Evaluation of the Safety and Immunogenicity of M-M-RII (Combination Measles-mumps-rubella Vaccine): Clinical Trials of Healthy Children and Adults Published Between 2010 and 2019

Conclusions: In trials published from 2010 to 2019, M-M-RII continued to be safe and immunogenic in all age groups studied. These data, along with the results of earlier trials, indicate that the performance of the vaccine has been consistent across more than 30 years of postlicensure studies.
Source: The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Vaccine Reports Source Type: research

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Get every episode of The Ambulance Science Podcast by subscribing to Apple Podcasts or Google Podcasts. Where I’m coming from (compared to most of my colleagues): Master’s in Public Health with a concentration in Health Policy from Yale Medical School.FT Faculty at GWU School of Medicine &Southern Connecticut State University MPH Program, and long-time adjunct faculty at NYMC MPH program in Health Policy.Assistant Commissioner of Health at the NYC Department of Health &Mental Hygiene during the first SARS outbreak.Served as State EMS Director, Consultant to Public Health Ca...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Podcasts Ambulance Science Source Type: news
When the long history of the COVID-19 pandemic is finally written, Dr. Leana Wen will be remembered as one of the most reassuring faces and reliable voices in this period of hardship. A former health commissioner of Baltimore and current visiting professor at the George Washington University School of Public Health, Wen has provided both encouragement and tough-love truths for a public hungry for information and counsel. In a Nov. 19 conversation with TIME’s Alice Park, she offered her candid thoughts about what is very much an inflection point in the pandemic—with two new vaccines (one from Moderna and one fro...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
Discussion Transplantation is not a common problem for primary care physicians but when a child’s disease has progressed to end-stage organ failure, transplantation can be the only treatment available. While the primary care provider usually is not involved in the daily management of patients before, during and after transplantation, they can be involved in many areas. These can include providing appropriate primary and acute care, ordering and obtaining necessary medical tests, medications and equipment, assisting with medical insurance, providing medical history and records to consultants, translating medical infor...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
Anti-vaccination movements lure increasingly more people into skipping potentially life-saving immunization against infectious diseases, such as measles, mumps, or rubella, highly impairing herd immunity for entire communities. Social media platforms could restrict the reach of anti-vax messages, groups, and activities, with algorithms recommending tailor-made content and health apps providing information about vaccinations. Here’s our collection of the most recent steps and digital tools supporting the fight against anti-vaccination and its believers. 300 percent increase in measles globally In a widely shared...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Empowered Patients Future of Medicine anti-vaccination anti-vax anti-vaxxer digital disease disease outbreak facebook figth Health Healthcare infection Innovation measles movement social media technology Source Type: blogs
We describe the use of a single intralesional treatment with the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine to successfully eliminate both local and distant recalcitrant warts as well as the proposed mechanism of this method. There are no other known reports of complete wart regression at distant untreated sites after a single intralesional MMR treatment.
Source: Dermatology Online Journal - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
We describe the use of a single intralesional treatment with the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine to successfully eliminate both local and distant recalcitrant warts as well as the proposed mechanism of this method. There are no other known reports of complete wart regression at distant untreated sites after a single intralesional MMR treatment. PMID: 30677806 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Dermatol Online J - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Dermatol Online J Source Type: research
Reply to Lee et al.'s letter to the editor pertaining to our publication entitled "Pain caused by measles, mumps, and rubella vaccines: A systematic literature review". Vaccine. 2018 Oct 29;36(45):6589-6590 Authors: Willame C, Lin L, Vetter V, Baril L, Praet N PMID: 30348362 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
To the editor: Response to Willame, et al., published in Vaccine 35 (2017) 5551-5558, entitled "Pain caused by measles, mumps, and rubella vaccines: A systematic literature review". Vaccine. 2018 Oct 29;36(45):6587-6588 Authors: Lee AW, Saldutti LP, Wolfson LJ, Stek JE, Kuter BJ PMID: 30348361 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling This is the time of year when it’s important to think about flu vaccinations. And there’s good reason for that! The flu causes thousands of preventable hospitalizations and deaths each year. But what about other vaccinations? Do you think of them as something for kids? You aren’t alone. And it’s true, a number of vaccinations are recommended for young children as well as preteens and teenagers. These vaccinations have provided an enormous benefit to public health by preventing diseases that were common and sometimes deadly in the past, including polio, rubella, and...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Infectious diseases Prevention Vaccines Source Type: blogs
Abstract Vaccines are one of the most successful medical advances in modern times. Most vaccine-preventable illnesses are unfamiliar to modern parents. Because of this, parents are increasingly questioning the necessity of immunizing their children, especially because no vaccine is completely free of adverse effects or the risk of complications. Family physicians should be aware of the risks and benefits of recommended immunizations. Thimerosal is currently used only in multidose vials of influenza vaccine, and exposure through vaccines is not associated with adverse neurologic outcomes. The measles, mumps, and ru...
Source: American Family Physician - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Am Fam Physician Source Type: research
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