Conscientious Objection and the Impact on LGBTQ Rights
  The debate over conscientious objection in health care has been lively since the passage of the Church Amendment in 1973.  The dilemma arises as bioethicists, theologians, legislators, and lawyers have argued over the proper balance between protecting clinician integrity and the professional obligations of medicine.  Two major developments have made this a big year for conscientious objection and LGBTQ rights.  One development has been the Supreme Court hearing of three cases arguing that the word “sex” in the Civil Rights Act can be interpreted as prohibiting discrimination based on gende...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 25, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Bioethics Today Tags: Health Care Author: Brummett LGBTQ religion syndicated Source Type: blogs

Dense breasts on a mammogram? What to know and do
You’re staring at a letter from your mammography facility. Your breast exam was normal, great. But then you see a note on the bottom: you have high breast density, which could put you at higher risk for breast cancer in the future. Now what? “The finding of dense breasts on a mammogram can be stressful and confusing for patients,” says Dr. Toni Golen, acting editor in chief of Harvard Women’s Health Watch. It’s information that may concern them, but they don’t know what to do about it. What is breast density? Breasts are composed of: lobules, which produce milk ducts, tubes that carry m...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - October 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kelly Bilodeau Tags: Breast Cancer Health Tests and procedures Women's Health Source Type: blogs

Common hormonal treatments linked to abnormal heart rhythms and sudden death in men being treated for prostate cancer
Treatments for advanced prostate cancer that suppress testosterone, a hormone (also called an androgen) that drives the malignant cells to grow and spread, are collectively referred to as androgen deprivation therapies, or ADT. These therapies can significantly extend lifespans in men who have the disease, but they also have a range of challenging side effects. In 2004, Dr. Marc Garnick, Gorman Brothers Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and editor in chief of HarvardProstateKnowledge.org, reported that in some men, an ADT drug called aberelix lengthens the time it tak...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - September 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlie Schmidt Tags: Health Living With Prostate Cancer Men's Health Prostate Health Prostate Knowledge Treatments HPK Source Type: blogs

We Need to Talk about Wound Care in Transgender Women Healing From a Vaginoplasty
By: Matt Hopper A lot of transgender women who undergo a vaginoplasty report being frustrated with the health care system and lack of competent practitioners who can provide quality care for gender-affirming procedures (medical procedures that affirm a transgender person’s gender identity). These procedures, such as hormone therapy, “top” surgery (i.e. mastectomy, breast implants, etc.), The post We Need to Talk about Wound Care in Transgender Women Healing From a Vaginoplasty appeared first on Johns Hopkins Nursing Magazine. (Source: Nursing Blogs at Johns Hopkins University)
Source: Nursing Blogs at Johns Hopkins University - May 31, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Editor Tags: Health Equity On the Pulse LGBT postoperative transgender Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, April 15th 2019
In this study, we found that senescent chondrocytes isolated from OA patients secrete more EVs compared with nonsenescent chondrocytes. These EVs inhibit cartilage ECM deposition by healthy chondrocytes and can induce a senescent state in nearby cells. We profiled the miR and protein content of EVs isolated from the synovial fluid of OA joints from mice with SnCs. After treatment with a molecule to remove SnCs, termed a senolytic, the composition of EV-associated miR and protein was markedly altered. The senolytic reduced OA development and enhanced chondrogenesis, and these were attributable to several specific differenti...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 14, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Growing Muscle and Strengthening Bone in Mice with a Follistatin-Like Molecule
In today's research materials, the authors report on the use of follistatin-like molecules to enhance bone density and increase muscle mass in mice. Myostatin and follistatin are well known to control muscle growth, and are consequently among the most promising targets for near future gene therapies. Either inhibition of myostatin, which can be achieved via antibody therapies in addition to gene therapies, or upregulation of follistatin can be used to deliver increased muscle growth in mammals. There are natural myostatin loss of function mutants in many species, including a few humans, and a range of heavily muscled engin...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 10, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Weekly Overseas Health IT Links – 9th February, 2019.
Here are a few I came across last week.Note: Each link is followed by a title and few paragraphs. For the full article click on the link above title of the article. Note also that full access to some links may require site registration or subscription payment.-----https://www.healthdatamanagement.com/news/messages-in-patient-portal-help-predict-medication-discontinuationPatient portal helps predict medication discontinuation By Greg SlabodkinPublished February 01 2019, 7:19am ESTResearchers say electronic communication between patients and providers via an online portal can indicate their potential for stopping therapy.A t...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - February 9, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David G More MB PhD Source Type: blogs

