New Scale Helps Identify More Serious Cases of Mononucleosis
Scale identifies college students at increased risk for corticosteroid Rx, chronic fatigue syndrome (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry - April 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Family Medicine, Infections, Neurology, Pediatrics, Psychiatry, Rheumatology, Journal, Source Type: news

New Scale Helps Identify More Serious Cases of Mononucleosis
MONDAY, April 15, 2019 -- A new scale for rating the severity of mononucleosis can identify patients at risk for more serious cases, including those who might develop chronic fatigue syndrome following infectious mononucleosis, according to a study... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - April 15, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Young Athletes Need to Be Sidelined After Bout of Mono
SUNDAY, April 14, 2019 -- Young sports buffs recovering from mononucleosis may be itching to return to the game they love. But one expert says the risk of suffering a burst spleen during play means staying on the sideline longer than some would... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - April 14, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

NIH researchers make progress toward Epstein-Barr virus vaccine
EBV is herpesvirus that causes infectious mononucleosis and is associated with certain cancers. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - April 9, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: news

NIH researchers make progress toward Epstein-Barr virus vaccine
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) A research team led by scientists from NIH's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) has determined how several antibodies induced by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a herpesvirus that causes infectious mononucleosis and is associated with certain cancers, block infection of cells grown in the laboratory. They then used this information to develop novel vaccine candidates that, in animals, elicited potent anti-EBV antibody responses that blocked infection of cell types involved in EBV-associated cancers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 9, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Does Bad 'Mono' Predict Chronic Fatigue Syndrome?
People with the most severe mononucleosis infections were more than three times as likely to meet the diagnostic criteria for chronic fatigue syndrome. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - April 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Severe'Mono' Infection May Raise Risk for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
TUESDAY, April 2, 2019 -- As if having the exhausting " kissing disease " -- also known as mononucleosis, or " mono " -- isn't bad enough, about 1 in 10 people with this infection will develop chronic fatigue syndrome in six months, researchers... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - April 2, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Assessment tool predicts chronic fatigue syndrome 6 months after mono
(Ann& Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago) To assess risk factors for chronic fatigue syndrome after mononucleosis, researchers developed and validated a scale for rating the severity of mononucleosis. In a study with 126 college students, they found that participants with a higher mononucleosis severity score had over three times the risk of meeting two or more sets of diagnostic criteria for chronic fatigue syndrome after six months. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 20, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Infectious Diseases A-Z: When a kiss is more than a kiss
Often referred to as the "kissing disease," mononucleosis is a common ailment caused by the Epstein-Barr virus that is transmitted through saliva. While you can get the virus through kissing, you also can be exposed through a cough or sneeze, or by sharing cups or utensils with someone who is infected. According to the Centers [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - February 4, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Does glandular fever lead to schizophrenia? Study reveals a link
Schizophrenia patients were more than twice likely to have virus antibodies, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine and Sheppard Pratt Health System, Baltimore, found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Schizophrenia linked with abnormal immune response to Epstein-Barr virus
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) New research from Johns Hopkins Medicine and Sheppard Pratt Health System shows that people in the study with schizophrenia also have higher levels of antibodies against the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a herpes virus that causes infectious mononucleosis, so-called mono. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 9, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Teaching the body to fight glandular fever could reduce MS symptoms
Research by the QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute in Queensland, Australia, found training the body to fight the Epstein-Barr virus reduced debilitating symptoms in MS patients. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New strategy discovered toward possible prevention of cancers tied to mono
(University of Minnesota) Researchers have discovered a possible path forward in preventing the development of cancers tied to two viruses, including the virus that causes infectious mononucleosis --more commonly known as mono or the 'kissing disease' -- that infects millions of people around the globe each year. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Small populations of normal cells affect immunity in patients with XLP1
(Tokyo Medical and Dental University) Patients with X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome type 1 (XLP1) are at risk of fatal infectious mononucleosis. Here, a Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU)-led research team performed detailed analyses of T cells in a family with a mild form of XLP1. They found small populations of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressing SLAM-associated protein at normal levels, suggesting that less invasive therapies, which affect fewer T cells, may be useful in treatment of XLP1. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 9, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Ruptured Spleen Samples in Patients With Mononucleosis Ruptured Spleen Samples in Patients With Mononucleosis
Histology of splenectomy specimens removed after spontaneous rupture due to infectious mononucleosis may resemble that of malignant lymphoma.American Journal of Clinical Pathology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - October 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pathology & Lab Medicine Journal Article Source Type: news

