Costs Keep Women From Taking Drugs to Prevent Cancer's Return Costs Keep Women From Taking Drugs to Prevent Cancer's Return
Poverty and higher out-of-pocket drug costs may be the main reason that some women don't stick with hormone therapy designed to prevent breast cancer recurrence, a recent U.S. study suggests.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

A THIRD of women cannot afford cancer treatment
Overall, slightly more than one-third of the 8,700 women in a study by the University of Texas Health and Science Center in Houston failed to stick with their prescribed hormone therapy regimens. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Transgender teens to get cheaper treatment in New York
The state's Health Department filed a proposal on Wednesday to cover hormone therapy for young people with gender dysphoria. Current rules only cover therapy for transitioning adults. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Tamoxifen linked to reduce contralateral breast cancer risk
Women should complete full course, say study authors Related items fromOnMedica Breast cancer drug ‘too costly’ for NHS Fertility treatments may impact on breast cancer risk Ten year hormonal therapy cuts breast cancer relapse Breast cancer and HRT Women denied cheap drug to stop breast cancer spread (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - October 6, 2016 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Claims that coffee prevents dementia are lukewarm at best
Conclusion This study suggests there is a link between self-reported caffeine consumption and risk of developing probable dementia or some kind of cognitive impairment. The findings could be important in leading to more research to investigate the mechanisms by which caffeine might provide protection against dementia and cognitive impairment. The hope being that such investigation may eventually lead to new forms of drug treatments. However, there are several limitations of the study, including: The level of caffeine was self-reported and may be inaccurate, particularly as it was presumed the reported intake of coffee, t...
Source: NHS News Feed - October 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Mental health Neurology Source Type: news

For Transgender Youths in New York, It Would Be a Health Care Milestone
The state wants its Medicaid program to allow minors being treated for gender dysphoria to receive coverage for hormone therapy. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: JESSE McKINLEY Tags: Transgender and Transsexuals Teenagers and Adolescence Medicaid Health Department (NYS) New York State Source Type: news

Transgender women who begin hormone therapy more likely to quit smoking
(Boston University Medical Center) While there has been much concern about the potential harm from transgender medical intervention (hormone therapy), a new study has found that transgender women who receive hormone therapy are more likely to quit or decrease smoking cigarettes as compared to the general population. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 5, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Hormone Therapy for Prostate Cancer Less Safe for Men With Prior Heart Attack
Title: Hormone Therapy for Prostate Cancer Less Safe for Men With Prior Heart AttackCategory: Health NewsCreated: 9/30/2016 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 10/3/2016 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Cancer General)
Source: MedicineNet Cancer General - October 3, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Hormone Therapy for Prostate Cancer Less Safe for Men With Prior Heart Attack
For this type of patient, cardiac risks linked to the treatment may outweigh any benefit, study suggests (Source: Cancercompass News: Other Cancer)
Source: Cancercompass News: Other Cancer - October 2, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Hormone therapy for prostate cancer less safe for men with prior heart attack
HealthDay News Men with prostate cancer often receive hormone-depleting therapy, but a new study suggests the treatment may pose a risk to men who've had a heart attack. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - September 30, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hormone Therapy for Prostate Cancer Less Safe for Men With Prior Heart Attack
FRIDAY, Sept. 30, 2016 -- Men diagnosed with prostate cancer often receive hormone-depleting therapy to help fight the tumor. But a new study suggests that the treatment may pose a risk to men who've previously suffered a heart attack. " Patient... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - September 30, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Hormone Therapy for Prostate Cancer Less Safe for Men With Prior Heart Attack
For this type of patient, cardiac risks linked to the treatment may outweigh any benefit, study suggests (Source: Fertility News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Fertility News - Doctors Lounge - September 29, 2016 Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: webmaster at doctorslounge.com Tags: Cardiology, Endocrinology, Nursing, Oncology, Reproductive Medicine, News, Source Type: news

New Approach to Hormone Therapy Hot Topic at NAMS Conference New Approach to Hormone Therapy Hot Topic at NAMS Conference
An updated position statement on hormone therapy and the nonhormonal management of menopausal symptoms are among the highlights of the North American Menopause Society (NAMS) 2016 Annual Meeting.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - September 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Ob/Gyn & Women ' s Health News Source Type: news

