Thanksgiving Recipe Roundup
I’m often asked to recommend recipes for Thanksgiving, so here’s a few suggestions for you all. I’ve never actually cooked a turkey, so this will just be sides and desserts. To be honest, that’s pretty much are all I care to eat at Thanksgiving dinner anyway. Noticeably missing from this list are recipes for cranberry sauce (I use the one on the cranberry bag – no need to mess with perfection), mashed potatoes (there is no recipe, it’s instinctual if you’re Patsy’s daughter), and stuffing (I’ve never made it, that gets assigned to someone else).   Hope the...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - November 18, 2022 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Uncategorized Gluten-free thanksgiving Holidays recipes Sides Thanksgiving desserts Thnksgiving recipes Vegetarian thanksgiving Source Type: blogs

5 Tips to Create Positive Food Memories for Pediatric Feeding Groups
Think about a favorite food memory. Do you remember only the taste of the food or does the entire scene—the smell of the dishes served, the sounds of the bustling restaurant or conversation of the friends’ home, the sight of the table setting and plating of the food—spring to mind? Food can trigger memories and emotions in a way other experiences can’t. How do these multi-faceted sensory memories created by good—or bad—food experiences affect our pediatric population when it comes to feeding? Using this question as my guide, I tried to find ways to create positive memories between food and sensory play for my ...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - June 25, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Cindy Herde Tags: Health Care Private Practice Slider Speech-Language Pathology Early Intervention Feeding Disorders Swallowing Disorders Source Type: blogs

Lose your wheat tooth
Remove wheat and other closely related grains, especially rye, barley, corn, and oats, and your taste perception changes: flavors become sharpened, more pronounced. It leads people to say such things as “I used to hate Brussels sprouts, but now I love them.” Or “I can no longer eat fast food because of the excessive sugar, salt, and synthetic flavors.” Removing the taste distortions of wheat and grains also sharpens your sensitivity to sweetness, making formerly tasty, sugary treats sickeningly sweet. Many find that candy bars, soda, or sugar in their coffee become intolerable, so cloyingly sweet th...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - June 9, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Gliadin Weight Loss wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Weeds, seeds, and soil #AllotmentLife
Mrs Sciencebase and I been working fairly hard on our allotment. We have planted potatoes, onions, Brussels sprouts, sunflowers, rocket, fruit bushes, French beans, squash, tomatoes, and strawberry plants and seeds. Some seem to be doing rather better than others, though none brilliantly. The thistles and other weeds are thriving, of course. Labrador unimpressed by AllotmentLife A couple of days of good rain for the first time in a while has muddied the soil, and given a good dose of H20 to the weeds and seeds. The rain is also hopefully washing in the well-rotted horse manure mulching one patch of the site. Meanwhile, the...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - May 29, 2019 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs

Phytonutrients: Paint your plate with the colors of the rainbow
Did you know that adding color to your meals will help you live a longer, healthier life? Colorful fruits and vegetables can paint a beautiful picture of health because they contain phytonutrients, compounds that give plants their rich colors as well as their distinctive tastes and aromas. Phytonutrients also strengthen a plant’s immune system. They protect the plant from threats in their natural environment such as disease and excessive sun. When humans eat plant foods, phytonutrients protect us from chronic diseases. Phytonutrients have potent anti-cancer and anti-heart disease effects. And epidemiological research sug...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katherine D. McManus, MS, RD, LDN Tags: Health Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs

Should I be eating more fiber?
You probably know the basics about fiber: it’s the part of plant foods that your body cannot digest, and there are two types — soluble fiber and insoluble fiber. Both types of fiber are good for us. Soluble fiber dissolves in water, forming a gel. It is the form of fiber that helps lower cholesterol levels, reduce the risk of heart disease, and regulate blood sugar levels. Soluble fiber is found in black beans, lima beans, Brussels sprouts, avocado, sweet potato, broccoli, turnips, and pears. Insoluble fiber passes through the digestive system relatively intact, adding bulk to stools. It is the form of fiber that preve...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katherine D. McManus, MS, RD, LDN Tags: Diet and Weight Loss Health Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs

Wheat Belly: Ten Rules for Healthy Eating
A hundred thousand years ago, you’d have no doubt what and how to eat. You would wake up every morning, grab your spear, club or axe and go kill something, wander and gather berries, nuts, or dig in the dirt for roots and tubers, or set traps for fish and reptiles. If you succeeded in the hunt, you would consume every organ that included thyroid, thymus, pancreas, stomach, liver, as well as meat. You’d drink water from streams and rivers, allow skin surface to be exposed to sunlight. You would NOT shower with soap or shampoo, apply hand sanitizer, drink chlorinated water, consume foods laced with herbicides and...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - February 20, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates autoimmune gluten-free grain-free grains Inflammation undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Healthy lifestyle can prevent diabetes (and even reverse it)
The rate of type 2 diabetes is increasing around the world. Type 2 diabetes is a major cause of vision loss and blindness, kidney failure requiring dialysis, heart attacks, strokes, amputations, infections and even early death. Over 80% of people with prediabetes (that is, high blood sugars with the high risk for developing full-blown diabetes) don’t know it. Heck, one in four people who have full-blown diabetes don’t know they have it! Research suggests that a healthy lifestyle can prevent diabetes from occurring in the first place and even reverse its progress. Can a healthy diet and lifestyle prevent diabetes? The D...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - September 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Diabetes Diet and Weight Loss Food as medicine Healthy Eating Prevention Source Type: blogs

10 superfoods to boost a healthy diet
No single food — not even a superfood — can offer all the nutrition, health benefits, and energy we need to nourish ourselves. The 2015–2020 US Dietary Guidelines recommend healthy eating patterns, “combining healthy choices from across all food groups — while paying attention to calorie limits.” Over the years, research has shown that healthy dietary patterns can reduce risk of high blood pressure, heart disease, diabetes, and certain cancers. Dietary patterns such as the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet and the Mediterranean diet, which are mostly plant-based, have demonstrated significant ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - August 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katherine D. McManus, MS, RD, LDN Tags: Diet and Weight Loss Health Source Type: blogs

Dirty mouth
While watching the morning news (you know, the tidbits of news aired between direct-to-consumer drug ads), a commercial came on claiming that a new mouthwash kills 99.9% of all bacteria in the mouth, good-looking young people gazing at each other with inviting smiles. Now why would you do that? Why would you wipe clean a bodily orifice that is meant to be teeming with microorganisms? The human gastrointestinal tract, as well as the airway, vagina, skin, and other body parts, are all meant to be colonized with microorganisms. It represents an important symbiotic relationship: we support their health and they support ours. ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - July 18, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates bowel flora cavities decay dental grain-free Inflammation teeth Source Type: blogs

Eat these foods daily (or at least often)
Improving your diet can seem like a lofty goal, one that people often think requires rigid self-discipline and sacrifice. Cupcakes out, pizza out, treats out, sigh. But it doesn’t really have to be that way. Sometimes making better decisions for your body can be about adding — not taking away. This may create a more palatable option for those looking for a health boost that feels like a bonus, not a burden. But what to add? I asked Teresa Fung, adjunct professor in the department of nutrition at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health for her advice on what foods pack the biggest nutritional punch to a daily diet...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kelly Bilodeau Tags: Diet and Weight Loss Health Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs

Scientific Studies Show How Nutrition Influences Our Creativity
In conclusion, our creative thinking is affected by a number of external elements, but the food we eat is such an important part of it. Choosing a diet with ingredients that are gradually processed by our body are crucial to staying productive. At the same time, our diet will also affect mental energy and positivity, and the combination of these factors will determine our levels of creativity.  You've read Scientific Studies Show How Nutrition Influences Our Creativity, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you've enjoyed this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles....
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - February 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Maria Onzain Tags: featured productivity tips self improvement creativity improve well-being nutrition nutrition and creativity nutrition and mental health pickthebrain Source Type: blogs

Who needs rice when you have cauliflower?
    Cauliflower is a versatile vegetable: raw, cooked, mashed, roasted, or riced. Using riced cauliflower allows you to recreate many rice dishes easily while maintaining a grain-free, low-carb eating style. Use riced cauliflower as a substitute for all forms of rice without sacrificing taste or texture. While you can rice the cauliflower yourself in a food chopper or food processor, food retailers such as Trader Joe’s are now selling pre-riced bags for convenience. Our replacement for mashed potatoes is mashed cauliflower, a delicious substitute that tastes every bit as good without the excessive carbohydrate load...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - October 16, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Cauliflower Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle Wheat-Free Lifestyle Dr. Davis gluten-free grain-free grains rice Thyroid Wheat Belly Total Health Source Type: blogs

The best place to launch a healthy lifestyle? Your kitchen
Because we all have to eat. When I saw the brochure for the Harvard Medical School Lifestyle Medicine conference, I was intrigued, and determined to attend. Why? Because how we live can either spur on or help prevent some of the biggest threats to health like diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and heart disease. The conference started with Culinary Health Education Fundamentals coaching. Its purpose is to teach providers like me how to teach patients about nutrition, and to help us identify and address barriers to eating healthy. Dr. Rani Polak, the Director of the Culinary Health Education Fundamentals (CHEF...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - August 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Health Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs

The best place to launch a healthy lifestyle? Your kitchen
Because we all have to eat. When I saw the brochure for the Harvard Medical School Lifestyle Medicine conference, I was intrigued, and determined to attend. Why? Because how we live can either spur on or help prevent some of the biggest threats to health like diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and heart disease. The conference started with Culinary Health Education Fundamentals coaching. Its purpose is to teach providers like me how to teach patients about nutrition, and to help us identify and address barriers to eating healthy. Dr. Rani Polak, the Director of the Culinary Health Education Fundamentals (CHEF...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - August 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Health Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs