Dopamine D3 Receptor Agonist Compounds, Methods of Preparation, Intermediates Thereof, and their Methods of Use
Due to the large degree of homology among dopamine D2-like receptors, discovering ligands capable of discriminating between the D2, D3, and D4 receptor subtypes remains a significant challenge. The development of subtype-selective pharmaceutical small molecules to activate (agonists) signals regulated by D2-like receptors has been especially difficult.  The inventors at the National Institute on Aging (NIDA) have recently synthesized a new generation of D3R selective agonists by applying a well-established bitopic molecular approach. Inventors were able to combine a primary pharmacophore (PP) with a secondary pharmaco...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - October 27, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Composite Gels and Methods of their Use in Tissue Repair, Drug Delivery, and as Implants
Gel materials, such as hydrogel materials, typically lose mechanical strength as they swell. This property of gels limits their use in both biological (e.g., cartilage repair) and non-biological (e.g., engineering and construction sealing and repair) applications. Innovative gels in both medical and non-medical fields sorely are needed.Recent innovations in this space, from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), include self-reinforcing, composite gels.   These gels comprise novel combinations of solvents and swellable crosslinked polymer particles.  Exemplary...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - October 27, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Simian T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Strain Type 3 (STLV-3) Subtype D Variant, a Highly Divergent STLV-3, for Development of Diagnostics, Therapeutics, Vaccines and Research Tools
Simian T-cell lymphotropic viruses (STLV) are nonhuman primate retroviruses closely related to the human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV). Types I, II, and III of HTLV have been found in humans and are believed to have originated from cross-species transmission of STLV from infected nonhuman primates. The HTLV viruses are known to cause leukemia, lymphoma, and neurological disorders.CDC researchers discovered a strain of simian T-cell lymphotropic virus type 3 known as STLV-3 subtype D variant. STLV-3 may be widespread in primates hunted in West-Central Africa, including the monkey Cercopithecus mona, which has a known geograph...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - October 26, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Rescue of AAV Production by shRNA Co-transfection
Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors are proving to be a valid, safe and efficient gene transfer system for clinical applications. As most vectors utilize constitutive promoters, this results in transgene expression in the producer cell. Some of these transgene products can induce proapoptotic, cytostatic or other unknown effects that interfere with producer cell function. Therefore, this reduces the viral vector yield and is a major limitation when trying to characterize poorly described genes. NIDCR developed a method of expression of the transgene product during the vector production in the produce cell but...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - October 23, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Ex-vivo Production of Regulatory B-Cells for Use in Auto-immune Diseases
Regulatory B-cells (Breg) play an important role in reducing autoimmunity and reduced levels of these cells are implicated in etiology of several auto-inflammatory diseases. Despite their impact in many diseases, their physiological inducers are unknown.   Given that Bregs are a very rare B-cell, identifying factors that promote their development would allow in vivo modulation of Breg levels and ex-vivo production of large amounts of antigen-specific Bregs to use in immunotherapy for auto-inflammatory diseases.  Researchers at NEI'sMolecular Immunology Section developed a method for theex-vivo production of Breg...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - October 22, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

T-Cell Therapy Against Patient-Specific Cancer Mutations
Human cancers contain genetic mutations that are unique to each patient. Some of the mutated peptides are immunogenic, can be recognized by T cells, and therefore, may serve as therapeutic targets.Scientists at the National Cancer Institute'sSurgery Branch developed a method to identify T cells that specifically recognize immunogenic mutations expressed only by cancer cells. The scientists identified cancer-specific mutations from a patient with widely metastatic cholangiocarcinoma by sequencing tumor samples and comparing with normal cells. Using tandem minigene constructs encoding all of the mutations expressed by a pati...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - October 22, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Structure-Based Design of SARS-CoV-2 Spike Immunogens Stabilized in the RBD-All Down Conformation
SARS-CoV-2 has emerged as a global pathogen, sparking urgent vaccine development efforts. The trimeric SARS-CoV-2 spike appears to be a leading vaccine antigen. However, the inability of antibodies such as CR3022, which binds tightly to a cryptic spike epitope, to neutralize SARS-CoV-2 suggests a spike-based means of neutralization escape.Researchers at the Vaccine Research Center (VRC) of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) sought to understand how antibodies with high affinity fail to neutralize the SARS-CoV-2. To that end, the researchers characterized the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein conformat...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - October 2, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Use of Acetalax for Treatment of Triple Negative Breast Cancer
Triple negative (progesterone receptor (PR)-, estrogen receptor (ER)-, human epidermal growth receptor 2 (HER2)-) breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive subtype that affects 15-20% of the 1.7 million cases of breast cancer occurring annually.   Currently, standard treatments of TNBC include cytotoxic chemotherapies, surgery, and radiation. However, TNBC readily becomes resistant to chemotherapy, and those with TNBC are more likely to have a recurrence or die within five years compared to those with other breast cancer types. Therefore, there is a need for safer and more effective TNBC treatments to improve patient outc...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - September 25, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Angiogenesis-Based Cancer Therapeutic
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-A (VEGF-A) is an angiogenic agent that drives blood vessel formation in solid tumors and other diseases, such as macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. Several therapies that target the ability of VEGF to stimulate angiogenesis have been approved. These therapies regulate VEGF-A activity by binding VEGF-A, thereby blocking VEGF-A from binding to its receptor on target cells. This technology utilizes a different approach to regulating VEGF-A activity by providing a VEGF-A protein antagonist that is produced by engineering native VEGF-A protein. The engineered VEGF-A protein disrupt...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - September 24, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Margaric Acid Decreases PIEZO2 Mediated Pain
Some existing therapies for treatment of pain are administered systematically and have significant side effects, such as addiction and drowsiness. Alternative therapy that does not impair normal touch function could be used to treat pain caused by mechanical injury or chronic inflammation. Administration of margaric acid was shown to ameliorate pain in mouse models of pain. In vitro data shows that margaric acid counteracts PIEZO2 (Piezo-type mechanosensitive ion channel component 2) potentiation evoked by bradykinin (i.e. a peptide that promotes inflammation) by reducing the mechanocurrents up to non-inflammatory levels. ...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - September 3, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Calcium (Ca2+) Flux-Dependent Method to Detect and Isolate Tumor Reactive T Cell Receptors (TCRs)
T cells with T cell receptors (TCRs) for cancer-specific antigens are used for adoptive cell therapy (ACT), wherein a patient ’s T cells are redirected against their own cancer. However, these isolated T cells may require further ex vivo manipulation to enhance their anti-tumor activity. The ex vivo manipulation of these T cells, or the selection of less functionally inert T cells, and genetic insertion of tumor specific TCRs may circumvent these limitations.To address this issue, it is crucial to recognize, select, and isolate tumor reactive T cells from a plethora of other non-reactive ones. When re-infused into th...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - September 3, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Extremely Rapid Method to Isolate Neoantigen Reactive T Cell Receptors (TCRs)
Adoptive cell transfer (ACT) uses tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) that recognize unique antigens expressed by cancer cells ( “neoantigens”). Neoantigen specific TIL administration in patients has resulted in long term regression of certain metastatic cancers. However, one of the challenges of ACT and engineered T cell receptor (TCR) therapies more broadly, is the identification and isolation of these mutation specific TILs and TCRs. Only a fraction of TILs in a given patient is known to be tumor reactive, while the majority are not useful for cell therapy. The current procedures for isolating neoantigen r...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - September 3, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Method of Neoantigen-Reactive T Cell Receptor (TCR) Isolation from Peripheral Blood of Cancer Patients
