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Genes that turn off after death, and debunking the sugar conspiracy
Some of our genes come alive after we die. David Grimm —online news editor for Science—talks with Sarah Crespi about which genes are active after death and what we can learn about time of death by looking at patterns of postmortem gene expression. Sarah also interviews David Merritt Johns of Columbia University about the so-called sugar conspiracy. Historical evidence suggests, despite recent media reports, it is unlikely that “big sugar” influenced U.S. nutrition policy and led to the low-fat diet fad of the ’80s and ’90s. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Lauri Andler (Phant...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - February 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Following 1000 people for decades to learn about the interplay of health, environment, and temperament, and investigating why naked mole rats don ’t seem to age
David Grimm —online news editor for Science—talks with Sarah Crespi about the chance a naked mole rat could die at any one moment. Surprisingly, the probability a naked mole rat will die does not go up as it gets older. Researchers are looking at the biology of these fascinating animals for clues to their s eeming lack of aging. Sarah also interviews freelancer Douglas Starr about his feature story on the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study—a comprehensive study of the lives of all the babies born in 1 year in a New Zealand hospital. Starr talks about the many insights that have c ome ...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - February 1, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Role of Surgery in Localized vs. Advanced Prostate Cancer
What is the standard of care for localized and advanced prostate cancer? Where does surgery come in to play? Learn more about what treatment options are available as Dr. Celestia Higano from Seattle C... Author: patientpower Added: 01/12/2018 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - January 12, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

The chicken and the egg: processing cancer imaging data so that more can be processed
Modern machinery learning techniques allow for the processing of large quantities of cancer images, at a much faster rate than could be done manually. However, as Julia Schnabel, PhD, of Kings Colleg... Author: VJOncology Added: 01/10/2018 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - January 10, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

Neural networks and deep learning in cancer imaging analysis
Artificial neural networks that can process information have existed for a long time. However, in recent years greater computing power has allowed for the creation of deep learning convolutional neu... Author: VJOncology Added: 01/10/2018 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - January 10, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

Modern machinery learning techniques in cancer imaging
Although there are few data sets available to researchers in cancer imaging compared with other fields, experts are able to make the most of the data they have available, as explained in this intervie... Author: VJOncology Added: 01/10/2018 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - January 10, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

Dealing With an MPN Diagnosis in Your 20s and Beyond: Samanthas Story
Although essential thrombocythemia (ET) is typically diagnosed later in life, there are young adults living with the disease. How do younger patients learn to cope and manage their MPN in the midst of... Author: patientpower Added: 01/05/2018 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - January 5, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

ROR1: An Update From ASH 2017
What have researchers discovered about ROR1 and its role in targeted CLL therapies? Andrew Schorr hosts coverage from the 2017 American Society of Hematology (ASH) conference to learn about the latest... Author: P2Professional Added: 01/05/2018 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - January 5, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

The developing role of pharmacist prescribers
Communicating and learning from shared experiences aids in the improvement of medical practices. In this interview, Bryn Thomas of The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK provides an overvi... Author: VJHemOnc Added: 01/03/2018 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - January 3, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

The Making of a Genius: Required Ingredients
What goes into the making of a genius? More mundanely, what factors are required for success in any field? Your answer will differ based on what factors you consider to be the most important for success. Photo of the obverse of a Fields Medal made by Stefan Zachow for the International Mathematical Union (IMU), showing a bas relief of Archimedes (as identified by the Greek text) (Photo credit: Wikipedia) No one can deny the large role that intelligence and talent play in the making of a genius, or to achieve moderate levels of success compared to peers. We can probably club these two factors together as ability, that is mo...
Source: The Mouse Trap - January 3, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: sandygautam Tags: intelligence curiosity deliberate practice efforts flow Genius grit self-control talent Source Type: podcasts

ROR1: An Update From ASH 2017
What have researchers discovered about ROR1 and its role in targeted CLL therapies? Andrew Schorr hosts coverage from the 2017 American Society of Hematology (ASH) conference to learn about the latest... Author: patientpower Added: 12/29/2017 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - December 29, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

Deep Learning Algorithms for Detection of Lymph Node Metastases From Breast Cancer
Interview with Jeffrey Alan. Golden, MD, author of Deep Learning Algorithms for Detection of Lymph Node Metastases From Breast Cancer: Helping Artificial Intelligence Be Seen (Source: JAMA Author Interviews)
Source: JAMA Author Interviews - December 12, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: The JAMA Network Source Type: podcasts

An E-learning tool for hematology-oncology nurses
A key finding of a recent Bloodwise study into the specific needs of hematological cancer patients highlighted the importance of access to a Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS). However, with busy wards a... Author: VJHemOnc Added: 12/11/2017 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - December 11, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

The need for collaboration amongst hospitals: learning from RATIFY
The recent RATIFY study (NCT00651261), which led to the approval of midostaurin for the treatment of FLT3-mutated AML patients, was made possible through the cooperation of many hospitals sharing pati... Author: VJHemOnc Added: 12/06/2017 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - December 6, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

Transferring lessons learnt from treating ALL to AML
Reflecting upon past research is key to the development of new treatments. In this interview at the International Conference of Acute Myeloid Leukaemia 2017, Estoril, Portugal by the European School o... Author: VJHemOnc Added: 12/05/2017 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - December 5, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

T-cell engaging antibodies: what lessons have we learnt?
The use of T-cell engaging antibodies for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) treatment is in the very early stages. In this interview, Marion Subklewe, MD, of the University of Munich, Munich, Germany, high... Author: VJHemOnc Added: 11/28/2017 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - November 28, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

Should Medical Schools Eliminate Lectures?
The University of Vermont Medical School has eliminated lectures in favor of active learning. Will other medical schools follow? (Source: Medscape Family Medicine Podcast)
Source: Medscape Family Medicine Podcast - November 15, 2017 Category: Primary Care Authors: Medscape Source Type: podcasts

'Now Is the Time to Learn' About CGM
The FreeStyle Libre, a newly approved device for continuous glucose monitoring, is a big advance for people with diabetes who want to avoid finger sticks, says Dr Anne Peters. (Source: Medscape Diabetes & Endocrinology Podcast)
Source: Medscape Diabetes & Endocrinology Podcast - November 10, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Authors: Medscape Source Type: podcasts

Expert Outlook: New and Promising MPN Therapies in Clinical Trials
Interested in learning more about developing options to treat myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs)? Treating MPNs isnt a one-size-fits-all approach, and research done through clinical trials continues... Author: P2Professional Added: 10/25/2017 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - October 25, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

"Double Speak" -- The Discovery Files
It is often claimed that bilinguals are better than monolinguals at learning languages. Now, the first study to examine bilingual and monolingual brains as they learn an additional language offers new evidence that supports this hypothesis. (Source: The Discovery Files)
Source: The Discovery Files - October 19, 2017 Category: Science Authors: National Science Foundation Source Type: podcasts

Twitter Has Given Me Power To Learn And Connect
Joanne Taylor, secondary breast cancer patient and Advocate, speaks from ESMO 2017 Author: patientpower Added: 10/19/2017 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - October 19, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

"Double Speak" -- The Discovery Files
It is often claimed that bilinguals are better than monolinguals at learning languages. Now, the first study to examine bilingual and monolingual brains as they learn an additional language offers new evidence that supports this hypothesis. (Source: The Discovery Files)
Source: The Discovery Files - October 19, 2017 Category: Science Authors: National Science Foundation Source Type: podcasts

Physician Experts Tell How to Combat Burnout
There are many unique challenges physicians face that lead to emotional and physical exhaustion. Learn from experts how to recognize the signs of burnout, how to beat burnout, and more. (Source: Medscape Family Medicine Podcast)
Source: Medscape Family Medicine Podcast - September 29, 2017 Category: Primary Care Authors: Medscape Source Type: podcasts

Seth Grant's latest Research (BS 137)
Seth Grant has made a career by combining his skills in molecular biology, medicine and neuroscience. Brain Science listeners may remember him best for his explorations of the evolution of the synapse (BSP 51) and in BSP 101 he told us about how small genetic changes related to synapse proteins can influence learning, but this month he shares a new paper, which describes what he calls the "genetic lifespan calendar.” The key idea is that the genes in both the mouse and human brain appear to follow a predictable schedule. Grant’s team also found that they could predict the age of a brain by looking at ...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - September 25, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Brain Evolution Brain Plasticity Brain Research Interviews Neuroscience Podcast Show Notes Synapses Source Type: podcasts

Cargo-sorting molecular robots, humans as the ultimate fire starters, and molecular modeling with quantum computers
This week we hear stories on the  gut microbiome’s involvement in multiple sclerosis, how wildfires start—hint: It’s almost always people—and a new record in quantum computing with Online News Editor David Grimm. Andrew Wagner talks to Lulu Qian about DNA-based robots that can carry and sort cargo. Sarah Crespi goes be hind the scenes with Science’s Photography Managing Editor Bill Douthitt to learn about snapping this week’s cover photo of the world’s smallest neutrino detector. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Curtis Perry/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook] (Sour...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - September 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Nature Podcast: 7 September 2017
Protecting red haired people from cancer, machine learning and gravitational distortions, and peeking inside predatory journals. (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - September 6, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nature Publishing Group Source Type: podcasts

Why Reading Science Matters (BS 136)
Click to listen to podcast The latest episode of Brain Science (BS 136) is  discussion of Language at the Speed of Sight: How We Read, Why So Many Can’t, and What Can Be Done About It by Mark Seidenberg . Unfortunately I was unable to reach  the author, so this is a return the show's early days when it was not dominated by interviews.  This book contains information that is important to anyone who cares about how children learn to read. One key theme is that there is a large gap between current reading science and educational practice.In this podcast we explore the relationshi...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - August 28, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Cognitive Science Computation Development Language learning Neuroscience Podcast Show Notes Reading and the Brain Source Type: podcasts

HF and CKD: Learning With Nephrologists
Patients with kidney disease are often excluded from heart failure trials. Dr Ileana Pi ñ a was among the HF experts invited to a meeting with nephrologists to learn how to manage such patients. (Source: Medscape Cardiology Podcast)
Source: Medscape Cardiology Podcast - August 17, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Medscape Source Type: podcasts

Research Summaries: Can Adolescents Learn Self-control? Delay of Gratification in the Development of Control over Risk Taking
Today’s research summary is based on a paper by Angela Duckworth and colleagues, and examines the nature of self-control as assessed by risk-taking, sensation-seeking, future time perspective and delay of gratification in US adolescents. Embed from Getty Images Adolescents are known to indulge in risk taking activities like recreational drug use and various theories abound as to why adolescence is a particularly sensitive time. As per one theory, there is a dopamine surge in reward centers of the brain during adolescence which leads to impulsive sensation seeking behavior. Traditionally, it is believed that th...
Source: The Mouse Trap - August 12, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: sandygautam Tags: Research Summaries Angela Duckworth self-control Source Type: podcasts

"Letter Imperfect" -- The Discovery Files
New research from Washington University in St. Louis suggests that children as young as 3 already are beginning to recognize and follow important rules and patterns governing how letters in the English language fit together to make words. The study provides new evidence that children start to learn about some aspects of reading and writing at a very early age. (Source: The Discovery Files)
Source: The Discovery Files - August 11, 2017 Category: Science Authors: National Science Foundation Source Type: podcasts

Treat Hypoglycemia Fast, but How?
Juicy Juice ® or juicy apple? Join this conversation on hypoglycemia to learn best practices for treatment and optimal patient education. (Source: Medscape Family Medicine Podcast)
Source: Medscape Family Medicine Podcast - August 3, 2017 Category: Primary Care Authors: Medscape Source Type: podcasts

Treat Hypoglycemia Fast, but How?
Juicy Juice ® or juicy apple? Join this conversation on hypoglycemia to learn best practices for treatment and optimal patient education. (Source: Medscape Medscape Podcast)
Source: Medscape Medscape Podcast - August 3, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: Medscape Source Type: podcasts

Lisa Barrett on How Emotions are Made (BS 135)
Lisa Felman Barrett (click to play interview) In How Emotions are Made, neuroscientist Lisa Feldman Barrett challenges a key long-standing assumption about emotions. She argues persuasively that the evidence does not support the idea that emotions are universal and hardwired. She calls this the classical theory because versions of this idea have been around at least since the ancient Greeks, but the idea was also one that Darwin embraced. It is also embedded in several past episodes of this podcast, including the popular interviews with Jaak Panksepp.In the Brain Science 135 I spoke with Dr. Barret...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - July 31, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Limbic System Books Brain Evolution Emotion Interviews learning Neuroscience Podcast Show Notes Source Type: podcasts

DNA and proteins from ancient books, music made from data, and the keys to poverty traps
This week we hear stories on turning data sets into symphonies for business and pleasure, why so much of the world is stuck in the poverty trap, and calls for stiffening statistical significance with Online News Editor David Grimm. Sarah Crespi talks to news writer Ann Gibbons about the biology of ancient books—what can we learn from DNA, proteins, and book worm trails about a book, its scribes, and its readers? Listen to previous podcasts. [Music: Jeffrey Cook] (Source: Science Magazine Podcast)
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - July 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Science Source Type: podcasts

Deep Learning at Chest Radiography (August 2017)
ARTICLE DISCUSSED: Deep Learning at Chest Radiography: Automated Classification of Pulmonary Tuberculosis by Using Convolutional Neural Networks. Radiology 2017;284(2):574-582. (Source: Radiology Podcasts)
Source: Radiology Podcasts - July 19, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: The Radiological Society of North America Tags: Podcasts Source Type: podcasts

Research Summaries: The Economics and Psychology of Personality Traits
Today’s research summary is about a paper co-authored by Angela Duckworth, that is at the intersection of psychology and economics. Though I have been following behavioral economics a bit, I still found the paper a bit challenging to read and comprehend and don’t claim to understand all the attached jargon, functions and mathematical formulations. The fact that the paper is 88 pages long wasn’t of help either (the saving grace being that 20 or more pages were filled with references alone), so read the rest of the summary at your own peril! An illustration of Spearman’s two-factor intelligence theory...
Source: The Mouse Trap - July 18, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: sandygautam Tags: economics personality Research Summaries Angela Duckworth Big Five personality traits Intelligence quotient Source Type: podcasts

Research Summaries: Self-Discipline Gives Girls the Edge: Gender in Self-Discipline, Grades, and Achievement Test Scores
Today’s post summarizes a paper by Angela Duckworth and Martin Seligman, that parses the same set of data, as obtained in their earlier paper (see research summary of that paper here), to come up with new insights about gender differences in self-control and scholastic achievement. Dangal (Photo credit: Wikipedia)   Girls, typically outperform boys when it comes to getting good grades overall and within each subject. this is true of US; however from what I have seen of Indian board results, the same is true of almost every board exam in India, be it CBSE, ICSE or State Boards. The girls however do not outperfor...
Source: The Mouse Trap - July 16, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: sandygautam Tags: Research Summaries Angela Duckworth IQ Martin Seligman self-control Source Type: podcasts

ADD - Which type of chromosome damage can predispose a family member to myeloma?
In this weeks video, Dr. Brian Durie explains how certain variations in genes may predispose a person to myeloma.BOTTOM LINE: Stay tuned to learn the latest on research regarding myeloma prev... Author: InternationalMyelomaFoundation Added: 06/20/2017 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - June 20, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

Slowly retiring chimps, tanning at the cellular level, and plumbing magma ’s secrets
This week we have stories on why it ’s taking so long for research chimps to retire, boosting melanin for a sun-free tan, and tracking a mouse trail to find liars online with Online News Editor David Grimm. Sarah Crespi talks to Allison Rubin about what we can learn from zircon crystals outside of a volcano about how long hot magma hangs out under a volcano. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Project Chimps; Music: Jeffrey Cook] (Source: Science Magazine Podcast)
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - June 15, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Lab Test Reference Ranges: How Are They Determined?
What do lab tests reference ranges mean, and how are they established? Andrew Schorr, Patient Power Founder, poses this question to experts Dr. Susan Leclair and Dr. William Wierda. Learn more as they... Author: patientpower Added: 05/19/2017 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - May 19, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

Education Round - Exercising too much, microbiome, suicide and translation
The BMJ publishes a lot of educational articles, and in an attempt to help you with your CPD, we have put together this round-up. Our authors and editors will reflect on the key learning points in the articles we discuss, and explain how they may change their practice in light of that new understanding. In this month's round up we're... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - May 15, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Navigating the RCC Treatment Landscape: Learning from Experience #KidneyCancer
Brian Rini, MD, Bernard Escudier, MD, James Larkin, MD and Cora N Sternberg, MD outline the challenges and Navigating the RCC Treatment Landscape: Learning from Experience at the 12th European Interna... Author: kidneycancer Added: 04/28/2017 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - April 28, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

Helping Diabetes Patients Overcome Financial Barriers
Diabetes care is expensive. Learn how to help your patients be adherent and maintain a healthy lifestyle. (Source: Medscape Diabetes & Endocrinology Podcast)
Source: Medscape Diabetes & Endocrinology Podcast - April 25, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Authors: Medscape Source Type: podcasts

Podcast: When good lions go bad, listening to meteor crashes, and how humans learn to change the world
This week, meteors ’ hiss may come from radio waves, pigeons that build on the wings of those that came before, and a potential answer to the century-old mystery of what turned two lions into people eaters with Online News Editor David Grimm. Elise Amel joins Julia Rosen to discuss the role of evolution and psychol ogy in humans’ ability to overcome norms and change the world, as part of a special issue on conservation this week in Science. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: bjdlzx/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook] (Source: Science Magazine Podcast)
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - April 20, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Podcast: Watching shoes untie, Cassini ’s last dive through the breath of a cryovolcano, and how human bias influences machine learning
This week, walk like an elephant —very far, with seeds in your guts, Cassini’s mission to Saturn wraps up with news on the habitability of its icy moon Enceladus, and how our shoes manage to untie themselves with Online News Editor David Grimm. Aylin Caliskan joins Sarah Crespi to discuss how biases in our writing may be perpe tuated by the machines that learn from them. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech; Music: Jeffrey Cook] (Source: Science Magazine Podcast)
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - April 13, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Machine Learning of Right Ventricular Motion (May 2017)
ARTICLE DISCUSSED: Machine Learning of Three-dimensional Right Ventricular Motion Enables Outcome Prediction in Pulmonary Hypertension: A Cardiac MR Imaging Study. Radiology 2017;283(2):381-390. (Source: Radiology Podcasts)
Source: Radiology Podcasts - March 21, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: The Radiological Society of North America Tags: Podcasts Source Type: podcasts

Making Sense of Precision Medicine Test Results
Learn more about personalized medicine, also known as precision medicine, in this web interview with Patient Power Host Andrew Schorr and Dr. Razelle Kurzrock, Director of the Center for Personalized ... Author: patientpower Added: 03/20/2017 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - March 21, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts