Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome
Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome is a relatively newly recognised condition - but, according to one study, can account for up to 6% of patients presenting to emergency departments. The causal mechanism is as yet unclear - but currently the only known way to prevent the syndrome is for the patient to stop their cannabis use. Yaniv Chocron, chief... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - July 19, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Fighting bad science in Austria
Cochrane Austria have been asking the public what they'd like to know about health. Not whether the latest drug is more efficacious, but whether glacier stone power cures hangovers. Gerald Gartlehner, director of the Cochrane Austria Centre joins us to explain what they do, and how their evidence has been received. Read more about the project... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - July 17, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Fertility awareness based methods for pregnancy prevention
Fertility awareness based methods of contraception are increasingly being used for pregnancy prevention.  In the US, the proportion of contraceptive users who choose such methods has grown from 1% in 2008 to approximately 3% in 2014.  Relative to other methods of pregnancy prevention, however, substantial misinformation exists around fertility... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - July 13, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Talk evidence - smoking, gloves and transparency
This month we have some more feedback from our listeners (2.20) Carl says it's time to start smoking cessation (or stop the reduction in funding for smoking reduction) (11.40) and marvels at how pretty Richard Doll's seminal smoking paper is. It's gloves off for infection control (22.20) Andrew George, a non-executive director of the Health... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - July 10, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

I have never encountered an organisation as vicious in its treatment of whistleblowers as the NHS
Margaret Heffernan has thought a lot about whistleblowing, and why companies don't respond well to it. She wrote the "Book Wilful Blindness: Why We Ignore the Obvious at our Peril". In this podcast she talks about how culture, and groupthink, leads to a culture where whistleblowers are ignored, and why the NHS needs to change the way it treats... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - July 4, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

After Grenfell
It's been just over two years since a fire broke out in Grenfell tower, in west London, claiming the lives of 72 residents. 223 people survived, thanks to the work of the fire brigade and health care. In this podcast we hear from Andrew Roe, assistant commissioner at London Fire Brigade, and Anu Mitra, consultant emergency physician at St Mary's... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - July 1, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

After Grenfel
It's been just over two years since a fire broke out in Grenfell tower, in west London, claiming the lives of 72 residents. 223 people survived, thanks to the work of the fire brigade and health care. In this podcast we hear from Andrew Roe, assistant commissioner at London Fire Brigade, and Anu Mitra, consultant emergency physician at St Mary's... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - July 1, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Talk Evidence - Z drugs, subclinical hypothyroidism and Drazen's dozen
This week on the podcast, (2.02) a listener asks, when we suggest something to stop, should we suggest an alternative instead? (8.24) Helen tells us to stop putting people on treatment for subclinical hypothyroidism, but what does that mean for people who are already receiving thyroxine? (20.55) Carl has a black box warning about z drugs, and... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - June 25, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Did international accord on tobacco reduce smoking?
WHO Director-General Dr. Tedros recently said “Since it came into force 13 years ago, the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control remains one of the world’s most powerful tools for promoting public health,”. But is it? That’s what a to studies just published on bmj.com try and investigate - one of which pulls together all the data w e have on... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - June 20, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Working as a team, and combating stress, in space
Nicole Stott is an engineer, aquanaut and one of the 220 astronauts to have lived and worked on the International Space Station. In a confined space, under huge pressure, with no way out, it's important that teams maintain healthy dynamics, and individuals can manage their stress adequately, and in this podcast Nicole explains a little about... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - June 18, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Thoroughly and deliberately targeted; Doctors in Syria
As Syria enters its ninth year of conflict, doctors are struggling to provide health care to a badly damaged country. While dealing with medicine shortages, mass casualties and everything that comes with working in a warzone, healthcare facilities and their staff are also facing an unprecedented number of targeted and often repeated attacks.... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - June 14, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Planning for the unplannable
Hi impact, low probability events are a planners nightmare. You know that you need to think about them, but how can you prioritise which event - terrorist attack, natural disaster, disease outbreak, deserves attention - and how can you sell the risks of that, but not oversell them? Risky business is a conference where some of these kind of things... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - June 11, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