Adoptive cell transfer (ACT) uses tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) that recognize antigens expressed by cancer cells (neoantigens). Neoantigen specific TIL administration in patients has resulted in long-term regression of certain metastatic cancers. However, current procedures for TIL therapy are highly invasive, labor-intensive, and time consuming. The success of these procedures is limited and differs between patients and histologies. Isolation of neoantigen reactive TCRs have historically been challenging due to very low precursor frequencies of these T-cells as well as lack of technical advances that can determin...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - September 3, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Novel Methods for Reducing Inflammation and Treating Diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's Disease
Microglia activation leads to inflammation mediated dopaminergic degeneration in the brain of patients with Parkinson and Alzheimer's Disease. Thus Identification of drugs that reduce microglia activation could prevent or reverse neuronal degeneration in these diseases and other degenerative CNS disorders.This invention describes small-peptide and non-peptide molecules that inhibit microglia activation and prevent neuronal degeneration with a bi-modal dose response curve. The non-peptide compounds have also been shown to prevent dopamine neuronal degeneration in animal models. This invention provides compositions and metho...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - September 3, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Denoising of Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging Using Low Rank Approximations in the Kinetic Domain
Accurate measurement of low metabolite concentrations produced by medically important enzymes is commonly obscured by noise during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Measuring the turnover rate of low-level metabolites can directly quantify the activity of enzymes of interest, including possible drug targets in cancer and other diseases. Noise can cause the in vivo signal to fall below the limit of detection. A variety of denoising methods have been proposed to enhance spectroscopic peaks, but still fall short for the detection of low-intensity signals. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is one method that has been critical...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - August 24, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Combination of Near Infrared Photoimmunotherapy Targeting Cancer Cells and Host-Immune Activation
Common methods of cancer therapy largely rely on either direct killing of cancer cells or activation of the host immune response to do so, but not both. A recently developed treatment of tumors uses an antibody/photo-absorber, Ab-IR700, with near infrared photoimmunotherapy (NIR-PIT), to selectively kill IR700-bound and NIR-light-exposed cancer cells by activating an immunogenic cell death pathway. NIR-PIT has been shown in human clinical trials to effectively target tumor cells via a host immune response with relatively few side effects. However, the depth of NIR-light penetration in vivo limits its usefulness. To address...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - August 24, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Diagnostic for Cancer of the Adrenal Glands and Adrenal Cortex
The National Cancer Institute seeks parties to co-develop a diagnostic method for adrenocortical cancer (ACC) through analysis of DNA methylation patterns in tissue.Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a very rare form of adrenal cancer.   Diagnosis is often done during surgical removal of the tumor.  Since the tumor pathology is not diagnosed prior to surgery, large numbers of patients with benign tumors undergo this surgery unnecessarily.  There remains a need for a less invasive diagnostic method to reduce both the healthcare costs and the unnecessary risks of invasive surgery on patients who do no...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - August 20, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Novel Regulatory B cells for Treatment of Cancer and Autoimmune Disease
The manner by which cancers evade the immune response is not well-understood. What is known is that the manner is an active process that regulates immune responses employing at least two types of suppressive cells, myeloid-derived suppressive cells and regulatory T cells (Tregs), a key subset of CD4+ T cells that controls peripheral tolerance to self- and allo-antigens. Tregs are considered to play a key role in the escape of cancer cells from anti-tumor effector T cells. Cancer cells have been found to directly activate resting B cells to form suppressive regulatory B cells (tBregs) and utilize them to evade immune survei...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - August 20, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Method of treating silicosis and other occupational lung diseases
The inhalation of dust containing crystalline silica particles causes silicosis, an incurable lung disease that progresses even after dust exposure ceases. Over a million US workers are exposed to silica dust annually, and thousands worldwide die each year from silicosis. The pulmonary inflammation caused by silica inhalation is characterized by a cellular infiltrate and the accumulation of chemokines, cytokines, and Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid.   Macrophages are the predominant immune cell type present in alveolar spaces. The uptake of silica particles by macrophages triggers the pro...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - August 20, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

T-cell Receptors Targeting CD20-Positive Lymphomas and Leukemias
CD20 is a protein expressed by wide ranges of lymphoid malignancies originating from B cells but not by indispensable normal tissues, making it an attractive target for therapies such as T-cell receptor (TCR) therapy. Current anti-CD20 therapeutics face a number of limitations. The most important limitation to current anti-CD20 therapies include cancer cells becoming resistant to the therapy. Resistance mechanisms to the existing CD20 therapies include loss of target antigen expression from the cell surface, loss of antibody epitope, or modulation of antibody epitope – all of which make the malignant cells “inv...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - August 19, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Gene Therapy for Treatment of CRX-Autosomal Dominant Retinopathies
Mutations in the cone rod homeobox (CRX) transcription factor lead to distinct retinopathy phenotypes, including early-onset vision impairment in dominant Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). Adeno-Associated virus (AAV) vector-mediated delivery of a CRX cDNA under the control of a CRX promoter region partially restored photoreceptor phenotype and expression of phototransduction genes in an in vitro model of CRX-LCA. Gene therapy using the CRX-AAV vector to retinal organoids derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) of a patient with the dominant CRX-I138fs mutation partially restored expression of visual opsins and...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - August 17, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Humanized Mouse Model to Study Mesothelin (MSLN) -targeted Cancer Therapeutics: Bl6/TPO Mice
Mesothelin (MSLN) is an antigen highly expressed in several human cancers including mesotheliomas, ovarian cancers and pancreatic cancers. As such, human MSLN (hMSLN) is a target for many anti-cancer drugs. Most therapeutics targeting hMSLN do not recognize the mouse isoform of MSLN (mMSLN) and therefore cannot be tested in mouse cancer models.  Investigators at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a mouse model wherein mice are genetically engineered to express hMSLN in the thyroid gland under the transcriptional control of a thyroid-specific (Tpo) gene promoter. Due to the tolerance to the hMSLN isofor...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - August 17, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Use and Preparation of CD206 Small Molecule Modulators as Therapeutics for CD206-Expressing Cancers
Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) accounts for more than 90% of pancreatic cancer cases, and it is one of the most aggressive malignancies with a 5-year survival rate of 6%. The high mortality rate caused by PDA is primarily from the lack of early diagnosis – it is often asymptomatic in early stages – and a poor response to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The major immune cell type present in the PDA microenvironment is a subset of macrophages commonly termed tumor-associated macrophages (TAM). TAMs originate from circulating monocytes upon activation by CCL2, a chemotactic chemokine secreted a...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - August 17, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Therapeutic Immunotoxins with Increased Half-Life and Anti-Tumor Activity
Recombinant Immunotoxins (RITs) are chimeric molecules composed of an antigen binding domain and toxin. The antigen binding domain component targets the cancer cell and delivers the toxin component to the cell. However, the efficacy of RITs is limited by their short half-life once they are in the patient. To address this problem, investigators at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) increased the half-life of RITs using polyethylene glycol (PEG).In specific embodiments, the antigen-binding fragment targets mesothelin, and the toxin is a fragment of Pseudomonas exotoxin (PE). Mesothelin is highly expressed in many human canc...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - August 17, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

High Affinity Nanobodies Targeting B7-H3 (CD276) for Treating Solid Tumors
CD276 (also called B7-H3) is a pan-cancer antigen expressed in multiple solid tumors and an emerging cancer target. CD276 protein is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer, prostate cancer, breast cancer, colon cancer, lung cancer, and brain tumors (such as neuroblastoma) – making it an ideal target for cancer therapy. Investigators at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have isolated a panel of anti-CD276 single domain antibodies (also known as nanobodies) from novel camel and rabbit single domain (VHH) libraries by phage display.  Nanobodies are the smallest known antigen-binding fragments of antibodies. Due ...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - August 17, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