Ask Well: My Daughter Has Mono. Is the Whole Family at Risk?
By midlife, the vast majority of adults are immune to the virus that causes mononucleosis. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - June 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: RONI CARYN RABIN Tags: Mononucleosis Fever Spleen Viruses Hygiene and Cleanliness Source Type: news

Health Tip: Understanding Mono
-- Once you contract mononucleosis, the virus behind it stays in your body, the Nemours Foundation says. In fact, about 95 percent of adults have the virus inside them, Nemours says. You won't always be contagious, but symptoms of the virus --... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - June 21, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Can'Mono' Virus Up Odds for 7 Other Diseases?
MONDAY, April 16, 2018 -- Millions of young Americans have lived through the fatigue and discomfort of mononucleosis. Now, new research suggests, but doesn't prove, that the virus that causes the illness may be linked to an increased risk for seven... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - April 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Epstein-Barr virus protein can 'switch on' risk genes for autoimmune diseases
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), the cause of infectious mononucleosis, has been associated with subsequent development of systemic lupus erythematosus and other chronic autoimmune illnesses, but the mechanisms behind this association were unclear. Now, a novel computational method shows that a viral protein found in EBV-infected human cells may activate genes associated with increased risk for autoimmunity. Scientists supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases report their findings today in Nature Genetics. (Source: EurekAlert!...
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 16, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

What is infectious mononucleosis? Headache and sore throat could be symptoms of illness
HEADACHE, sore throat, and swollen tonsils are all symptoms of infectious mononucleosis, also known as mono. But what is it, what are the symptoms, and is the illness cause for concern? (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - March 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UCLA study describes structure of tumor herpes virus associated with Kaposi ’s sarcoma
UCLA researchers have provided the first description of the structure of the herpes virus associated with Kaposi ’s sarcoma, a type of cancer.The discovery answers important questions about how the virus spreads and provides a potential roadmap for the development of antiviral drugs to combat both that virus and the more common Epstein-Barr virus, which is present in more than 90 percent of the adult population and is believed to have a nearly identical structure.In the study, published in the journal  Nature, the UCLA team showed in the laboratory that an inhibitor could be developed to break down the herpes vi...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 20, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Have you got a persistent sore throat? Why you should never ignore condition
A SORE throat is unpleasant and uncomfortable. But, you should never ignore a persistent sore throat that lasts longer than three weeks, as it could be a sign of glandular fever, tonsillitis, or even cancer. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - January 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Higher MS Risk From Epstein-Barr Virus Spans Racial, Ethnic Groups Higher MS Risk From Epstein-Barr Virus Spans Racial, Ethnic Groups
High levels of a serum marker of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and a history of infectious mononucleosis are associated with an increased risk of multiple sclerosis (MS) across racial and ethnic groups, new research shows.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - September 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

More Evidence Links the'Mono' Virus to MS Risk
Latest study shows blacks and Hispanics also vulnerable Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Infectious Mononucleosis, Multiple Sclerosis (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - August 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

More Evidence Links the'Mono' Virus to MS Risk
WEDNESDAY, Aug. 30, 2017 -- There's more evidence that having mononucleosis may up the risk for multiple sclerosis (MS), with researchers reporting that the link isn't limited to whites. In fact, while " mono consistently increases the risk of... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - August 30, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

A Few Metaphors to Better Understand Depression
Depression is a difficult illness to understand. It’s hard to understand for the people suffering from it, but it’s downright impossible to know everything that a person who deals with depression on a daily basis goes through if you have never experienced it personally. For this reason, I have come up with a few real-life examples to help those who may not fully understand what depression is or how it functions. Of course, this will be the simplistic version. Depression is an extremely complex disease. As a person with depression myself, I have learned that it is very difficult to understand even for those who ...
Source: Psych Central - August 30, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Caitlin Gearsbeck Tags: Antidepressants Depression General Happiness Personal Stories Self-Esteem Bipolar Disorder Depressed Mood Depressive Episode Mental Illness Stigma Mood Disorder Source Type: news

Virus that causes mono may increase risk of MS for multiple races
(American Academy of Neurology) Like whites, Hispanic and black people who have had mononucleosis, commonly known as mono, which is caused by Epstein-Barr virus, may have an increased risk of multiple sclerosis, according to a new study published in the Aug. 30, 2017, online issue of Neurology ® , the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Treating mononucleosis: why the mystery?
Mononucleosis, a common condition usually caused by the Epstein-Barr virus, affects millions but has no cure or vaccine, and has a high risk of misdiagnosis. So what is being done to improve the situation? Abi Millar reports. (Source: Pharmaceutical Technology)
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - July 13, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

What is glandular fever? THIS symptom can take months to go away
GLANDULAR fever - also known as the ‘kissing disease’ - is a viral infection with symptoms that can persist for several months. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - June 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cancer-causing virus masters cell's replication, immortality
(Duke University) Duke researchers detail how the Epstein-Barr virus manages to persist quietly inside the immune system's B cells in as many as 90 percent of adults. Should something go awry however, the virus can cause mononucleosis or cancers of the lymph. 'The challenge is that it's a really efficient pathogen,' said Micah Luftig, an associate professor of molecular genetics and microbiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 2, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Getting back into the swing of things: Jake ’s journey with Crohn’s disease
It was a cloudy, September day at the Country Club of Miami in South Florida. Jake Goodstat, a high school sophomore and varsity golf player, approached the ninth green. He walked up to his ball with putter in hand, took a deep breath and gently tapped the ball to make the putt. He says this was the hole where he cinched second place in the 2016 South Florida Junior Golf Tournament. “It was the greatest feeling in the world to know that I placed,” recalls Jake, a Florida teen who underwent surgery two months prior to treat his Crohn’s disease. “Before my surgery, I...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - January 26, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Maureen McCarthy Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Athos Bousvaros Center for Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) Crohn's disease Robert Shamberger Source Type: news

Pharma Technology Focus – Issue 54
In this issue: Senator Bernie Sanders continues to rail against the pharma industry, why companies pay to prolong patents, a new genomic array helping fight disease in Africa, treating mononucleosis, a new era for ibuprofen, and more. (Source: Pharmaceutical Technology)
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - December 14, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Mononucleosis
(Source: eMedicineHealth.com)
Source: eMedicineHealth.com - November 17, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