Early Menopause Tied to Heart Disease, Death Risk
Findings highlight need for certain women to discuss hormone therapy with their doctor, researchers say (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - September 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Invasive early prostate cancer treatments not always needed
Conclusion Decisions about treatment for prostate cancer are fraught with difficulty, especially in the early stages. Because many prostate cancers grow very slowly, some men don't need treatment and will never be bothered by their cancer. However, some cancers grow and spread around the body, and can be fatal if not treated. Until now, there's been insufficient good information to help men decide whether to choose surgery, radiotherapy or active monitoring. These studies give us the best evidence yet to compare the results of the three most commonly-used treatments. The results don't tell us that one treatment is better f...
Source: NHS News Feed - September 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Medical practice Source Type: news

12 Period Facts Everyone Should Know
Despite what a carefree tampon commercial would have you believe, that time of the month can be uncomfortable, varied and complex. No two periods look the same: Some women experience excruciating symptoms each time. Others may skip months entirely. And did you know that men can also have a physical reaction to a woman’s monthly cycle? Basically, there’s more to a period than what you hear in pop culture. And it will serve everyone better to be more informed about the process and armed with the facts. Below are a few things everyone should know about that oh-so-wonderful time of the month: 1. The ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 14, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

12 Period Facts Everyone Should Know
Despite what a carefree tampon commercial would have you believe, that time of the month can be uncomfortable, varied and complex. No two periods look the same: Some women experience excruciating symptoms each time. Others may skip months entirely. And did you know that men can also have a physical reaction to a woman’s monthly cycle? Basically, there’s more to a period than what you hear in pop culture. And it will serve everyone better to be more informed about the process and armed with the facts. Below are a few things everyone should know about that oh-so-wonderful time of the month: 1. The ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 14, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Tanzania: Why Radiations Treatment in Tanzania Requires Huge Investment
[Citizen] In life and in the oncology practice, prevention avails the best chance to battle cancer, especially for a resource-strained country like Tanzania. For the cases of cancer that fail to be prevented early, treatment is a prerequisite and this includes an array of choices. Cancer treatment can entail surgery chemotherapy, radiotherapy, hormonal therapy and immunotherapy. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - September 13, 2016 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Breakthrough in polycystic ovary syndrome diagnosis
Measuring new hormone advocated by scientists Related items fromOnMedica Higher levels of sex hormones linked to breast cancer link in younger women Hormone therapy treatment helps treat type 2 diabetes well Women with PCOS at much greater risk of diabetes Polycystic ovarian syndrome Polycystic ovarian syndrome and autism link (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - September 11, 2016 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Pharmacologic Considerations for PrEP in Transgender Women Pharmacologic Considerations for PrEP in Transgender Women
Find out what there is to know about the use of preexposure prophylaxis in transgendered women -- and learn about the possible drug interactions between these medications and hormonal therapy.JAIDS: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes (Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines - September 7, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: HIV/AIDS Journal Article Source Type: news

Computerized tissue image analysis reveals underlying genomics of ER+ breast cancer
(Case Western Reserve University) The number of tubules in tumors may predict which women with estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer will benefit from hormone therapy alone and which require chemotherapy. A computer program to automatically count the tubules correlated with the scores produced by the current best test differentiating between indolent and aggressive ER+ cancers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 7, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Expectations May Influence Side Effects of BC Hormone Therapy Expectations May Influence Side Effects of BC Hormone Therapy
Side effects from taking tamoxifen for breast cancer may be worse if a patient expects they will be bad before therapy even begins, according to a study from Germany.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - September 2, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Improving Adjuvant Hormone Therapy Use in Medicaid Managed Care – Insured Women, New York State, 2012 – 2014
(Source: CDC Preventing Chronic Disease)
Source: CDC Preventing Chronic Disease - September 1, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

When it comes to menopausal hormone therapy, women are left guessing at the risks | Margaret McCartney
A new study suggests stronger links between MHT and breast cancer. But patchy information means it ’s hard to advise my patients properlyAs a freshly minted doctor in the early 1990s, I attended lectures describinghormone replacement therapy– which is now known, in this context, as MHT, menopausal hormone therapy – as close to a miracle cure-all. Women shouldn’t worry their pretty little heads, it was implied at the time, because doctors knew best – and this treatment would not only make them feel fantastically sexy, but preven t cardiovascular disease and strokes. Promotion, back then, went b...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 30, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Margaret McCartney Tags: Menopause Society Medical research Science Health Women Life and style UK news Source Type: news

