Recipes for Health: Gluten Free Fettucine with Brussels Sprouts, Lemon and Ricotta
Creamy ricotta and Brussels sprouts add color and texture to this dish.     (Source: NYT)
Source: NYT - February 24, 2014 Category: Nutrition Authors: By MARTHA ROSE SHULMAN Tags: Cooking and Cookbooks Pasta Recipes Diet and Nutrition Source Type: news

What Foods Contain Carotene?
Discussion Carotenemia is a common problem in infants as carotene containing foods are often the first solid foods for infants. This is a benign problem and families can be reassured. It resolves in weeks to months depending on the diet. Carotenes are not synthesized by humans and are obtained through the diet. Carotenes are ingested as amorphous solids and crystals and breakdown of cellular membranes increases the bioavailability of the carotenes. Breakdown of the walls is often mechanical (e.g. grinding up of the food), but absorption is also affected through pancreatic lipases, thyroid hormone, bile acids, dietary fiber...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - January 27, 2014 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

The Twelve Bangs of Christmas | video | @GrrlScientist
Twelve science-based suggestions for strengthening family bonds whilst also livening up the holidays!Is Christmas a little boring this year? If you are a child or a chemist (or a chemist who never really grew up), you will enjoy these suggestions for some interesting science-based activities designed to liven up your holidays: explosions!Lyrics, for those of you wish to sing along with the video:On the twelfth day of Christmas, two science guys gave to me…12 mince pies a'popping11 baubles blazing10 stockings spontaneously combusting9 reindeers a'rocketing8 brussels sprouts cannons firing7 bags of chestnuts roasting6 pres...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 25, 2013 Category: Science Authors: GrrlScientist Tags: theguardian.com Blogposts Christmas Chemistry Activities for children Science Source Type: news

Dad’s diet may impact on offspring’s future health
Conclusion This research demonstrated that a folate deficient diet given to male mice led to a higher rate of birth abnormalities in their offspring than male mice on a folate sufficient diet. There were a number of chemical patterns on the DNA of the folate deficient mouse fathers that appeared to be inherited by their offspring. These patterns affected DNA regions that the researchers say, may affect rates of chronic disease. There are a number of large limitations to this research. The research was on a small group of mice and not people. So, this doesn’t provide sufficient evidence on which to base any new diet...
Source: NHS News Feed - December 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Genetics/stem cells Pregnancy/child Source Type: news

8 Recipes That Will Change Your Mind About Brussel Sprouts
With all the talk about superfoods, its time we remember that they don't have to be exotic to be super nutritious. The much maligned brussel sprout is most definitely a superfood. Only 6 of these cute wannabe baby cabbages packs 90% of the RDA for Vitamin C! Not to mention they're packed with a ton of other nutrients from bone building Magnesium and Vitamin K to blood pressure lowering Potassium  read more (Source: HealthCastle.com Nutrition Tips - written by Registered Dietitians)
Source: HealthCastle.com Nutrition Tips - written by Registered Dietitians - December 10, 2013 Category: Nutrition Source Type: news

8 Recipes That Will Change Your Mind About Brussel Sprouts
With all the talk about superfoods, its time we remember that they don't have to be exotic to be super nutritious. The much maligned brussel sprout is most definitely a superfood. Only 6 of these cute wannabe baby cabbages packs 90% of the RDA for Vitamin C! Not to mention they're packed with a ton of other nutrients from bone building Magnesium and Vitamin K to blood pressure lowering Potassium read more (Source: HealthCastle.com Nutrition Tips - written by Registered Dietitians)
Source: HealthCastle.com Nutrition Tips - written by Registered Dietitians - December 9, 2013 Category: Nutrition Source Type: news

Eating Brussels sprouts helps boost fertility in both men and women
Neema Savvides, a nutritional therapist at the Harley Street Fertility Clinic, says sprouts increase sperm levels and help line the womb with the right nutrients. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 4, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Trying for a baby? Eat Brussels sprouts: Vegetable helps boost fertility in both men and women
Neema Savvides, a nutritional therapist at the Harley Street Fertility Clinic, says sprouts increase sperm levels and help line the womb with the right nutrients. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 4, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Video: Scientists create world's first Christmas tree powered by Brussels sprouts
Scientists in the UK have created the world's first Christmas tree with lights powered only by Brussels sprouts.     (Source: The Independent - Science)
Source: The Independent - Science - December 2, 2013 Category: Science Tags: Science Source Type: news

Healthy Thanksgiving recipes
Thanksgiving is a time to be thankful for family, friends and great food. This year, try making healthier alternatives to some of your favorite holiday dishes. The staff at Preventive Cardiology Program at Boston Children’s Hospital has researched some delicious and healthy recipes to put on your table this year. Remember, be creative and an extra side of vegetables never hurt anyone! APPETIZER: Butternut Squash Soup This year, instead of filling up on empty calories before the main meal, try eating a healthy soup! Ingredients A single (2 to 3 pound) butternut squash, peeled and seeded 2 tablespoons unsalted butter...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 26, 2013 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Boston Children's Hospital staff Tags: All posts healthy eating thanksgiving with family Source Type: news

Brussels Sprouts: Health Benefits and How To
Custom Title:  Brussels Sprout (HealthCastle.com) Brussels sprouts tend to bring out strong opinions: You either love them or you hate them. If you love them, you're in luck – these tiny cabbages are packed with nutrition. As a bonus, they thrive in colder temperatures, so they're at their peak when there are few other fresh, local produce options available. If you've always thought you hated them, you just might want to give them another chance. Brussels sprouts are enjoying a moment in the spotlight, which means there are all kinds of new ways...
Source: HealthCastle.com Nutrition Tips - written by Registered Dietitians - November 5, 2013 Category: Nutrition Source Type: news

Eating broccoli may help prevent osteoarthritis
New research from the UK suggests that sulforaphane, a compound found in broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables such as cabbage and Brussels sprouts, could help fight osteoarthritis, the most common form of arthritis. Led by the University of East Anglia (UEA), the study used cell and tissue tests to show that sulforaphane blocked cartilage-destroying enzymes by intercepting a molecule that causes inflammation... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 28, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Arthritis / Rheumatology Source Type: news

Broccoli may slow, prevent osteoarthritis
New research from the UK suggests that sulforaphane, a compound found in broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables such as cabbage and Brussels sprouts, could help fight osteoarthritis, the most common form of arthritis. Led by the University of East Anglia (UEA), the study used cell and tissue tests to show that sulforaphane blocked cartilage-destroying enzymes by intercepting a molecule that causes inflammation... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 28, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Arthritis / Rheumatology Source Type: news

Healthy eating can protect eyesight
When it comes to protecting your vision, what you eat may affect what you see, reports the August 2013 Harvard Health Letter. Vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients found in food play a role in preventing two common causes of vision problems: cataracts and age-related macular degeneration. Cataracts are cloudy areas in the lens of the eye, while macular degeneration is a deterioration of the macula, the part of the eye that controls central vision. "While there is no definite proof, some studies suggest that eating a diet rich in certain nutrients may help," says Dr. Ivana Kim, associate professor of ophthalmology at Harv...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - August 1, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The 'brussels sprouts' gene: TAS2R38
As the annual sprout-eating ritual approaches, Anna Perman explains why you either love them or hate them Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 1, 2011 Category: Science Authors: Anna Perman Tags: Genetics Biology Science Source Type: news