MillionsMissing: A Hidden Epidemic and a Day of Action
(Photo credit: Mary F. Calvert) A hidden epidemic has swept the globe -- and your neighborhood is not immune. In its wake are millions of lives ruined. Its silent victims are all ages, from all backgrounds and in every state across America: Up to 99,000 in Illinois, 152,000 in New York and 211,000 in Texas. There is no prevention, no treatment and no cure for this barely acknowledged disease that gets barely any government funding. In total, there are 1 million to 2.5 million in the US, 17 million worldwide, whose lives have been devastated due to the most serious neuroimmune disease you never knew existed: Myalgic Ence...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A Novel Approach to the Shocky Child
  Start with three quick bedside ultrasounds and you might avoid an unnecessary IV push An 11-year-old boy is brought to your emergency department following a few hours of persistent vomiting, irritability and decreasing activity. His mother also reports about two days of fever, decreased appetite and nasal stuffness. On initial evaluation, his vital signs include a heart rate of 128 beats/minute, blood pressure of 82/64 mmHg, respirations of 24 breaths/minute and temperature of 101.50F. Pulse oximetry reveals 98% saturation on room air while capillary refill time is approximately 5 seconds. His activity is reduced an...
Source: EPMonthly.com - September 27, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Matt McGahen Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Olympic diving champion Chris Mears reveals how he nearly died when his spleen ruptured due to glandular fever
The 23-year-old from Berkshire collapsed while competing in the Youth Olympic Festival, Sydney, in January 2009. He was diagnosed with glandular fever and a ruptured spleen. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 30, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Olympic silver medallist Roger Black goes under the microscope in our health quiz  
Roger Black won a silver medal in men's 400m at the 1996 Olympics. Now he reveals that he almost gave up his athletic career, after suffering severe glandular fever at the age of 27. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 16, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Could a CURE for HIV be in sight? Scientists discover how to boost the immune system
The discovery could pave the way for treatments for other viruses, including Epstein Barr, which causes glandular fever, scientists from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, Australia said. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Big step towards cure for HIV and other lifelong viral infections
New research has taken us a step closer to finding a cure for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), as well as other infections including the glandular fever virus, which is associated with the development of lymphoma. Some infections, such as HIV, cannot be cured with antiviral therapy because the virus effectively hides from the immune system. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - August 4, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Big step towards cure for lifelong viral infections
(Monash University) New research has taken us a step closer to finding a cure for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), as well as other infections including the glandular fever virus, which is associated with the development of lymphoma. Some infections, such as HIV, cannot be cured with antiviral therapy because the virus effectively hides from the immune system. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 3, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Towards a cure for herpesviruses: Targeting infection with CRISPR/Cas9
Most adults carry multiple herpesviruses. Following the initial acute infection, these viruses establish life-long infections in their hosts and cause cold sores, keratitis, genital herpes, shingles, infectious mononucleosis, and other diseases. A new study suggests that attacking herpesvirus DNA with CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology can suppress virus replication and, in some cases, lead to elimination of the virus. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 30, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Diagnosing mononucleosis: Researchers work to expedite proper treatment
One researcher wasn't impressed with research on infectious mononucleosis when he wrote his first published review on it back in the 1990s, and he still isn't. Early diagnosis of mono is key in expediting proper treatment, says one expert. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 2, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Diagnosing mononucleosis: UGA's Mark Ebell works to expedite proper treatment
(University of Georgia) The University of Georgia's Mark Ebell wasn't impressed with research on infectious mononucleosis when he wrote his first published review on it back in the 1990s. He still isn't -- a subject he discusses in the April issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.Early diagnosis of mono is key in expediting proper treatment, said Ebell, a professor of epidemiology in the College of Public Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 2, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Researchers at Howard Hughes Medical Institute Develop Blood Test That Reveals a Patient’s Viral History; Could Reduce Unnecessary Clinical Laboratory Testing
The VirScan test gives doctors insight into a patient’s lifetime exposure to viruses and thus may be developed into a useful medical laboratory test Scientists and pathologists are learning that blood is like a time capsule, holding precious information about exposure to viruses over the years—chickenpox at five, mononucleosis at 18, flu at 40. You […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - December 30, 2015 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: jude Tags: Instruments & Equipment Laboratory Instruments & Laboratory Equipment Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology Laboratory Testing antibodies big data blood test Brigham and Women Source Type: news

Mononucleosis: Can it recur?
(Source: MayoClinic.com - Ask a Specialist)
Source: MayoClinic.com - Ask a Specialist - December 2, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

My Open Letter to Lyme Disease
Dear Lyme disease, I'm not angry. But I admit you made me miserable. You sneakily rushed through my veins. Anonymous, without a name, you tortured me for months. I didn't know who you were or where you came from. I would stare bleakly out my freshman dorm window, my eyes dull and my head throbbing. I blamed my school. During my first quarter at Northwestern University, my boyfriend and I broke up, my grandfather died, and I couldn't get out of bed for my morning classes. I reluctantly dropped a course after meeting with an adviser who thought I was struggling to acclimate to college. I was 850 miles from home and started ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 30, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NOWDx Focuses on On-Site Diagnosis
Just inside the front door of NOWDiagnostics is a dog bed with a chew toy that is roughly the size of an elephant femur. The owner of the chew toy bounds up to visitors: Annie, an overtly cheerful 7-month-old Irish wolfhound who belongs to NOWDiagnostics CEO Kevin Clark. Annie, after being petted partially in self-defense, soon lopes off through the office complex to make her rounds at the Springdale facility. Don’t mistake the casualness of the greeting for a lack of seriousness at NOWDiagnostics. Clark and his staff of mostly Ph.D.-credentialed researchers are doing serious and potentially lifesaving work. “I...
Source: Arkansas Business - Health Care - November 23, 2015 Category: American Health Source Type: news