Anticipation of Side Effects Makes Them Worse for Breast Cancer Patients
A new study has found that negative expectations increase both the severity and number of side effects experienced by breast cancer patients undergoing hormone therapy. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - August 26, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Anna Azvolinsky Tags: Breast Cancer News Source Type: news

Combined HRT breast cancer risk 'may have been underestimated'
Conclusion This study shows a link between the use of combined oestrogen and progesterone HRT and breast cancer risk, particularly among women who take the pill for a long period of time. But this is not the entire story. The study included a large cohort of women. The risk increase for combined HRT is based on only 52 of the 39,183 women taking the combined pill who developed breast cancer. Of these, only seven women had been taking the pill for more than 15 years. Therefore, the analysis was based on a very small number, which may mean the risk associations are not completely accurate....
Source: NHS News Feed - August 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Medication Older people Source Type: news

Expecting the worst increases side-effects in breast cancer patients on hormone therapies
A study of women receiving hormone therapies such as tamoxifen as part of their treatment for breast cancer has found that the number and seriousness of side effects they experienced were influenced by their expectations. The study found that women who had higher expectations of suffering more and worse side-effects before their treatment began did, in fact, experience more after two years of adjuvant hormone therapy. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - August 23, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Hormone Therapy
Title: Hormone TherapyCategory: Procedures and TestsCreated: 7/10/1999 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 8/23/2016 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Menopause General)
Source: MedicineNet Menopause General - August 23, 2016 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Expecting the worst increases side-effects in breast cancer patients on hormone therapies
(European Society for Medical Oncology) A study of women receiving hormone therapies such as tamoxifen as part of their treatment for breast cancer has found that the number and seriousness of side effects they experienced were influenced by their expectations. The study, published in Annals of Oncology, found that women who had higher expectations of suffering more and worse side-effects before their treatment began did, in fact, experience more after two years of adjuvant hormone therapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 22, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Outlook & Research into Alzheimer ’ s
Developing new treatments for Alzheimer’s disease is an active area of research. Scientists are testing a number of drugs to see if they prevent Alzheimer’s disease, slow the disease, or help reduce behavioral symptoms. There is evidence that inflammation in the brain may contribute to Alzheimer’s disease and that drugs to cut down on inflammation may help. One recent study showed that two non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs — rofecoxib and naproxen — did not slow the progression of Alzheimer’s disease in people already diagnosed. Scientists believe, however, that anti-inflammatory dru...
Source: Psych Central - August 17, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Jane Framingham, Ph.D. Tags: Alzheimer's Memory and Perception Alzheimer's disease anti-inflammatory drugs drug testing Ginkgo biloba mental decline new treatment vitamin E Source Type: news

New study shows breast tumors evolve in response to hormone therapy
(Washington University School of Medicine) A new analysis of breast tumors, before and after hormone-reduction therapy, reveals the extreme genetic complexity of these tumors and the variety of responses that are possible to estrogen-deprivation treatments. The findings also suggest that analyzing a single sample of the breast tumor is insufficient for understanding how a patient should best be treated. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 9, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Hormone therapy for prostate cancer may pose a risk for black men
Black men treated with hormone therapy for prostate cancer may have a higher risk of death than white men undergoing the same therapy, according to a new study. But the deaths aren’t actually caused by prostate cancer. Androgen deprivation therapy, or ADT, is a hormone treatment that shrinks prostate tumors. Researchers from the Brigham and Women’s […] (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - August 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lateshia Beachum Tags: biomedical research cancer health Source Type: news

Estrogen and Cognition: Another Piece in the Puzzle Estrogen and Cognition: Another Piece in the Puzzle
Dr JoAnn Manson discusses two recent studies that explore a possible cognitive benefit from early hormone therapy.Medscape Ob/Gyn (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - August 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Ob/Gyn & Women ' s Health Commentary Source Type: news

African-American men negatively impacted by hormone therapy for treatment of prostate cancer
(Brigham and Women's Hospital) In a retrospective study analyzing patients' medical records, researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital found that patients' race significantly affected their longevity by increasing the likelihood of death after receiving androgen deprivation therapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 4, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