What Matters To You Day
It's What Matters To You day - #wmty - and in this podcast Anya de Iongh, The BMJ's patient editor, and Joe Fraser, author of Joe's Diabetes who works at NHS England on personalised care, get together to discuss what personalised care actually means, how it changes the ways in which patients and health professionals interact, and how it can be... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - June 6, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Tech and the NHS - A tale of two cultures
The NHS is about caring for people, free at the point of care, creating a safety net which catches the most vulnerable. Tech has been defined by the facebook maxim "move fast, break things" - looking to disrupt a sector, get investment and move on.   We want to be able to harness the potential utility of digital tech in the NHS - but how can those... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - June 3, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Finding out who funds patient groups
We ’ve been banging the drum about transparency of payment to doctors for years - we’ve even put a moratorium on financial conflicts of interest in the authors of any of our education articles. Not because we think that all doctors who receive money from industry are being influenced to push their agenda - but because we have no way of telling when... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - May 29, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Talk evidence - cancer causing food, prostate cancer and disease definitions
Helen Macdonald and Carl Heneghan are back again talking about what's happened in the world of evidence this month. (1.05) Carl rants about bacon causing cancer (7.10) Helen talks about prostate cancer, and we hear from the author of the research paper which won Research Paper Of The Year at the BMJ awards. We also cover disease definition and... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - May 25, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

What caused the drop in stroke mortality in the UK
Stroke mortality rates have been declining in almost every country, and that reduction could result from a decline in disease occurrence or a decline in case fatality, or both. Broadly - is that decline down to better treatment or better prevention. Olena Seminog, a researcher, and and Mike Rayner, professor of population health, both from the... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - May 23, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Helping parents with children who display challenging behaviour
Looking after a young child is hard enough, but when that child has learning difficulties and displays challenging behaviour - the burden on parents can be extreme. That behaviour may prompt a visit to the doctor, and in this podcast we’re talking about how parents can be supported in that - what services are available. We’ll also be discussing... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - May 17, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Tackling gambling
In the UK we have a complex relationship with gambling, the government licences the national lottery, and uses profit from that to fund our art and museum sector - horse racing is a national TV event, and we've seen a proliferation of betting shops on our high streets. At the same time, there's increasing acceptance that gambling causes problems... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - May 10, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

The sex lives of married Brits
The National Surveys of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles is a deep look into the sex lives of us brits - and has been running now for 30 years, giving us some longitudinal data about the way in which those sex lives have changed. The latest paper to be published, based on that data, looks at the frequency of sex - how often different groups are... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - May 9, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Doctors and extinction rebellion
Starting in the middle of April, the group “Extinction Rebellion” have organised a series of non-violent direct action protests. Most notably bringing central London to a standstill - but these events are now continuing around the country. Predictably, they have received a lot of criticism - they have also received a lot of support - am ongst... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - May 3, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Introducing Sharp Scratch - our new podcast for students and junior doctors
Here's a taster for our new student podcast - Sharp Scratch. We're talking about the hidden curriculum, things you need to know to function as a doctor, but are rarely formally taught. This is a taster - if you enjoy, subscribe! https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/student-bmj-podcast/id331561304 Sharp Scratch episode 1: Surviving the night... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - April 26, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Gypsy and Traveller health
In the UK, there's an ethnic group that is surprisingly large, but often overlooked by society, and formal healthcare services. The gypsy traveller community have poorer health outcomes because of systemic issues around access to health and education. In this podcast we're joined by Michelle Gavin and Samson Rattigan, who both work for Friend's... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - April 24, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Could open access have unintended consequences?
An “author pays” publishing model is the only fair way to make biomedical research findings accessible to all, say David Sanders, professor of gastroenterology at Sheffield University, but James Ashton and worries that it can lead to bias in the evidence base towards commercially driven results - a s those are the researchers who can pay for open... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - April 19, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Talk Evidence - health checks, abx courses and p-values
Helen Macdonald and Carl Heneghan are back again talking about what's happened in the world of evidence this month. (1.20) Carl grinds his gears over general health checks, with an update in the Cochrane Library. (9.15) Helen is surprised by new research which looks at over prescription of antibiotics - but this time because the courses... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - April 17, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Capital punishment, my sixth great grandfather, and me
On the 7th of June, 1753, Dr Archibald Cameron was executed at Tyburn. "The body, after hanging twenty minutes, was cut down: it was not quartered; but the heart was taken out and burnt. " 250 years later, his sixth great grandson, Robert Syned found himself deeply involved in the process of execution, as an expert witness in a case about the use... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - April 9, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

