Physicians can ’t do everything for everybody in every visit
How long does it take to diagnose guttate psoriasis versus pityriasis rosea? Swimmers ear versus a ruptured eardrum? A kidney stone? A urinary tract infection? An ankle sprain? So why is the typical “cycle time,” the time it takes for a patient to get through a clinic such as mine for these kinds of problems, […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 28, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/a-country-doctor" rel="tag" > Hans Duvefelt, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Physician Primary Care Source Type: blogs

Brief is Good
By HANS DUVEFELT, MD How long does it take to diagnose guttate psoriasis versus pityriasis rosea? Swimmers ear versus a ruptured eardrum? A kidney stone? A urinary tract infection? An ankle sprain? So why is the typical “cycle time”, the time it takes for a patient to get through a clinic such as mine for these kinds of problems, close to an hour? Answer: Mandated screening activities that could actually be done in different ways and not even necessarily in person or in real time! Guess how many emergency room or urgent care center visits could be avoided and handled in the primary care office i...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Medical Practice Physicians Hans Duvefelt primary care Source Type: blogs

What causes kidney stones (and what to do)
Stone disease has plagued humanity since ancient times. Kidney stones have been identified in Egyptian mummies. The Hippocratic oath describes their treatment: “I will not use the knife, not even verily, on sufferers from stone, but I will give place to such as are craftsmen therein.” Who gets kidney stones and why? The lifetime risk of kidney stones among adults in the US is approximately 9%, and it appears that global warming may be increasing that risk. (As the climate warms, human beings are more likely to get dehydrated, which increases the risk of stone formation.) There are four major types of kidney sto...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - May 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kevin R. Loughlin, MD, MBA Tags: Health Healthy Aging Kidney and urinary tract Source Type: blogs

‘ At Least You Don ’ t Have … ’ How to Be Supportive of Someone with Chronic Illness
I was speaking with someone recently who has a series of chronic and painful conditions; some of which are noticeable and some ‘invisible’. What is particularly distressful is that people sometimes say to her, “At least you don’t have cancer.” How dismissive is that? I know they are trying to help her feel better about what she does have and perhaps even attempt to minimize the impact, but it is not compassionate or helpful. There are diagnoses such as fibromyalgia, lupus, diabetes, arthritis or neuropathy which some people have to navigate. It might mean taking naps on an as-needed basis, en...
Source: World of Psychology - May 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Edie Weinstein, MSW, LSW Tags: Chronic Pain Health-related Inspiration & Hope Personal Arthritis Chronic Illness Diabetes Fibromyalgia Lupus Lyme disease neuropathy peer support Source Type: blogs

Why the wheelchair? Could it be gout?
When Paul Manafort appeared in court for sentencing recently, he was in a wheelchair and pleaded for leniency, in part because “his confinement had taken a toll on his physical and mental health.” He reportedly had symptoms of depression and anxiety — but what was the health problem that put him in a wheelchair? According to multiple news reports, the answer is gout. Yes, that ancient disease you may have thought didn’t exist anymore has stricken Mr. Manafort. He joins the rising number of people in the country diagnosed with this common disease. What is gout? Gout is a cause of severe joint pa...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - March 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Arthritis Bones and joints Health Inflammation Source Type: blogs

Podcast: How to Reduce the Stress of Social Media
 Social media sites have become a huge part of our lives, enabling us to easily stay in touch with countless friends and family members all over the world. But there’s a dark side to social media, as it also enables negative things like bullying to proliferate. Many people have found that social media creates a huge amount of anxiety in their lives, but don’t feel they can live without it. In this episode, learn some ways to reduce the anxieties associated with social media. Subscribe to Our Show! And Remember to Review Us! About Our Guest Dr. John Huber is the Chairman for Mainstream Ment...
Source: World of Psychology - March 28, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Show Tags: General Stress Technology The Psych Central Show Gabe Howard social media Vincent M. Wales Source Type: blogs