Preserving fertility during cancer treatments
Cancer treatment — and cancer itself — can threaten fertility. This is a tremendously important survivorship issue for many people. As an oncologist, I’m often asked questions about preserving fertility during cancer treatment. If this issue affects you, here is an overview of key options. When should you talk to your cancer team about fertility? Future children may not be foremost on your mind when you are diagnosed with cancer. Soon afterward, though, it’s worth talking to your doctor about fertility issues, if this is important to you now or might one day become important. Your doctor can explain...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ann Partridge, MD, MPH Tags: Cancer Fertility Infertility Source Type: blogs

Alternative therapies for cancer
This study was not designed to directly compare non-conventional therapies with conventional ones, and the results do not mean that all unproven remedies are useless. In fact, an unproven treatment may become conventional if rigorous research proves its worth. There are many types of alternative treatments (including herbs, vitamins, homeopathy, yoga, and acupuncture) that might have different effects and have not yet been well studied. Importantly, this study did not examine the interaction of conventional and alternative treatments (which in some cases may cause problems). In addition, this study did not actually find th...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Cancer Complementary and alternative medicine Health Source Type: blogs

Hormonal therapy for aggressive prostate cancer: How long is enough?
This study reaffirms what many clinicians have put into practice: longer duration hormonal therapy in appropriately selected patient populations provides a greater benefit,” said Dr. Marc Garnick, the Gorman Brothers Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and editor in chief of HarvardProstateKnowledge.org. “Prior studies using three years of hormonal therapy have also shown this, but it is important to recognize that some men may have significantly delayed return of the body’s testosterone upon completion of the therapy — a fact that needs to be di...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - January 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlie Schmidt Tags: Health Living With Prostate Cancer Prostate Knowledge Treatments HPK Source Type: blogs

‘Cultural Humility’ Impacts Patient Safety for Transgender Women Healing From a Vaginoplasty
By: Matt Hopper A common theme among transgender women who undergo a vaginoplasty is their frustration with the health care system and lack of confidence that practitioners can or will provide quality care for gender-affirming procedures (medical procedures that affirm a transgender person’s gender identity). These medical procedures, such as hormone therapy, “top” surgery (i.e. The post ‘Cultural Humility’ Impacts Patient Safety for Transgender Women Healing From a Vaginoplasty appeared first on Johns Hopkins Nursing Magazine. (Source: Nursing Blogs at Johns Hopkins University)
Source: Nursing Blogs at Johns Hopkins University - January 17, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Editor Tags: Health Equity On the Pulse LGBT postoperative transgender Source Type: blogs

Should We Integrate " Longevity Medicine " into Mainstream Care
More than 12 years ago, I posted a blog note about the field of anti-aging medicine, longevity and its practitioners (see:Anti-Aging, Longevity Medicine, and Lab Testing) that included the following paragraph:Just to frame the issue and get your attention, annual revenue from the anti-aging industry is estimated to be $56B  -- this includes products such as anti-aging cream and botox injections. Need to find an anti-aging physician?  No problem. Here is the link to the home page of theAmerican Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine (A4M). It's not too late to attend the 14th Annual International Congress on Anti...
Source: Lab Soft News - January 2, 2019 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Clinical Lab Testing Healthcare Business Lab Industry Trends Lab Standards Medical Research Preventive Medicine Quality of Care Source Type: blogs