A method to label heparan sulfate proteoglycan in the plasma membrane of mammalian cells
Heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) is a group of lipid-anchored proteoglycans, engaged in a variety of key biological functions on cell surface. HSPG-mediated endocytosis of neurotoxic protein aggregates has been linked to aging related neurodegenerative diseases. Labeling HSPG is a promising technique to trace cell profile in cell research, monitor its trafficking in live cells and in tissues. Researchers at the NIDDK have discovered a method in which a positively charged fluorescent protein binds specifically to HSPG on cell surface. This is a promising cost-effective technique that will help scientists to monitor the f...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - August 13, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Self-Assembled Ferritin Nanoparticles Expressing Hemagglutinin as an Influenza Vaccine
NIH inventors at the Vaccine Research Center have developed a novel influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA)-ferritin nanoparticle influenza vaccine that is easily manufactured, potent, and elicits broadly neutralizing influenza antibodies against multiple strains of influenza. This novel influenza nanoparticle vaccine elicited two types of broadly neutralizing, cross-protective antibodies, one directed to the highly conserved HA stem and a second proximal to the conserved receptor binding site (RBS) of the viral HA, providing a new platform for universal and seasonal influenza. In addition, HA-ferritin nanoparticles can be easi...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - August 3, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Antisense Oligonucleotides against Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion
Advanced stage cancers are typically marked by metastases of the primary cancer to secondary sites such as lungs, liver, and bones. Such metastatic cancers result in strikingly low 5-year survival rates, underscoring the need for novel therapeutics. For example, bone metastasis of primary breast cancer has a 5-year survival rate of 13%, lung cancer only 1%. There is a need for targeted therapy options specific to metastases. One approach to targeting metastases is to reduce cancer cell migration and invasion.Several mRNAs become localized to subcellular destinations during the metastatic process. These mRNAs may play roles...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - July 21, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Novel One-Well Limiting-Antigen Avidity Enzyme Immunoassay to Detect Recent HIV-1 Infection Using a Multi-subtype Recombinant Protein
This CDC developed Limiting-Antigen avidity Enzyme Immunoassay (LAg-avidity-EIA) provides an easy way to measure increasing binding strength (avidity) of HIV antibodies as part of maturation HIV antibodies after seroconversion, providing a method to distinguish early-stage from long-term HIV-1 infection. Surveillance of HIV-1 provides information on prevalence rates of the disease, but determination of new infection rates (HIV-1 incidence) is difficult to deduce. Longitudinal follow up is expensive and can be biased.Unlike assays which use antigens derived from only one subtype and use two wells, this new approach employs ...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - July 9, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Monoclonal Antibodies that Neutralize B. anthracis Protective Antigen (PA), Lethal Factor (LF) and Edema Factor (EF)
Anthrax, whether resulting from natural or bioterrorist-associated exposure, is a constant threat to human health. The lethality of anthrax is primarily the result of the effects of anthrax toxin, which has 3 components: a receptor-binding protein known as " protective antigen " (PA) and 2 catalytic proteins known as " lethal factor " (LF) and " edema factor " (EF). Although production of an efficient anthrax vaccine is an ultimate goal, the benefits of vaccination can be expected only if a large proportion of the population at risk is immunized. The low incidence of anthrax suggests that larg...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - July 9, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Altering the Immune Hierarchy for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Vaccine Development by Targeting V1V2 Regions
The development of an effective human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine has been an ongoing area of research. Sequence diversity and immunodominance are major obstacles in the design of an effective vaccine against HIV. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a vaccine that overcomes these major obstacles by utilizing the combination of DNA and protein targets directed to the conserved HIV regions.    Previous studies by NCI have demonstrated that co-administration of DNA expressing Gag and Env proteins elicits a protective immune response and reduces infection burden. Env, which medi...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - July 7, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Aryl Hydantoin Heterocycle Compounds that Target the Androgen Receptor for Prostate Cancer Treatment
