How Autocracies Could Misuse Digital Health Innovations
How long do you think it will take for authoritarian governments, dictatorships or tyrannies until they realize the vast potential in digital health technologies and until they learn how to harness their powers? Twenty years? Ten years? We have to warn you, the era of 24/7 surveillance and intrusion into the innermost secrets of human life is even closer than that. Watch out! Dystopic worst case scenario-alert! Digital technologies are double-edged swords: they promised social change… On 17 December 2010, a Tunisian vegetable vendor set up his cart on the street in Sidi Bouzid to sell goods that he obtained the day ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - September 22, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Bioethics Future of Medicine Security & Privacy AR artificial intelligence big data biotechnology black mirror dystopia genes genetics genomics Health health sensors Healthcare insurance MR Personalized medicine scifi Source Type: blogs

Weekly Overseas Health IT Links – 22nd September, 2018
Here are a few I came across last week.Note: Each link is followed by a title and few paragraphs. For the full article click on the link above title of the article. Note also that full access to some links may require site registration or subscription payment.-----https://www.digitalhealth.net/2018/09/code-conduct-ai/Government publishes code of conduct for AI and data-driven healthcare techThe government has published a code of conduct on artificial intelligence and data-driven technologies in healthcare, with a view to creating a “safe and trusted environment in which innovation can flourish”.Claire Reid &nda...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - September 22, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David G More MB PhD Source Type: blogs

Why doctors can ’t take sick days
I learn all manner of interesting things from the information sheets posted on the walls of the employee bathrooms at my hospital. I learn, for example, about upcoming CME offerings for advance practice providers, how many seconds one has to scrub the hub of a central line, and what the new process is when nurses need to call in sick. They call a specific phone number and state that they cannot come to work. Done. Someone else’s problem now. This is amazing to me, because there is no such construct in place for physicians when we are sick. Every few months, my cell phone dings at a sickeningly early hour. My “h...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 21, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/lisa-sieczkowski" rel="tag" > Lisa Sieczkowski, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Hospitalist Practice Management Source Type: blogs

HUD ’s Inexperienced Bureaucrats
TheWashington Postslammed Ben Carson ’s Department of Housing and Urban Development today. The paper found that “loyalty eclipses expertise” in the upper ranks of the agency given that 24 of HUD’s 70 political appointees have little housing experience. Most of the 24 helped on either Trump’s or Carson’s presidential campaig ns.A few thoughts.Washington is a revolving door of analysts and operatives moving back and forth between trade associations and businesses (when their team is out) and executive branch agencies (when their team is in). Arguably, Carson ’s policy of bringing non...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - September 21, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Chris Edwards Source Type: blogs

Want to Be #RelationshipGoals? Avoid These Roadblocks
We all want to be that “perfect” couple, but there are a few ways we keep it from happening. I cannot count how many times a day I run across #relationshipgoals. We hashtag it wherever we see it, and we all let out a collective wistful sigh. But it seems like normalizing certain dating and relationship behaviors has prevented many of us from having the relationship goals we claim to want. If what we’re really interested in is having the kind of long-term relationship that inspires this sort of wistfulness in others, we’re going to need to level up. This means that we can’t just put minimal eff...
Source: World of Psychology - September 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Publishers Relationships YourTango Appreciation Communication Couples Equality Happiness Healthy Relationship Inequality Love Relationship Goals Responsibility Source Type: blogs

Nurse Researchers Connect The Dots
“It used to be you went to doctor, got a shot, and you were better or, unfortunately, you died. Now there’s a lot more chronic disease, and the beauty of the nursing PhD is that we learn a healing perspective, because a shot doesn’t cure you anymore,” says Melissa Hladek. “That’s so important, we see The post Nurse Researchers Connect The Dots appeared first on Johns Hopkins Nursing Magazine. (Source: Nursing Blogs at Johns Hopkins University)
Source: Nursing Blogs at Johns Hopkins University - September 21, 2018 Category: Nursing Authors: Editor Tags: On the Pulse PhD post-doctoral Source Type: blogs