Is the ketogenic diet dangerous?
  Answer: No—unless you do it for more than a few months. After a few months, the upfront metabolic and weight benefits will begin to reverse and new health problems arise. We know this with confidence. I raise this question once again because more and more people are coming to me reporting problems. It may take months, even years, but the long-term consequences can be quite serious. Achieving ketosis by engaging in a very low-carbohydrate, high-fat lifestyle is—without a doubt—an effective means of losing weight, breaking insulin and leptin resistance, reversing type 2 diabetes and fatty liver, redu...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - March 12, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: ketones bowel flora ketogenic ketotic undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Five big nutritional mistakes I ’ ve made over the years
No question: I have made some huge nutritional blunders over the past 25 years since I began to become seriously involved in nutritional issues. My mistakes, however, have provided powerful feedback on how to get diet right, how to get diet wrong. The impact of diet is profound. Among the huge mistakes I’ve made: 1) Reducing total and saturated fat, eating vegetarian—It made me hungry, never satisfied, and, along with mistake #2, made me a type 2 diabetic with fasting blood sugars of 160+ mg/dl, triglycerides as high as 390 mg/dl, a HDL of 27 mg/dl, oodles of small LDL particles, and high blood pressure. 2) Eat...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - March 2, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates exercise grain-free grains undoctored vitamin D Weight Loss wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Is wheat really THAT bad?
Because it has become such a frequent item in everyday meals, suggesting that something so commonplace must be fine, people often ask: Is wheat really that bad? Let’s therefore catalog the health conditions that are associated with wheat consumption. Health conditions we know with 100% certainty are caused by consumption of wheat and related grains: Celiac disease, dermatitis herpetiformis, cerebellar ataxia, “idiopathic” peripheral neuropathy, temporal lobe seizures, gluten encephalopathy, type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune hepatitis, autoimmune pancreatitis, tooth decay Health conditions ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - March 2, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates autoimmune diabetes gluten-free grain-free grains wheat wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Wheat Belly: Ten Rules for Healthy Eating
A hundred thousand years ago, you’d have no doubt what and how to eat. You would wake up every morning, grab your spear, club or axe and go kill something, wander and gather berries, nuts, or dig in the dirt for roots and tubers, or set traps for fish and reptiles. If you succeeded in the hunt, you would consume every organ that included thyroid, thymus, pancreas, stomach, liver, as well as meat. You’d drink water from streams and rivers, allow skin surface to be exposed to sunlight. You would NOT shower with soap or shampoo, apply hand sanitizer, drink chlorinated water, consume foods laced with herbicides and...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - February 20, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates autoimmune gluten-free grain-free grains Inflammation undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Cross referrals between urologist and gynecologist for IUI treatment
Lots of patients with a low sperm count are seen by a gynecologist , who then advises them to do an IUI treatment because they don't have anything better to offer them.However, because their sperm count is poor, they refer the patient to an andrologist/ urologist .Many urologists are clueless about male infertility treatment , because they specialize in doing other things , such as removing prostates and treating kidney stones. This is why most of them aren't very interested in treating the infertile man, because they are primarily surgeons who like operating. And honest urologists know there is little they can offer ...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - January 20, 2019 Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs

What Could Happen When You Don ’t Carefully Read a Radiology Report
A  lawsuitinvolving a 49-year-old male with colon cancer has demonstrated the need for physicians to thoroughly read radiology reports and for radiologists to effectively relay image interpretations.The patient had undergone a CT scan for pre-procedure workup for his extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy to remove kidney stones. The scan showed a possible indication of colon cancer, and the radiologist had made note of those findings on the second page of the report that was sent to the urologist that same day. However, the urologist neglected to read the second page, and 19 months later, the patient was diagnosed wit...
Source: radRounds - January 18, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Subversive Patriotism: A Constitution Day Reminder
In Washington earlier this month, one person ’s words in the New York Timeswere were deemed a threat to national security by those at whom they were aimed.An anonymous Trump administration official was labeled “a seditious traitor who must be identified and prosecuted for illegal conduct” for exercising his or her 1st Amendment rights by publishing an op-ed in the September 5 edition of the New York Times. Vice President Pencestated that the op-ed writer’s actions inside the Administration—trying to limit what the writer believes is the damage President Trump is d...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - September 17, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Patrick G. Eddington Source Type: blogs