African-American Men Negatively Impacted by Hormone Therapy for Treatment of Prostate Cancer
Researchers from Brigham and Women ’s Hospital found that African-American men treated with hormone therapy had higher risk of death when compared to non-African American men (Source: BWH News)
Source: BWH News - August 4, 2016 Category: Hospital Management Source Type: news

Twin Brothers Battle Rare Condition That Causes Never-Ending Hunger
Raising twin boys is a challenge for any single mom, but it’s especially difficult for one particular mom in New Haven, Connecticut. Dianna Schatzlein-Ahern’s two youngest sons, Stevie and Eddie Ahern, are 11. They both suffer from Prader-Willi syndrome, a genetic condition that makes them insatiably hungry no matter how much they eat. “I have to keep everything locked away so they don’t get up in the middle of the night and have a feast,” Schatzlein-Ahern told Barcroft TV. “They can never feel full, so could potentially eat themselves to death.” For health reasons, she a...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - July 28, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Menopause, sleepless nights may make women age faster
In a pair of studies published today UCLA researchers report that menopause accelerates biological aging and that insomnia, which often accompanies menopause, also has a clear association with age acceleration. The dual findings suggest both factors could increase women’s risk for aging-related diseases and earlier death. The two studies, published in separate journals, contribute to increasing evidence of the biological clock’s variability. The menopause study was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. “For decades, scientists have disagreed over whether menopause causes aging ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 26, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

PodMed: A Medical News Roundup From Johns Hopkins (with audio)
(MedPage Today) -- This week's topics include extending therapy in breast cancer, a high-fat Mediterranean diet, risks of IVF, and hormone therapy and cognition (Source: MedPage Today Pediatrics)
Source: MedPage Today Pediatrics - July 23, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Source Type: news

Menopausal Estrogen Therapy Doesn't Appear To Sharpen Women's Brains, No Matter When They Go On It
Going on hormone therapy after menopause doesn't improve women's memory and thinking ability, no matter when they begin the treatment, according to a growing body of research. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - July 22, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Rita Rubin Source Type: news

Hormone Therapy: No Effect on Cognition After Menopause Hormone Therapy: No Effect on Cognition After Menopause
The first randomized trial to look specifically at timing of hormone therapy with estradiol on cognition has shown no effect in early or late postmenopausal women. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Psychiatry Headlines)
Source: Medscape Psychiatry Headlines - July 21, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Postmenopausal hormone therapy has no effect on memory
One of the first large-scale, long-term studies to investigate the effects of hormone therapy on memory in postmenopausal women draws a blank. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 21, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Menopause Source Type: news

Hormone therapy for brain performance: No effect, whether started early or late
Hormone therapy has a negligible effect on verbal memory and other mental skills regardless of how soon after menopause a woman begins therapy, new research shows. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - July 21, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Hormone Therapy Won't Help Memory After Menopause
Title: Hormone Therapy Won't Help Memory After MenopauseCategory: Health NewsCreated: 7/19/2016 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 7/20/2016 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Womens Health General)
Source: MedicineNet Womens Health General - July 20, 2016 Category: OBGYN Source Type: news

Hormone Therapy Won't Help Memory After Menopause
5-year study found no difference in thinking skills, with or without estrogen treatment (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - July 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hormone therapy won't help memory after menopause
Steven Reinberg, HealthDay News Women who take estrogen after menopause may believe it helps them maintain their memory and thinking skills, but a new study suggests they are mistaken. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - July 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hormone Therapy Won't Help Memory After Menopause
5-year study found no difference in thinking skills, with or without estrogen treatment Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Hormone Replacement Therapy, Memory, Menopause (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - July 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hormone Therapy Won't Help Memory After Menopause
5-year study found no difference in thinking skills, with or without estrogen treatment Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Hormone Replacement Therapy, Memory, Menopause (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - July 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hormone Therapy Won't Help Memory After Menopause
TUESDAY, July 19, 2016 -- Women who take estrogen after menopause may believe it helps them maintain their memory and thinking skills, but a new study suggests they are mistaken. Researchers found no change in mental ability associated with... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - July 19, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Hormone Therapy Won't Help Memory After Menopause
TUESDAY, July 19, 2016 -- Women who take estrogen after menopause may believe it helps them maintain their memory and thinking skills, but a new study suggests they are mistaken. Researchers found no change in mental ability associated with... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - July 19, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news