Hormone therapy for depression: Are the risks worth the benefits?
When you think of menopause, you might think of hot flashes and night sweats. But many women also experience symptoms of depression. The risk of depression doubles or even quadruples during the menopausal transition, which has researchers looking for ways to address — or even prevent — the problem. One study published in JAMA Psychiatry found that hormone therapy may help ward off symptoms of peri- and postmenopausal depression in some women. Researchers found that perimenopausal and early postmenopausal women who were treated with hormones were less likely to experience symptoms of depression than women in the...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - November 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kelly Bilodeau Tags: Anxiety and Depression Health Menopause Source Type: blogs

“News (Hot) Flash: Sex, Drugs and Menopause” Recap – 2010 Breakfast Series
Our panel this morning discussed the issues surrounding how the WHI results were interpreted and communicated to women and their health care providers. We recognize that hormones are not appropriate for all women, and look forward to hosting a future panel that highlights alternatives. The speakers have a variety of backgrounds and experiences (and genders), and we aim to promote diversity of voices. This was not normal breakfast conversation. Today was a jolting – and disruptive – talk about what happens to women’s bodies when they age. (Who knew that if you’re menopausal and you don’t take y...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - September 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

New blood test may someday help guide the best treatment for aggressive prostate cancer
Tumors that spread, or metastasize, in the body shed cells into blood that doctors can scrutinize for insights into what a patient’s cancer might do. Analyzing these so-called circulating tumor cells (CTCs) isn’t part of routine care yet, in part because they’re so hard to pick out of the millions of normal cells in a blood sample. Still, scientists are making progress in this area. And in June, a research team reported that treatment decisions made on the basis of CTC testing had increased lifespans in men with an aggressive type of metastatic prostate cancer. Doctors usually treat metastatic prosta...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - August 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlie Schmidt Tags: Cancer Health Men's Health Prostate Health Source Type: blogs

Systematic review: puberty suppressing drugs do not alleviate gender dysphoria
By Christian Jarrett Clinicians treating teenagers with gender dysphoria, the teens themselves, and their parents, are faced with a dilemma – puberty suppressing drugs and hormonal treatments will likely make it easier for the adolescent to gender transition in due course, and the earlier that process begins, the more effective it is likely to be. However, intervening earlier comes with a greater risk that the teen may later de-transition (that is, change their mind about wanting to transition to the other gender), leaving them with potentially irreversible bodily changes caused by the hormonal treatment. Accord...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - July 23, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: biological Gender Mental health Source Type: blogs

Systematic review: puberty suppressing drugs alone do not alleviate gender dysphoria
By Christian Jarrett Clinicians treating teenagers with gender dysphoria, the teens themselves, and their parents, are faced with a dilemma – puberty suppressing drugs and hormonal treatments will likely make it easier for the adolescent to gender transition in due course, and the earlier that process begins, the more effective it is likely to be. However, intervening earlier comes with a greater risk that the teen may later de-transition (that is, change their mind about wanting to transition to the other gender), leaving them with potentially irreversible bodily changes caused by the hormonal treatment. Accord...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - July 23, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: biological Gender Mental health Source Type: blogs

Systematic review finds “qualified support” for hormonal treatments for gender dysphoria in youth
By Christian Jarrett Clinicians treating children with gender dysphoria, the children themselves, and their parents, are faced with a dilemma – early use of puberty suppressing drugs (followed later by further hormonal treatments) will likely make it easier for the young person to gender transition in due course, and the earlier that process begins, the more effective it is likely to be. However, intervening earlier comes with the possibility that the child’s feelings of gender dysphoria would have dissipated naturally, or that they may later de-transition (that is, change their mind about wantin...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - July 23, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: biological Gender Mental health Source Type: blogs

Depression: Common medication side effect?
This study is especially thought-provoking, given that more and more people are taking medications with depression or suicidal thoughts as possible side effects. The CDC just released updated data showing a troubling recent rise in suicide rates, and that 54% of those who die from suicide do not have a known mental health disorder, so this is an important public health issue. That said, it is important to note: in this study, people who used these medications were more likely to be widowed and have chronic health problems, both of which are associated with a higher risk of depression. And many (but not all) of these medica...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - July 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Anxiety and Depression Drugs and Supplements Health Source Type: blogs