Tamsulosin and passage of renal stones
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - September 10, 2018 Category: Internal Medicine Tags: nephrology urology Source Type: blogs

Let ’s talk about the psychiatric boarding crisis
Imagine spending days or even weeks in an emergency room without treatment for a broken leg or painful kidney stone. Patients in psychological crisis across the country are living this exact scenario. Long waits in an ER, hospital room or prison for an inpatient psychiatric bed, otherwise known as psychiatric boarding, are their unfortunate reality. Rewind to over 50 years ago — as institutionalized patients were gradually integrated into communities, the availability of inpatient mental health beds began to shrink. The number of beds nationally in state and county psychiatric facilities plummeted by 350,000 between ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 30, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/aida-cerundolo" rel="tag" > Aida Cerundolo, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Emergency Medicine Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Low-carb fairy tales
Conclusion: Premarin INCREASED breast cancer, INCREASED endometrial cancer, INCREASED cardiovascular death, even accelerated dementia. And this has been the story over and over again: Conclusions drawn in observational studies have proven to be flat wrong about 4 times out of 5. This hasn’t stopped people like Frank Sacks and Walter Willett, through the observational Physicians’ Health Study and Nurses’ Health Study to, time and again, declare observational findings as fact. Unfortunately, even the USDA buys this observational fiction, incorporating the findings of observational studies in their dietary g...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - August 24, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates Fat grain-free low-carb saturated wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Do You Have FOMO?
I was an active kid, running at the speed of sound and light, rarely stopping to catch my breath. I attribute part of that to a diagnosis of asthma that I would not allow to slow me down. I felt a need to prove that I could keep up with my peers, not wanting to be thought of as weak. School, swim team, Girl Scouts, Hebrew School, volunteering, youth group as well as time with friends, kept me busy. Seems it was preparation for my current lifestyle. Nearing 60, I work as a therapist, journalist, minister, editor, teacher, speaker and facilitator. Add to it various volunteer activity, and a full, rich social life with famil...
Source: World of Psychology - August 3, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Edie Weinstein, MSW, LSW Tags: Habits Happiness Health-related Motivation and Inspiration Personal Technology Source Type: blogs

The misguided expectation of eliminating pain
I am against all forms of bodily pain, both foreign and domestic. I wish the world were pain-free. When I am suffering from even a routine headache, I want immediate relief just like everyone else. The medical approach to pain control has changed dramatically even during my own career. When I started practicing a few decades ago, the strategy was pain reduction. We gave narcotics for very few indications such as kidney stones, heart attacks and severe abdominal pain after a surgeon evaluated the patient. (The reason for this was so the surgeon could obtain an accurate assessment of the patient’s belly before pain med...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 31, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/michael-kirsch" rel="tag" > Michael Kirsch, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Medications Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Tropical Travel Trouble 009 Humongous HIV Extravaganza
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 009 The diagnosis of HIV is no longer fatal and the term AIDS is becoming less frequent. In many countries, people with HIV are living longer than those with diabetes. This post will hopefully teach the basics of a complex disease and demystify some of the potential diseases you need to consider in those who are severely immunosuppressed. While trying to be comprehensive this post can not be exhaustive (as you can imagine any patient with ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - July 7, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Amanda McConnell Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine AIDS art cryptococcoma cryptococcus HIV HIV1 HIV2 PEP PrEP TB toxoplasma tuberculoma Source Type: blogs

What Should You Do When Your Hospital Bills You Nearly $4,000 for a CT Scan?
A middle-aged Mississippi man has fallen victim to the trappings of the U.S. ’s overly-complex medical billing system. Jimmie Taggart, a financial consultant, was billed $3,878.25 for a CT scan earlier this year and is now refusing to pay.Taggart ’s doctor at the North Mississippi Medical Center recommended he undergo a CT scan after a urine test indicated he had kidney stones. Before agreeing to the scan, Taggart was assured by the medical center that his insurance would cover the procedure.Later on, a bill came in the mail stating that the scan cost $5,171 but his provider, Aetna, indicated that its in-networ...
Source: radRounds - July 7, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

A physician ’s personal crisis with pain
Six months ago, I had severe right flank pain. In the ER, I had an ultrasound showing a possible kidney stone. I deferred a CT scan and went home with medication. I fit the textbook picture: I had abnormal imaging, and I was given a treatment and discharged. I was advised to return if the pain worsened or failed to resolve. I briefly improved, but then the pain returned much worse. Ten days later, I returned to the ER. I was given ketorolac and had a CT, which showed no stone. The ER attending advised me to go home and take ibuprofen. At that point, my pain was 8/10, and I was having significant trouble moving despite the ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 24, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/heather-finlay-morreale" rel="tag" > Heather Finlay-Morreale, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Emergency Medicine Nephrology Pain Management Source Type: blogs

A Hippocratic Oath for technology
Modern technology needs to do better. This is the message delivered by every CEO after every Silicon Valley scandal in recent memory. This time, they should really do it. Medicine can show them how. Let’s have the professionals building our future abide by industry-wide standards, just as doctors do. As both a startup founder and a physician, this idea makes intuitive sense to me. Drawing on my experience treating patients and running a digital platform, here’s what a Hippocratic Oath for tech might look like. First, it shouldn’t say “first do no harm.” Not that I’m in favor of doin...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 22, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/joshua-landy" rel="tag" > Joshua Landy, MD < /a > Tags: Tech Mobile health Primary Care Source Type: blogs

New treatment through stem cell transplant for Sickle cell anemia
Sickle cell anemia is a form of anemia in which there aren’t enough healthy red blood cells to carry enough oxygen throughout your body. General symptoms include fatigue and joint pain with periods of intense pain that can last either hours or weeks. Revee Agyepong, a 17-year-old from Edmonton, Canada, suffered from sickle cell anemia with symptoms of chronic bone and joint pain, irregular heartbeat, kidney stones and shortness of breath. “I thought that everyone would go out for recess and play, then come back with a terrible headache and body pain, couldn’t breathe … eventually I&n...
Source: Cord Blood News - April 30, 2018 Category: Perinatology & Neonatology Authors: Maze Cord Blood Tags: blood disorder Cord Blood medical research stem cells Source Type: blogs

5 things that can help you take a pass on kidney stones
If you’ve ever passed a kidney stone, you probably would not wish it on your worst enemy, and you’ll do anything to avoid it again. “Kidney stones are more common in men than in women, and in about half of people who have had one, kidney stones strike again within 10 to 15 years without preventive measures,” says Dr. Brian Eisner, co-director of the Kidney Stone Program at Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital. Where do kidney stones come from? Kidney stones form develop when certain substances, such as calcium, oxalate, and uric acid, become concentrated enough to form crystals in your ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - March 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Matthew Solan Tags: Health Kidney and urinary tract Source Type: blogs

How to use the Wheat Belly and Undoctored books for maximum benefit
There are 6 books in the entire Wheat Belly series dating back to September, 2011. It’s been a glorious few years watching so many people experience spectacular health and weight transformations doing the opposite of conventional dietary advice, with many of their stories highlighted here on the pages of the Wheat Belly Blog, as well as the Official Wheat Belly Facebook page. Seasoned Wheat Belliers already know a lot about navigating the different content of the Wheat Belly books. But we’ve had so many newcomers that I thought it would be helpful to discuss how and when each of the Wheat Belly books can be use...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - March 5, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle autoimmune blood sugar cholesterol diabetes edema grain-free grains Weight Loss Wheat Belly Total Health Source Type: blogs

5 must-haves for great physician online profiles
Patients have a lot of choices when it comes to physicians.  Making sure your online profile is up to date, complete, and contains these five items will improve the chances that a website visitor will become a patient. Create a personal connection. Having good rapport with patients is important, and that process starts before patients ever walk in the door. How often have you seen a physician bio that only contains a single, humanizing detail in the last sentence: “Dr. John lives in Washington, DC with his wife, Karen.”  Some physicians may be hesitant to provide personal info, that shouldn&rsquo...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 4, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/brian-r-dooley" rel="tag" > Brian R. Dooley < /a > Tags: Social media Practice Management Source Type: blogs

Dr. Google: The top 10 health searches in 2017
Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling Ever wonder what other people are wondering about? I know I do. So, here are the top 10 health searches in Google for 2017. And just so you don’t have to look each one up, I’ve provided a brief answer. You’re welcome. 1.  What causes hiccups? I was surprised this one made it to the top 10 list of health searches. Maybe this search is common because hiccups are as mysterious as they are universal. I’ve written about hiccups before, but let’s just say the cause in any individual person is rarely known or knowable. Then again, the reason hiccups stop is als...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Health Source Type: blogs

Be ketotic . . . but only sometime
Achieving ketosis by engaging in a very low-carbohydrate, high-fat lifestyle is an effective means of losing weight, breaking insulin and leptin resistance, reversing type 2 diabetes and fatty liver, reducing blood pressure, reversing the inflammation of visceral fat, and may even cause partial or total remission of selected cancers. So what’s the problem? The problem comes when people remain ketotic for extended periods. We know with confidence that long-term ketosis poses substantial risk for health complications because thousands of children have followed ketogenic diets over the years as a means of suppressing in...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - February 2, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle Source Type: blogs

A story of 2 torsions
The kids were asleep, and I could hear a muted, distant moaning coming from our bedroom. It reminded me of labor pains, but there were three things making labor unlikely: my wife’s IUD, the absence of a gravid abdomen and the kind of unintentional celibacy that occurs between working parents raising two toddlers. I tried to ignore the moaning. In part, because it was a Sunday night, and the sound was disrupting the golden hour (the 60 minutes between the kid’s bedtime and my own), and because I could immediately recognize this was something potentially very bad. If I didn’t acknowledge it, perhaps, it wou...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 14, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/ronald-zacker" rel="tag" > Ronald Zacker, PA-C < /a > Tags: Conditions Emergency Medicine Source Type: blogs

Health Care Needs Its Rosa Parks Moment
BY SHANNON BROWNLEE On Wednesday, October 25, 2017 I was at the inaugural Society for Participatory Medicine conference. It was a fantastic day and the ending keynote was the superb Shannon Brownlee. It was great to catch up with her and I’m grateful that she agreed to let THCB publish her speech. Settle back with a cup of coffee (or as it’s Thanksgiving, perhaps something stronger), and enjoy–Matthew Holt George Burns once said, the secret to a good sermon is to have a good beginning and a good ending—and to have the two as close together as possible. I think the same is true of final keynotes aft...
Source: The Health Care Blog - November 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Matthew Holt Tags: OP-ED Patients Physicians Lown Institute Overtreatment Right Choice Alliance Shannon Brownlee Society for Participatory Medicine Source Type: blogs

10 rules to keep physicians on time
The key to staying on time in a busy clinic and to finish the day unscathed is to be in battle mode from the get go. The ten rules outlined below will help you to achieve that goal. 1. Make sure your bladder is empty, and that you are well hydrated. This goes without saying. You don’t want to finish the day with hydronephrosis or a kidney stone. This would lead to sick days and bite into your productivity pie. 2. You may be loaded with caffeine, your compassion tank may be full, and you may feel motivated in the early hours of the day when you are still fresh, but don’t fall into the trap of socializing with yo...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 8, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/drizzlemd" rel="tag" > DrizzleMD < /a > Tags: Physician Practice Management Primary Care Source Type: blogs

