1st International Workshop on Acute Leukem... Author: VJHemOnc Added: 03/02/2018 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - March 2, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

What can be learnt about using interferon in patients with myelofibrosis?
Treating patients who suffer from myelofibrosis with interferon used to be considered inappropriate due to the drug being poorly tolerated. Now, speaking from the American Society of Hematology (ASH) ... Author: VJHemOnc Added: 03/02/2018 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - March 2, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

A new dark matter signal from the early universe, massive family trees, and how we might respond to alien contact
For some time after the big bang there were no stars. Researchers are now looking at cosmic dawn —the time when stars first popped into being—and are seeing hints of dark matter’s influence on supercold hydrogen clouds. News Writer Adrian Cho talks with Sarah Crespi about how this observation was made and what it means for our understanding of dark matter. Sarah also interviews Joanna Ka planis of the Wellcome Sanger Institute in Hinxton, U.K., about constructing enormous family trees based on an online social genealogy platform. What can we learn from the biggest family tree ever built—w...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - March 1, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

What can we learn about CLL by studying environmental stimuli?
Although genetics and epigenetics serve an important role in the efficacy of novel agents such as ibrutinib, other factors must also be considered. Here, Francesco Forconi, MD, DM, PhD, FRCPath, of th... Author: VJHemOnc Added: 02/27/2018 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - February 27, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

Genes that turn off after death, and debunking the sugar conspiracy
Some of our genes come alive after we die. David Grimm —online news editor for Science—talks with Sarah Crespi about which genes are active after death and what we can learn about time of death by looking at patterns of postmortem gene expression. Sarah also interviews David Merritt Johns of Columbia University about the so-called sugar conspiracy. Historical evidence suggests, despite recent media reports, it is unlikely that “big sugar” influenced U.S. nutrition policy and led to the low-fat diet fad of the ’80s and ’90s. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Lauri Andler (Phant...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - February 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Following 1000 people for decades to learn about the interplay of health, environment, and temperament, and investigating why naked mole rats don ’t seem to age
David Grimm —online news editor for Science—talks with Sarah Crespi about the chance a naked mole rat could die at any one moment. Surprisingly, the probability a naked mole rat will die does not go up as it gets older. Researchers are looking at the biology of these fascinating animals for clues to their s eeming lack of aging. Sarah also interviews freelancer Douglas Starr about his feature story on the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study—a comprehensive study of the lives of all the babies born in 1 year in a New Zealand hospital. Starr talks about the many insights that have c ome ...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - February 1, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Role of Surgery in Localized vs. Advanced Prostate Cancer
What is the standard of care for localized and advanced prostate cancer? Where does surgery come in to play? Learn more about what treatment options are available as Dr. Celestia Higano from Seattle C... Author: patientpower Added: 01/12/2018 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - January 12, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

The chicken and the egg: processing cancer imaging data so that more can be processed
Modern machinery learning techniques allow for the processing of large quantities of cancer images, at a much faster rate than could be done manually. However, as Julia Schnabel, PhD, of Kings Colleg... Author: VJOncology Added: 01/10/2018 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - January 10, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

Neural networks and deep learning in cancer imaging analysis
Artificial neural networks that can process information have existed for a long time. However, in recent years greater computing power has allowed for the creation of deep learning convolutional neu... Author: VJOncology Added: 01/10/2018 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - January 10, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

Modern machinery learning techniques in cancer imaging
Although there are few data sets available to researchers in cancer imaging compared with other fields, experts are able to make the most of the data they have available, as explained in this intervie... Author: VJOncology Added: 01/10/2018 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - January 10, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

Dealing With an MPN Diagnosis in Your 20s and Beyond: Samanthas Story
Although essential thrombocythemia (ET) is typically diagnosed later in life, there are young adults living with the disease. How do younger patients learn to cope and manage their MPN in the midst of... Author: patientpower Added: 01/05/2018 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - January 5, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

ROR1: An Update From ASH 2017
What have researchers discovered about ROR1 and its role in targeted CLL therapies? Andrew Schorr hosts coverage from the 2017 American Society of Hematology (ASH) conference to learn about the latest... Author: P2Professional Added: 01/05/2018 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - January 5, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

The developing role of pharmacist prescribers
Communicating and learning from shared experiences aids in the improvement of medical practices. In this interview, Bryn Thomas of The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK provides an overvi... Author: VJHemOnc Added: 01/03/2018 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - January 3, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

The Making of a Genius: Required Ingredients
What goes into the making of a genius? More mundanely, what factors are required for success in any field? Your answer will differ based on what factors you consider to be the most important for success. Photo of the obverse of a Fields Medal made by Stefan Zachow for the International Mathematical Union (IMU), showing a bas relief of Archimedes (as identified by the Greek text) (Photo credit: Wikipedia) No one can deny the large role that intelligence and talent play in the making of a genius, or to achieve moderate levels of success compared to peers. We can probably club these two factors together as ability, that is mo...
Source: The Mouse Trap - January 3, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: sandygautam Tags: intelligence curiosity deliberate practice efforts flow Genius grit self-control talent Source Type: podcasts

ROR1: An Update From ASH 2017
What have researchers discovered about ROR1 and its role in targeted CLL therapies? Andrew Schorr hosts coverage from the 2017 American Society of Hematology (ASH) conference to learn about the latest... Author: patientpower Added: 12/29/2017 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - December 29, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

Deep Learning Algorithms for Detection of Lymph Node Metastases From Breast Cancer
Interview with Jeffrey Alan. Golden, MD, author of Deep Learning Algorithms for Detection of Lymph Node Metastases From Breast Cancer: Helping Artificial Intelligence Be Seen (Source: JAMA Author Interviews)
Source: JAMA Author Interviews - December 12, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: The JAMA Network Source Type: podcasts