Prostate cancer is the most prevalent form of cancer among all men in the United States (US). It is also the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the US among men, largely due to the progressively treatment resistant nature of the disease. Treatment options for early stage prostate cancer include watchful waiting, radical prostatectomy, radiation therapy, and importantly androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). Prostate cancer is dependent on androgen hormones, such as testosterone, for sustaining and promoting growth. Androgen hormones bind to the Androgen receptor (AR), causing AR localization to the nucleus where...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - July 7, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Reporter Assay for Detection and Quantitation of Replication-Competent Gammaretrovirus
Gammaretroviral vectors were the first viral gene-therapy vectors to enter clinical trials and remain in use. One potential hazard associated with the use of such vectors is the presence of replication-competent retroviruses (RCR) in the vector preparations – either as a result of: 1) recombination events between the plasmids used for vector production, 2) interactions between the plasmids and endogenous retroviral sequences in the packaging cell lines, or 3) as a result of contamination in the laboratory. RCRs are potentially pathogenic and shown to induce malignancy in mice and non-human primates. Therefore, it is ...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - July 7, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Monoclonal Antibodies Against Bacillus Anthracis Antigens
Anthrax, whether resulting from natural or bioterrorist-associated exposure, is a constant threat to human health. Bacillus anthracis is the causative agent of anthrax. It is surrounded by a polypeptide capsule of poly-gamma-D-glutamic acid (gamma-D-PGA), which is essential for virulence, is poorly immunogenic and has anti-phagocytic properties. Antibodies to the capsule have been shown to enhance phagocytosis and killing of encapsulated bacilli. The lethality of anthrax is primarily the result of the effects of anthrax toxin, which has 3 components: a receptor-binding protein known as " protective antigen " (PA)...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - July 6, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

North-2'-Deoxy-Methanocarbathymidines as Antiviral Agents Against Poxviruses
This invention relates to a method for the prevention or treatment of poxvirus infection by administering an effective amount of an antiviral agent comprising a carbocyclic 2'-deoxynucleoside analog (as described in U.S. Patent Nos. 5,629,454 and 5,869,666) to an individual in need thereof. North-methanocarbathymidine (N-MCT), a thymidine analog with a pseudosugar moiety locked in the northern conformation, which was previously shown to exert strong activity against herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, has been identified as exhibiting potent activity against poxviruses. N-MCT effectively blocks poxvirus synthesis through i...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - July 6, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Recombinant Proteins of the Swine Hepatitis E Virus and Their Uses as a Vaccine and Diagnostic Reagents for Medical and Veterinary Applications
This invention is based on the discovery of the swine hepatitis E virus (swine HEV), the first animal strain of HEV identified and characterized, and its ability to infect across species. The inventors have found that the swine HEV is widespread in the general pig population in the United States and other countries and that swine HEV can infect non-human primates. The inventors have amplified and sequenced the complete genome of swine HEV. The capsid gene (ORF2) of swine HEV has been cloned and expressed in a baculovirus expression system.The possibility that swine HEV may infect humans raises a potential public health con...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - July 6, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Protein Nanoparticles for Antigen Display in Vaccines
The technology relates to a protein-based nanoparticle platform that allows presentation of immunogenic molecules such as influenza virus antigens. This protein platform is made up of hepatitis B capsid/core proteins. The core proteins contain immunogenic loop c/e1, where other antigens can be inserted and the chimeric protein retains the ability to form capsid-like particles. The technology describes the insertion of one or more copies of influenza epitopes derived from the globular head or the stem region of hemagglutinin protein into or around the c/e1 loop of the core protein. The nanoparticles formed by the use of Hep...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - July 6, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Monoclonal Antibodies That Bind or Neutralize Hepatitis B Virus
Hepatitis B virus (HBV) chronically infects over 300 million people worldwide. Many of them will die of chronic hepatitis or hepatocellular carcinoma. The present technology relates to the isolation and characterization of a novel neutralizing chimpanzee monoclonal antibody to HBV. The antibody was identified through a combinatorial antibody library constructed from bone marrow cells of a chimpanzee experimentally infected with HBV. The selected monoclonal antibody has been shown to react equally well with wild-type HBV and the most common neutralization escape mutant variants. Therefore, this monoclonal antibody with high...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - July 6, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Recombinant Proteins Of A Pakistani Strain Of Hepatitis E And Their Use In Diagnostic Methods And Vaccines
A strain of hepatitis E virus from Pakistan (SAR-55) implicated in an epidemic of enterically transmitted non-A, non-B hepatitis, now called hepatitis E, is disclosed. The invention relates to the expression of the whole structural region of SAR-55, designated open reading frame 2 (ORF-2), in a eukaryotic expression system. The expressed protein is capable of forming HEV virus-like particles which can serve as an antigen in diagnostic immunoassays and as an immunogen or vaccine to protect against infection by hepatitis E.IC: NIAIDNIH Ref. No.: E-141-1992-2TAB No: TAB-328Provider Technology ID: 328Update...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - July 6, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Swine Hepatitis E Virus Available For Use in Diagnosis, Prevention and Treatment of Hepatitis E
Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the cause of Hepatitis E, a liver disease that occurs primarily in developing countries due to fecal contaminated drinking water. Outbreaks of HEV infection have caused epidemics in Africa, Central and Southeast Asia and Mexico and cases of the disease have also been reported sporadically in more developed countries. Hepatitis E is most often overcome by a host ’s natural defenses; however the disease is more severe in pregnant women, who exhibit a 20% mortality rate due to HEV infection. Presently, no vaccines or therapeutic agents, which prevent or treat HEV infection, are commercially pr...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - July 6, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Diagnostic Reagents And Vaccines For Multiple Genotypes Of Hepatitis C Virus
The invention describes the complete nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of the envelope 1 (E1) gene of 51 hepatitis C virus (HCV) isolates from around the world and the grouping of these isolates into twelve distinct HCV genotypes. More specifically, this invention relates to the oligonucleotides, peptides and recombinant proteins derived from the envelope 1 gene sequences of these isolates and to diagnostic methods and vaccines that employ these reagents.IC: NIAIDNIH Ref. No.: E-120-1993-0TAB No: TAB-136Provider Technology ID: 136Updated On: Jul 6, 2020Date Published: Monday, July 6,...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - July 6, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Four Chimpanzee Monoclonal Antibodies that Neutralize Hepatitis A Virus
This invention claims antibodies and/or fragments thereof specific for hepatitis A virus (HAV) and the use of the antibodies in the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of hepatitis A. Hepatitis A is the most common type of hepatitis reported in the United States, which reports an estimated 134,000 cases annually, and infects at least 1.4 million people worldwide each year. HAV is a positive sense RNA virus that is transmitted via the fecal-oral route, mainly through contaminated water supplies and food sources. HAV is thought to replicate in the oropharynx and epithelial lining of the intestines, where it initiates a tran...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - July 6, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

A Varicella-Zoster Virus Mutant that is Markedly Impaired for Latent Infection Available for the Development of Shingles Vaccines and Diagnostics
Reactivation of latent Varicella-Zoster virus (VZV) infection is the cause of shingles, which is prominent in adults over the age of 60 and individuals who have compromised immune systems, due to HIV infection, cancer treatment and/or transplant. Shingles is a worldwide health concern that affects approximately 600,000 Americans each year. The incidence of shingles is also high in Europe, South America, and India; the latter having an estimated two million individuals affected, yearly. Recent research studies show that VZV vaccines have a significant effect on decreasing the incidence of shingles in elderly.The current tec...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - July 6, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Infectious cDNA Clone of GB Virus B and Uses Thereof
The current invention provides nucleic acid sequences comprising the genomes of infectious GB virus B, the most closely related member of the Flaviviridae to hepatitis C virus (HCV). It also covers chimeric GBVB-HCV sequences and polypeptides for use in the development of vaccines and diagnostic assays for HCV and the development of screening assays for the identification of antiviral agents for HCV. Additional information can be found in Bukh et al. (1999), Virology 262, 470-478.IC: NIAIDNIH Ref. No.: E-173-1999-0TAB No: TAB-490Provider Technology ID: 490Updated On: Jul 6, 2020Date Published: ...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - July 6, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Monoclonal Antibodies Against Orthopoxviruses