She sees difficult patients, but is a difficult patient herself
The patient is a 27-year-old Caucasian woman: slender, well-groomed. She is sitting in the office of her urologist, and she is unconsciously twisting her hands as she interrupts the doctor, having finally worked up the nerve. “I know you told me to expect some pain for a while after the lithotripsy. But I’ve been having pain in my bladder, even when I don’t think there are any stones. It started two years ago, before the stones. It feels like pressure, and it really stings when I urinate. It especially hurts when I’ve taken naproxen or loratadine, or if I have caffeine, or if I get dehydrated at all...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 8, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/kristin-puhl" rel="tag" > Kristin Puhl < /a > Tags: Education Primary Care Urology Source Type: blogs

The Undoctored protocol to prevent and alleviate calcium oxalate kidney stones
People who have had the painful experience of passing a kidney stone remember well what this feels like, as sufferers describe it as one of the few pains worse than childbirth. Over 7 years, 50 percent of people who have had an episode will experience a recurrence, with a greater proportion experiencing a recurrence over a longer period. The majority of kidney stones are made from calcium oxalate. I have developed the Undoctored protocol to help you prevent these painful stones from forming. This is one Undoctored Protocol among many provided in the Undoctored book, further expanded in the growing list of Protocols in the ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - November 7, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle bowel flora diy health Dr. Davis Source Type: blogs

We Simply Won ’ t Go To Mars Without Digital Health
“It’s 2017, we should have a lunar base by now,” noted Elon Musk when he revealed his grandiose plans about going to Mars in at least five years. “What the hell is going on?”, he asked clearly not being satisfied with the current state of astronautics. However, I say, we should not only concentrate on the development of space technologies but devote more focus to advancing technologies to keep people well and alive on the Red Planet. Digital health opens amazing horizons there. That’s what I detailed in my paper in New Space. We’ll colonize Mars There are plans for h...
Source: The Medical Futurist - October 11, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Telemedicine astronautics digital health elon musk gc3 Healthcare Innovation mars NASA Personalized medicine space space travel SpaceX technology wearables Source Type: blogs

VisualDx + Derm Expert, a Deep Learning App to Help Diagnose Skin Conditions
When a person develops an unsightly skin condition, the first person to assess it is typically not a dermatologist. A lack of expertise in dermatology too often leads to misdiagnoses. General practice physicians, for example, get very little training on skin conditions. Now, thanks to a new feature inside the latest Apple iOS for iPhones and iPads, any physician can have access to an impressive image recognition platform that identifies skin conditions and recommends further actions. We spoke with Dr. Art Papier, CEO of VisualDx, about the VisualDx + Derm Expert app that the company is making available. The new app is cert...
Source: Medgadget - September 26, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Dermatology Exclusive Medicine Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 199
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 199. Question 1 What does this pastry have in common with cardiology? http://www.waitrose.com + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer expand(document.getElementById('ddet1872942130'));expand(document.getElementById('ddetlink1872942130')) The french call it a &ld...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - July 28, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Frivolous Friday Five Bazett's formula chocolate torsade gentamicin myasthenia gravis pimped renal colic rollercoaster torsades de pointes william harvey Source Type: blogs

Citrate salts for treating and preventing kidney stones
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - July 24, 2017 Category: Internal Medicine Tags: nephrology urology Source Type: blogs

Vitamin D: Finding a balance
Over the July 4th weekend, my non-physician husband with a history of skin cancer tried to justify not wearing sunscreen in order to get some vitamin D. My husband, of course, has no idea how much vitamin D he needs or why, and I suspect he is not alone. Why do we need vitamin D? The easy answer is for bones. Vitamin D facilitates absorption of calcium and phosphate, which are needed for bone growth. Without sufficient vitamin D, bones become brittle (in children this is called rickets and in adults it is called osteomalacia) and break more easily. Vitamin D is likely beneficial for other parts of the body as well; studies...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - July 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Emily S. Ruiz, MD, MPH Tags: Drugs and Supplements Health Prevention Source Type: blogs

Why is magnesium so important?
One of the six core strategies in the Undoctored Wild, Naked, and Unwashed program for health and weight loss is restoration of magnesium. Magnesium deficiency is alarmingly common in today’s world. Why? Our reliance on filtered water that has had all of the magnesium removed, the reduced content of magnesium in modern crops, and the widespread use of proton pump inhibitors—-drugs prescribed to treat acid reflux and ulcers while reducing magnesium absorption. Remember those darned phytates in wheat and other grains that bind magnesium and other positively charged minerals in the intestinal tract, preventing ab...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - July 18, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle a fib constipation Dr. Davis grain-free grains health healthcare heart rhythm hydrochlorothiazide kidney stones oxalate sudden death Source Type: blogs

Pulsed High Intensity Ultrasound Removes Calcified Buildup from Prosthetic Heart Valves
Image via: American College of Cardiology Prosthetic heart valves that fit inside failed natural valves have now been used for years to treat thousands of patients. As time passes following implantation, the man-made valves tend to accumulate calcified debris over their leaflets. This slowly degrades their functionality and eventually requires revision procedures that may involve replacement of the prostheses, or valve-in-valve procedures that fit new prosthetic valves inside of old ones. A team of French researchers are proposing using pulsed cavitational ultrasound, also known as histotripsy, to clean the original i...
Source: Medgadget - June 19, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Cardiac Surgery Cardiology Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error, Continued: The CMRC Affirms Full Support for Libelous Esther
By David Tuller, DrPH For the last couple of weeks, I have been hammering the CFS/ME Research Collaborative to take a position on the actions of its deputy chair, Libelous Esther—better known as Dr. Esther Crawley. As I reported in several previous posts, Dr. Crawley falsely accused me of writing “libelous blogs” and Dr. Racaniello of posting them. To keep members of the CMRC board in the loop, I have sent them e-mails with links to these posts. In these e-mails, I have tried to be direct and pointed, but reasonably polite. I have mostly succeeded, although the recipients might have their own perspective....
Source: virology blog - May 15, 2017 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Commentary Information CFS/ME Research Collaborative chronic fatigue syndrome CMRC libel libelous mecfs myalgic encephalomyelitis PACE Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 28-year-old man is evaluated for recurrent nephrolithiasis
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 28-year-old man is evaluated for recurrent nephrolithiasis. Medical history is significant for Crohn disease complicated by multiple small bowel strictures requiring resection. He began developing kidney stones 3 years ago following his last bowel surgery. Analysis of the stones has consistently shown calcium oxalate, and he has been adherent to a low oxalate diet, oral hydration to maintain urine output of at least 2 L/d, and intake of 2 g of calcium carbonate with each meal. However, he has continued...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 13, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/mksap" rel="tag" > mksap < /a > Tags: Conditions Nephrology Source Type: blogs

New Undoctored book hits bookstores today
My new book, Undoctored: Why Health Care Has Failed You and How You Can Become Smarter Than Your Doctor, hits bookstores today, May 9th, 2017. I will be hosting a Facebook LIVE event today, also, at 5 pm Eastern/4 pm Central/3 pm Mountain/2 pm Pacific. I want Undoctored to spark a revolution, a revolt against the healthcare system and its predatory ways. Undoctored sums up the lessons learned from the six years of the worldwide Wheat Belly experience that witnessed hundreds of thousands, even millions, of people achieve slenderness and health. Undoctored expands the discussion to show readers how even greater levels of hea...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - May 9, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Undoctored costs drugs grains health healthcare medical devices medicines wheat Source Type: blogs

Fear as a Teacher
“You gain strength, courage, and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face. You must do the thing which you think you cannot do.” – Eleanor Roosevelt Taking a deep breath as I am typing these words about a topic that is inherent in the human condition. I consider myself a pretty brave person, having faced deaths of family members and friends, injury, an ectopic pregnancy, financial challenge, a heart attack, shingles, kidney stones, job layoff, illness, relationships ending, and loss of my home in a hurricane. These are all common life events; some expected, mos...
Source: World of Psychology - May 3, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Edie Weinstein, MSW, LSW Tags: Anxiety and Panic Self-Help Success & Achievement Source Type: blogs

