Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

More Evidence Links the'Mono' Virus to MS Risk
Latest study shows blacks and Hispanics also vulnerable Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Infectious Mononucleosis, Multiple Sclerosis (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - August 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

More Evidence Links the'Mono' Virus to MS Risk
WEDNESDAY, Aug. 30, 2017 -- There's more evidence that having mononucleosis may up the risk for multiple sclerosis (MS), with researchers reporting that the link isn't limited to whites. In fact, while " mono consistently increases the risk of... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - August 30, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

A Few Metaphors to Better Understand Depression
Depression is a difficult illness to understand. It’s hard to understand for the people suffering from it, but it’s downright impossible to know everything that a person who deals with depression on a daily basis goes through if you have never experienced it personally. For this reason, I have come up with a few real-life examples to help those who may not fully understand what depression is or how it functions. Of course, this will be the simplistic version. Depression is an extremely complex disease. As a person with depression myself, I have learned that it is very difficult to understand even for those who ...
Source: Psych Central - August 30, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Caitlin Gearsbeck Tags: Antidepressants Depression General Happiness Personal Stories Self-Esteem Bipolar Disorder Depressed Mood Depressive Episode Mental Illness Stigma Mood Disorder Source Type: news

Virus that causes mono may increase risk of MS for multiple races
(American Academy of Neurology) Like whites, Hispanic and black people who have had mononucleosis, commonly known as mono, which is caused by Epstein-Barr virus, may have an increased risk of multiple sclerosis, according to a new study published in the Aug. 30, 2017, online issue of Neurology ® , the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Treating mononucleosis: why the mystery?
Mononucleosis, a common condition usually caused by the Epstein-Barr virus, affects millions but has no cure or vaccine, and has a high risk of misdiagnosis. So what is being done to improve the situation? Abi Millar reports. (Source: Pharmaceutical Technology)
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - July 12, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

What is glandular fever? THIS symptom can take months to go away
GLANDULAR fever - also known as the ‘kissing disease’ - is a viral infection with symptoms that can persist for several months. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - June 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cancer-causing virus masters cell's replication, immortality
(Duke University) Duke researchers detail how the Epstein-Barr virus manages to persist quietly inside the immune system's B cells in as many as 90 percent of adults. Should something go awry however, the virus can cause mononucleosis or cancers of the lymph. 'The challenge is that it's a really efficient pathogen,' said Micah Luftig, an associate professor of molecular genetics and microbiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 2, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Getting back into the swing of things: Jake ’s journey with Crohn’s disease
It was a cloudy, September day at the Country Club of Miami in South Florida. Jake Goodstat, a high school sophomore and varsity golf player, approached the ninth green. He walked up to his ball with putter in hand, took a deep breath and gently tapped the ball to make the putt. He says this was the hole where he cinched second place in the 2016 South Florida Junior Golf Tournament. “It was the greatest feeling in the world to know that I placed,” recalls Jake, a Florida teen who underwent surgery two months prior to treat his Crohn’s disease. “Before my surgery, I...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - January 26, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Maureen McCarthy Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Athos Bousvaros Center for Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) Crohn's disease Robert Shamberger Source Type: news

Pharma Technology Focus – Issue 54
In this issue: Senator Bernie Sanders continues to rail against the pharma industry, why companies pay to prolong patents, a new genomic array helping fight disease in Africa, treating mononucleosis, a new era for ibuprofen, and more. (Source: Pharmaceutical Technology)
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - December 14, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Mononucleosis
(Source: eMedicineHealth.com)
Source: eMedicineHealth.com - November 17, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

MillionsMissing: A Hidden Epidemic and a Day of Action
(Photo credit: Mary F. Calvert) A hidden epidemic has swept the globe -- and your neighborhood is not immune. In its wake are millions of lives ruined. Its silent victims are all ages, from all backgrounds and in every state across America: Up to 99,000 in Illinois, 152,000 in New York and 211,000 in Texas. There is no prevention, no treatment and no cure for this barely acknowledged disease that gets barely any government funding. In total, there are 1 million to 2.5 million in the US, 17 million worldwide, whose lives have been devastated due to the most serious neuroimmune disease you never knew existed: Myalgic Ence...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A Novel Approach to the Shocky Child
  Start with three quick bedside ultrasounds and you might avoid an unnecessary IV push An 11-year-old boy is brought to your emergency department following a few hours of persistent vomiting, irritability and decreasing activity. His mother also reports about two days of fever, decreased appetite and nasal stuffness. On initial evaluation, his vital signs include a heart rate of 128 beats/minute, blood pressure of 82/64 mmHg, respirations of 24 breaths/minute and temperature of 101.50F. Pulse oximetry reveals 98% saturation on room air while capillary refill time is approximately 5 seconds. His activity is reduced an...
Source: EPMonthly.com - September 27, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Matt McGahen Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Olympic diving champion Chris Mears reveals how he nearly died when his spleen ruptured due to glandular fever
The 23-year-old from Berkshire collapsed while competing in the Youth Olympic Festival, Sydney, in January 2009. He was diagnosed with glandular fever and a ruptured spleen. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 30, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Olympic silver medallist Roger Black goes under the microscope in our health quiz  
Roger Black won a silver medal in men's 400m at the 1996 Olympics. Now he reveals that he almost gave up his athletic career, after suffering severe glandular fever at the age of 27. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 16, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Could a CURE for HIV be in sight? Scientists discover how to boost the immune system
The discovery could pave the way for treatments for other viruses, including Epstein Barr, which causes glandular fever, scientists from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, Australia said. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Big step towards cure for HIV and other lifelong viral infections
New research has taken us a step closer to finding a cure for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), as well as other infections including the glandular fever virus, which is associated with the development of lymphoma. Some infections, such as HIV, cannot be cured with antiviral therapy because the virus effectively hides from the immune system. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - August 4, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Big step towards cure for lifelong viral infections
(Monash University) New research has taken us a step closer to finding a cure for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), as well as other infections including the glandular fever virus, which is associated with the development of lymphoma. Some infections, such as HIV, cannot be cured with antiviral therapy because the virus effectively hides from the immune system. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 3, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Towards a cure for herpesviruses: Targeting infection with CRISPR/Cas9
Most adults carry multiple herpesviruses. Following the initial acute infection, these viruses establish life-long infections in their hosts and cause cold sores, keratitis, genital herpes, shingles, infectious mononucleosis, and other diseases. A new study suggests that attacking herpesvirus DNA with CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology can suppress virus replication and, in some cases, lead to elimination of the virus. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 30, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Diagnosing mononucleosis: Researchers work to expedite proper treatment
One researcher wasn't impressed with research on infectious mononucleosis when he wrote his first published review on it back in the 1990s, and he still isn't. Early diagnosis of mono is key in expediting proper treatment, says one expert. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 2, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Diagnosing mononucleosis: UGA's Mark Ebell works to expedite proper treatment
(University of Georgia) The University of Georgia's Mark Ebell wasn't impressed with research on infectious mononucleosis when he wrote his first published review on it back in the 1990s. He still isn't -- a subject he discusses in the April issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.Early diagnosis of mono is key in expediting proper treatment, said Ebell, a professor of epidemiology in the College of Public Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 2, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Researchers at Howard Hughes Medical Institute Develop Blood Test That Reveals a Patient’s Viral History; Could Reduce Unnecessary Clinical Laboratory Testing
The VirScan test gives doctors insight into a patient’s lifetime exposure to viruses and thus may be developed into a useful medical laboratory test Scientists and pathologists are learning that blood is like a time capsule, holding precious information about exposure to viruses over the years—chickenpox at five, mononucleosis at 18, flu at 40. You […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - December 30, 2015 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: jude Tags: Instruments & Equipment Laboratory Instruments & Laboratory Equipment Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology Laboratory Testing antibodies big data blood test Brigham and Women Source Type: news

Mononucleosis: Can it recur?
(Source: MayoClinic.com - Ask a Specialist)
Source: MayoClinic.com - Ask a Specialist - December 2, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