Concerns that variola (smallpox) virus might be used as a biological weapon have led to the recommendation of widespread vaccination with vaccinia virus. While vaccination is generally safe and effective for prevention of smallpox, it is well documented that various adverse reactions in individuals have been caused by vaccination with existing licensed vaccines. Vaccinia immune globulin (VIG) prepared from vaccinated humans has historically been used to treat adverse reactions arising from vaccinia immunization. However, VIG lots may have different potencies and carry the potential to transmit other viral agents.Chimpanzee...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - July 6, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

HCV/BVDV Chimeric Genomes and Uses Thereof
The current invention provides nucleic acid sequences comprising chimeric viral genome of hepatitis C Virus (HCV) and bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV). The chimeric viruses are produced by replacing the structural region or a structural gene of an infectious BVDV clone with the corresponding region or gene of an infectious HCV. It covers the use of these sequences and polypeptides encoded by all or part of the sequences in the development of vaccines and diagnostic assays for HCV and the development of screening assays for the identification of antiviral agents for HCV.IC: NIAIDNIH Ref. No.: E-102-1999-0TAB N...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - July 6, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Cloned Genome of Infectious Hepatitis C Virus of Genotype 2a and Uses Thereof
The current invention provides a nucleic acid sequence comprising the genome of infectious hepatitis C viruses (HCV) of genotype 2a. The encoded polyprotein differs from those of the infectious clones of genotypes 1a and 1b (U.S. Patent 6,153,421) by approximately thirty (30) percent. It covers the use of this sequence and polypeptides encoded by all or part of the sequence, in the development of vaccines and diagnostic assays for HCV and the development of screening assays for the identification of antiviral agents for HCV. Additional information can be found in Yanagi et al. (1999), Virology 262, 250-263.IC: NIAIDNI...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - July 6, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Monoclonal Antibodies Specific for the E2 Glycoprotein of Hepatitis C Virus and Their Use in the Diagnosis, Treatment and Prevention of Hepatitis C
Hepatitis C virus is an enveloped, single stranded RNA virus, approximately 50 nm in diameter, that has been classified as a separate genus in the Flaviviridae family. Most persons infected with hepatitis C virus develop chronic infection. These chronically infected individuals have a relatively high risk of developing chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. There is currently no vaccine to prevent the hepatitis C virus infection. The present invention relates to human monoclonal antibodies which exhibit immunological binding affinity for the hepatitis C virus E2 glycoprotein and are cross-reactive...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - July 6, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Production Of Complementary DNA Representing Hepatitis A Viral Sequences By Recombinant DNA Methods And Uses Therefor
A method for the production and use of single- and double-stranded (ds) cDNA representing hepatitis A virus (HAV) sequences has been discovered, including an infectious, full-length cDNA clone of wild-type HAV. Large quantitites of the novel HAV cDNA can be harvested at a relatively low cost via insertion of the cDNA molecules into a recombinant DNA vector and subsequent transformation in appropriate cells; modification of bacteria by genetic engineering permits for the production of ds HAV cDNA. The cDNA molecules hold substantial diagnostic potential because they are highly specific and very sensitive to HAV; they can al...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - July 6, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research

Cloned Genomes Of Infectious Hepatitis C Virus And Uses Thereof
The current invention provides nucleic acid sequences comprising the genomes of infectious hepatitis C viruses (HCV) of genotype 1a and 1b. It covers the use of these sequences, and polypeptides encoded by all or part of the sequences, in the development of vaccines and diagnostic assays for HCV and the development of screening assays for the identification of antiviral agents for HCV.Additional information can be found in: Yanagi et al., " Transcripts from a single full-length cDNA clone of hepatitis C virus are infectious when directly transfected into the liver of a chimpanzee, " Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA (19...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - July 6, 2020 Category: Research Authors: ott-admin Source Type: research