Rethinking the screening mammogram
This study analyzed data from women over 40 and compared the size of breast cancers at the time of diagnosis detected in the 1970s (before mammography became common) with the size of tumors detected between 2000 and 2002, when screening mammography was routine. Treatments and rates of death due to breast cancer 10 years after the diagnosis were also analyzed. The study found that: As more women underwent routine screening mammograms, more small breast cancers were detected. Many of these tumors were restricted to the ducts within the breast (called ductal carcinoma in situ), and even without treatment would never threaten...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - June 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Health Source Type: blogs

A mix of treatments may extend life for men with aggressive prostate cancer
For men diagnosed with aggressive cancer that’s confined to the prostate and nearby tissues, the overarching goal of treatment is to keep the disease from spreading (or metastasizing) in the body. Doctors can treat these men with localized therapies, such as surgery and different types of radiation that target the prostate directly. And they can also give systemic treatments that kill off rogue cancer cells in the bloodstream. Hormonal therapy, for instance, is a systemic treatment that kills prostate cancer cells by depriving them of testosterone, which fuels their growth. Now a new study shows that a mix of differe...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - March 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlie Schmidt Tags: Cancer Men's Health Prostate Health Source Type: blogs

FDA approves new drug for men at high risk of prostate cancer spread
A newly approved drug called apalutamide is giving hope to thousands of men confronting a tenacious problem after being treated for prostate cancer. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels should plummet to zero after surgery, and to near zero after radiation therapy, but in some men, they continue rising even when there’s no other evidence of cancer in the body. Doctors typically respond to spiking PSA with drugs that block the production of testosterone, which is the male sex hormone that fuels prostate cancer. However, this type of medically induced castration, called hormonal therapy, doesn’t always reduce P...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - March 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlie Schmidt Tags: Cancer Health Men's Health Prostate Health Source Type: blogs

Obstruction of medical justice: How health care fails patients with cancer
Isn’t getting cancer bad enough? That’s the frustrated thought that goes through my mind when I see patients with cancer suffering — not from their cancer, but from the failure of the health care system. Take Nancy,* a 60-year-old woman with hormone-positive breast cancer. When she came to the emergency room with a fungating breast mass, we knew immediately she had ignored it for a long time; she said she hadn’t been able to see a doctor because she didn’t have insurance. But after confirming the diagnosis of incurable metastatic breast cancer, she was discharged home to continue with hormone ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 22, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/miriam-a-knoll" rel="tag" > Miriam A. Knoll, MD < /a > Tags: Policy Oncology/Hematology Public Health & Source Type: blogs

Why do some breast cancer patients decline chemotherapy and radiation?
Adjuvant therapy after surgery, such as chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, and radiation therapy, has contributed to a 39% decrease in breast cancer mortality since 1989. Unfortunately, a significant number of women decline evidence-based adjuvant therapy. A recent study suggests that distrust of the medical system plays a significant role in such refusal. The post Why do some breast cancer patients decline chemotherapy and radiation? appeared first on RESPECTFUL INSOLENCE. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - November 20, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Cancer Medicine Skepticism/critical thinking Surgery adjuvant breast cancer chemotherapy radiation therapy Source Type: blogs

Life After Breast Cancer Does Suck
Here's the truth. "The Secret Suckiness to Life After Breast Cancer" . Go read it. Judith Basya writes the truth. There is no new normal. Cancer lurks for ever. And life on some levels, really does suck after breast cancer. And they never told us about it and we don't get to talk about it.Judith raises some good points including this one which resonates with me most:" And why is my situation only to be discussed in therapy, while other people ’s job woes are acceptable dinner-table fodder? "Yes, really? Why don't we talk about post breast cancer suckiness in therapy and not at the dinner table? Ou...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - November 2, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: breast cancer bonds coping friends questions secrets Source Type: blogs

Urinary incontinence: Common and manageable
As a primary care doctor, I see a lot of women dealing with the inconvenience, discomfort, and embarrassment of urinary incontinence (unintended leaking of urine). Some are comfortable bringing this up right away. Others suffer needlessly because they feel too shy or awkward to mention it. The truth is, an estimated 45% of women experience some form of urinary incontinence at some point in their lives. That’s almost half of all women! It’s a very big deal. Urinary incontinence can negatively affect physical and emotional well-being. For example, women may avoid going out because they’re worried about havi...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - October 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Kidney and urinary tract Women's Health Source Type: blogs

Tumor Size Doesn't Matter
This study shows that it's not only tumor size that is important for breast cancer patients but also tumor biology. All tumors in the study were small - less than 1 cm - and the lymph nodes were free of cancer (node negative), which in principle should be a signal of good prognosis. But nearly one in four patients - those identified as genomic high risk - derived benefit from chemotherapy. " "" " Small node negative tumors can be very aggressive, even if they are classified as clinical low risk, " said de Azambuja. " Tumor biology needs to be taken into account when deciding adjuvant treatment...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - October 11, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: breast cancer treatment cancer research tumor Source Type: blogs

New Research Which Could Have More Thought
This study did not include women who had mastectomies or suspicious or enlarged lymph nodes in a physical exam." To make sure that women have the appropriate lymph node surgery, the American Society for Clinical Oncology released guidelines on sentinel lymph node biopsy for people diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer. The guidelines say sentinel lymph node biopsy SHOULD be offered under these circumstances:breast cancer in which there is more than one tumor, all of which have formed separately from one another (doctors call these multicentric tumors); these types of breast cancers are rareDCIS treated with mastect...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - October 8, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: breast cancer breast cancer treatment young cancer patients Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: October 7, 2017
Can a “psychological autopsy” help us determine violent and criminal motives? Why do power outages affect a person’s mental health? Do you know the right way to approach a service dog? Find out in today’s Psychology Around the Net! Las Vegas Shooting: Police Conducting ‘Psychological Autopsy’ of Gunman Stephen Paddock in Search for Motive: Retired FBI profiler Jim Clemente says a “psychological autopsy” might establish a motive for Stephen Paddock’s shooting spree, and that if suicide didn’t destroy Paddock’s brain, experts might be able to find a neurolog...
Source: World of Psychology - October 7, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Brain and Behavior Disorders Men's Issues Psychology Around the Net Research Schizophrenia Sexuality Women's Issues Genetics Mood Disorders psychological autopsy Psychosis Puerto Rico Service Dogs Stephen Paddock study Subs Source Type: blogs

Why a case report being circulated by advocates doesn't show that the ketogenic diet combats cancer
In conclusion, this combined metabolic approach appears effective in treating advanced TNBC, given this patient’s complete response with a good quality of life.Now, there is one thing that is interesting here. The doses of chemotherapy used were considerably lower thanwhat is usually used, with doses decreased by at least half or more. Does this mean anything? Who knows? cPR rates for TNBC have been reported to range from 20-35%. It could mean the regimen made the chemotherapy more effective, or it could mean that this woman just happened to have a particularly chemosensitive tumor. Even if we take this case report a...
Source: Respectful Insolence - October 4, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: oracknows Source Type: blogs

Why a case report being circulated by advocates doesn't show that the ketogenic diet combats cancer
In conclusion, this combined metabolic approach appears effective in treating advanced TNBC, given this patient’s complete response with a good quality of life.Now, there is one thing that is interesting here. The doses of chemotherapy used were considerably lower thanwhat is usually used, with doses decreased by at least half or more. Does this mean anything? Who knows? cPR rates for TNBC have been reported to range from 20-35%. It could mean the regimen made the chemotherapy more effective, or it could mean that this woman just happened to have a particularly chemosensitive tumor. Even if we take this case report a...
Source: Respectful Insolence - October 4, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: oracknows Source Type: blogs