How to have joy at work
Jessica Perlo is the Director for Joy at Work at the Institute for Healthcare Improverment, and James Mountford is direct or of quality at the Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust. Together they joined us at the International Forum on Quality and Safety in Healthcare to discuss joy at work - what that concept actually means, and practically,... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - April 5, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Social prescribing
Non-medical interventions are increasingly being proposed to address wider determinants of health and to help patients improve health behaviours and better manage their conditions - this is known as social prescribing. In England, the NHS Long Term Plan states that nearly one million people will qualify for referral to social prescribing schemes... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - April 4, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Applying new power in medicine
Change requires the application of power - the way in which individuals can accrue power has shifted in our digitally connected world. Traditional ways of influencing change in healthcare (getting the chief executive on side, having a quiet chat with the medical director) are not the only way to build a momentum. Henry Timms - author of “New... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - April 1, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Talk Evidence - Shoulders, statins and doctors messes
Helen Macdonald and Carl Heneghan are back again talking about what's happened in the world of evidence this month. They start by talking about shoulders - what does the evidence say about treating subacromial pain, and why the potential for a subgroup effect shouldn't change our views about stop surgery (for now, more research needed). (16.00)... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - March 28, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Is opt-out the best way to increase organ donation?
As England ’s presumed consent law for 2020 clears parliament, Veronica English, head of medical ethics and human rights at the BMA, say that evidence from Wales and other countries shows that it could increase transplantation rates. But Blair L Sadler, physician and senior adviser to California State Unive rsity, consider such legal changes a... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - March 22, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

An acutely disturbed person in the community
It can be difficult to know what to do when a person in severe psychological distress presents to a general practice or community clinic, particularly if they are behaving aggressively, or if they are refusing help. Most patients who are acutely disturbed present no danger to others, however situations can evolve rapidly. Frontline staff need to... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - March 21, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Passing on the secret knowledge of loop diuretics
In every generation there are a few that know the secret; the counterintuitive effects of loop diuretics. In this podcast Steven Anisman, cardiologist at the Dartmouth Hitchcock Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, joins us to explain about the threshold effects of these drugs, and why that might change the way in which you think about... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - March 15, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

#talkaboutcomplications
Renza Scibilia and Chris Aldred have diabetes, and their introduction to the idea of complications arising from the condition were terrifying. Because of this early experience, and Chris's later development of complications, they have campaigned to make doctors really think about the way in which they talk about complications with patients.... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - March 14, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Ebola - Stepping up in Sierre Leone
In 2014, Oliver Johnson was a 27 year old British doctor, working on health policy in Sierre Leone after finishing medical school. Also working in Freetown was Sinead Walsh, then the Irish Ambassador to the country. Then the biggest outbreak of Ebola on record happened in West Africa, starting in Guinea and quickly spreading to Liberia, Sierre... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - March 8, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Signals from the NIHR
If you've been keeping up to day with The BMJ - online on in print, you might have noticed that we've got a new type of article - NIHR Signals - and they are here to give busy clinicians a quick overview of practice changing research that has come out of the UK's National Institute for Health Research. Tara Lamont, director of the NIHR... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - March 7, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Nuffield 2019 - How can the NHS provide a fulfilling lifelong career
More doctors are choosing to retire early, doctors who take career breaks find it hard to return to practice, and doctors at all stages of their careers are frustrated by the lack of support given to training and development in today ’s NHS. Each year the BMJ holds a roundtable discussion at the Nuffield Summit - where health leaders come... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - March 6, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Diabetes Insipidus - the danger of misunderstanding diabetes
Diabetes is synonymous with sugar, but diabetes insipidus, "water diabetes", can't be forgotten. Between 2009 and 2016, 4 people died in hospital in England, when lifesaving treatment for the condition was not given. In this podcast, we hear some practical tips for non-specialists to aid diagnosis, and how patients should be managed during... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - March 1, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Talk Evidence - Radiation, fertility, and pneumonia
Helen Macdonald and Carl Heneghan are back again talking about what's happened in the world of evidence this month. They start by talking about how difficult a task it is to find evidence that's definitely practice changing, what GPs can learn from Malawian children with nonsevere fast-breathing pneumonia, how radiation dosage varies... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - February 27, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Sorry for the interruption in service
The problem we had publishing our feed has been fixed, and normal service has resumed. Thank you for subscribing to the podcast, if you have thoughts you'd like to express, we'd love to hear them. https://www.bmj.com/podcasts (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - February 22, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Safeguarding LGBT+ young people
Recent years have seen political and social progress for people who identify as LGBT+ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender; the “+” indicating inclusion of other minority sexual and gender identities). Yet international evidence shows ongoing health and social inequalities in this group, many of which emerge during adolescence and represent... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - February 15, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Should we be screening for AF?
Current evidence is sufficient to justify a national screening programme, argues Mark Lown clinical lecturer at the University of Southampton, but Patrick Moran, senior research fellow in health economics at Trinity College Dublin, thinks there are too many unanswered questions and evidence from randomised trials is needed to avoid... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - February 14, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Chronic Rhinosinusitis
Patients who experience chronic rhinosinusitis may way for a considerable period of time before presenting, because they believe the condition to be trivial. In this podcast, Alam Hannan, ENT Consultant at the Royal Throat Nose and Ear Hospital in London, explains why that belief is not founded, and describes which treatments can be effective at... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - February 8, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Assisted dying: should doctors help patients to die?
The Royal College of Physicians will survey all its members in February on this most controversial question. It says that it will move from opposition to neutrality on assisted dying unless 60% vote otherwise. The BMJ explores several conflicting views. From Canada, palliative care doctor Sandy Buchman explains why he sees medical aid in dying... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - February 4, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Goran Henriks - How an 80 year old woman called Esther shaped Swedish Healthcare
J önköping has been at the centre of the healthcare quality improvement movement for years - but how did a forested region of Sweden, situated between it's main cities, come to embrace the philosophy of improvement so fervently? Goran Henriks, chief executive of learning and innovation at Qulturum in Jönköping joins us to explain. He also tells... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - January 25, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Talk evidence - TIAs, aging in Japan and women in medicine
In this EBM round-up, Carl Heneghan, Helen Macdonald and Duncan Jarvies are back to give you an update Dual vs single therapy for prevention of TIA or minor stroke - how does the advice that dual work better translate in the UK? Carl explains why Japan can teach us to get active and, how GPs can use that information to "drop a decade" in... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - January 23, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

EBM roundup - January 2019
In this EBM round-up, Carl Heneghan, Helen Macdonald and Duncan Jarvies are back to give you an update Dual vs single therapy for prevention of TIA or minor stroke - how does the advice that dual work better translate in the UK? Carl explains why Japan can teach us to get active and, how GPs can use that information to "drop a decade" in... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - January 23, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

HIV - everything you wanted to know about PeP and PreP
We have had two articles published recently on bmj.com, looking at drug prevention of HIV; PeP - Post-exposure Prophylaxis and PreP - Pre-exposure Prophylaxis, neither prevent the virus from entering the body, but they do prevent the infection from taking hold. There are lots of questions that doctors have about these - what are the risk... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - January 16, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

HbA1c - when it might not be accurately measuring glycemic control
HbA1c concentration is used as the biomarker for long term glycaemic control, however if the lifespan of red blood cells is altered, that may lead to an over, or under estimation of that control. In this podcast Ravinder Sodi, consultant clinical biochemist at University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust, explains when to suspect... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - January 15, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Terence Stephenson - looking back at chairing the GMC
Terence Stephenson is a consultant paediatrician who became been chair of the General Medical Council in 2015. His 4 year tenure has now come to an end, but during his time with the regulator the medical profession faced a number of challenges - the case of Hadiza Bawa Garba and a growing recruitment crisis in the NHS - the GMC is the... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - January 15, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts