Improved Live-Attenuated Vaccine for Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Bearing Codon-Pair Deoptimized NS1, NS2, N, P, M and SH Genes and Additional Point Mutations in the P Gene
RSV is the most important viral agent of severe respiratory disease in infants and young children worldwide and also causes substantial morbidity and mortality in older adults. RSV is estimated to cause more than 33 million lower respiratory tract illnesses, three million hospitalizations, and nearly 200,000 childhood deaths worldwide annually, with many deaths occurring in developing countries. However, despite the prevalence of RSV and the dangers associated with infection, no RSV vaccine has been successfully developed to date. Accordingly, there is a public health need for RSV vaccines.This vaccine candidate comprises ...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - February 25, 2021 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

3-o-sulfo-galactosylceramide Analogs as Activators of Type II Natural Killer T (NKT) Cells to Reduce Cancer Metastasis to the Lung
Lung metastases are a sign of widespread cancer with poor survival rate. Lung malignancies can originate from almost any cancer type spread via the blood stream. Most common lung metastases are from melanoma, breast cancer, bladder cancer, colon cancer, prostate cancer, neuroblastoma, and sarcoma. Living more than 5 years with lung metastases is uncommon, and surgical procedures are only effective with localized lung metastases. Lung metastasis are extremely frequent and resistant to regular treatment due to immunosuppressive regulatory sulfatide-reactive type II NKT cells. Currently, there is no effective treatment that c...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - February 24, 2021 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Stable Human Cell Lines Expressing Flavivirus Virus-Like Particles (VLPs) for Vaccine, Biologics, and Diagnostic Development
Flaviviruses such as Zika virus, dengue virus, West Nile virus, yellow fever virus, and Japanese encephalitis virus cause widespread illness and death throughout the world. Typically, flaviviruses get transmitted through the bite of infected mosquitoes and ticks.CDC has identified and characterized distinct flavivirus cross-reactive epitopes (specific pieces of the antigen to which an antibody binds) that can improve serodiagnosis and vaccination against flaviviruses. CDC ’s new flavivirus VLPs have structural proteins as the basis to form the viral particles. They do not have a viral genome so they are non-infectiou...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - February 19, 2021 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Replication-Competent Adenovirus Type 4 SARS-CoV-2 Vaccines and Their Use
NIAID has produced recombinant adenovirus type 4 (Ad4), SARS-CoV-2 spike, vectors for administration to humans. These recombinant vaccines permit rapid development of high levels of neutralizing antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 in experimental animals. This vaccine is designed to improve the durability of the immune response by inducing mucosal and systemic immunity. Further, this system should be incredibly simple and efficient when producing vaccine at scale. This technology is available for licensing for commercial development in accordance with 35 U.S.C. 209 and 37 CFR part 404, as well as for further development and evaluatio...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - February 19, 2021 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Monoclonal Antibodies Against Coxiella burnetii, the Cause of Q Fever for Diagnostic Development
Coxiella burnetii (C. burnetii), the bacterium that causes Q fever, gets transmitted by inhalation and remains extremely stable in the environment. It has a very low infectious dose (very few bacteria can cause illness), making it a potential agent for bioterrorism. These factors have led to inclusion of C. burnetii on the Health and Human Services list of Select Agents. Cattle, sheep, and goats commonly get infected with C. burnetii. People, especially those who handle farm animals, can become exposed to C. burnetii by breathing in dust contaminated from infected animal body fluids. The bacterium can exist in two antigeni...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - February 19, 2021 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Epstein-Barr Virus Antibody That Blocks Fusion And Neutralizes Virus Infection of B Cells
Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is the most common cause of infectious mononucleosis and is associated with nearly 200,000 cancers and 140,000 deaths each year. EBV-associated cancers include Hodgkin's lymphoma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, Burkitt B cell lymphoma, and EBV post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease. The latent reservoir for EBV in the body is the B lymphocyte. Thus, blocking B cell infection is important for reducing EBV-related disease.EBV can infect both B cells and epithelial cells; however, the method of entry differs between these two cell types. To initiate B cell infection, EBV glycoprotein 350 (gp350) binds t...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - February 16, 2021 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Size-dependent brain distribution of macromolecular drug delivery platform
The blood brain barrier (BBB) is a specialized endothelium that prevents the uptake of substances from the systemic circulation into the central nervous system. This barrier, while protecting the sensitive physiological environment of the brain, is also a major impediment in administering therapeutics that need to pass through the BBB. A drug delivery platform that could deliver therapeutic agents directly to the brain is needed, and could have wide ranging significance in a variety of psychiatric, oncology, infectious, and neurodegenerative diseases. Currently, there are no approved formulations that can effectively incre...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - February 9, 2021 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Monomeric and Oligomeric Compounds as Contraceptives and Endocrine Therapeutics
The options for male contraceptives are limited. Research is ongoing to develop a male contraceptive based on hormonal activity. Testosterone is one of the hormones necessary in producing sperm.   Testosterone is absolutely required as a hormone for male fertility. Derivatives of testosterone for male contraceptives currently in clinical trials are associated with estrogenic deficiency. This deficiency can cause several issues including, but not limited to, bone density loss, risk of obesi ty, cardiovascular disease, and/or ineffective carbohydrate or lipid metabolism. Researchers at theEunice Kennedy ShriverNati...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - February 9, 2021 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

A VSV-EBOV-Based Vaccine Against COVID-19
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the causative agent of for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). COVID-19 is characterized by fever, cough, difficulty breathing, loss of taste and smell, nausea, and sore throat. As of the fourth quarter 2020, COVID-19 is responsible for over 1.17 million deaths worldwide. As the pandemic continues to surge, the importance of a safe, affordable, and efficacious vaccine is of urgent importance. The present technology utilizes the well characterized vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) encoding the Ebola virus (VSV-EBOV) to express additionally a codon-optimized SAR...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - February 5, 2021 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor for the Treatment of Neurodegenerative Diseases and Diabetes
TheNational Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) is seeking interested parties to license or co-develop GDNFOS peptides and non-coding RNAs as therapeutic agents for neurodegenerative diseases.Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is a small human protein encoded by the GDNF gene. GDNF has been effective therapy in laboratory animal models of Parkinson's disease and protects several types of neurons in the brain and peripheral nervous system. Researchers at the NIDA have discovered primate-specific GDNFOS, encoded by the opposite strand of glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) gene. The GDNFOS gene encodes f...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - January 28, 2021 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

3D Image Rendering Software for Biological Tissues
Available for commercial development is software that provides automatic visualization of features inside biological image volumes in 3D. The software provides a simple and interactive visualization for the exploration of biological datasets through dataset-specific transfer functions and direct volume rendering. The method employs a K-Means++ clustering algorithm to classify a two-dimensional histogram created from the input volume. The classification process utilizes spatial and data properties from the volume. Then using properties derived from the classified clusters, the software automatically generates color and opac...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - January 28, 2021 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Prefusion-Stabilized Fusion (F) Glycoprotein Vaccine Immunogens For Human Metapneumovirus
Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) infections have been shown as a common cause of upper and lower respiratory diseases such as bronchiolitis and pneumonia in young children, the elderly, and other immunocompromised individuals. Studies show that infections by the non-segmented negative strand RNA virus begin with attachment and entry of viral glycoproteins that mediate fusion with host cellular membranes. Like for the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV), a viral entry is initiated by the fusion (F) protein. Given its role in hMPV entry, the F protein has thus been a target for eliciting neutralizing antibodies and developm...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - January 26, 2021 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Hybridoma cell lines producing antibodies to RSV NS1
This technology provides a new set of hybridoma cell lines each expressing a single monoclonal antibody against human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) nonstructural protein 1 (NS1). These antibodies have variously been shown to detect NS1 protein in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Western blot assay, immunofluorescence microscopy of paraformaldehyde-fixed cells, and flow cytometry. The various antibodies can vary in their efficiency in each of these assays. This technology provides a unique set of qualified monoclonal antibodies against RSV NS1 protein which currently do not exist. These antibodies and cell ...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - January 25, 2021 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Combination therapies for covid-19 (sars-cov-2)
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is caused by a novel RNA enveloped coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2 when the virus enters human airway cells via an ACE2-mediated entry process. This entry pathway is facilitated by the cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG), which enhances viral attachment to the cell surface. Researchers at NIDDK and NCATS have discovered a collection of FDA-approved drugs that can interfere with the entry of SARS-CoV-2. These drugs can be grouped into three classes based on the distinct steps in the viral entry pathway that they target. Specifically, Mitoxantrone, Raloxifene, and Piceatannol bind...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - January 25, 2021 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

High-Throughput COVID-19 Diagnostic Test that Detects Both Viral and Host Nucleic Acid
The rapid worldwide spread and impact of COVID-19 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has created a need for accurate, reliable, and readily accessible testing on a massive scale.NIEHS researchers developed a massively paralleled multiplexed screening method using next generation sequencing (NGS). This method uses sample-specific barcoded indexes that detect both SARS-COV-2 virus and the host ’s transcriptional response to infection simultaneously. By matching existing laboratory protocols for PCR-based sample processing, this assay is easily incorporated into existing CLIA-certifie...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - January 11, 2021 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

T-cell Receptors (TCRs) Specific for p53 Mutants
Tumor protein 53 (tp53 or p53) acts as a tumor suppressor by regulating cell division and DNA repair. Mutations of p53 reduce or eliminate its regulatory functions, contributing to cancer formation and progression. Such mutations in tumor protein p53 are expressed in a variety of human cancers such as colon, pancreatic, breast, and non-small cell lung cancer. Novel therapeutics are needed that specifically target p53 mutations, as small molecule inhibitors lack sequence specificity.T cell receptors (TCRs) are proteins expressed on the surface of T lymphocytes that can recognize peptide antigens from infected and malignant ...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - December 28, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

RNASEH-Assisted Detection Assay for RNA
Several viral epidemics – such as the epidemics caused by H1N1 influenza virus, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Ebola virus, Zika virus, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) virus, Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) virus and SARS-CoV-2 – have profoundly impacted global human health. Early identification o f infected and/or infectious persons and isolating them from the population are some of the most effective and evident measures to prevent human-to-human spreading. In addition, areas with low resources and infrastructure may benefit from this technique for the detection of any viral or non-viral...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - November 30, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Oxynitidine Derivatives Useful as Inhibitors of Topoisomerase IB (TOP1) and Tyrosyl-DNA Phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1) for Treating Cancer
Topoisomerase 1B (TOP1) is an enzyme that relieves the torsional strain in DNA. To relieve the torsional strain, TOP1B cleaves one strand of DNA and forms a transient complex called a TOP1-DNA covalent cleavage complex (TOP1cc). TOP1 inhibitors – such as camptothecin – stabilize the TOP1cc and prevent relegation of the broken DNA which, when encountered by replication and transcription machinery, triggers cell death. The DNA damage generated by the TOP1cc can be repaired by several pathways, including tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (T DP1) pathway.  Inhibitors of TOP1, including camptothecin (CPT), have ...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - November 30, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Leucine Zipper-bearing Kinase (LZK) -Targeting Degraders and Methods of Use
Leucine Zipper-bearing Kinase (LZK) has been identified as a novel therapeutic target in squamous cell carcinomas with 50% of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and lung squamous cell carcinomas (LSCC) patients showing amplifications or gains in LZK expression. Identifying successful therapies for the treatment of HNSCC or LSCC remains a significant unmet medical need.  Researchers at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have discovered a technology involving synthesized LZK-targeting PROTACs which are comprised of a LZK kinase inhibitor, linker, and a E3-ligase-binding warhead targeting VHL. The LZK PRO...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - November 30, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Triazole derivatives as p2y14 receptor antagonists
The technology describes the composition of small molecule compounds that are antagonists of the P2Y14 receptor. Also provided are methods of using the compounds, including a method of treating a disorder, such as inflammation, diabetes, insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, a lipid disorder, obesity, a condition associated with metabolic syndrome, and asthma, and a method of antagonizing P2Y14 receptor activity in a cell.NIDDKE-213-2015-0Development of P2Y14 receptor antagonist for treatment of disorders, such as:Inflammationdiabetesobesityasthmalipid disordermetabolic syndromer3425Nov 20, 2020Friday, November 20, 202062/233...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - November 20, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

P2Y14 Receptor Antagonists Containing A Biaryl Core
The technology discloses composition of compounds that fully antagonize the human P2Y14 receptor, with moderate affinity with insignificant antagonism of other P2Y receptors. Therefore, they are highly selective P2Y14 receptor antagonists. Even though there is no P2Y14 receptor modulators in clinical use currently, selective P2Y14 receptor antagonists are sought as potential therapeutic treatments for asthma, cystic fibrosis, inflammation and possibly diabetes and neurodegeneration.NIDDKE-028-2018-0Development of P2Y14 receptor antagonist for treatment of disorders, such as:Inflammationdiabetescystic fibrosisasthmaneurodeg...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - November 20, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Identification of a New Human Monoclonal Antibody that More Potently Prevents Malaria Infection
Malaria is a major disease caused by a parasite transmitted through the bite of infected female mosquitoes. Globally, an estimated 214 million cases of malaria and 438,000 deaths from malaria occur annually, with chidren in African and South Asian regions being most vulnerable. Approximately 1,500-2,000 cases of malaria are reported in the United States each year, mostly in returning travelers from malaria- endemic countries. Among the international travelers, military personnel, diplomats, pregnant women, children and older individuals with weakened immune systems are more likely to be at risk of malaria infection and mor...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - November 13, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Dopamine D3 Receptor Agonist Compounds, Methods of Preparation, Intermediates Thereof, and their Methods of Use
Due to the large degree of homology among dopamine D2-like receptors, discovering ligands capable of discriminating between the D2, D3, and D4 receptor subtypes remains a significant challenge. The development of subtype-selective pharmaceutical small molecules to activate (agonists) signals regulated by D2-like receptors has been especially difficult.  The inventors at the National Institute on Aging (NIDA) have recently synthesized a new generation of D3R selective agonists by applying a well-established bitopic molecular approach. Inventors were able to combine a primary pharmacophore (PP) with a secondary pharmaco...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - October 27, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Composite Gels and Methods of their Use in Tissue Repair, Drug Delivery, and as Implants
Gel materials, such as hydrogel materials, typically lose mechanical strength as they swell. This property of gels limits their use in both biological (e.g., cartilage repair) and non-biological (e.g., engineering and construction sealing and repair) applications. Innovative gels in both medical and non-medical fields sorely are needed.Recent innovations in this space, from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), include self-reinforcing, composite gels.   These gels comprise novel combinations of solvents and swellable crosslinked polymer particles.  Exemplary...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - October 27, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Simian T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Strain Type 3 (STLV-3) Subtype D Variant, a Highly Divergent STLV-3, for Development of Diagnostics, Therapeutics, Vaccines and Research Tools
Simian T-cell lymphotropic viruses (STLV) are nonhuman primate retroviruses closely related to the human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV). Types I, II, and III of HTLV have been found in humans and are believed to have originated from cross-species transmission of STLV from infected nonhuman primates. The HTLV viruses are known to cause leukemia, lymphoma, and neurological disorders.CDC researchers discovered a strain of simian T-cell lymphotropic virus type 3 known as STLV-3 subtype D variant. STLV-3 may be widespread in primates hunted in West-Central Africa, including the monkey Cercopithecus mona, which has a known geograph...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - October 26, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Rescue of AAV Production by shRNA Co-transfection
Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors are proving to be a valid, safe and efficient gene transfer system for clinical applications. As most vectors utilize constitutive promoters, this results in transgene expression in the producer cell. Some of these transgene products can induce proapoptotic, cytostatic or other unknown effects that interfere with producer cell function. Therefore, this reduces the viral vector yield and is a major limitation when trying to characterize poorly described genes. NIDCR developed a method of expression of the transgene product during the vector production in the produce cell but...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - October 23, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Ex-vivo Production of Regulatory B-Cells for Use in Auto-immune Diseases
Regulatory B-cells (Breg) play an important role in reducing autoimmunity and reduced levels of these cells are implicated in etiology of several auto-inflammatory diseases. Despite their impact in many diseases, their physiological inducers are unknown.   Given that Bregs are a very rare B-cell, identifying factors that promote their development would allow in vivo modulation of Breg levels and ex-vivo production of large amounts of antigen-specific Bregs to use in immunotherapy for auto-inflammatory diseases.  Researchers at NEI'sMolecular Immunology Section developed a method for theex-vivo production of Breg...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - October 22, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

T-Cell Therapy Against Patient-Specific Cancer Mutations
Human cancers contain genetic mutations that are unique to each patient. Some of the mutated peptides are immunogenic, can be recognized by T cells, and therefore, may serve as therapeutic targets.Scientists at the National Cancer Institute'sSurgery Branch developed a method to identify T cells that specifically recognize immunogenic mutations expressed only by cancer cells. The scientists identified cancer-specific mutations from a patient with widely metastatic cholangiocarcinoma by sequencing tumor samples and comparing with normal cells. Using tandem minigene constructs encoding all of the mutations expressed by a pati...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - October 22, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Structure-Based Design of SARS-CoV-2 Spike Immunogens Stabilized in the RBD-All Down Conformation
SARS-CoV-2 has emerged as a global pathogen, sparking urgent vaccine development efforts. The trimeric SARS-CoV-2 spike appears to be a leading vaccine antigen. However, the inability of antibodies such as CR3022, which binds tightly to a cryptic spike epitope, to neutralize SARS-CoV-2 suggests a spike-based means of neutralization escape.Researchers at the Vaccine Research Center (VRC) of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) sought to understand how antibodies with high affinity fail to neutralize the SARS-CoV-2. To that end, the researchers characterized the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein conformat...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - October 2, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Use of Acetalax for Treatment of Triple Negative Breast Cancer
Triple negative (progesterone receptor (PR)-, estrogen receptor (ER)-, human epidermal growth receptor 2 (HER2)-) breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive subtype that affects 15-20% of the 1.7 million cases of breast cancer occurring annually.   Currently, standard treatments of TNBC include cytotoxic chemotherapies, surgery, and radiation. However, TNBC readily becomes resistant to chemotherapy, and those with TNBC are more likely to have a recurrence or die within five years compared to those with other breast cancer types. Therefore, there is a need for safer and more effective TNBC treatments to improve patient outc...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - September 25, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Angiogenesis-Based Cancer Therapeutic
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-A (VEGF-A) is an angiogenic agent that drives blood vessel formation in solid tumors and other diseases, such as macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. Several therapies that target the ability of VEGF to stimulate angiogenesis have been approved. These therapies regulate VEGF-A activity by binding VEGF-A, thereby blocking VEGF-A from binding to its receptor on target cells. This technology utilizes a different approach to regulating VEGF-A activity by providing a VEGF-A protein antagonist that is produced by engineering native VEGF-A protein. The engineered VEGF-A protein disrupt...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - September 24, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Margaric Acid Decreases PIEZO2 Mediated Pain
Some existing therapies for treatment of pain are administered systematically and have significant side effects, such as addiction and drowsiness. Alternative therapy that does not impair normal touch function could be used to treat pain caused by mechanical injury or chronic inflammation. Administration of margaric acid was shown to ameliorate pain in mouse models of pain. In vitro data shows that margaric acid counteracts PIEZO2 (Piezo-type mechanosensitive ion channel component 2) potentiation evoked by bradykinin (i.e. a peptide that promotes inflammation) by reducing the mechanocurrents up to non-inflammatory levels. ...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - September 3, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Calcium (Ca2+) Flux-Dependent Method to Detect and Isolate Tumor Reactive T Cell Receptors (TCRs)
T cells with T cell receptors (TCRs) for cancer-specific antigens are used for adoptive cell therapy (ACT), wherein a patient ’s T cells are redirected against their own cancer. However, these isolated T cells may require further ex vivo manipulation to enhance their anti-tumor activity. The ex vivo manipulation of these T cells, or the selection of less functionally inert T cells, and genetic insertion of tumor specific TCRs may circumvent these limitations.To address this issue, it is crucial to recognize, select, and isolate tumor reactive T cells from a plethora of other non-reactive ones. When re-infused into th...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - September 3, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Extremely Rapid Method to Isolate Neoantigen Reactive T Cell Receptors (TCRs)
Adoptive cell transfer (ACT) uses tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) that recognize unique antigens expressed by cancer cells ( “neoantigens”). Neoantigen specific TIL administration in patients has resulted in long term regression of certain metastatic cancers. However, one of the challenges of ACT and engineered T cell receptor (TCR) therapies more broadly, is the identification and isolation of these mutation specific TILs and TCRs. Only a fraction of TILs in a given patient is known to be tumor reactive, while the majority are not useful for cell therapy. The current procedures for isolating neoantigen r...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - September 3, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Method of Neoantigen-Reactive T Cell Receptor (TCR) Isolation from Peripheral Blood of Cancer Patients
Adoptive cell transfer (ACT) uses tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) that recognize antigens expressed by cancer cells (neoantigens). Neoantigen specific TIL administration in patients has resulted in long-term regression of certain metastatic cancers. However, current procedures for TIL therapy are highly invasive, labor-intensive, and time consuming. The success of these procedures is limited and differs between patients and histologies. Isolation of neoantigen reactive TCRs have historically been challenging due to very low precursor frequencies of these T-cells as well as lack of technical advances that can determin...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - September 3, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Novel Methods for Reducing Inflammation and Treating Diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's Disease
Microglia activation leads to inflammation mediated dopaminergic degeneration in the brain of patients with Parkinson and Alzheimer's Disease. Thus Identification of drugs that reduce microglia activation could prevent or reverse neuronal degeneration in these diseases and other degenerative CNS disorders.This invention describes small-peptide and non-peptide molecules that inhibit microglia activation and prevent neuronal degeneration with a bi-modal dose response curve. The non-peptide compounds have also been shown to prevent dopamine neuronal degeneration in animal models. This invention provides compositions and metho...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - September 3, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Denoising of Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging Using Low Rank Approximations in the Kinetic Domain
Accurate measurement of low metabolite concentrations produced by medically important enzymes is commonly obscured by noise during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Measuring the turnover rate of low-level metabolites can directly quantify the activity of enzymes of interest, including possible drug targets in cancer and other diseases. Noise can cause the in vivo signal to fall below the limit of detection. A variety of denoising methods have been proposed to enhance spectroscopic peaks, but still fall short for the detection of low-intensity signals. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is one method that has been critical...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - August 24, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Combination of Near Infrared Photoimmunotherapy Targeting Cancer Cells and Host-Immune Activation
Common methods of cancer therapy largely rely on either direct killing of cancer cells or activation of the host immune response to do so, but not both. A recently developed treatment of tumors uses an antibody/photo-absorber, Ab-IR700, with near infrared photoimmunotherapy (NIR-PIT), to selectively kill IR700-bound and NIR-light-exposed cancer cells by activating an immunogenic cell death pathway. NIR-PIT has been shown in human clinical trials to effectively target tumor cells via a host immune response with relatively few side effects. However, the depth of NIR-light penetration in vivo limits its usefulness. To address...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - August 24, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Diagnostic for Cancer of the Adrenal Glands and Adrenal Cortex
The National Cancer Institute seeks parties to co-develop a diagnostic method for adrenocortical cancer (ACC) through analysis of DNA methylation patterns in tissue.Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a very rare form of adrenal cancer.   Diagnosis is often done during surgical removal of the tumor.  Since the tumor pathology is not diagnosed prior to surgery, large numbers of patients with benign tumors undergo this surgery unnecessarily.  There remains a need for a less invasive diagnostic method to reduce both the healthcare costs and the unnecessary risks of invasive surgery on patients who do no...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - August 20, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Novel Regulatory B cells for Treatment of Cancer and Autoimmune Disease
The manner by which cancers evade the immune response is not well-understood. What is known is that the manner is an active process that regulates immune responses employing at least two types of suppressive cells, myeloid-derived suppressive cells and regulatory T cells (Tregs), a key subset of CD4+ T cells that controls peripheral tolerance to self- and allo-antigens. Tregs are considered to play a key role in the escape of cancer cells from anti-tumor effector T cells. Cancer cells have been found to directly activate resting B cells to form suppressive regulatory B cells (tBregs) and utilize them to evade immune survei...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - August 20, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Method of treating silicosis and other occupational lung diseases
The inhalation of dust containing crystalline silica particles causes silicosis, an incurable lung disease that progresses even after dust exposure ceases. Over a million US workers are exposed to silica dust annually, and thousands worldwide die each year from silicosis. The pulmonary inflammation caused by silica inhalation is characterized by a cellular infiltrate and the accumulation of chemokines, cytokines, and Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid.   Macrophages are the predominant immune cell type present in alveolar spaces. The uptake of silica particles by macrophages triggers the pro...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - August 20, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

T-cell Receptors Targeting CD20-Positive Lymphomas and Leukemias
CD20 is a protein expressed by wide ranges of lymphoid malignancies originating from B cells but not by indispensable normal tissues, making it an attractive target for therapies such as T-cell receptor (TCR) therapy. Current anti-CD20 therapeutics face a number of limitations. The most important limitation to current anti-CD20 therapies include cancer cells becoming resistant to the therapy. Resistance mechanisms to the existing CD20 therapies include loss of target antigen expression from the cell surface, loss of antibody epitope, or modulation of antibody epitope – all of which make the malignant cells “inv...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - August 19, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Gene Therapy for Treatment of CRX-Autosomal Dominant Retinopathies
Mutations in the cone rod homeobox (CRX) transcription factor lead to distinct retinopathy phenotypes, including early-onset vision impairment in dominant Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). Adeno-Associated virus (AAV) vector-mediated delivery of a CRX cDNA under the control of a CRX promoter region partially restored photoreceptor phenotype and expression of phototransduction genes in an in vitro model of CRX-LCA. Gene therapy using the CRX-AAV vector to retinal organoids derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) of a patient with the dominant CRX-I138fs mutation partially restored expression of visual opsins and...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - August 17, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Humanized Mouse Model to Study Mesothelin (MSLN) -targeted Cancer Therapeutics: Bl6/TPO Mice
Mesothelin (MSLN) is an antigen highly expressed in several human cancers including mesotheliomas, ovarian cancers and pancreatic cancers. As such, human MSLN (hMSLN) is a target for many anti-cancer drugs. Most therapeutics targeting hMSLN do not recognize the mouse isoform of MSLN (mMSLN) and therefore cannot be tested in mouse cancer models.  Investigators at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a mouse model wherein mice are genetically engineered to express hMSLN in the thyroid gland under the transcriptional control of a thyroid-specific (Tpo) gene promoter. Due to the tolerance to the hMSLN isofor...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - August 17, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Use and Preparation of CD206 Small Molecule Modulators as Therapeutics for CD206-Expressing Cancers
Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) accounts for more than 90% of pancreatic cancer cases, and it is one of the most aggressive malignancies with a 5-year survival rate of 6%. The high mortality rate caused by PDA is primarily from the lack of early diagnosis – it is often asymptomatic in early stages – and a poor response to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The major immune cell type present in the PDA microenvironment is a subset of macrophages commonly termed tumor-associated macrophages (TAM). TAMs originate from circulating monocytes upon activation by CCL2, a chemotactic chemokine secreted a...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - August 17, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Therapeutic Immunotoxins with Increased Half-Life and Anti-Tumor Activity
Recombinant Immunotoxins (RITs) are chimeric molecules composed of an antigen binding domain and toxin. The antigen binding domain component targets the cancer cell and delivers the toxin component to the cell. However, the efficacy of RITs is limited by their short half-life once they are in the patient. To address this problem, investigators at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) increased the half-life of RITs using polyethylene glycol (PEG).In specific embodiments, the antigen-binding fragment targets mesothelin, and the toxin is a fragment of Pseudomonas exotoxin (PE). Mesothelin is highly expressed in many human canc...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - August 17, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

High Affinity Nanobodies Targeting B7-H3 (CD276) for Treating Solid Tumors
CD276 (also called B7-H3) is a pan-cancer antigen expressed in multiple solid tumors and an emerging cancer target. CD276 protein is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer, prostate cancer, breast cancer, colon cancer, lung cancer, and brain tumors (such as neuroblastoma) – making it an ideal target for cancer therapy. Investigators at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have isolated a panel of anti-CD276 single domain antibodies (also known as nanobodies) from novel camel and rabbit single domain (VHH) libraries by phage display.  Nanobodies are the smallest known antigen-binding fragments of antibodies. Due ...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - August 17, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

A method to label heparan sulfate proteoglycan in the plasma membrane of mammalian cells
Heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) is a group of lipid-anchored proteoglycans, engaged in a variety of key biological functions on cell surface. HSPG-mediated endocytosis of neurotoxic protein aggregates has been linked to aging related neurodegenerative diseases. Labeling HSPG is a promising technique to trace cell profile in cell research, monitor its trafficking in live cells and in tissues. Researchers at the NIDDK have discovered a method in which a positively charged fluorescent protein binds specifically to HSPG on cell surface. This is a promising cost-effective technique that will help scientists to monitor the f...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - August 13, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Self-Assembled Ferritin Nanoparticles Expressing Hemagglutinin as an Influenza Vaccine
NIH inventors at the Vaccine Research Center have developed a novel influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA)-ferritin nanoparticle influenza vaccine that is easily manufactured, potent, and elicits broadly neutralizing influenza antibodies against multiple strains of influenza. This novel influenza nanoparticle vaccine elicited two types of broadly neutralizing, cross-protective antibodies, one directed to the highly conserved HA stem and a second proximal to the conserved receptor binding site (RBS) of the viral HA, providing a new platform for universal and seasonal influenza. In addition, HA-ferritin nanoparticles can be easi...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - August 3, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Antisense Oligonucleotides against Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion
Advanced stage cancers are typically marked by metastases of the primary cancer to secondary sites such as lungs, liver, and bones. Such metastatic cancers result in strikingly low 5-year survival rates, underscoring the need for novel therapeutics. For example, bone metastasis of primary breast cancer has a 5-year survival rate of 13%, lung cancer only 1%. There is a need for targeted therapy options specific to metastases. One approach to targeting metastases is to reduce cancer cell migration and invasion.Several mRNAs become localized to subcellular destinations during the metastatic process. These mRNAs may play roles...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - July 21, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research