It ’s not gonna’ kill you to take hormone replacement
It’s not going to kill you to take hormone replacement therapy. That’s the take home message from the latest analysis of the Women’s Health Initiative, the largest and longest randomized trial of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in menopausal women. After almost 18 years of follow up in the WHI, there was no increase in overall mortality, including death rates from cancer, in women taking HRT for up to 5.6 years (estrogen plus progestin) or 7.2 years (estrogen alone). There was a non-significant reduction in mortality among those who started HRT between ages 50 and 59, the group most likely to ...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - September 22, 2017 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Hormone Replacement Menopause WHI breast cancer estrogen HRT Prempro Source Type: blogs

Combination hormonal therapy boosts survival in men with aggressive prostate cancer
A standard approach for treating aggressive prostate cancer is to give therapies that block testosterone, a tumor-stimulating hormone. Should initial hormonal therapies fail, doctors can switch to other drugs that suppress testosterone in different ways. One of them, a drug called abiraterone, has been shown to significantly extend lifespans in men who have become resistant to other hormonal treatments. But in June, two major studies reported simultaneously that abiraterone also prolongs life in men with aggressive prostate cancer that’s been newly diagnosed. One of the studies, a phase 3 clinical trial called LATITU...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - August 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlie Schmidt Tags: Cancer Health Men's Health Prostate Health Source Type: blogs

 “I Feel that I’m a Human Being There”: A Transgender Older Adult’s Experience With a Family Medicine Clinic
By: K. Abel Knochel, PhD, University of Minnesota Duluth, Duluth, Minnesota, and Dylan Flunker, MPP, Rainbow Health Initiative, Minneapolis, Minnesota Melissa is a white, 63-year-old academic. She began identifying to others as female six years ago, although she has self-identified as female throughout her life. Melissa is in the process of transitioning and receives care through Smiley’s Family Medicine Clinic. She discussed her experiences in an interview with the Minnesota Transgender Aging Project (MTAP) in September 2016. MTAP is exploring the care that older transgender adults experience and expect in the Twin ...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - August 10, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective empathy humanism LGBT Minnesota Transgender Aging Project patient Source Type: blogs

Yoga improves treatment-related symptoms in men with prostate cancer
Decades of research show that yoga can reduce the emotional and physical fatigue brought on by cancer treatment. Now researchers have shown for the first time that’s also true specifically for men being treated for prostate cancer. Men who took a yoga class twice a week during treatment reported less fatigue, fewer sexual side effects, and better urinary functioning than men who did not, according a new study. “The data are convincing,” said the study’s principal investigator, Dr. Neha Vapiwala, an associate professor of radiation oncology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in Phil...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - August 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlie Schmidt Tags: Cancer Complementary and alternative medicine Prostate Health Yoga Source Type: blogs

Cognitive Training or Gingko Biloba to prevent cognitive decline and dementia? New comprehensive report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine clarifies priorities for public health and for future research
Evidence Supporting Three Interventions That Might Slow Cognitive Decline and the Onset of Dementia Is Encouraging but Insufficient to Justify a Public Health Campaign Focused on Their Adoption (National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine): “Cognitive training, blood pressure management for people with hypertension, and increased physical activity all show modest but inconclusive evidence that they can help prevent cognitive decline and dementia, but there is insufficient evidence to support a public health campaign encouraging their adoption, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, E...
Source: SharpBrains - June 23, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness Professional Development Acetylcholinesterase antidementia treatments biomarkers blood pressure management cognitive-decline Cognitive-impairment Cognitive-Training Source Type: blogs

Combining surgery, radiation, and hormonal therapy dramatically extends survival in men with advanced prostate cancer
In April, scientists reported encouraging results from a pilot study of men with metastatic prostate cancer, or cancer that has spread beyond the prostate gland. Long considered incurable, these advanced cancers are usually treated by giving men systemic drugs that target new tumors forming in the body. The scientists who led this new study took a more aggressive approach. In addition to giving systemic therapy, they surgically removed the prostate gland and affected lymph nodes, and also treated visible cancer in the bones with radiation. By throwing everything but the kitchen sink at these cancers, they achieved a stunni...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - June 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlie Schmidt Tags: Cancer Health Prostate Health Source Type: blogs

Adding hormonal therapy to radiation lengthens survival in men with recurring prostate cancer
High-grade cancer that’s still confined to the prostate is generally treated surgically. But a third of the men who have their cancerous prostates removed will experience a rise in blood levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). This is called PSA recurrence. And since detectable PSA could signal the cancer’s return, doctors will often treat it by irradiating the prostate bed, or the area where the gland used to be. In February, researchers reported that radiation is a more effective treatment for PSA recurrence when given in combination with androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). ADT interferes with the body&rsq...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - May 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlie Schmidt Tags: Cancer Prostate Health Source Type: blogs

Motherhood, the Brain and Dementia: Changing Hormones Alter Risk
Throughout decades of study, hormone therapy (HT), often but not always the same as hormone replacement therapy (HRT), has been glorified and demonized in turn. The information that doctors receive has come from ongoing studies that seemed to offer over time radically conflicting results. A new study may add more confusion since this study has found that not only does HT given near menopause create changes in a woman’s brain, but motherhood itself creates changes. Read full article on how changing hormones can alter the risk of Alzheimer's: Support a caregiver or jump start discussion in support groups with real stor...
Source: Minding Our Elders - May 13, 2017 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

January, 2035: The First Designer Baby Brought To Life
I write short science fiction stories to raise awareness about the massive ethical issues we will have to face when disruptive technologies show their full potential. This way, people can get scared, excited or just initiate discussions about how to prepare for the coming changes in health, disease and life. Waiting to disconnect Lydia from the artificial womb The birth of a baby is always one of the greatest events in the parents’ life. But the 21st of January was also a big day in the Digital Healthcare Facility in London, UK. Lydia, the first so-called „designer baby” was brought to life. Unbearable am...
Source: The Medical Futurist - May 9, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Medical Science Fiction CRISPR designer babies designer baby future GC1 genome editing sci-fi Source Type: blogs

This gynecological issue is misdiagnosed over 50 percent of the time
As a consultant in gynecologic pathology, I receive requests for second opinions from patients who have been diagnosed with endometrial hyperplasia. My opinion is based upon correlating the relevant clinical history with a review of the patient’s pathology slides and report. In my experience, there is a difference of opinion that leads to a change in treatment in about half of the cases. 75 percent of cases with changed diagnoses are downgraded to a less serious condition or normal variant, and the remaining 25 percent of those cases are upgraded to a more serious condition. Pathologists are particularly likely to ov...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 5, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/roger-reichert" rel="tag" > Roger Reichert, MD, PhD < /a > Tags: Conditions OB/GYN Source Type: blogs

Transgender Health Equity: Patients Say Providers Lack Expertise And Understanding Of Transgender Health Needs
For the past five years, Massachusetts has mandated that insurers provide coverage for medical services related to the health of transgender people, including gender-affirming medical services. But it was not clear how well the mandate was working or whether people were able to access care now that services were covered. Were insurers covering the right services? What barriers were being encountered? Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Foundation’s new program, the Health Equity Roundtable, set out to find answers to these questions by bringing together transgender men, transgender women, and transgender youth, along with pa...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - March 29, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Shani Dowd Tags: Featured Health Equity Quality transgender discrimination transgender rights Source Type: blogs

What Can Women Do to Prevent Early Menopause?
About Early Menopause The average age a woman goes into menopause is 51. Menopause is considered abnormal when it begins before the age of 40 and is called “premature ovarian failure.” Common symptoms that come with menopause include hot flashes, night sweats, sleep problems, sexual issues, vaginal dryness, pain during sex, pelvic floor disorders (urine, bowel leakage, pelvic organ prolapse), losing bone mass, and mood swings. Menopause is mostly genetically predetermined, which means you generally can’t do much to delay it from happening. What we can do is work to counter-balance or prevent the symptoms ...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - March 13, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Tags: Health Tips Women's Health diet and exercise early menopause tatiana sanses Source Type: blogs