EverSleep Wearable Sleep Tracker: Product Review and Interview with CEO
Readers might recall the 2017 Indiegogo campaign by SomnoHealth to create EverSleep, a wearable sleep tracker with built-in oxygenation monitoring. The campaign reached 224% of its original goal in addition to receiving a $50k Arrow Electronics Flash Funding Grant and recognition as a 2017 National Sleep Foundation SleepTech 2017 Semifinalist. Today, the EverSleep device is available for $199.99, while the accompanying mobile app can be downloaded from either the Apple or Google Play stores. In addition to monitoring blood oxygenation, the device captures data to provide insight into movement while sleeping, snoring, pulse...
Source: Medgadget - September 21, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Michael Batista Tags: Cardiology Exclusive Medicine Rehab Source Type: blogs

Risk Management in Medical Devices Industry: a 2-Day In-Person Seminar
Risk management is a mandatory and necessary process during the entire device life. Not only will it help to design and maintain devices efficiently, but it also ensures that the device will be as safe as possible and prevents harms to patients, users, and the environment. Like any process that tries to produce repeatable and consistent results, the risk management process must be clearly understood, including the strengths but also the limitations. By attending this seminar you will learn the main elements of ISO 14971, ISO 13485, IEC62304, IEC62366-1/-2, risk management life cycle steps and benefits, and FDA software rev...
Source: Medgadget - September 21, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: ComplianceOnline Tags: Sponsored Content Source Type: blogs

How Do You Know if You Are a Good Person?
In these turbulent times, social conscience is a valuable asset. What we think, feel, say and do impacts on the people with whom we interact in personal and professional settings. Some have blind spots when it comes to attitude that leads to faux pas and mis-steps. It is what we do with our oops moments that places it on one side of the line or the other. In an NPR interview with Dolly Chugh, Ph.D.  the author of  The Person You Mean to Be: How Good People Fight Bias, she explains to Radio Times host, Marty Moss-Coane, the dynamics involved in being what she calls a “goodish person”, knowing that we ...
Source: World of Psychology - September 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Edie Weinstein, MSW, LSW Tags: Ethics & Morality Personal Self-Help Source Type: blogs

Brain Training vs Facebook/ Social Media: 1 — 0
___ Does Regular Brain Training Keep Selena Gomez at the Peak of Her Career? (YCB): “Selena Gomez hit the headlines this week when she revealed to ELLE Magazine that, despite being one of the world’s most influential celebrities online with 142 million followers on Instagram alone, she actually has no social media or photo editing apps on her smartphone. In fact, the only app she does have is Peak, a popular brain-training app. The Peak app has already reached 40 million downloads worldwide, and Selena Gomez is just part of a growing trend of 20-somethings who are now using apps and games like this for fun, sel...
Source: SharpBrains - September 21, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Technology app Brain-Training brain-training-app Peak relaxation Selena Gomez self-improvement smartphone social-media Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: September 21, 2018
How hard are you on yourself? I can always spot the most self-critical among us. They are usually the ones judging everyone else. If you find yourself constantly picking at a your partner or finding ways someone is disappointing you, you might want to turn inward. Have you been neglecting yourself lately? If you’re interested in learning more about criticism, a few of this week’s posts look at why it’s showing up in your life. More Than Just a Dream: The Science Behind Nightmares (Change Your Mind Change Your Life) – Are you literally tired from your nightly nightmares? Try one of these scientifica...
Source: World of Psychology - September 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

Face and Voice Recognition Identifies Dementia Sufferers
Dementia can creep on slowly and develop without much notice in many patients. Monitoring these changes is not easy, typically requiring professional experts to interpret faint symptoms gauged through standard questionnaires. Patients undergoing such testing tend to get used to it and end up improving their test taking ability, skewing the results. Researchers at Osaka University and Nara Institute of Science and Technology in Japan have now developed a similar, but purely computer-driven approach that asks a user questions and then comprehensively monitors the responses. As the user answers questions, the software id...
Source: Medgadget - September 20, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Neurology Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Sep 20, B. F. Skinner: Today in the History of Psychology (20th September 1971)
B. F. Skinner was featured on the front cover of Time magazine and is the subject of three cover stories on behavior, titled "Skinner's Utopia: Panacea, or Path to Hell?" "Twin Oaks: On to Walden Two" and "A Skinnerian Innovation: Baby in a Box. " The brilliant cover image of Skinner was drawn by renowned artist and illustrator Don Ivan Punchatz. See following link to learn all about the life and work of psychology legend B.F. Skinner.B.F. Skinner (Source: Forensic Psychology Blog)
Source: Forensic Psychology Blog - September 20, 2018 Category: Forensic Medicine Source Type: blogs

Is Addiction Hereditary?
Looking at Your Family History It can be widely speculated that addiction can be hereditary. If there are addicts in your family, it could be possible that their behaviors can be passed on to you, as well. When considering this, it is important to look at your family history, especially your parent’s. Numerous studies show the cause of addiction can be broken down to 50 percent genetic and 50 percent issues with coping skills. Further studies have shown that children of addicts are up to 8 times more likely to also develop an addiction. One study in particular took 231 individuals who had been clinically diagnosed wi...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - September 20, 2018 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery Alcohol Alcoholism Depression Depression Treatment Drinking Drug Rehab Information Drug Treatment Dual Diagnosis and Eating Disorder Treatment Mental Health family family disease hereditary Source Type: blogs

VR Helps Diffuse MRI Fears for Children and Their Parents
National Health Service physicist Jonathan Ashmore, PhD, has spearheaded the development of a virtual reality (VR) app that gives children who are nervous about their upcoming MRI an exact idea of what the procedure looks like.Children and their parents alike can be very anxious about a scheduled MRI. The inter-family anxiety can only worsen the experience for the young patient. The free app delivers a 360-degree perspective from inside the MRI so that children and fearful adults can be emotionally prepared for the experience before they undergo the scan. The app can be especially useful for evaluating epilepsy cases. It &...
Source: radRounds - September 20, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

I Know What You Did This Summer
By: Susan Wiley At the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing (JHSON), we know that two very different heads are better than one. We were an early adopter of interprofessional education, a practice that creates space for nurses, doctors, and even health care entrepreneurs to learn and grow together. We know that sharing insights from a The post I Know What You Did This Summer appeared first on Johns Hopkins Nursing Magazine. (Source: Nursing Blogs at Johns Hopkins University)
Source: Nursing Blogs at Johns Hopkins University - September 20, 2018 Category: Nursing Authors: Editor Tags: On the Pulse internship Interprofessional education Source Type: blogs

The Gift of Self-Compassion
Feeling love and compassion for others can be difficult. But holding ourselves with love and compassion can be even more challenging. Why do we often treat ourselves in ways that we’d never treat others? And what would it take to bring more compassion to ourselves? Plato has famously said, “Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle.” This wise perception also applies to ourselves. Each of us has faced betrayals, adversities, and losses — and sadly, more difficulties probably lie ahead. Life would be less stressful and more fulfilling as we learn the art of self-compassion. Why is Sel...
Source: World of Psychology - September 20, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John Amodeo, PhD Tags: General Happiness Mindfulness Psychology Relationships Self-Esteem Self-Help Spirituality self-compassion Source Type: blogs

Some thoughts on clinical judgement
Thus far I have recorded 8 podcasts for Annals on Call, 4 of which have already been published.  The term and concept of clinical judgement enters the conversations repeatedly.  Each podcast has had a different guest, yet in most of these conversations I have heard clinical judgement invoked.  What is clinical judgement?  Do we just use the term when we want to stray from protocol or algorithm?  I found this definition which gets us part way to an understanding. For purposes of description, it can be considered the sum total of all the cognitive processes involved in clinical decision making. It in...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - September 20, 2018 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

Shortening time in medical school is a bad idea. Or is it?
Recently, there has been a number of articles on reducing the length of medical training to help ease the physician shortage. And our medical curriculum is due for a major overhaul. Its foundational document, the Flexner report, was released over 100 years ago, and our medical needs and knowledge have changed. Shortening medical education may provide a “bonus” in easing the anticipated shortage of physicians but may have more significant unanticipated consequences. The bonus While estimates vary, we are expected to need an additional 100,000 physicians beyond our current capacity to graduate physicians by 2030....
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 20, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/charles-dinerstein" rel="tag" > Charles Dinerstein, MD, MBA < /a > Tags: Education Medical school Public Health & Policy Source Type: blogs

A New Conversation on Trust in Health Care and Health Professions Education
  Broken hands on broken ploughs Broken treaties, broken vows Broken pipes, broken tools People bending broken rules Hound dog howling, bullfrog croaking Everything is broken. —Bob Dylan, “Everything is Broken” For many patients, Bob Dylan’s lyrics may as well have been written about the U.S. health care system. While everything may not actually be broken, there has certainly been an erosion of trust in physicians during my career. In 1966, 73% of Americans reported having great confidence in the leaders of medicine; in 2012, that number had fallen to 34%.1 I see this lack of trust most keenly ...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - September 20, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: David P. Sklar, M.D. Tags: Featured From the Editor health care teams learning environment New Conversations patient care trust Source Type: blogs

See what happens when hyperacute T-waves are missed
Written by Pendell Meyers, edits by Steve SmithA man in his 60s with history of hypertension and MI 10 years ago, with PCI, presented to an outside hospital complaining of chest pain that started while mowing the lawn. His chest pain was located in the central chest, non-radiating, and associated with diaphoresis, nausea, and vomiting.Here is his ECG on arrival:What do you think?This ECG is all but diagnostic of subepicardial ischemia of the anterior, lateral, and inferior walls, most likely due to Occlusion MI (OMI), probably of the LAD. This is evidenced by hyperacute T-waves in leads V3-V6. Leads II and aVF al...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - September 20, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Pendell Source Type: blogs

Sep 19, Human Factors: Today in the History of Psychology (19th September 1958)
Human Factors, the flagship journal of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society was first published. In his introductory essay entitled "A Home of Our Own, " editor in chief Stanley Lippert noted that human factors specialists would no longer be forced to publish their work in the "literary homes of friends and relatives. " See following link to learn all about the fascinating history of psychology.History of Psychology (Source: Forensic Psychology Blog)
Source: Forensic Psychology Blog - September 19, 2018 Category: Forensic Medicine Source Type: blogs

5 Ways to Simplify Fall Transitions for Students —and SLPs, Too
Transitioning to the school routine after the summer break can challenge anyone. Any child might struggle with pushing bedtime back when it’s still light out and adjusting to eating lunch at a new time. Those with speech-language or social communication deficits find the shift in routine especially difficult. As speech-language pathologists working with children, we can help our clients or students tackle this transition every year. During my more than 20 years working with children, I’ve discovered a few strategies to lay the groundwork for a more productive fall. Admit and recognize that transitioning is hard...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - September 19, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Kristina Peterkin Tags: Academia & Research Private Practice Schools Slider Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: blogs

A Guide to Making Machine Learning Work in Health Care
Apologies on the hiatus for posting on THCB. As many of you know, I was running around getting Health 2.0 in order this past weekend. Today we are featuring a piece on understanding how machine learning can actually work in health care today-Matthew Holt   By LEONARD D’ AVOLIO, PhD   There’s plenty of coverage on what machine learning may do for healthcare and when. Painfully little has been written for non-technical healthcare leaders whose job it is to successfully execute in the real world with real returns. It’s time to address that gap for two reasons. First, if you are res...
Source: The Health Care Blog - September 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Economics Patients Physicians Education graphics statistics storytelling Source Type: blogs

Coping with Mirror Anxiety in Dementia Patients
People with dementia move backwards in time, and may no longer recognize their current selves in mirrors (or any reflective surfaces, like inside windows at night-time).by Rita JablonskiAlzheimer's Reading RoomSome people “friend” themselves (seeWhen Alzheimer's Patients Friend Themselves).They happily talk to and interact with their reflection.Other people become upset when they see a stranger staring at them in the mirror.Article -Dementia Patients are People TooSubscribe to the Alzheimer's Reading RoomEmail:Reflections can cause paranoia or accusations of infidelity arise.Has your loved one everaccused you o...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - September 19, 2018 Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimer's Alzheimers Dementia care of dementia patients caregiving coping coping with alzheimers help alzheimer's help with dementia care mirrors Source Type: blogs

Do ADHD drugs really help college students without ADHD?
___ Over the past 15 years there has been growing awareness that many college students without an ADHD diagnosis use ADHD drugs. On some campuses, rates of self-reported non-medical use have exceeded 30% of students. The primary reason students report taking ADHD drugs is to enhance their academic performance. And, the strong majority of students — over 80% in a study I conducted — believe it is helpful for this purpose. Furthermore, students who report problems with attention are more likely to report non-medical use than other students; this suggests that some self-medicate to address their perceived attentio...
Source: SharpBrains - September 19, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Dr. David Rabiner Tags: Attention and ADD/ADHD Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness academic-performance. Adderall ADHD-diagnosis ADHD-drugs cognitive-functioning college Mental-Health neurocognitive psychiatric conditions Working-memory Source Type: blogs

What's new in midwifery - 19th September 2018
Some recent things you might need to know about.Professional Records Standards BodyStandard for maternity care records to support the introduction of digital maternity records in England.ResearchNIHR SignalsInducing labour at or after 41 weeks reduces risks to infantsAppraisal of Cochrane Review looking at induction of labour for women at or beyond termNHS England case studiesHertfordshire perinatal mental healthcommunity servicesNICE consultationsNeonatal infection (early onset): antibiotics for prevention and treatment: Draft scope consultation.  Closing date for comments: 12 October 2018.Intrapartum care for wome...
Source: Browsing - September 19, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: midwifery Source Type: blogs

The Digital Health Buzzword Radar
Data-driven haircare, blockchain-enabled long island ice tea or artificially intelligent toilet paper: the buzzwords of our time seem to be everywhere, and digital health is no exception. Sometimes it even seems to be the breeding ground of overhyped technologies and overmarketing. Here, we collected the most often used digital health buzzwords and placed them on our buzzword radar. Digital health is ripe for hype As digital health is gaining momentum, more and more companies come forward with their disruptive ideas; or at least with their claims about having built disruptive digital health solutions. For the reason that o...
Source: The Medical Futurist - September 19, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Bioethics Business Future of Medicine Medical Professionals Patients Policy Makers Researchers AI artificial intelligence big data blockchain buzzword deep learning digital health DTC Genetic testing genetics genomics H Source Type: blogs

Answers after IVF failure
When an IVF cycle fails, patients want answers !It ’s natural to feel disappointed, sad and angry, because you are now back to square one – even after spending all that time, money and energy ! And what happened to all the reassurances which the doctor offered, saying your embryos were perfect and that you were “definitely going to get pregnan t” ? Was it all just a lie ?Please take a break and give yourself time to grieve and recover ! The truth is that many women who have had a failed IVF cycle will be successful on a second or even a third cycle. While success can never be guaranteed, some of the...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - September 19, 2018 Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs

Sep 18, Wilhelm Wundt: Today in the History of Psychology (18th September 1861)
Wilhelm Wundt presented a landmark paper on the personal difference between visual and auditory observation at the Natural Science Conference at Speyer, Germany. Writing about Wundt's discipline defining address at Speyer, Edward Bradford Titchener noted that "There is no more remarkable incident in the history of experimental psychology than Wundt's attempt, by way of a single crucial experiment, to overturn the whole Herbartian psychology. " See following link to learn all about the fascinating history of psychology.History of Psychology (Source: Forensic Psychology Blog)
Source: Forensic Psychology Blog - September 18, 2018 Category: Forensic Medicine Source Type: blogs

Human Centered Design in Healthcare #askpatients – #HITsm Chat Topic
We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 9/21 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Jen Horonjeff (@jhoronjeff) from @Savvy_Coop on the topic of “Human Centered Design in Healthcare #askpatients“. I, Jen Horonjeff, have a confession – I’m one of the dreaded “non-compliant” patients you hear about. I have been living with juvenile arthritis and other autoimmune diseases for 33 years, so I often have a complex treatment plan. One of my biggest offenses is I don’t get my blood work ...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - September 18, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: John Lynn Tags: #HITsm Digital Health Healthcare HealthCare IT Patient Advocacy #askpatients #HITsm Topics Jen Horonjeff Patient Centered Design Savvy Coop User-centered Design Source Type: blogs

Stop the money-shaming in medicine
There is a taboo in medicine. It is becoming less prominent, but it still exists. You’re not supposed to talk about money. Not how much something costs a patient, not how much you get paid, not how you invest, and certainly not about the freedom from medicine that financial independence can bring. This first shows up as you are applying to medical school. You don’t want anyone writing a letter of recommendation or heaven forbid an admissions committee to get even a whiff of an idea that you might actually want to receive a paycheck for practicing medicine at some point down the road. It is reinforced throu...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 18, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/james-m-dahle" rel="tag" > James M. Dahle, MD < /a > Tags: Finance Practice Management Source Type: blogs

School refusal: When a child won ’t go to school
The transition back to school each fall is challenging for many families. But some children and teens feel so much emotional distress that they may repeatedly balk at attending school or staying there — a problem known as school refusal, or school avoidance if it occurs consistently. Ways to identify school refusal and tips on responding to it quickly are described below. What is school refusal? Shifting from a more relaxed summer routine to early wake-ups, hours in class, and dreaded homework makes many students feel mildly anxious or cranky during the early weeks of a new school year. For some students, howeve...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - September 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Julia Martin Burch, PhD Tags: Adolescent health Anxiety and Depression Children's Health Mental Health Parenting Source Type: blogs

Ask the Readers: What Is Your Favorite Personality Test?
The New Yorker recently published an article about personality tests. It mainly covers the history of MBTI (Myers-Briggs Type Indicator), but it also talks about personality tests in general. The article says that while some people find personality tests helpful, some others doubt its value. But still, the tests are gaining popularity in recent decades. The article also states that there are over two thousand personality tests out there! That number surprised me. I only know a few tests myself. So here is my question to you: What is your favorite personality test and why? Please leave your answer in the comments so that ev...
Source: Life Optimizer - September 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Donald Latumahina Tags: Purpose Source Type: blogs

Physicians need to learn to avoid moral errors
There’s an ugly undercurrent that sometimes shows up in the emergency department: indeed all over the world of medicine. I’ve seen it in doctors and nurses alike. It’s a meanness, a smallness, a kind of moral judgment that can lead us to make poor medical decisions. Or it can simply make us poorer in spirit. I remember the day I had a young man who was in custody. He was 18, handcuffed and in a jail jump-suit. I don’t remember what was wrong. I just remember that he looked young and scared. Someone had brought ice cream to the staff. My patient was hungry. “Hey, give him a sundae, OK?” I...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 18, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/edwin-leap" rel="tag" > Edwin Leap, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Emergency Medicine Source Type: blogs

dayzz, An Evidence-Based, Personalized Sleep Training App for Employers, Interview with CEO Amir Inditzky
In addition to fatigue, high blood pressure, and weight gain experienced by individuals with chronically poor sleep, productivity and performance in the workplace are also known to suffer. Sleep deprivation, for example, can cost employers up to six lost working days and $2,762 in financial impact annually per employee. Today, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine estimates that 50-70 million adults in the U.S. suffer from chronic sleep issues or wakefulness disorder. Medgadget has previously covered sleep management solutions seeking to help individuals achieve better sleep. An upcoming player in the market is startup da...
Source: Medgadget - September 18, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Michael Batista Tags: Exclusive Medicine Net News Neurology Psychiatry Rehab Source Type: blogs

UK study finds children with maths difficulties (SLDM/dyscalculia) are 100 times less likely to receive an official diagnosis than peers with dyslexia
By Christian Jarrett Given how important maths skills are in everyday life, it is vital that we develop ways to reliably identify those children with particular learning difficulties related to maths (known as “specific learning disorder in mathematics”/SLDM or dyscalculia) so that they can be provided with appropriate support. Unfortunately, maths-related learning problems are far less understood and recognised compared with similar problems related to reading and language. A recent study in the British Journal of Psychology highlights this issue, being the first to estimate the prevalence of SLDM/dyscalc...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - September 18, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Educational Source Type: blogs

UK study finds the likelihood of children with maths difficulties (SLDM/dyscalculia) receiving an official diagnosis is substantially lower than for their peers with dyslexia
By Christian Jarrett Given how important maths skills are in everyday life, it is vital that we develop ways to reliably identify those children with particular learning difficulties related to maths (known as “specific learning disorder in mathematics”/SLDM or dyscalculia) so that they can be provided with appropriate support. Unfortunately, maths-related learning problems are far less understood and recognised compared with similar problems related to reading and language. A recent study in the British Journal of Psychology highlights this issue, being the first to estimate the prevalence of SLDM/dyscalc...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - September 18, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Educational Source Type: blogs

UK study finds children with maths difficulties (SLDM/dyscalculia) far less likely to receive an official diagnosis than their peers with dyslexia
By Christian Jarrett Given how important maths skills are in everyday life, it is vital that we develop ways to reliably identify those children with particular learning difficulties related to maths (known as “specific learning disorder in mathematics”/SLDM or dyscalculia) so that they can be provided with appropriate support. Unfortunately, maths-related learning problems are far less understood and recognised compared with similar problems related to reading and language. A recent study in the British Journal of Psychology highlights this issue, being the first to estimate the prevalence of SLDM/dyscalc...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - September 18, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Educational Source Type: blogs

5 Productivity Apps to Help Skyrocket your Focus
Conclusion Maintaining focus is vital when you want to remain productive with your work, but it’s also hard to achieve at times. But, if you block out distracting noises, declutter your browser, address distracting websites and phone apps, as well as compete against a running timer, you’re bound to maximize your focus. And, once you maximize your focus, no task or assignment will present an undefeatable challenge.You've read 5 Productivity Apps to Help Skyrocket your Focus, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you've enjoyed this, please visit our site for more inspirational...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - September 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Marija Kojic Tags: productivity tips apps best productivity apps focus time management Source Type: blogs

Sep 17, Oskar Pfungst and the case of Clever Hans: Today in the History of Psychology (17th September 1904)
Oskar Pfungst began his famous investigation into the case of " Clever Hans, " a horse that could seemingly solve mathematical problems (multiplication and division) by tapping out answers with his right hoof. However, Pfungst concluded that the explanation for this lay not in any rational thinking on the part of " Clever Hans " but rather in the almost imperceptible ideomotor movement and nuanced body language of his owner Mr. Von Osten which signaled to the horse when he was expected to start and stop tapping. Oskar Pfungst's findings in the case of " Clever Hans " were instrumental in raisi...
Source: Forensic Psychology Blog - September 17, 2018 Category: Forensic Medicine Source Type: blogs

Spotlight on SIG 6, Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics
Members of SIG 6 work to provide a forum for collaboration between researchers and clinicians to translate research into evidence-based practice related to hearing and balance.  Read on for Keith Wolgemuth’s first-hand experience. When did you join your ASHA special interest group (SIG)—and what made you want to join? I joined SIG 6 in early 2016, initially to complete a one-year term left by a colleague who needed to fulfill other professional commitments. Within three months, I was in a position to fill a vacancy as the SIG 6 associate coordinator, by virtue of being the only person on the committee...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - September 17, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Keith Wolgemuth Tags: Academia & Research Audiology Health Care Schools Slider Aging and Hearing Loss Hearing Assistive Technology hearing loss treatment hearing research Source Type: blogs

Oticon Opn Hearing Aids Now Help Assess Hearing Health
Oticon, one of the big names in hearing aid products, is releasing a tool that helps people using hearing aids to learn more about their hearing health and to better understand how these devices are impacting their lives. The technology is available on the Oticon Opn hearing aids, including for patients that have already been using the devices. It’s now a part of the company’s ON App and Oticon compares the offering to wearable activity trackers, but specifically designed to assess one’s hearing-related activities and participation in them. The HearingFitness software monitors the use of the Oticon Opn an...
Source: Medgadget - September 17, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: ENT Rehab Source Type: blogs

Applying AI Based Outlier Detection to Healthcare – Interview with Dr. Gidi Stein from MedAware
Most people who receive healthcare understand that healthcare is as much art as it is science. We don’t expect our doctors to be perfect or know everything because the human body is just too complex and there are so many factors that influence health. What’s hard for patients to understand is when obvious human errors occur. This is especially true when technology or multiple layers of humans should have caught the obvious. This is exactly why I was excited to interview Dr. Gidi Stein, CEO and Co-founder of MedAware. As stated on their website, their goal is to eliminate prescription errors. In the interview be...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - September 17, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: John Lynn Tags: Healthcare Healthcare AI Healthcare Analytics HealthCare IT Allscripts dbMotion Dr. Gidi Stein MedAware Medication Error Detection Medication Errors Source Type: blogs

Burnout doesn ’t start in medical school
Burnout affects as many as 50 percent of physicians. Interventions have been proposed at virtually every stage of a physician’s life, from medical school to residency training to professional practice. While the rigors of medical training certainly contribute to the high levels of burnout in the profession, there are indications that the trouble begins at the undergraduate level. I recently graduated from an undergraduate program geared toward students interested in medicine. Through an anonymous forum on our e-learning platform, numerous students have confessed to feeling a profound sense of inadequacy regarding the...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 17, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/anna-goshua" rel="tag" > Anna Goshua < /a > Tags: Education Medical school Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Treating Autism With Cord Blood Therapy
Apratim Dey Singah of Kolkata, India was 18 months of age when his parents noticed his communication skills were not progressing compared to the other children his age. Apratim’s birth was a month premature and he was diagnosed having Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Autism can be characterized by challenges with social skills, repetitive behaviors, speech and nonverbal communication, as well as unique strengths and differences. Apratim had enough of these traits to be recognized as being on the spectrum. After much research, Apratim’s parents learned that in 2014 (when Apratim was born), Duke University launche...
Source: Cord Blood News - September 17, 2018 Category: Perinatology & Neonatology Authors: Maze Cord Blood Tags: brain development Cord Blood medical research parents stem cells Source Type: blogs

Nurse, Throw Your Hat Over the Wall
In your nursing career, have you ever wanted to get something done but never had the gumption to make the commitment and just do it? Well, there's an old Irish proverb that says, "When you come upon a wall, throw your hat over it and then go and get your hat. "In the context of your nursing career, I like to think of this saying in terms of you putting some skin in the game and making a commitment to do what needs to be done, no matter what obstacles may appear to be in your way. What are you avoiding? What are you waiting for? Is there a deep end you just need to dive into?The Deep EndMany of us have a history o...
Source: Digital Doorway - September 17, 2018 Category: Nursing Tags: career career development career management careers healthcare careers nurse nurses nursing nursing careers Source Type: blogs

Who likes to be alone? Not introverts, according to a new paper on personality and the experience of solitude
By Christian Jarrett Why do some people go to great lengths to have the chance to spend time by themselves, while others find solitude painful and forever crave company? The most obvious answer would seem to be that it relates to differences in social aspects of personality, and specifically that extraverts will find solitude painful while introverts will enjoy their own company more than anyone else’s. However, a new paper, published as a pre-print at PsyArXiv (not yet peer-reviewed), and involving three diary studies with hundreds of undergrad volunteers, suggests the truth is more complicated. In fact, there was n...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - September 17, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Emotion Personality Source Type: blogs

The Power of Befriending the Exile Within
You're reading The Power of Befriending the Exile Within, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. Exiles in the Psyche I had a dream that there was someone else living in my apartment when I wasn't there.  A friend turned to me and said, “Hey, did you know there is another woman living here with you?”  I shook my head.  If it was true, how was it that I had never encountered her? Gazing around my messy apartment, I realized it explained a lot. When we are young, we all learn how to exil...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - September 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: katmeggers Tags: blogging confidence featured happiness psychology self confidence self improvement exile pickthebrain self analysis Source Type: blogs

Sep 16, Karen Horney: Today in the History of Psychology (16th September 1885)
Karen Horney was born. An eminent psychoanalytic theorist and pioneer within the field of the psychology of women, Horney wrote widely on the androcentric (male centered) nature of orthodox Freudian thinking and psychology in general. In addition to her influential contribution to feminine psychology, the influence of Horney's innovative and groundbreaking personality theories spread far and wide; for instance, her views on the potential for human growth were followed with great interest by the likes of Abraham Maslow and Carl Rogers. A truly original thinker ahead of her time, Karen Horney's ideas helped inform an eclecti...
Source: Forensic Psychology Blog - September 16, 2018 Category: Forensic Medicine Source Type: blogs