Welcome to planet medicine
, where four rides around the sun earns you a golden ticket to study more, to train more, and to enjoy splicing two sacred letters onto the end of your title. The days are long, the weeks go fast, and sleep is optional. In this world, all-star draftees leave their immaculate collegiate careers as masters of memorization and intellectual puzzle solvers only to still be no more qualified to check a pulse than a two-year-old. Day one is the first and last day you will ever wear your pristine and spotless white cape — soon to be decorated with pen marks, coffee stains, and HIPAA-protected body fluids. It all begins as yo...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 21, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/bevan-johnson" rel="tag" > Bevan Johnson, MBA < /a > Tags: Education Medical school Source Type: blogs

Should You Take an Anticoagulant for AF? — Applying the 4 questions
This study of nearly 1000 elderly AF patients found that the risk of major bleeding was not different between aspirin and warfarin. I, therefore, side more with the European guidelines. Aspirin confers significant bleeding with either no or minimal stroke prevention effects. 4. What happens if I do nothing? This is easy. For the patients above, who have two risk factors, the green faces depict what happens if they do nothing. The most likely scenario is that they will not have a stroke (approx 97%) and not have a bleed (98%). The North American AF treatment guidelines grade the strength of their recommendations. They give ...
Source: Dr John M - April 18, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr John Source Type: blogs

Once Again I Wasn't The Patient
And it was nice. I went to visit my brother for the weekend. And didn't really see him. He had a kidney stone (and a lot nastier word to describe it) that caused him intense pain.I did get to go to Lowes with him to get parts of his upstairs sink. I also ran and emptied his dishwasher twice. Drove his children all over the place and visited him in the hospital. I fed his cat several times. I walked his girlfriend's dog a bunch of times - including in a snowstorm. I let the dog hog the bed one night and then I let the cat snuggle the next nights. I had dinner with his ex-wife and two of the children one night. I also drove ...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - March 7, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: being a patient family fatigue travel Source Type: blogs

Gaming the System
This post was originally published by  The Health Care Blog  on February 11.  As physicians ready themselves for the future of medicine under onerous MACRA regulations, it seems appropriate to glance into the future and visualize the medical utopia anticipated by so many.  Value-based care, determined by statistical analysis, is going to replace fee for service. Six months ago, I received my first set of statistics from a state Medicaid plan and was told my ER utilization numbers were on the higher end compared to most practices in the region.  This was perplexing as my patients...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - February 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Medicaid Source Type: blogs

Gaming the System
By NIRAN Al-AGBA, MD As physicians ready themselves for the future of medicine under onerous MACRA regulations, it seems appropriate to glance into the future and visualize the medical utopia anticipated by so many.  Value-based care, determined by statistical analysis, is going to replace fee for service.    Six months ago, I received my first set of statistics from a state Medicaid plan and was told my ER utilization numbers were on the higher end compared to most practices in the region.  This was perplexing as my patients tend to avoid ER visits at all costs and can be found milling about in my park...
Source: The Health Care Blog - February 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 168
Welcome to the 168th edition of Research and Reviews in the Fastlane. R&R in the Fastlane is a free resource that harnesses the power of social media to allow some of the best and brightest emergency medicine and critical care clinicians from all over the world tell us what they think is worth reading from the published literature. This edition contains 5 recommended reads. The R&R Editorial Team includes Jeremy Fried, Nudrat Rashid, Soren Rudolph, Justin Morgenstern and, of course, Chris Nickson. Find more R&R in the Fastlane reviews in the R&R Archive, read more about the R&a...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - January 11, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Nudrat Rashid Tags: Anaesthetics Education Emergency Medicine Intensive Care Neurology Neurosurgery Pre-hospital / Retrieval R&R in the FASTLANE Resuscitation recommendations research and reviews Source Type: blogs