My Open Letter to Lyme Disease
Dear Lyme disease, I'm not angry. But I admit you made me miserable. You sneakily rushed through my veins. Anonymous, without a name, you tortured me for months. I didn't know who you were or where you came from. I would stare bleakly out my freshman dorm window, my eyes dull and my head throbbing. I blamed my school. During my first quarter at Northwestern University, my boyfriend and I broke up, my grandfather died, and I couldn't get out of bed for my morning classes. I reluctantly dropped a course after meeting with an adviser who thought I was struggling to acclimate to college. I was 850 miles from home and started ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 30, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NOWDx Focuses on On-Site Diagnosis
Just inside the front door of NOWDiagnostics is a dog bed with a chew toy that is roughly the size of an elephant femur. The owner of the chew toy bounds up to visitors: Annie, an overtly cheerful 7-month-old Irish wolfhound who belongs to NOWDiagnostics CEO Kevin Clark. Annie, after being petted partially in self-defense, soon lopes off through the office complex to make her rounds at the Springdale facility. Don’t mistake the casualness of the greeting for a lack of seriousness at NOWDiagnostics. Clark and his staff of mostly Ph.D.-credentialed researchers are doing serious and potentially lifesaving work. “I...
Source: Arkansas Business - Health Care - November 23, 2015 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Smoking an MS Risk Factor Among MS Patients' Relatives (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- But no link found to history of infectious mononucleosis (Source: MedPage Today Meeting Coverage)
Source: MedPage Today Meeting Coverage - October 4, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

New Hope for Vaccine Against Germ That Causes 'Mono'
Shot seems to work against Epstein-Barr virus in mice and monkeys, but human trials are still to come Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Immunization, Infectious Mononucleosis (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - August 13, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers shed light on link between diet, Epstein-Barr
A new study is shedding light on the connection between diet and a common childhood disease. Using national health data, the researchers determined children who ate certain types of food or dealt with food insecurity may be more likely to contract the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). EBV is a common virus that often causes no symptoms on its own; it’s better known as a cause of infectious mononucleosis and having a connection to some cancers. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 8, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Diet and EBV infection
American research has found that people with a bad diet or who ate beans, red meat and fruit juice daily had a higher risk of being infected by the virus that can cause glandular fever. Newswise Epstein Barr virus (EBV) - A to Z of MS (Source: Multiple Sclerosis Trust)
Source: Multiple Sclerosis Trust - April 7, 2015 Category: Neurology Source Type: news

Picture of Infectious Mononucleosis
Title: Picture of Infectious MononucleosisCategory: ImagesCreated: 10/19/2009 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 12/10/2014 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Hepatitis C General)
Source: MedicineNet Hepatitis C General - December 10, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Picture of Infectious Mononucleosis
Title: Picture of Infectious MononucleosisCategory: ImagesCreated: 2/3/2011 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 12/10/2014 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Hepatitis C General)
Source: MedicineNet Hepatitis C General - December 10, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

'Kissing disease' outbreak closes Oklahoma school district
OKLAHOMA CITY (Reuters) - A small Oklahoma school district has ordered all of its students to stay away from classes until December due to an outbreak of mononucleosis, officials said on Thursday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - November 20, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Mononucleosis and Epstein-Barr: What's the connection?
(Source: MayoClinic.com - Ask a Specialist)
Source: MayoClinic.com - Ask a Specialist - November 11, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sophie King documents her four stone weight loss in just three months
Sophie King, 26, from Newquay, Cornwall, saw her weight balloon to 14 stone after glandular fever, a leg abscess and a broken ankle. She decided to document herself shifting the pounds online. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 27, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Leon O'Neill left brain damaged after reaction to glandular fever drugs
Leon O'Neill, from Cumbria, battled leukaemia twice and before falling ill with glandular fever. He was given medication but had a devastating reaction t0 the drugs. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 5, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How the kissing disease virus hijacks human cells
A component of the Epstein Barr (EBV) virus takes over our cells gene regulating machinery, allowing the virus to replicate itself, researchers have discovered. The EBV virus causes a variety of diseases such as Hodgkin’s lymphoma and Burkitt’s lymphoma, with the most prevalent disease being infectious mononucleosis commonly known as “kissing disease” because of its mode of transmission between humans. It turns out that the diseases begin with kiss of a molecular sort; a viral protein contacting the molecules that control our genes. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 10, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Researchers discover how the kissing disease virus hijacks human cells
(University of Montreal) University of Montreal researchers have discovered how a component of the Epstein Barr (EBV) virus takes over our cells gene regulating machinery, allowing the virus to replicate itself. The EBV virus causes a variety of diseases such as Hodgkin's lymphoma and Burkitt's lymphoma, with the most prevalent disease being infectious mononucleosis commonly known as 'kissing disease' because of its mode of transmission between humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 9, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Mononucleosis: Can I Get a Rash? polyDNA Answers Survey Questions and...
In its latest December, 2013 survey, polyDNA found that only 15% of respondents knew that the Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) can cause a rash during mononucleosis (Mono). polyDNA recommends Gene-Eden-VIR to...(PRWeb January 28, 2014)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/01/prweb11515989.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - January 28, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Young killer cells protect against infectious mononucleosis
More than 90 percent of all adults are carriers of the oncogenic Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV). Primary infection with this herpes virus as a young child is generally not linked to any symptoms, and usually offers life-long protection from its cancer-causing effect. However, for people who do not become infected with the virus until adolescence, the infection often leads to infectious mononucleosis (commonly known as glandular fever). Our immune systems can generally fend off this disease after a period of between one and several months. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 27, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases / Bacteria / Viruses Source Type: news

Moving closer to Epstein-Barr virus vaccine to prevent mono, some cancers
Development of a vaccine against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has taken a step forward with the Canadian discovery of how EBV infection evades detection by the immune system. EBV causes infectious mononucleosis and cancers such as Hodgkin's lymphoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma, which is the most common cancer in China, as well as opportunistic cancers in people with weakened immune systems. A member of the herpes virus family that remains in the body for life, the virus infects epithelial cells in the throat and immune cells called B cells... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 15, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lymphoma / Leukemia / Myeloma Source Type: news

Epstein-Barr virus-associated diseases and cancer
You might not know it, but most of us are infected with the herpesvirus known as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). For most of us, the virus will lead at worst to a case of infectious mononucleosis, but sometimes, and especially in some parts of the world, those viruses are found in association with cancer. Now, researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Cell Reports have found that the difference between a relatively harmless infection and a cancer-causing one lies at least partly in the viral strain itself... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 14, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases / Bacteria / Viruses Source Type: news

How a ubiquitous herpesvirus sometimes leads to cancer
(Cell Press) Most of us are infected with the herpesvirus known as Epstein-Barr virus. For most of us, the virus will lead at worst to a case of infectious mononucleosis, but sometimes, and especially in some parts of the world, those viruses are found in association with cancer. Now, researchers have found that the difference between a relatively harmless infection and a cancer-causing one lies at least partly in the viral strain itself. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 10, 2013 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Infectious Mononucleosis
Title: Infectious MononucleosisCategory: Diseases and ConditionsCreated: 12/31/1997 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 9/25/2013 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Hepatitis C General)
Source: MedicineNet Hepatitis C General - September 25, 2013 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Programmed cell death activates latent herpesviruses
Researchers have found that apoptosis, a natural process of programmed cell death, can reactivate latent herpesviruses in the dying cell. The results of their research, which could have broad clinical significance since many cancer chemotherapies cause apoptosis, was published ahead of print in the Journal of Virology. Human herpesviruses (HHV) are linked to a range of childhood and adult diseases, including chickenpox, mononucleosis, cold sores, and genital sores, and are of a particular concern for patients who are immunosuppressed due cancer or AIDS... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - September 9, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Biology / Biochemistry Source Type: news

Management Options for Infectious MononucleosisManagement Options for Infectious Mononucleosis
Are antiviral agents effective for treating mono? U.S. Pharmacist (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - June 27, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Family Medicine/Primary Care Journal Article Source Type: news

Should tennis be worried about the 'kissing disease'?
Nicknamed the "kissing disease," mononucleosis or glandular fever is a viral illness that can linger for weeks, months or even years. CNN investigates its prevalence within the sport of tennis. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - May 20, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Is EBV a Common Cause of Elevated Liver Enzymes?
Discussion Infectious mononucleosis is caused by an Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) infection causing the triad of fever, sore throat and adenopathy. The differential diagnosis of clinical presentations similar to EBV includes: Viral Cytomegalovirus Herpes simplex Hepatitis A, B, C HIV Varicella Bacterial/Spirochete Brucellosis Leptospirosis Syphilis Q fever Miscellaneous Autoimmune hepatitis Drug side effects Ischemia Wilson Disease Treatment for EBV infections is mainly supportive. Anti-viral medications such as ganciclovir are usually used for severe problems. Liver failure has been treated by transplant. Refraining fr...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - April 1, 2013 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Donna M. D'Alessandro, M.D. Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Infectious Mononucleosis: Still a 'Kissing Disease'Infectious Mononucleosis: Still a 'Kissing Disease'
Paul G. Auwaerter, MD, describes new research that sheds additional light on the old problem of EBV infection and infectious mononucleosis. Medscape Infectious Diseases (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - March 20, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases Commentary Source Type: news