Exercise, or Reducing AI's Side Effects
All of us'lucky'people with hormone positive breast cancer, get the'benefit'of being able to take hormone therapy or aromatase inhibitors (AIs) such as Femara, Aromasin, etc. These lovely little pills potentially reduce your risk of breast cancer recurrence (that most dreaded of all possibilities).However these aforementioned lovely little pills cause nice side effects such as bone loss and joint pain. I have friends who had to discontinue AIs because of these side effects. They can be THAT bad.So anew research study (because we always need more research) has come up with a cure for these issues: Exercise. Parts of me says...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 13, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: breast cancer treatment exercise hormone therapy side effects Source Type: blogs

Correlating Activity Levels and Telomere Length as a Proxy for the Pace of Aging
Discussions about the benefits of exercise should start when we are young, and physical activity should continue to be part of our daily lives as we get older, even at 80 years old." Associations of Accelerometer-Measured and Self-Reported Sedentary Time With Leukocyte Telomere Length in Older Women Emerging evidence has linked leukocyte telomere length (LTL) to modifiable factors such as smoking, body mass index, and physical activity. Sedentary behavior has also been studied in relation to LTL, but with mixed findings. In the Nurses' Health Study, there was no association of total sedentary time or...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 20, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

A Look at Ascendance Biomedical, Packaging Medical Tourism for Longevity Therapies
Ascendance Biomedical is a fairly new venture, still in the early stages of formalizing its structure and agenda. It is focused on two twofold path of (a) establishing patient-funded trials of potentially useful therapies in the longevity science space, and (b) packaging participation in trials and later purchase of therapies via medical tourism, bundling all of the complications into a single product. The people involved overlap with the principals of the Global Healthspan Policy Institute, and are fairly well connected in our community. The organization is tackling just a few types of therapy to get started, gaining expe...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 29, 2016 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs

What ’s Confusing Us About Mental Health Parity
The Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act (MHPAEA) has been law since 2008. MHPAEA provided that health plans could not limit mental health or substance use disorder benefits in a way that was more restrictive than how most medical/surgical benefits were limited. This sounds simple enough, but in this year alone there has been a White House task force, voluminous Department of Labor guidance, a SAMHSA best practices manual, and an Energy & Commerce Committee hearing to find out why most people still can’t access care. We still don’t have all the answers. The issues these efforts have uncovered are n...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - December 22, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Nathaniel Counts, Timothy Clement, Amanda Mauri, Paul Gionfriddo and Garry Carneal Tags: Featured Payment Policy Public Health Quality Behavioral Health Mental Health substance use Source Type: blogs

Treating the primary tumor can improve survival in men whose prostate cancer has spread
This study suggests a different and very novel way of thinking about how to manage men who present with metastatic prostate cancer,” said Dr. Marc Garnick, the Gorman Brothers Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and editor in chief of HarvardProstateKnowledge.org. “There are other cancers where treating the primary cancer in the setting of metastatic disease has been associated with improvements — and this study provides an important impetus to consider this option both in the context of clinical studies and individualized patient selection.” Rel...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - September 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlie Schmidt Tags: Cancer Health Men's Health Prostate Health Source Type: blogs

Transgender healthcare coverage: Prevalence, recent trends, and considerations for payers
The post originally ran on Milliman, Inc. on July 28, 2016. Recently, the concept of gender identity and what it means from a health insurance coverage perspective has been receiving increased attention. This paper lays out recent trends, including recent federal and state laws affecting health insurance benefits for transgender individuals. We also examine health insurance clinical coverage policies related to gender reassignment surgery as well as prevalence estimates. Finally, we provide future considerations for healthcare payers, including appropriately capturing data relevant to the healthcare needs of the transgende...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - September 9, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Transgender Healthcare Uncategorized Source Type: blogs