An E-learning tool for hematology-oncology nurses
A key finding of a recent Bloodwise study into the specific needs of hematological cancer patients highlighted the importance of access to a Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS). However, with busy wards a... Author: VJHemOnc Added: 12/11/2017 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - December 11, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

The need for collaboration amongst hospitals: learning from RATIFY
The recent RATIFY study (NCT00651261), which led to the approval of midostaurin for the treatment of FLT3-mutated AML patients, was made possible through the cooperation of many hospitals sharing pati... Author: VJHemOnc Added: 12/06/2017 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - December 6, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

Transferring lessons learnt from treating ALL to AML
Reflecting upon past research is key to the development of new treatments. In this interview at the International Conference of Acute Myeloid Leukaemia 2017, Estoril, Portugal by the European School o... Author: VJHemOnc Added: 12/05/2017 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - December 5, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

T-cell engaging antibodies: what lessons have we learnt?
The use of T-cell engaging antibodies for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) treatment is in the very early stages. In this interview, Marion Subklewe, MD, of the University of Munich, Munich, Germany, high... Author: VJHemOnc Added: 11/28/2017 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - November 28, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

Should Medical Schools Eliminate Lectures?
The University of Vermont Medical School has eliminated lectures in favor of active learning. Will other medical schools follow? (Source: Medscape Family Medicine Podcast)
Source: Medscape Family Medicine Podcast - November 15, 2017 Category: Primary Care Authors: Medscape Source Type: podcasts

'Now Is the Time to Learn' About CGM
The FreeStyle Libre, a newly approved device for continuous glucose monitoring, is a big advance for people with diabetes who want to avoid finger sticks, says Dr Anne Peters. (Source: Medscape Diabetes & Endocrinology Podcast)
Source: Medscape Diabetes & Endocrinology Podcast - November 10, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Authors: Medscape Source Type: podcasts

Expert Outlook: New and Promising MPN Therapies in Clinical Trials
Interested in learning more about developing options to treat myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs)? Treating MPNs isnt a one-size-fits-all approach, and research done through clinical trials continues... Author: P2Professional Added: 10/25/2017 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - October 25, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

"Double Speak" -- The Discovery Files
It is often claimed that bilinguals are better than monolinguals at learning languages. Now, the first study to examine bilingual and monolingual brains as they learn an additional language offers new evidence that supports this hypothesis. (Source: The Discovery Files)
Source: The Discovery Files - October 19, 2017 Category: Science Authors: National Science Foundation Source Type: podcasts

Twitter Has Given Me Power To Learn And Connect
Joanne Taylor, secondary breast cancer patient and Advocate, speaks from ESMO 2017 Author: patientpower Added: 10/19/2017 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - October 19, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

"Double Speak" -- The Discovery Files
It is often claimed that bilinguals are better than monolinguals at learning languages. Now, the first study to examine bilingual and monolingual brains as they learn an additional language offers new evidence that supports this hypothesis. (Source: The Discovery Files)
Source: The Discovery Files - October 19, 2017 Category: Science Authors: National Science Foundation Source Type: podcasts

Physician Experts Tell How to Combat Burnout
There are many unique challenges physicians face that lead to emotional and physical exhaustion. Learn from experts how to recognize the signs of burnout, how to beat burnout, and more. (Source: Medscape Family Medicine Podcast)
Source: Medscape Family Medicine Podcast - September 29, 2017 Category: Primary Care Authors: Medscape Source Type: podcasts

Seth Grant's latest Research (BS 137)
Seth Grant has made a career by combining his skills in molecular biology, medicine and neuroscience. Brain Science listeners may remember him best for his explorations of the evolution of the synapse (BSP 51) and in BSP 101 he told us about how small genetic changes related to synapse proteins can influence learning, but this month he shares a new paper, which describes what he calls the "genetic lifespan calendar.” The key idea is that the genes in both the mouse and human brain appear to follow a predictable schedule. Grant’s team also found that they could predict the age of a brain by looking at ...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - September 25, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Brain Evolution Brain Plasticity Brain Research Interviews Neuroscience Podcast Show Notes Synapses Source Type: podcasts

Cargo-sorting molecular robots, humans as the ultimate fire starters, and molecular modeling with quantum computers
This week we hear stories on the  gut microbiome’s involvement in multiple sclerosis, how wildfires start—hint: It’s almost always people—and a new record in quantum computing with Online News Editor David Grimm. Andrew Wagner talks to Lulu Qian about DNA-based robots that can carry and sort cargo. Sarah Crespi goes be hind the scenes with Science’s Photography Managing Editor Bill Douthitt to learn about snapping this week’s cover photo of the world’s smallest neutrino detector. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Curtis Perry/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook] (Sour...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - September 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Nature Podcast: 7 September 2017
Protecting red haired people from cancer, machine learning and gravitational distortions, and peeking inside predatory journals. (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - September 6, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nature Publishing Group Source Type: podcasts

Why Reading Science Matters (BS 136)
Click to listen to podcast The latest episode of Brain Science (BS 136) is  discussion of Language at the Speed of Sight: How We Read, Why So Many Can’t, and What Can Be Done About It by Mark Seidenberg . Unfortunately I was unable to reach  the author, so this is a return the show's early days when it was not dominated by interviews.  This book contains information that is important to anyone who cares about how children learn to read. One key theme is that there is a large gap between current reading science and educational practice.In this podcast we explore the relationshi...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - August 28, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Cognitive Science Computation Development Language learning Neuroscience Podcast Show Notes Reading and the Brain Source Type: podcasts