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New drug hope for rare bone cancer patients
(Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) Patients with a rare bone cancer of the skull and spine -- chordoma -- could be helped by existing drugs, suggest scientists from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, University College London Cancer Institute and the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust. In the largest genomics study of chordoma to date, published today in Nature Communications, scientists show that a group of chordoma patients have mutations in genes that are the target of existing drugs, known as PI3K inhibitors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 12, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Pain in the Butt - Coccydynia Means Coccyx Pain
Coccydynia refers to pain and tenderness originating from the coccyx. The coccyx is commonly referred to as the tailbone (Figure 1). It is a small curved V-shaped bone at the bottom of the spine (Figure 2). It is the final segment of the vertebral column comprising of two to four separate or fused vertebrae (lies below the sacrum). The coccyx provides an important attachment for tendons, ligaments and muscles. Most doctors are not very familiar with the coccyx or its problems. The coccyx has very little movement, excessive movement of the coccyx is abnormal. When sitting, the coccyx shifts forward and acts as a shoc...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 13, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Gadolinium MRI contrast not needed to evaluate pediatric tumors
There is no need to use gadolinium-based contrast agents with MRI scans to...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: 3T MRI could become routine for fetal anomalies PET/MRI can be a boon for pediatric cancer patients FDA eyes risks of gadolinium contrast brain deposits SNMMI: FDOPA-PET/MRI monitors pediatric brain tumors Gadolinium contrast retention raises new safety questionsComments: 1/13/2016 7:15:20 PMDrummer Do studies like this kind of make the scientist in you cringe a little bit?   I mean, I'm sure the authors didn't come out and say you don't need Gd for any tumor imaging in children. ...
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - January 13, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Studies point to clinical advantages of proton therapy
New data from clinical trials demonstrate the technology's potential advantages over conventional radiation, including less side effects and survival in some cases, for several harder-to-treat tumors: pancreatic, late-stage, non-small cell lung and chordoma and chondrosarcoma, two rare cancers found in bone or soft tissue. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - October 19, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

ASTRO: Penn Medicine studies point to clinical advantages of proton therapy
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) New data from clinical trials conducted at the Robert Proton Therapy Center demonstrate the technology's potential advantages over conventional radiation, including less side effects and survival in some cases, for several harder-to-treat tumors: pancreatic, late-stage, non-small cell lung and chordoma and chondrosarcoma, two rare cancers found in bone or soft tissue. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 19, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Chordoma Foundation grant to JAX, University College
(Jackson Laboratory) The Chordoma Foundation has made a seed grant of $75,000 to Adrienne Flanagan, M.D., Ph.D., of University College, London, and her Jackson Laboratory collaborator, Mike Sasner, Ph.D., to develop a new mouse model for chordoma, a difficult-to-treat bone cancer affecting the skull and spine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 2, 2014 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

FDA-approved lung cancer medication shrinks chordoma in mice
Johns Hopkins researchers say that a drug approved to treat lung cancer substantially shrank tumors in mice that were caused by a rare form of bone cancer called chordoma.Reporting in the journal PLOS ONE, the researchers say the finding offers hope to chordoma patients, who have no treatment options once surgery and radiation have been exhausted. There are no U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved medications for the disease and, because its incidence is only one in 1 million, there is little financial incentive for pharmaceutical companies to develop or test drugs to treat them. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 15, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer / Oncology Source Type: news

In search of a treatment for a rare bone cancer
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) Johns Hopkins researchers say that a drug approved to treat lung cancer substantially shrank tumors in mice that were caused by a rare form of bone cancer called chordoma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 11, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news